US6144573A - Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities - Google Patents

Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US6144573A
US6144573A US09/292,448 US29244899A US6144573A US 6144573 A US6144573 A US 6144573A US 29244899 A US29244899 A US 29244899A US 6144573 A US6144573 A US 6144573A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
data
memory
circuitry
leads
associated
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US09/292,448
Inventor
Francis B. Heile
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Altera Corp
Original Assignee
Altera Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US9075798P priority Critical
Application filed by Altera Corp filed Critical Altera Corp
Priority to US09/292,448 priority patent/US6144573A/en
Assigned to ALTERA CORPORATION reassignment ALTERA CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HEILE, FRANCIS B.
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US6144573A publication Critical patent/US6144573A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11CSTATIC STORES
    • G11C15/00Digital stores in which information comprising one or more characteristic parts is written into the store and in which information is read-out by searching for one or more of these characteristic parts, i.e. associative or content-addressed stores
    • G11C15/04Digital stores in which information comprising one or more characteristic parts is written into the store and in which information is read-out by searching for one or more of these characteristic parts, i.e. associative or content-addressed stores using semiconductor elements
    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11CSTATIC STORES
    • G11C15/00Digital stores in which information comprising one or more characteristic parts is written into the store and in which information is read-out by searching for one or more of these characteristic parts, i.e. associative or content-addressed stores

Abstract

A programmable logic array integrated circuit device includes regions of programmable logic, regions of memory, and a programmable network of interconnection conductors for selectively conveying signals to, from, and between the regions of logic and memory. The memory regions are usable as content addressable memory. Circuitry is provided for facilitating programming of the memory in content addressable mode.

Description

This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional application Ser. No. 60/090,757, filed Jun. 26, 1998, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to programmable logic devices, and more particularly to providing programmable logic devices with content addressable memory capabilities.

Heile U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/034,050, filed Mar. 3, 1998 (which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety), shows that programmable logic array integrated circuit devices that have large blocks of random access memory ("RAM") (or read-only memory ("ROM")) can be equipped to facilitate the performance of product term ("p-term") logic in the RAM (or ROM). (For convenience herein, the ROM alternative will be understood to be included in references to RAM.) As the immediately above-mentioned reference explains, the ability to perform p-term logic in large blocks of RAM on a programmable logic device that may also include other types of programmable logic capability (e.g., large numbers of small, programmable, look-up tables for performing look-up table logic) increases the flexibility and usability of the device.

There are also applications of programmable logic devices that would benefit from having content addressable memory capability on the devices. A content addressable memory is one in which different "words" of data are stored in different word locations in the memory, and when data matching one of the stored words is applied to the memory, the memory responds by outputting an indication of the location found to contain the applied data. Content addressable memories ("CAMs") are also sometimes called associative memories.

In view of the foregoing, it is an object of this invention to provide programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities.

It is another object of this invention to provide programmable logic devices with content addressable memories, the contents of which can be efficiently changed during operation of the device.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

These and other objects of the invention are accomplished in accordance with the principles of the invention by providing programmable logic devices of the type shown in the immediately above-mentioned reference with output circuitry for the RAM blocks that allows the p-term capabilities of the device to be used to provide content addressable memory outputs if content addressable memory operation is desired. In addition, to increase the efficiency with which the contents of a RAM block being used as a content addressable memory can be changed, circuitry is provided for allowing certain read address signals to be applied to certain write address leads of the RAM block, with selective modification of those read address signals. Used in this way, the read address signals control the writing of new data into a selected word location in the RAM block in such a way that fewer write cycles are required to change the contents of a word location. For example, only two write cycles may be required to change a word of any length. If a word may include "don't care" bits, then three write cycles may be required to change a word of any length.

Further features of the invention, its nature and various advantages will be more apparent from the accompanying drawings and the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a simplified schematic block diagram of an illustrative RAM region which can be modified in accordance with this invention to facilitate the provision of content addressable memory capabilities.

FIG. 2 is a more detailed but still simplified schematic block diagram of an illustrative embodiment of a representative portion of the FIG. 1 circuitry.

FIG. 3 is a more detailed but still simplified schematic block diagram of an illustrative embodiment of another portion of the FIG. 1 circuitry.

FIG. 4 is a simplified block diagram showing an illustrative embodiment of circuitry added to the FIG. 3 circuitry to implement certain aspects of this invention.

FIG. 5 is a simplified block diagram showing an illustrative embodiment of modifications of the FIG. 1 circuitry in order to implement further aspects of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a more detailed but still simplified block diagram of an illustrative embodiment of a portion of the FIG. 5 circuitry.

FIG. 7 is a simplified schematic block diagram of an illustrative programmable logic array integrated circuit device including memory regions in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 8 is a simplified schematic block diagram of another illustrative programmable logic array integrated circuit device including memory regions in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 9 is a simplified block diagram of an illustrative system employing a programmable logic device incorporating memory regions in accordance with the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

