US6253318B1 - Method of developing physical requirements for computer configuration - Google Patents

Method of developing physical requirements for computer configuration Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US6253318B1
US6253318B1 US09126025 US12602598A US6253318B1 US 6253318 B1 US6253318 B1 US 6253318B1 US 09126025 US09126025 US 09126025 US 12602598 A US12602598 A US 12602598A US 6253318 B1 US6253318 B1 US 6253318B1
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
configuration
drive
sizer
computer
virtual
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US09126025
Inventor
Manoj J. Varghese
Christoph Schmitz
Keith L. Kelley
Charles A. Bartlett
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Hewlett Packard Enterprise Development LP
Original Assignee
Compaq Computer Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems
    • G06F3/0602Dedicated interfaces to storage systems specifically adapted to achieve a particular effect
    • G06F3/0604Improving or facilitating administration, e.g. storage management
    • G06F3/0607Improving or facilitating administration, e.g. storage management by facilitating the process of upgrading existing storage systems, e.g. for improving compatibility between host and storage device
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F17/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific functions
    • G06F17/50Computer-aided design
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems
    • G06F3/0628Dedicated interfaces to storage systems making use of a particular technique
    • G06F3/0629Configuration or reconfiguration of storage systems
    • G06F3/0632Configuration or reconfiguration of storage systems by initialisation or re-initialisation of storage systems
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems
    • G06F3/0668Dedicated interfaces to storage systems adopting a particular infrastructure
    • G06F3/0671In-line storage system
    • G06F3/0683Plurality of storage devices
    • G06F3/0689Disk arrays, e.g. RAID, JBOD

Abstract

A method implemented according to the invention relates to a method including the conversion between of logical requirements and physical requirements, including such devices as computer drive arrays, controller/storage box combinations, and conversion of virtual disk drive heights to physical disk drive heights. The methods of the invention can be applied to the configuration of most hierarchical system.

Description

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is related to the following copending, concurrently filed, and commonly assigned United States patent applications which are hereby incorporated by reference:

U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/126,023, entitled “METHOD FOR DESCRIBING AND STORING DESCRIPTIONS OF HIERARCHICAL STRUCTURES” to Christoph Schinitz, Keith L. Kelley, Charles A. Bartlett, and Manoj J. Varghese;

U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/126,022, entitled “SIZER FOR INTERACTIVE COMPUTER SYSTEM CONFIGURATION” to Charles A. Bartlett, Christoph Schinitz, Keith L. Kelley, and Manoj J. Varghese; and

U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/126,024, entitled “PRICE/PERFORMANCE BASED COMPUTER CONFIGURATION” to Keith L. Kelley, Christoph Schmitz, Charles A. Bartlett and Manoj J. Varghese.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to a method for determining a computer's physical requirements from logical requirements and, more particularly, to a method including conversion of logical drive array requirements into physical array requirements, determination of controller/storage box combinations, and conversion of virtual disk drive heights to physical disk drive heights.

2. Description of the Related Art

The original computers were very complex devices that required skilled technicians and scientists to operate. When a new device, such as a printer, was added to the computer, special software and hardware needed to be developed specifically for the new device. With the advent of personal computers, it became impractical to require users to develop new software and hardware whenever new hardware was added.

Computer components eventually became standardized, and one of the important pieces of the puzzle was the Disk Operating System, or DOS. Originally DOS only supported a small number of devices such as printers, floppy drives, and hard disk drives. In addition, DOS was severely limited in the number of different computer configurations and components such as memory and peripherals that could be supported.

One advance in the computer arts was the arrival of “plug-and-play” architecture. Plug-and play means that a device can be added to a system without significant setup. This and other tools were the result of the standardization of interfaces which enables many devices to be easily configured to work together.

Today, the typical consumer and business user is presented with an astonishing number of choices with respect to the configuration of a new computer. A computer can be tailored to the particular needs of every user, from a multi-national corporation with immense database requirements to an individual who only desires to log into the Internet. There are computers specialized to perform such tasks as bulk memory storage, communications, and game playing. Depending upon a user's needs, a computer can be configured with anywhere from 16 megabytes to hundreds of megabytes of random access memory (RAM). Static storage such as hard disk drives can vary in capacity from gigabytes (109 bytes) to terabytes (1012 bytes) of data, each arranged in any one of a large number of configurations. Large amounts of RAM and static storage, however, cost proportionally more money. As a result, there is usually a tradeoff between price and performance.