FIGS. 1-3 are respectively substantially identical to FIGS. 1, 3, and 4 in the immediately above-mentioned reference and will be briefly described as an aid to understanding the present invention. FIG. 1 shows a typical RAM region 10 that can be included as part of a programmable logic device. Examples of programmable logic devices that can include RAM regions 10 in accordance with this invention are shown in Cliff et al. U.S. Pat. No. 5,550,782, Cliff et al. U.S. Pat. No. 5,689,195, Cliff et al. U.S. patent Pat. No. 5,909,126, Cliff et al. U.S. Pat. No. 5,963,049, and Jefferson et al. U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/266,235, filed Mar. 10, 1999 (Docket No. 174/152), all of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein in their entireties. RAM region 10 is usable either as RAM or to perform p-term logic. A typical RAM cell 30 included in the RAM block 11 of RAM region 10 is shown in FIG. 2. RAM cell 30 includes relatively strong inverter 32 and relatively weak inverter 33 connected in a closed loop series. Data on Data In lead 316 can be written into RAM cell 30 by using a logic 1 signal on Column Select lead 315 to turn on transistor 34 while transistor 35 is turned on by a logic 1 signal on Row Write lead 301. Inverter 33 is not strong enough to modify the Data In signal from lead 316, but it is strong enough to hold inverter 32 in the state that it is left by the last Data In signal that it received. Data can be read from RAM cell 30 by using a logic 1 signal on Row Read lead 305 to turn on transistor 36. If the output of inverter 32 is logic 1, transistor 37 will also be turned on and Data Out lead 304 will be pulled low. On the other hand, if the output of inverter 32 is logic 0, transistor 37 will not be turned on and cell 30 will not pull Data Out lead 304 down. Weak pull up 306 keeps Data Out lead 304 at logic 1 unless one (or more) of the RAM cells 30 connected to that lead is pulling down on the lead.

RAM block 11 includes 64 rows and 32 columns of RAM cells 30. All of the 64 RAM cells 30 in a given column are connected to one common Data In lead 316, one common Column Select lead 315, and one common Data Out lead 304 uniquely associated with that column. Similarly, all of the 32 RAM cells 30 in a given row are connected to one common Row Write lead 301 and one common Row Read lead 305 uniquely associated with that row. The number of rows and columns in RAM block 11 is arbitrary and can be changed if desired.

FIG. 1 will now be further explained with reference to use of RAM region 10 as RAM. Features related to use of RAM region 10 for p-term logic will be described later.

As many as 16 bits of data to be written into RAM block 11 can be applied in parallel via Data In leads 12. Alternatively, only eight, four, two, or one bit of data may be applied in parallel via leads 12. The RAM block 11 columns into which the data on leads 12 are to be written are identified by the Address Write signals on leads 14. Column decode, data selection, and control logic 13 applies logic 1 signals to the Column Select leads 15 for the columns to receive the data, and also steers the one, two, four, eight, or 16 data bits to Data In leads 16 in groups of one, two, four, eight, or 16, depending on how circuitry 13 is controlled by associated programmable function control elements ("FCEs") (not shown separately in FIG. 1). A representative one of leads 16 is shown in part as lead 316 in FIG. 2, and a representative one of leads 15 is shown in part as lead 315 in FIG. 2. The RAM block row into which the data on leads 16 is written is selected by the signals on Address Write leads 17. Address decoder 18 decodes the signals on leads 17 to select one of 64 outputs. A logic 1 Write Enable signal on lead 100 causes address muxing 19 to pass the one-of-64 selection of decoder 18 on to the corresponding one of 64 leads 101 (a representative one of which is shown in part as lead 301 in FIG. 2).

To read data from RAM block 11, Address Read signals on leads 102 are used to select the columns from which the data will be read, and Address Read signals on leads 171 are used to select the rows from which the data will be read. Sense amps, OR gates, and RAM data output selection circuitry 103 responds to the signals on leads 102 and the above-mentioned FCEs that indicate whether one, two, four, eight, or 16 data bits are being handled in parallel to select from among the 32 Data Outs (304 in FIG. 2) the appropriate ones to be applied to leads 110. Address decoder 18 decodes the signals on leads 171 to select the one of 64 rows from which the data is to be read. A logic 1 Read Enable signal on lead 104 causes address muxing 19 to pass this selection on to the appropriate one of 64 leads 105. In RAM mode p-term multiplexing 107 passes on signals from leads 105 to leads 205 (a representative one of which is shown in part as Row Read lead 305 in FIG. 2).

In p-term mode FCE 106 is programmed to cause p-term multiplexing 107 to use leads 115 (rather than leads 105) as the signal sources for leads 205. Leads 115 carry the true and complement versions of 32 signals (on leads 114) derived from Address Write leads 14 (five signals), Data In leads 12 (16 signals), Address Read leads 171 (six signals), and Address Read leads 102 (five signals). Thus, instead of only one of the 64 Read Enable leads 205 carrying a logic 1 signal as in a RAM mode read operation, in a p-term mode read operation 32 of leads 205 will each carry a logic 1 signal. (The other 32 of leads 205 will each carry a logic 0 signal.) This enables each Data Out lead 304 in RAM block 11 to provide an output signal which is the logical product of the signals on leads 205 and the data stored in the RAM cells 30 served by that Data Out lead 304.

From the foregoing it will be appreciated that in p-term mode the signal on each lead 114 is applied in true form to one row of RAM block 11 and in complement form to another row of RAM block 11. Thus in each column of RAM block 11 two RAM cells 30 are associated with each lead 114. One of these RAM cells 30 stores a so-called "true RAM bit" that is accessed by the true version of the associated lead 114 signal. The other of these RAM cells 30 stores a so-called "complement RAM bit" or "comp RAM bit" that is accessed by the complement version of the associated lead 114 signal.

An illustrative embodiment of circuitry 103 is shown in more detail in FIG. 3. Each of AND gates 402 represents the logical AND function performed by the circuitry connected to a respective one of Data Out leads 304 in FIG. 2. In RAM mode circuitry 440 is used to select particular Data Out signals 304 for application to programmable logic connectors ("PLCs"; e.g., multiplexers) like depicted PLC 450. Circuitry 440 is therefore controlled by Address Read signals 102 (FIG. 1) and the one-two-four-eight-or-16 option control FCEs mentioned above in connection with FIG. 1. In RAM mode each PLC 450 is controlled by the associated FCE 452 (which can be the same as FCE 106 in FIG. 1) to pass the applied circuit 440 output signal. The output signal of each PLC 450 can be output directly to the associated lead 110, or registered by the associated flip-flop 460 and then output to lead 110. PLC 480 (controlled by FCE R6) selects whether the registered or unregistered signal is applied to lead 110. The other circuitry shown in FIG. 3 is not used in RAM mode.

In p-term mode circuitry 440 is not used, and the other circuitry shown in FIG. 3 is used instead. Without repeating all the details described in the reference from which FIG. 3 has been substantially reproduced, the principal point is that OR gates like 410 are provided to form logical sums of product term signals applied to those OR gates. Anywhere from 16 two-p-term sums to one 32-p-term sum can be produced. PLCs 450 are programmed to pass the sum signals, which can then be output either with or without registration by a flip-flop 460 as described above in connection with RAM mode.

Operation of a p-term (i.e., column) in RAM block 11 as a word of content addressable memory ("CAM") in accordance with this invention involves storing in the RAM cells 30 of that column data appropriate to recognizing a particular word of data applied to RAM block 11 via leads 114. Because of their similarity in this context to word lines in EPROM arrays in AND-OR logic devices (see, for example, Chan et al. U.S. Pat. No. 4,969,121, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety), leads 114 are sometimes referred to herein as word lines. The following Table I shows the data that must be stored in the RAM cells 30 in RAM block 11 receiving (via leads 205) the true and complement of various values of a lead 114 signal in order to "recognize" those values as matching the data stored in those RAM cells. Table I also shows the various interpretations of RAM block 11 data that is not recognized as matching a lead 114 signal.

              TABLE I______________________________________Word Line  Value TRUE RAM COMP RAM P-Term P-Term Meaning for  (Lead 114) Bit 30 Bit 30 Value This Word Line 114______________________________________0       0         1         0     Not Recognized  0 1 0 1 Recognized  1 0 1 1 Recognized  1 1 0 0 Not Recognized  X 0 0 1 Don't Care  X 1 1 0 Disabled______________________________________

Table I shows (in its second line) that in order for a logic 0 signal on a lead 114 to be recognized as matching the corresponding portion of a word stored in a column of RAM block 11, the RAM cell 30 in that RAM block column receiving the true version of that lead 114 signal must contain logic 1, and the RAM cell 30 in that RAM block column receiving the complement version of that lead 114 signal must contain logic 0. Then the p-term value for that lead 114 signal will be logic 1. The p-term value thus referred to is the AND of the signals applied to that RAM block column's Data Out lead 304 from the transistors 36 of the RAM cells 30 receiving the true and complement versions of the lead 114 signal. The final p-term value for the signals on all of leads 114 is the AND of the Table I p-term value for all of the lead 114 signals.

Table I similarly shows (in its third line) that in order for a logic 1 signal on a lead 114 to be recognized as matching the corresponding portion of a word stored in a column of RAM block 11, the RAM cell 30 in that RAM block column receiving the true version of the lead 114 signal must contain logic 0 and the associated RAM cell 30 receiving the complement version of that signal must contain logic 1. Then both the true and complement RAM cells 30 will contribute logic 1 to the associated Data Out lead 304.

If a lead 114 is logic 0 and the associated true and complement RAM cells 30 contain 0 and 1, respectively, then the complement RAM cell 30 will apply logic 0 to the associated Data Out lead 304. This is the condition indicated in the first line in Table I. Any one (or more) logic 0 applied to a Data Out lead 304 will pull that lead to logic 0 and indicate that there is no match between the lead 114 signals and the data word stored in the RAM block 11 column associated with that Data Out lead. Similarly, if a lead 114 is logic 1 and the associated true and complement RAM cells 30 contain 1 and 0 respectively, then the true RAM cell 30 will apply logic 0 to the associated Data Out lead 304. This is the condition indicated in the fourth line of Table I. Again, this will pull the Data Out lead 304 to logic 0, thereby indicating that there is no match between the lead 114 signals and the data word stored in the RAM block column associated with that Data Out lead.

If the RAM cells 30 that receive the true and complement of a lead 114 signal both contain logic 0, then those RAM cells will both contribute logic 1 to the associated Data Out lead 304 regardless of the logical state (1 or 0) of that lead 114 signal. This nullifies the effect of that particular lead 114 signal in determining whether or not the applied data on leads 114 matches data stored in that column of RAM block 11. This "don't care" condition is indicated in the fifth line of Table I.

If the RAM cells 30 that receive the true and complement of a lead 114 signal both contain logic 1, then one or the other of those RAM cells will contribute logic 0 to the associated Data out lead 304 regardless of the logical state (1 or 0) of that lead 114 signal. This prevents the column in RAM block 11 that includes these RAM cells from ever recognizing (in the content addressable memory sense) data applied via leads 114. This "disabled" condition is indicated in the last line of Table I.

FIG. 4 shows illustrative augmentation of the FIG. 3 circuitry in accordance with this invention to support operation of RAM region 10 as a content addressable memory. Each of the 32 p-term signals 304 is applied to 32-to-5 encoder and match flag circuit 500. The match flag portion of circuit 500 can be 25 circuitry for providing the logical OR of all 32 p-term signals 304 in order to produce a match output signal on lead 504. Match output signal 504 will therefore be logic 1 whenever one of p-term signals 304 indicates a match between the data stored in the associated column of RAM cells and the data applied via leads 114. If there is no match, match output signal 504 will be logic 0. (If it is desired to indicate when more than one match has been found, circuit 500 can include appropriate additional logic circuitry.) The 32-to-5 encoder portion of circuit 500 can be conventional logic for computing the five-bit binary address of the one of 32 p-terms 304 that is logic 1 when Match signal 504 indicates that there is one such logic 1 value among the 32 p-terms. The resulting five-bit binary address is output on Address leads 502. From the foregoing it will be seen that if circuitry 103 in FIG. 1 is augmented as shown in FIG. 4, circuitry 103 will have additional outputs 502 and 504 (see also FIG. 5, described below). (As an alternative to providing separate output leads 502 and 504 for the Address and Match output signals, those signals can be multiplexed onto a subset of leads 110).