The number of possible devices that can be added to any particular system has also grown. Computers now routinely come with devices that were unavailable even a few decades ago, such as speakers, CD-ROM drives, and fax modems. In addition, a user can add a large number of additional components such as tape drives, network cards, and specialized, game playing devices such as a joy stick. The number of possible choices for a computer system configuration is multiplied by the number of manufacturers that produce each component producing perhaps millions of possible systems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Using a method implemented according to the invention, logical requirements are defined from physical requirements and physical requirements are derived from logical requirements. One embodiment of the invention involves the definition of logical drive array requirements from physical drive array requirements. The method also includes the conversion of logical drive array requirements into physical array requirements. Other embodiments may include the conversion of physical to logical and logical to physical requirements to determine controller/storage box combinations and disk drive/drive enclosure combinations.

For example, the method according to the invention allows the height of disk drives to be defined with considerations other than physical height, such as the space required between drives, to be taken into consideration when defining a disk drive for inclusion into a hardware description file (HDF) (see previously incorporated U.S. patent application entitled “Method For Describing And Storing Descriptions Of Hierarchical Structures”) as used by an interactive configuration tool (a “sizer”) (see previously incorporated U.S. patent application entitled “Sizer For Interactive Computer System Configuration”).

To fit computer hard drives into a drive cage enclosure, one has to heed certain constraints, such as geometry and controller technology. The method according to the present invention produces “coefficients” that can be used to determine potentially unconfigurable, or illegal, drive combinations.

One method according to the present invention assigns to each hard drive type a virtual height. The drive enclosure is also assigned a virtual height. For example, a half size drive, or thick drive (1.6 inches), might be assigned a virtual height of 0.5 with respect to a particular drive enclosure of virtual height 1.0 (3.2 inches). A third height, or thin drive (1.0 inches), might be also be assigned a virtual height of 0.5 with respect to the drive enclosure because of mounting considerations. In the drive enclosure, three thin drives could not fit because the combined virtual heights of the three drives would be greater than the drive enclosure's virtual height of 1.0 (0.5+0.5+0.5=1.5, which is greater than 1.0). This limitation on the inclusion of thin drives can be realized even though it might seem apparent that three thin drives, each 1.0 inches thick, could fit into a drive enclosure that is 3.2 inches tall.

Apart from the geometry of drive enclosures, constraints can also be virtualized., such as the computer bus. For example, one SCSI channel can only address seven SCSI Ids. In a particular computer system, an available, internal drive enclosure might physically hold eight 1.0″ drives. However, only seven drives could be addressed on one SCSI channel, so duplexing would be necessary to utilize all eight slots. These types of limitations are included in the virtualization of the enclosure so that the limitations are taken into account.

By defining the size and requirements of components in terms of virtual requirements, the computations of a sizer are simplified and the configuration of diverse components is generalized. It thus becomes possible to mix drives programmatically of different types within a single drive enclosure. The method according to the present invention can be applied to any set of components that are fitted within an enclosure. The virtualization of device size works on most other computer devices such as CD-ROM and tape drives, as well as non-computer devices such as an amplifier and other stereo components mounted in a rack.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a computer system capable of being programmed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a computer system capable of being configured by an interactive computer system configuration device using the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a computer system configuration program, or sizer, including application specific sizer modules, a sizer framework, and hardware definition files; and

FIG. 4 illustrates a logical fit calculation using more complex geometries.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF INVENTION

Turning to FIG. 1, illustrated is a typical computer system S in which the techniques according to the invention can be implemented. The computer system S in the illustrated embodiment is a PCI bus based machine, having a peripheral component interconnect (PCI) bus 10. The PCI bus 10 is controlled by PCI controller circuitry located within a memory/accelerated graphics port (AGP)/PCI controller 14. This controller 14 (the “host bridge”) couples the PCI bus 10 to a processor 32 and a memory subsystem 20.