FIGS. 5 and 6 show how the circuitry of FIG. 1 can be further modified in accordance with additional aspects of this invention to facilitate writing data into RAM block 11 when RAM region 10 is to be used as a content addressable memory. Because in the circuitry shown in FIG. 1 only one row can be written at a time, 64 successive write cycles are required to write the 64 true and complement RAM cell 30 values in a column of RAM block 11 that are required to enable that column to function as a word of content addressable memory (i.e., to determine whether or not to recognize a 32-bit word applied via leads 114). With the modified circuitry shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 only two write cycles are required if there are no "don't care" bits in the applied data, or only three write cycles are required if there are "don't care" bits. FIGS. 5 and 6 will be described first with reference to cases involving no "don't care" bits. Thereafter, the handling of "don't care" bit cases will be described.

As shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, p-term multiplexing 107 is augmented as p-term multiplexing and cam write control logic 107'. Just as during p-term and CAM read modes multiplexer 107 is controlled by FCE 106 to apply true and complement signals 115 to leads 205 (rather than applying signals 105 to leads 205), during p-term and CAM write modes multiplexer 620 (FIG. 6) is controlled by FCE 106 to apply true and complement signals 115--each gated by an associated EXCLUSIVE OR gate 610--to leads 101' (rather than applying signals 101 to leads 101'). The second input to each of EXCLUSIVE OR gates 610 is a common CAM Write Invert signal 601.

In order to store in a column of RAM block 11 the data required to allow that column to recognize a particular 32-bit word applied via leads 114, the word it is desired to recognize is asserted on leads 114. CAM Write Invert signal 601 is then made logic 0 and the Column Select and Data In leads 315 and 316 for the desired column are both made logic 1. RAM Write Enable signal 100 is also briefly made logic 1 to enable AND gates 630. Within the selected column this combination of signals causes all the RAM cells 30 for which the associated signal 115 is logic 1 to store logic 0 (because these logic 1 signals 115 are passed by EXCLUSIVE OR gates 610, multiplexer 620, and AND gates 630 to the associated Write Enable WE leads 101' (corresponding to leads 301 as shown by FIG. 2)). With reference to earlier Table I, this means that the true RAM bit 30 associated with each signal 114 that is logic 1 will now contain logic 0 and the complement RAM bit 30 associated with each signal 114 that is logic 0 will similarly contain logic 0. (Consistent with Table I, the content of a RAM cell 30 is identified by the output state of the inverter 32 of that RAM cell.)

After logic 0 has thus been stored in the necessary RAM cells 30, logic 1 is stored in the remaining RAM cells in the column being programmed as follows. The word to be recognized continues to be asserted on leads 114. CAM Write Invert signal 601 is changed to logic 1 and the Data in signal 316 of the column being programmed is changed to logic 0. RAM Write Enable signal 100 is then again briefly made logic 1. The logic 1 state of signal 601 causes all of leads 101' that were formerly not selected to be selected (i.e., to become logic 1). This causes of the RAM cells 30 in the column being programmed that did not previously store logic 0 to now store logic 1. In particular, the true RAM bits 30 associated with all signals 114 that are logic 0 now store logic 1, as do the complement RAM bits 30 associated with all signals 114 that are logic 1. The RAM block column being considered is now fully programmed in accordance with the second and third lines of Table I. When the data word on leads 114 that was thus used to program that column is again applied to leads 114 and RAM block 11 is read, that column will recognize the presence of that data word on leads 114.

If the data on leads 114 includes one or more "don't care" bits, those bits are set to logic 1 during the two programming write cycles described above. Then for a third programming write cycle the "don't care" bits on leads 114 are toggled to logic 0, while the other lead 114 signals are left at their correct values. CAM Write Invert signal 601 is set to logic 1, the Data In signal 316 for the column being programmed is set to logic 1, and RAM Write Enable signal 100 is briefly set to logic 1. This causes logic 1 to be written into the complement RAM cells 30 associated with the "don't care" bits on leads 114 without disturbing any of the data previously written into the other RAM cells in the column being programmed. After the third write cycle both the true and complement RAM bits 30 associated with each "don't care" signal 114 will be logic 0, which, as the fifth line in Table I shows, is the condition required to allow a column in RAM block 11 to effectively ignore a lead 114 signal.

FIG. 5 also shows modification of the circuitry 103 of FIG. 1 to circuitry 103' that includes Address and Match output signals 502 and 504 as described above in connection with FIG. 4. (Again, as an alternative to providing separate output leads 502 and 504 for the Address and Match output signals, those signals can be multiplexed onto a subset of leads 110.)

FIG. 7 shows an illustrative programmable logic array integrated circuit device 720 which includes memory regions 10 as described above in accordance with this invention. In addition to a column of memory regions 10, programmable logic device 720 includes several columns of regions 721 of programmable logic. The regions 10 and 721 in the various columns additionally form horizontal rows of such regions. Each region 721 includes several subregions or modules 722 of programmable logic. Each logic module 722 is programmable to provide an output signal 725 which is any of several logical functions of a plurality of input signals 724 applied to that logic module. For example, each logic module 722 may include a four-input look-up table. Such a look-up table can be implemented as a relatively small (e.g., 16-bit) random access memory, which is much smaller than preferred memory regions 10 (e.g., each including a 2K-bit RAM block 11).

Interconnection conductors 723 of various types are provided for conveying signals to, from, and between the various regions 10 and 721, as well as making input and output connections to external circuitry. For example, some conductors 723 are associated with and extend along each of the rows of regions 10/721. Other conductors 723 are associated with and extend along each of the columns of regions 10 or 721. Still other conductors 723 are associated with individual regions 10 or 721 (e.g., for bringing signals from other nearby conductors 723 to the associated region 10 or 721). Input signals 724 are applied to the associated region 10 or 721 from these last-mentioned conductors, and output signals 725 from each region are also applied to nearby conductors 723. Programmable logic connectors ("PLCs") are provided for selectively connecting various conductors 723, 724, and 725 to one another at or near their intersections.

Only a few representative conductors 723, 724, and 725 are shown in FIG. 7. Additional information (not believed necessary for an understanding of the present invention) regarding suitable interconnection conductor arrangements can be found in other references such as Cliff et al. U.S. Pat. No. 5,550,782, Cliff et al. U.S. Pat. No. 5,689,195, Cliff et al. U.S. Pat. No. 5,909,126, Cliff et al. U.S. Pat. No. 5,963,049 and Jefferson et al. U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/266,235, filed Mar. 10, 1999 (Docket No. 174/152), all of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein in their entireties. With particular reference to memory regions 10, the input signals on leads 12, 14, 17, 100, 102, 104, 171, and 601 of a memory region 10 in FIG. 1 or 5 come from the input conductors 724 of that region in FIG. 7. Similarly, the output signals 110, 502, and 504 of a memory region 10 in FIG. 1 or 5 are applied to the output conductors 725 of that region in FIG. 7. The particular arrangement of interconnection conductors used on device 720 is in no way critical to the present invention, and any of a vast number of different interconnection conductor arrangements known in the art are equally suitable for such use. Similarly, the particular construction of logic regions 721 is not critical to this invention, and any of many different constructions known in the art can be used.

FIG. 8 shows another example of a programmable logic device 720' having memory regions 10 as described above embedded among logic blocks 721'. Except for the modifications of this invention, device 720' may be constructed generally as shown in Freeman U.S. patent Re. 34,363, which is also hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. Thus each logic block 721' may be a configurable logic block ("CLB") which includes one or two small look-up tables. Each memory region 10 and CLB 721' may be surrounded by interconnection conductors 723' for conveying signals to, from, and between memory regions 10 and CLBs '721, as well as making input and output connections to external circuitry. Each CLB 721' may receive signals 724' from the interconnection conductors 723' adjacent to any of its sides. Similarly, each CLB 721' may output signals 725' to any of its sides. As in the embodiment shown in FIG. 7, each memory region 10 is usable as content addressable memory. Again, the particular interconnection conductor arrangement and logic block construction used on device 720' are in no way critical to this invention.

FIG. 9 illustrates a programmable logic device 720/720' of this invention in a data processing system 802. Data processing system 802 may include one or more of the following components: a processor 804; memory 806; I/O circuitry 808; and peripheral devices 810. These components are coupled together by a system bus 820 and are populated on a circuit board 830 which is contained in an end-user system 840.

System 802 can be used in a wide variety of applications, such as computer networking, data networking, instrumentation, video processing, digital signal processing, or any other application where the advantage of using programmable or reprogrammable logic is desirable. Programmable logic device 720/720' can be used to perform a variety of different logic functions. For example, programmable logic device 720/720' can be configured as a processor or controller that works in cooperation with processor 804. Programmable logic device 720/720' may also be used as an arbiter for arbitrating access to a shared resource in system 802. In yet another example, programmable logic device 720/720' can be configured as an interface between processor 804 and one of the other components in system 802. It should be noted that system 802 is only exemplary, and that the true scope and spirit of the invention should be indicated by the following claims.

Various technologies can be used to implement programmable logic devices 720/720' employing the memory regions 10 of this invention, as well as the various components of those memory regions. For example, function control elements 106 and other FCEs can be SRAMs, DRAMs, first-in first-out ("FIFO") memories, EPROMs, EEPROMS, function control registers (e.g., as in Wahlstrom U.S. Pat. No. 3,473,160), ferro-electric memories, fuses, antifuses, or the like. From the various examples mentioned above it will be seen that this invention is applicable to both one-time-only programmable and reprogrammable devices.

It will be understood that the foregoing is only illustrative of the principles of the invention, and that various modifications can be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention. For example, the particular numbers of rows and columns of memory cells mentioned above in the description of depicted array 11 are only illustrative, and different numbers of rows and columns (generically N rows and M columns) can be provided instead if desired. (When RAM region 10 is used on a programmable logic device 720 or 720' as in FIG. 7 or 8, it is preferable for N and M to be relatively large so that RAM region 10 will have significantly different logic capabilities than the relatively small individual logic modules 722 or regions 721/721' also included on the device. For example, N is preferably at least 16 and M is preferably at least eight. In the particular embodiment that has been described N is 64 and M and 32.) The words "row" and "column" are used arbitrarily herein, and no absolute or fixed directions or orientations are intended thereby. For example, these words can be interchanged in this specification and claims if desired. As another example of modifications within the scope of this invention, the polarities of various signals and logic mentioned herein are only illustrative, and other polarities can be used if desired. Thus the fixed potential to which each transistor 37 is connected could be logic 1 rather than logic 0 as shown in FIG. 2, and each Data Out conductor 304 could have a pull down connection to logic 0 rather than a pull up connection to logic 1 as shown in FIG. 2. Another example of this general type of modification would be to connect the gate of transistor 37 in FIG. 2 to the input of inverter 32 rather than to the output of that inverter. This would mean that the output of each memory cell would have the same polarity as the data applied to that cell.