The host bridge 14 in the disclosed embodiment is a 440LX Integrated Circuit by Intel Corporation, also known as the PCI AGP Controller (PAC). The processor 32 is preferably a Pentium II. The processor 32 could be replaced with a different processor other than the Pentium II without detracting from the spirit of the invention.

The PCI bus 10 couples a variety of devices that generally take advantage of a high speed data path. This includes a network interface controller (NIC) 42, which preferably supports the ThunderLan™ power management specification by Texas Instruments, and a floppy disk drive 74. The floppy disk drive 74 preferably would be a 3½″ floppy disk. A video display 82, a mouse 70, and a keyboard 68 can also be coupled to the host bridge 14, enabling interaction with the computer system S.

Finally, a sizer 200 (see FIG. 3) capable of utilizing the methods of the present invention would run on the processor 32 and utilize the other devices of computer system S. Such a sizer is further described in previously incorporated U.S. patent application entitled “Sizer For Interactive Computer System Configuration.”

The computer system S illustrates only one platform in which the system according to the present invention can be implemented. The disclosed techniques can, without distracting from the spirit of the invention, be implemented in any device that executes computer programs, regardless of whether the device contains less, additional, or different components than the system in FIG. 1.

The Target System Configuration

Turning to FIG. 2, illustrated is a computer system R capable of being configured by a sizer 200 utilizing the present invention. The computer system R contains multiple processors 129, 130, and 131. The processors 129, 130, and 131 are each connected to their own host buses 101, 102, and 103 respectively, which in turn connect to a PCI bus 110. In one embodiment, the capacity of the buses 101, 102, 103, and 110 to support a number of processors can be virtualized. The PCI bus 110 might have a different logical size than the buses 101, 102, and 103 which are currently supporting a single processor. The logical size of the PCI bus 110 might indicate to a program such as a sizer 200 utilizing the present invention that the PCI bus 110 can support multiple processors and additional hardware. A logical size assigned to the buses 101, 102, and 103 might indicate to the sizer 200 that no additional hardware can be supported.

The PCI bus 110 is controlled by PCI controller circuitry located within a memory/accelerated graphics port (AGP)/PCI controller 114. This controller 114 (the “host bridge”) couples also the PCI bus 110 to four memory subsystems 120-23. The PCI bus 110 couples a variety of devices that generally take advantage of a high speed data path. This includes a small computer system interface (SCSI) controller 136, with both an internal port 138 and an external port 140. In addition, a video display 182 can be coupled PCI controller 114 for display of data by the computer system R. In one embodiment, the capacity of the control 114 can be virtualized allowing a program utilizing the present invention to determine combinations of devices that can be supported, each possibly with different requirements and therefor different logical sizes.

There is a relatively loose connection between the computer system R and the memory subsystems 120-123. The major constraint includes the number of controllers 114 which can be installed in the computer system R. In one embodiment, both the number of controllers and the variations among individual controllers can be derived from logical requirements. The logical requirements may take the form of hardware description files 208-214 (HDF) (see FIG. 3). The logical requirements may incorporate additional constraints such as a user-defined PCI slot reservation for non-performance related expansions such as NICs or a Remote Insight Board.

The sizer 200 uses drive capacity and performance information to configure the storage subsystems 120-123. The sizer framework 206 (see FIG. 3) maintains a list of available hard drives defined using logical requirements. The maximum and recommended I/O rates, which are specific to an application, may be maintained by the application sizer 202 (see FIG. 3) or derived by the sizer 200 from basic performance information maintained by the sizer framework 206 (rpm and seek time). As in other subsystems, the sizer framework 206 supports increment/decrement operation and may constrain selections.

The sizer 202 utilizes the hard drive information to properly arrange the data areas into a set of drive arrays which are included in the recommendation provided to the sizer framework 206. Each drive array includes: the hard drive selected for the array, the number of drives in the array, the capacity configured for each of the RAID levels (0, 1, and 5), and a description of the drive array contents.

The sizer defines a set of disk models which configure the data areas into drive arrays. Each disk model assigns the RAID levels for the data areas and maps the data areas to the drive arrays. The appropriate hard drive selection and drive quantity is made based on hard drive capacity and performance information. Each disk model has a range of drive quantities that are appropriate for its use; some disk models may be rejected by the sizer 202 due to this constraint.

The computer system R illustrates only one platform which the sizer 200 utilizing the present invention can configure. The disclosed techniques can, without distracting from the spirit of the invention, be implemented on any device that has a hierarchical structure, regardless of whether the structure contains less, additional, or different components than the system in FIG. 2. The device configured by means of the present invention does not need to be a computer, but might be a device such as a rack mounted, custom stereo system.

The Sizer Framework Configuration

Turning now to FIG. 3, illustrated is a sizer, complete with application sizer modules 202 and 204, a sizer framework 206, and hardware description files (HDFs) 208-214. The application sizer modules 202 and 204 are designed individually for a specific application such as a computer designated as a Microsoft SQL server, a Microsoft NT server, or an Oracle database server. The sizer framework 206 contains the functionality common to current or future application sizers. This design enables a software developer to build an application sizer without the need of recreating or rewriting the common functionality such as the graphical user interface (GUI).

The HDFs 208-214 are read in by the sizer framework 206 and contain descriptions of all hardware available to be configured into a computer system. Examples of hardware that may be described in a HDF 208 are memory chips, hard disks, network interface cards 42 (NICs), memory controllers 14 and 114, and CD-ROM drives. The application sizer 202 or 204 may not need all the descriptions read into memory from the HDFs 208-241 but the sizer framework 206, not knowing what a specific application sizer 202 or 204 needs, reads in all that are available. The application sizers 202 and 204 have no direct connection with the HDFs 208-214, but instead rely on the sizer framework 206 for information on available hardware which the framework 206 has obtained from the HDFs 208-214.

The set of framework services can be viewed as being two tiered, the lower level contains the infrastructure services 420 while the upper layer support application features 408 like navigation 410 and report management 412 which are directly visible to the user.

The framework will support both sizer and non-sizer clients. For example, data collection pieces directly supported by the framework can be termed non sizer clients 422 and 424. The partition of the application space will allow for a single plug in interface with a two way split.

Individual sizers 202 will be developed by deriving from a core set of frame work classes, and further specializing, member functions, or overriding functionality, already provided by the framework. The framework APIs 406 are the glue that enables all the components to work together. Specific infrastructure 420 functionality is exposed, to a sizer 202, via the APIs 406 The Diagrams 1-3 illustrate one embodiment of the present invention; a sizer using HDF's. The following definitions provide a formal description that can be applied to most any hierarchical system. The use of the term “drive” is illustrative of one embodiment only.

Drive Height Fitting

The method of drive height fitting can be described using the following definitions.

DEFINITION 1 Suppose we are given η different drive types and a drive enclosure E.

The set of feasible drive combinations defined as:

CE={I=(I1, . . . ,In) εINn|I1 Type 1 drives, . . . , In Typedrives fit in E}

The tuple of optimal components is defined as:

CE=(C1, . . . , Cn)

where E maximally fits C1 drives of Type 1, . . . , Cn drives of Type η.

In one embodiment, the goal is to find suitable virtual heights of drive types and enclosure. For example, in a disk mirroring configuration, disk drives are added in pairs and might have a logical height twice as large as a disk in non-mirrored configuration. Another embodiment might involve possible controller/storage box combinations using slots available instead of height of the enclosure and number of slots required by a device or reserved instead of drive heights

DEFINITION 2 Suppose one is given a different drive types and a drive enclosure E.

The set of suitable virtual height combinations is defined as:

HE={(h1, . . . , hn, h)εINn+1|

h1I1++hnI1≦h ∀I εCE,h c >h ∀c εCE }

This set might be potentially empty or can have infinitely many solutions. It is sufficient to produce one representative from the set (if not empty). This can be achieved by the following integer linear program (ILP):

Given drive enclosure E, search for (h1, . . . , hn, h) εINn+1

min h, s.t

h1I1++h nIn≦h ∀I εCEh1C >h ∀C εCE

This is a problem that can be solved in finite time, unfortunately an ILP is recognized as an NP complete problem, a class of inherently hard problems. However the problem instances arising in the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1-3 is small, such that solutions might even be found by hand.