Claims (17)

The invention claimed is:
1. Memory circuitry usable as content addressable memory comprising:
a plurality of programable memory cells organized as a two-dimensional array of intersecting rows and columns of such memory cells, wherein each memory cell has a storage capacity of one bit of binary data;
a plurality of write enable leads, each of which is associated with and extends adjacently along a respective one of the rows, each of the write enable leads being configured to selectively enable writing of data to the memory cells in the associated row;
a plurality of read enable leads, each of which is associated with and extends adjacently along a respective one of the rows, each of the read enable leads being configured to selectively enable reading of data from the memory cells in the associated row;
a plurality of input signal leads; and
connector circuitry configured to selectively connect each of the input signal leads to a respective one of the write enable leads or a respective one of the read enable leads.
2. The memory circuitry defined in claim 1 further comprising:
a plurality of source signal leads, each of which is configured to convey a respective one of a plurality of source signals; and
transmission circuitry configured to apply a true version of each source signal to a respective one of the input signal leads and to apply a complement version of each source signal to a respective further one of the input signal leads.
3. The memory circuitry defined in claim 2 further comprising:
a plurality of data in signal leads, each of which is associated with a respective one of the columns; and
write control circuitry associated with each of the memory cells and configured to respond to a write enable signal on the write enable lead associated with the row that includes that memory cell by writing into that memory cell a data in signal from the data in lead associated with the column that includes that memory cell.
4. The memory circuitry defined in claim 3 further comprising:
a plurality of data out signal leads, each of which is associated with a respective one of the columns; and
read control circuitry associated with each of the memory cells and configured to respond to a read enable signal on the read enable signal lead associated with the row that includes that memory cell by applying data from that memory cell to the data out lead associated with the column that includes that memory cell.
5. The memory circuitry defined in claim 4 further comprising:
pull circuitry configured to pull each of the data out leads to a predetermined one of two logical states when no data applied to that data out lead by the read control circuitry drives that data out lead to the other of the two logical states.
6. The memory circuitry defined in claim 5 further comprising:
address encoding circuitry configured to produce address signals indicative of a coded address of the column associated with any one of the data out leads that has been driven to the other of the two logical states.
7. The memory circuitry defined in claim 5 further comprising:
match detection circuitry configured to produce a match output signal when any of the data out leads has been driven to the other of the two logical states.
8. A programmable logic device including memory circuitry as defined in claim 1.
9. The programmable logic device defined in claim 8 further comprising:
a plurality of modules of programmable logic.
10. The programmable logic device defined in claim 9 wherein each of the logic modules includes a four-input look-up table.
11. The programmable logic device defined in claim 10 wherein the content addressable memory comprises at least 16 rows and at least 8 columns of said memory cells.
12. A digital processing system comprising:
processing circuitry;
a memory coupled to said processing circuitry; and
a programmable logic device as defined in claim 8 coupled to the processing circuitry and the memory.
13. A printed circuit board on which is mounted a programmable logic device as defined in claim 8.
14. The printed circuit board defined in claim 13 further comprising:
a memory mounted on the printed circuit board and coupled to the programmable logic device.
15. The printed circuit board defined in claim 13 further comprising:
processing circuitry mounted on the printed circuit board and coupled to the programmable logic device.
16. The method of using a content addressable memory which is configured to store a plurality of data words and to produce a recognition output signal when any of the stored data words corresponds to data input signals applied to the memory, the memory including, for each of the data words, first and second memory locations uniquely associated with each bit in the data input signals, and data writing circuitry configured to allow selection of a data word and selective writing of data into the first and second memory locations of the selected data word, the selective writing into the first and second memory locations associated with each bit in the data input signals being based on true and complement versions, respectively, of that bit, comprising:
applying to the memory data input signals corresponding to a data word to be subsequently recognized by the memory;
using the data writing circuitry to select a data word;
using the data writing circuitry to selectively write a first data value into some of the first and second memory locations of the selected data word based on the true and complement versions of the bits of the applied data input signals;
logically inverting the true and complement versions of the applied data input signals; and
using the data writing circuitry to selectively write a second data value into the remaining first and second memory locations of the selected data word based on the logically inverted true and complement versions of the bits of the applied data input signals.
17. The method defined in claim 16 wherein at least one of the bits of the applied data input signals is a "don't care" bit, the logical state of which should not be considered by the content addressable memory when determining whether the selected data word corresponds to the applied data input signals, and wherein the method further comprises:
setting the "don't care" bit to a first logical state during the method as defined in claim 16 thereafter:
applying to the memory modified data input signals corresponding to the data word to be subsequently recognized by the memory but with the "don't care" bit logically inverted from the first logical state; and
using the data writing circuitry to selectively write the second data value into the first and second memory locations of the selected data word based on the logically inverted true and complement versions of the bits of the applied modified data input signals.
US09/292,448 1998-06-26 1999-04-15 Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities Expired - Lifetime US6144573A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US9075798P true 1998-06-26 1998-06-26
US09/292,448 US6144573A (en) 1998-06-26 1999-04-15 Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09/292,448 US6144573A (en) 1998-06-26 1999-04-15 Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities
US09/658,914 US6344989B1 (en) 1998-06-26 2000-09-11 Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09/658,914 Continuation US6344989B1 (en) 1998-06-26 2000-09-11 Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US6144573A true US6144573A (en) 2000-11-07

Family

ID=26782595

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09/292,448 Expired - Lifetime US6144573A (en) 1998-06-26 1999-04-15 Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities
US09/658,914 Expired - Lifetime US6344989B1 (en) 1998-06-26 2000-09-11 Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09/658,914 Expired - Lifetime US6344989B1 (en) 1998-06-26 2000-09-11 Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US6144573A (en)