The described method very efficiently tests whether a certain combination (t1, . . . , ti) of drive types can be fit into a drive enclosure:

Drives Fit if and only if t1 h1+ . . . +tn hn≦h

Although this equation will determine appropriate fits within an enclosure, this equation can be extended to higher order terms, such as if rather than height, area occupied is an issue. For example, if a drive face occupies a certain amount of area, the following type of higher order equation could be employed:

t1h1 2+t1h1+t2h1 2+t2h2. . . ≦h2

Further, if both heights and widths are known, both heights and widths can be factored into the equation. In any case, an example of such a more complex geometry is illustrated and attached to FIG. 4.

The methods of the present invention can be applied the configuration of most hierarchical systems. In addition to the example of drive/drive cage configuration, the method, as described formally can be utilized to configure a number of systems such as custom, rack-mounted stereo system.

The drive height fitting in virtualization of drive heights, as well as the use of the techniques to convert drive array requirements into physical arrays of drives and to find possible combinations of controllers and external drive cages, are further defined and described in the attached source code appendix. In any case, the use of virtualization and the disclosed fitting algorithm can be applied to a variety of configurations other than hard drive—drive cage configurations.

Claims (21)

What is claimed is:
1. A system for selecting a hard drive-drive cage configuration, the system comprising:
a processor; and
a configuration sizer tool executed by the processor to maintain logical requirement information and performance information for a plurality of hard drives, the logical requirement information including a list of available hard drives of different disk models with differing requirements, and to determine an appropriate hard drive-drive cage configuration based on the logical requirement information and the performance information,
wherein virtual heights for the plurality of hard drives are fitted to a virtual height for a hard drive cage in determining the appropriate hard drive-drive cage configuration.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein the hard drive and drive cages are virtualized and fit according to an algorithm in which virtual hard drive heights are fit into virtual drive cage heights by searching for sets in which combinations of virtual hard drive heights are less than the virtual drive cage heights.
3. The system of claim 2, wherein the configuration sizer tool includes a configuration sizer framework and a configuration sizer specific to a particular class of computer products.
4. The system of claim 1, wherein the configuration sizer tool includes a configuration sizer framework and a configuration sizer specific to a particular class of computer products.
5. A system for selecting configurations of computer components, the system comprising:
a processor; and
a configuration sizer tool executed by the processor to maintain logical requirement information and performance information for a plurality of computer components of a first type, the logical requirement information including a list of available computer components of a first type of different models with differing requirements, and to determine an appropriate system configuration based on the logical requirement information and the performance information,
wherein virtual heights for a plurality of computer components of a first type are fitted to a virtual height for computer components of a second type in determining the appropriate system configuration.
6. The system of claim 5, wherein the particular types of components are hard drives and the second type of component is a drive cage, and hard drive height is virtualized relative to the height of the drive cage.
7. The system of claim 6, wherein the configuration sizer tool includes a configuration sizer framework and a configuration sizer specific to a particular class of computer products.
8. The system of claim 5, wherein the configuration sizer tool includes a configuration sizer framework and a configuration sizer specific to a particular class of computer products.
9. The system of claim 5, wherein the particular types of components are drives, and the second type of components are drive controllers, and wherein the characteristic that is virtualized is number of available channels.
10. The system of claim 9, wherein the configuration sizer tool includes a configuration sizer framework and a configuration sizer specific to a particular class of computer products.
11. Computer executable code stored on machine readable media for selecting configurations of computer components, the computer executable code comprising:
a configuration sizer tool executed by the processor to maintain logical requirement information and performance information for a plurality of hard drives, the logical requirement information including a list of available hard drives of different disk models with differing requirements, and to determine an appropriate hard drive-drive cage configuration based on the logical requirement information and the performance information,
wherein virtual heights for the plurality of hard drives are fitted to a virtual height for a hard drive cage in determining the appropriate hard drive-drive cage configuration.
12. The computer executable code of claim 11, wherein the hard drive and drive cages are virtualized and fit according to an algorithm in which virtual hard drive heights are fit into virtual drive cage heights by searching for sets in which combinations of virtual hard drive heights are less than the virtual drive cage heights.
13. The computer executable code of claim 12, wherein the configuration sizer tool includes a configuration sizer framework and a configuration sizer specific to a particular class of computer products.
14. The computer executable code of claim 11, wherein the configuration sizer tool includes a configuration sizer framework and a configuration sizer specific to a particular class of computer products.
15. A computer executable code, stored in a memory and executed by a processor, for selecting for selecting configurations of computer components, comprising:
a configuration sizer tool maintain logical requirement information and performance information for a plurality of computer components of a first type of different models with differing requirements, and to determine an appropriate system configuration based on the logical requirement of information and the performance information,
wherein virtual heights for a plurality of computer components of a first type are fitted to a virtual height for computer components of a second type in determining the appropriate system configuration.
16. The computer executable code of claim 15, wherein the particular types of components are hard drives and the second type of component is a drive cage, and hard drive height is virtualized relative to the height of the drive cage.
17. The computer executable code of claim 16, wherein the configuration sizer tool includes a configuration sizer framework and a configuration sizer specific to a particular class of computer products.
18. The computer executable code of claim 15, wherein the configuration sizer tool includes a configuration sizer framework and a configuration sizer specific to a particular class of computer products.
19. The computer executable code of claim 15, wherein the particular types of components are drives, and the second type of components are drive controllers, and wherein the characteristic that is virtualized is number of available channels.
20. The computer executable code of claim 19, wherein the configuration sizer tool includes a configuration sizer framework and a configuration sizer specific to a particular class of computer products.
21. A method of selecting system configuration comprising the steps of.
providing a configuration sizer tool to develop an appropriate system configuration based on logical requirement information and performance information;
calculating performance characteristics for candidate systems that satisfy the logical requirement information and the performance information specified by a user, including determining an appropriate hard drive-drive cage configuration by comparing the logical requirement information and performance information of a plurality of hard drives; and
displaying the candidate systems to the user.
US09126025 1998-07-29 1998-07-29 Method of developing physical requirements for computer configuration Expired - Lifetime US6253318B1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09126025 US6253318B1 (en) 1998-07-29 1998-07-29 Method of developing physical requirements for computer configuration

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09126025 US6253318B1 (en) 1998-07-29 1998-07-29 Method of developing physical requirements for computer configuration

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US6253318B1 true US6253318B1 (en) 2001-06-26

Family

ID=22422604

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09126025 Expired - Lifetime US6253318B1 (en) 1998-07-29 1998-07-29 Method of developing physical requirements for computer configuration

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US6253318B1 (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060178864A1 (en) * 2005-02-08 2006-08-10 Madhavi Khanijo Automated system and method for configuring a rack assembly
US20060253472A1 (en) * 2005-05-03 2006-11-09 Wasserman Theodore J System, method, and service for automatically determining an initial sizing of a hardware configuration for a database system running a business intelligence workload
US20070130515A1 (en) * 2003-11-28 2007-06-07 Koninklijke Phillips Electronics N.V. System for displaying images with multiple attributes
US20090094355A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2009-04-09 International Business Machines Corporation Integrated capacity and architecture design tool
US7584348B1 (en) * 2005-10-28 2009-09-01 Altera Corporation Techniques for configuring an embedded processor operating system
US7769735B2 (en) 2005-05-03 2010-08-03 International Business Machines Corporation System, service, and method for characterizing a business intelligence workload for sizing a new database system hardware configuration

Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5452415A (en) 1992-03-26 1995-09-19 Alcatel Network Systems, Inc. Method and system for automatically displaying and configuring a network monitoring system
US5515524A (en) 1993-03-29 1996-05-07 Trilogy Development Group Method and apparatus for configuring systems
US5546595A (en) * 1993-12-21 1996-08-13 Taligent, Inc. Object-oriented system using objects representing hardware devices, physical connectors and connections between the physical connectors for configuring a computer
US5603043A (en) * 1992-11-05 1997-02-11 Giga Operations Corporation System for compiling algorithmic language source code for implementation in programmable hardware
US5640595A (en) 1993-06-29 1997-06-17 International Business Machines Corporation Multimedia resource reservation system with graphical interface for manual input of resource reservation value
US5651133A (en) * 1995-02-01 1997-07-22 Hewlett-Packard Company Methods for avoiding over-commitment of virtual capacity in a redundant hierarchic data storage system
US5655148A (en) * 1994-05-27 1997-08-05 Microsoft Corporation Method for automatically configuring devices including a network adapter without manual intervention and without prior configuration information
US5668995A (en) 1994-04-22 1997-09-16 Ncr Corporation Method and apparatus for capacity planning for multiprocessor computer systems in client/server environments
US5687334A (en) * 1995-05-08 1997-11-11 Apple Computer, Inc. User interface for configuring input and output devices of a computer
US5708769A (en) * 1990-11-09 1998-01-13 Emc Corporation Logical partitioning of a redundant array storage system
US5740436A (en) * 1995-06-06 1998-04-14 Apple Computer, Inc. System architecture for configuring input and output devices of a computer
US5787246A (en) * 1994-05-27 1998-07-28 Microsoft Corporation System for configuring devices for a computer system