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6344989B1 (en) 1998-06-26 2002-02-05 Altera Corporation Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities
US6351143B1 (en) * 2000-05-01 2002-02-26 Xilinx, Inc. Content-addressable memory implemented using programmable logic
US6400635B1 (en) 2000-03-15 2002-06-04 Altera Corporation Memory circuitry for programmable logic integrated circuit devices
US6501296B2 (en) * 1999-02-25 2002-12-31 Xilinx, Inc. Logic/memory circuit having a plurality of operating modes
US6614261B2 (en) 1999-03-04 2003-09-02 Altera Corp Interconnection and input/output resources for programable logic integrated circuit devices
US6630841B2 (en) 1999-02-25 2003-10-07 Xilinx, Inc. Configurable logic element with expander structures
US6754766B1 (en) 2002-02-14 2004-06-22 Altera Corporation Emulation of content-addressable memories
US6765408B2 (en) 2002-02-11 2004-07-20 Lattice Semiconductor Corporation Device and method with generic logic blocks
US7902864B1 (en) 2005-12-01 2011-03-08 Altera Corporation Heterogeneous labs
US9779785B2 (en) 2015-05-11 2017-10-03 Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Computer architecture using compute/storage tiles
US9934011B2 (en) * 2001-03-22 2018-04-03 Cornami, Inc. Method and apparatus for a compiler and related components for stream-based computations for a general-purpose, multiple-core system
US9983990B1 (en) * 2013-11-21 2018-05-29 Altera Corporation Configurable storage circuits with embedded processing and control circuitry

Families Citing this family (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030033374A1 (en) * 2001-07-24 2003-02-13 Condor Engineering, Inc. Method and system for implementing a communications core on a single programmable device
US7505295B1 (en) * 2004-07-01 2009-03-17 Netlogic Microsystems, Inc. Content addressable memory with multi-row write function
US7380053B2 (en) * 2005-03-17 2008-05-27 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for emulating content-addressable memory primitives
JP5048122B2 (en) * 2008-02-29 2012-10-17 ルネサスエレクトロニクス株式会社 Semiconductor device

Citations (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US34363A (en) * 1862-02-11 Improvement in machinery for cleaning cotton
US3473160A (en) * 1966-10-10 1969-10-14 Stanford Research Inst Electronically controlled microelectronic cellular logic array
US3849638A (en) * 1973-07-18 1974-11-19 Gen Electric Segmented associative logic circuits
US4740917A (en) * 1984-11-30 1988-04-26 International Business Machines Corporation Memory using conventional cells to perform a ram or an associative memory function
US4876466A (en) * 1987-11-20 1989-10-24 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Programmable logic array having a changeable logic structure
US4912345A (en) * 1988-12-29 1990-03-27 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. Programmable summing functions for programmable logic devices
US4975601A (en) * 1989-09-29 1990-12-04 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. User-writable random access memory logic block for programmable logic devices
US5027011A (en) * 1989-10-31 1991-06-25 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. Input row drivers for programmable logic devices
US5099150A (en) * 1989-09-29 1992-03-24 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. Circuit block for programmable logic devices, configurable as a user-writable memory or a logic circuit
US5121006A (en) * 1991-04-22 1992-06-09 Altera Corporation Registered logic macrocell with product term allocation and adjacent product term stealing
US5128559A (en) * 1989-09-29 1992-07-07 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. Logic block for programmable logic devices
US5144582A (en) * 1990-03-30 1992-09-01 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. Sram based cell for programmable logic devices
US5226005A (en) * 1990-11-19 1993-07-06 Unisys Corporation Dual ported content addressable memory cell and array
US5270587A (en) * 1992-01-06 1993-12-14 Micron Technology, Inc. CMOS logic cell for high-speed, zero-power programmable array logic devices
US5282163A (en) * 1990-11-19 1994-01-25 Kawasaki Steel Corporation Programmable logic device with circuit portions common to both configuration and use circuits
US5302865A (en) * 1993-02-16 1994-04-12 Intel Corporation High-speed comparator logic for wide compares in programmable logic devices
US5319589A (en) * 1992-04-17 1994-06-07 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Dynamic content addressable memory device and a method of operating thereof
US5339268A (en) * 1992-05-08 1994-08-16 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Content addressable memory cell and content addressable memory circuit for implementing a least recently used algorithm
US5362999A (en) * 1993-03-18 1994-11-08 Xilinx, Inc. EPLD chip with hybrid architecture optimized for both speed and flexibility
US5383146A (en) * 1992-06-08 1995-01-17 Music Semiconductors, Inc. Memory with CAM and RAM partitions
US5386155A (en) * 1993-03-30 1995-01-31 Intel Corporation Apparatus and method for selecting polarity and output type in a programmable logic device
US5408434A (en) * 1993-02-16 1995-04-18 Inmos Limited Memory device that functions as a content addressable memory or a random access memory
US5450608A (en) * 1993-04-15 1995-09-12 Intel Corporation Programmable logic having selectable output states for initialization and resets asynchronously using control bit associated with each product term
US5532957A (en) * 1995-01-31 1996-07-02 Texas Instruments Incorporated Field reconfigurable logic/memory array
US5557218A (en) * 1994-07-14 1996-09-17 Hyundai Electronics Industries Co., Ltd. Reprogrammable programmable logic array
US5559747A (en) * 1994-08-25 1996-09-24 Fujitsu Limited Static RAM and processing apparatus including static RAM
US5574930A (en) * 1994-08-12 1996-11-12 University Of Hawaii Computer system and method using functional memory
US5689195A (en) * 1995-05-17 1997-11-18 Altera Corporation Programmable logic array integrated circuit devices
US5809281A (en) * 1993-03-30 1998-09-15 Altera Corporation Field programmable gate array with high speed SRAM based configurable function block configurable as high performance logic or block of SRAM
US5815726A (en) * 1994-11-04 1998-09-29 Altera Corporation Coarse-grained look-up table architecture
US5844854A (en) * 1996-09-18 1998-12-01 Altera Corporation Programmable logic device with two dimensional memory addressing
US5936873A (en) * 1997-09-30 1999-08-10 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Single ended match sense amplifier
US5940852A (en) * 1997-05-01 1999-08-17 Altera Corporation Memory cells configurable as CAM or RAM in programmable logic devices