US5819042A (en) 1996-02-20 1998-10-06 Compaq Computer Corporation Method and apparatus for guided configuration of unconfigured network and internetwork devices
US5850539A (en) * 1995-05-23 1998-12-15 Compaq Computer Corporation Automated system for facilitating creation of a rack-mountable component personal computer
US5892681A (en) 1989-01-06 1999-04-06 Minc, Incorporated Partitioning of Boolean logic equations into physical logic devices

Patent Citations (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5892681A (en) 1989-01-06 1999-04-06 Minc, Incorporated Partitioning of Boolean logic equations into physical logic devices
US5708769A (en) * 1990-11-09 1998-01-13 Emc Corporation Logical partitioning of a redundant array storage system
US5452415A (en) 1992-03-26 1995-09-19 Alcatel Network Systems, Inc. Method and system for automatically displaying and configuring a network monitoring system
US5603043A (en) * 1992-11-05 1997-02-11 Giga Operations Corporation System for compiling algorithmic language source code for implementation in programmable hardware
US5515524A (en) 1993-03-29 1996-05-07 Trilogy Development Group Method and apparatus for configuring systems
US5640595A (en) 1993-06-29 1997-06-17 International Business Machines Corporation Multimedia resource reservation system with graphical interface for manual input of resource reservation value
US5546595A (en) * 1993-12-21 1996-08-13 Taligent, Inc. Object-oriented system using objects representing hardware devices, physical connectors and connections between the physical connectors for configuring a computer
US5668995A (en) 1994-04-22 1997-09-16 Ncr Corporation Method and apparatus for capacity planning for multiprocessor computer systems in client/server environments
US5787246A (en) * 1994-05-27 1998-07-28 Microsoft Corporation System for configuring devices for a computer system
US5655148A (en) * 1994-05-27 1997-08-05 Microsoft Corporation Method for automatically configuring devices including a network adapter without manual intervention and without prior configuration information
US5809329A (en) * 1994-05-27 1998-09-15 Microsoft Corporation System for managing the configuration of a computer system
US5793979A (en) * 1994-05-27 1998-08-11 Microsoft Corporation System for allocating the resources of a computer system
US5651133A (en) * 1995-02-01 1997-07-22 Hewlett-Packard Company Methods for avoiding over-commitment of virtual capacity in a redundant hierarchic data storage system
US5687334A (en) * 1995-05-08 1997-11-11 Apple Computer, Inc. User interface for configuring input and output devices of a computer
US5850539A (en) * 1995-05-23 1998-12-15 Compaq Computer Corporation Automated system for facilitating creation of a rack-mountable component personal computer
US5740436A (en) * 1995-06-06 1998-04-14 Apple Computer, Inc. System architecture for configuring input and output devices of a computer
US5819042A (en) 1996-02-20 1998-10-06 Compaq Computer Corporation Method and apparatus for guided configuration of unconfigured network and internetwork devices

Non-Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Bonnie Carter et al., "Oracle System Sizer Getting Started For Compaq Windows NT Systems", Systems Release 2.3.1, pp. 1:2 to 1:5, 1996.*
Bonnie Carter et al., "Oracle System Sizer(TM)Getting Started for Compaq Windows NT Systems, Rel. 2.3.1," 1996, pp. 1:2-1:5.
Bonnie Carter et al., "Oracle System Sizer™Getting Started for Compaq Windows NT Systems, Rel. 2.3.1," 1996, pp. 1:2-1:5.

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070130515A1 (en) * 2003-11-28 2007-06-07 Koninklijke Phillips Electronics N.V. System for displaying images with multiple attributes
US20060178864A1 (en) * 2005-02-08 2006-08-10 Madhavi Khanijo Automated system and method for configuring a rack assembly
US20060253472A1 (en) * 2005-05-03 2006-11-09 Wasserman Theodore J System, method, and service for automatically determining an initial sizing of a hardware configuration for a database system running a business intelligence workload
US7769735B2 (en) 2005-05-03 2010-08-03 International Business Machines Corporation System, service, and method for characterizing a business intelligence workload for sizing a new database system hardware configuration
US7584348B1 (en) * 2005-10-28 2009-09-01 Altera Corporation Techniques for configuring an embedded processor operating system
US20090094355A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2009-04-09 International Business Machines Corporation Integrated capacity and architecture design tool
US8856332B2 (en) 2007-10-09 2014-10-07 International Business Machines Corporation Integrated capacity and architecture design tool
US9935892B2 (en) 2007-10-09 2018-04-03 International Business Machines Corporation Integrated capacity and architecture design tool

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6718415B1 (en) Computer system and method including console housing multiple computer modules having independent processing units, mass storage devices, and graphics controllers
US6665786B2 (en) Dynamic disk partition management
Seawright et al. VM/370—a study of multiplicity and usefulness
US20100058332A1 (en) Systems and methods for provisioning machines having virtual storage resources
US6799316B1 (en) Virtualizing hardware with system management interrupts
US20020103996A1 (en) Method and system for installing an operating system
US20030200149A1 (en) System and method for facilitating network installation
Foster et al. Remote I/O: Fast access to distant storage
US20020013832A1 (en) Software-based network attached storage services hosted on massively distributed parallel computing networks
US20050044284A1 (en) Multi-host virtual bridge input-output switch
US20060184938A1 (en) Method, apparatus and system for dynamically reassigning memory from one virtual machine to another
US5113500A (en) Multiple cooperating and concurrently operating processors using individually dedicated memories
Sloan High Performance Linux Clusters with OSCAR, Rocks, OpenMosix, and MPI: A Comprehensive Getting-Started Guide
US20070057958A1 (en) Computer-implemented systems and methods for managing images
US20100058335A1 (en) Methods and systems for integrated storage and data management using a hypervisor
US20090164660A1 (en) Transferring A Logical Partition ('LPAR') Between Two Server Computing Devices Based On LPAR Customer Requirements
US6834299B1 (en) Method and system for automating the configuration of a storage area network
US6263387B1 (en) System for automatically configuring a server after hot add of a device
US6473655B1 (en) Data processing system and method for creating a virtual partition within an existing partition in a hard disk drive
US6496791B1 (en) Interfaces for an open systems server providing tape drive emulation
US20040111580A1 (en) Method and apparatus for mapping storage partitions of storage elements for host systems
US6519679B2 (en) Policy based storage configuration
US20070168481A1 (en) Upgradeable persistent virtual storage
US7577722B1 (en) Provisioning of computer systems using virtual machines
US20110246984A1 (en) Storage optimization selection within a virtualization environment

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: COMPAQ COMPUTER CORPORATION, TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:VARGHESE, MANOJ J.;SCHMITZ, CHRISTOPH;KELLY, KEITH L.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:009539/0103

Effective date: 19981001

AS Assignment

Owner name: COMPAQ INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES GROUP, L.P., TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:COMPAQ COMPUTER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:012370/0510

Effective date: 20010620

AS Assignment

Owner name: HEWLETT-PACKARD DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, L.P., TEXAS

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:COMPAQ INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES GROUP, LP;REEL/FRAME:015000/0305

Effective date: 20021001

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

CC Certificate of correction
FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 12

AS Assignment

Owner name: HEWLETT PACKARD ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT LP, TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HEWLETT-PACKARD DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, L.P.;REEL/FRAME:037079/0001

Effective date: 20151027