Family Cites Families (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USRE34363E (en) 1984-03-12 1993-08-31 Xilinx, Inc. Configurable electrical circuit having configurable logic elements and configurable interconnects
US6160419A (en) * 1997-11-03 2000-12-12 Altera Corporation Programmable logic architecture incorporating a content addressable embedded array block
US6020759A (en) * 1997-03-21 2000-02-01 Altera Corporation Programmable logic array device with random access memory configurable as product terms
US6144573A (en) 1998-06-26 2000-11-07 Altera Corporation Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities

Patent Citations (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US34363A (en) * 1862-02-11 Improvement in machinery for cleaning cotton
US3473160A (en) * 1966-10-10 1969-10-14 Stanford Research Inst Electronically controlled microelectronic cellular logic array
US3849638A (en) * 1973-07-18 1974-11-19 Gen Electric Segmented associative logic circuits
US4740917A (en) * 1984-11-30 1988-04-26 International Business Machines Corporation Memory using conventional cells to perform a ram or an associative memory function
US4876466A (en) * 1987-11-20 1989-10-24 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Programmable logic array having a changeable logic structure
US4912345A (en) * 1988-12-29 1990-03-27 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. Programmable summing functions for programmable logic devices
US4975601A (en) * 1989-09-29 1990-12-04 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. User-writable random access memory logic block for programmable logic devices
US5128559A (en) * 1989-09-29 1992-07-07 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. Logic block for programmable logic devices
US5099150A (en) * 1989-09-29 1992-03-24 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. Circuit block for programmable logic devices, configurable as a user-writable memory or a logic circuit
US5027011A (en) * 1989-10-31 1991-06-25 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. Input row drivers for programmable logic devices
US5144582A (en) * 1990-03-30 1992-09-01 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc. Sram based cell for programmable logic devices
US5226005A (en) * 1990-11-19 1993-07-06 Unisys Corporation Dual ported content addressable memory cell and array
US5282163A (en) * 1990-11-19 1994-01-25 Kawasaki Steel Corporation Programmable logic device with circuit portions common to both configuration and use circuits
US5121006A (en) * 1991-04-22 1992-06-09 Altera Corporation Registered logic macrocell with product term allocation and adjacent product term stealing
US5270587A (en) * 1992-01-06 1993-12-14 Micron Technology, Inc. CMOS logic cell for high-speed, zero-power programmable array logic devices
US5319589A (en) * 1992-04-17 1994-06-07 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Dynamic content addressable memory device and a method of operating thereof
US5339268A (en) * 1992-05-08 1994-08-16 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Content addressable memory cell and content addressable memory circuit for implementing a least recently used algorithm
US5383146A (en) * 1992-06-08 1995-01-17 Music Semiconductors, Inc. Memory with CAM and RAM partitions
US5302865A (en) * 1993-02-16 1994-04-12 Intel Corporation High-speed comparator logic for wide compares in programmable logic devices
US5408434A (en) * 1993-02-16 1995-04-18 Inmos Limited Memory device that functions as a content addressable memory or a random access memory
US5473267A (en) * 1993-02-16 1995-12-05 Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics Limited Programmable logic device with memory that can store routing data of logic data
US5362999A (en) * 1993-03-18 1994-11-08 Xilinx, Inc. EPLD chip with hybrid architecture optimized for both speed and flexibility
US5386155A (en) * 1993-03-30 1995-01-31 Intel Corporation Apparatus and method for selecting polarity and output type in a programmable logic device
US5809281A (en) * 1993-03-30 1998-09-15 Altera Corporation Field programmable gate array with high speed SRAM based configurable function block configurable as high performance logic or block of SRAM
US5450608A (en) * 1993-04-15 1995-09-12 Intel Corporation Programmable logic having selectable output states for initialization and resets asynchronously using control bit associated with each product term
US5557218A (en) * 1994-07-14 1996-09-17 Hyundai Electronics Industries Co., Ltd. Reprogrammable programmable logic array
US5574930A (en) * 1994-08-12 1996-11-12 University Of Hawaii Computer system and method using functional memory
US5559747A (en) * 1994-08-25 1996-09-24 Fujitsu Limited Static RAM and processing apparatus including static RAM
US5815726A (en) * 1994-11-04 1998-09-29 Altera Corporation Coarse-grained look-up table architecture
US5532957A (en) * 1995-01-31 1996-07-02 Texas Instruments Incorporated Field reconfigurable logic/memory array
US5689195A (en) * 1995-05-17 1997-11-18 Altera Corporation Programmable logic array integrated circuit devices
US5844854A (en) * 1996-09-18 1998-12-01 Altera Corporation Programmable logic device with two dimensional memory addressing
US5940852A (en) * 1997-05-01 1999-08-17 Altera Corporation Memory cells configurable as CAM or RAM in programmable logic devices
US5936873A (en) * 1997-09-30 1999-08-10 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Single ended match sense amplifier

Non-Patent Citations (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
"Altera Enables System-Level Integration with Raphael Family of Embedded PLDs", Altera Corporation, San Jose, California, Aug. 31, 1998.
"Altera Unveils New Name for Raphael: Advanced Programmable Embedded Matrix (APEX)", Altera Corporation, San Jose, California, Oct. 7, 1998.
"Apex 20K Device Family; Breakthrough MultiCore Architecture", Altera Corporation, San Jose, California, after Aug. 31, 1998.
"Apex 20K Programmable Logic Device Family; Advance Product Brief", Altera Corporation, San Jose, California, Oct. 1998, pp. 1, 2, and 9.
"IFX780 10ns FLEXlogic FPGA with SRAM Option; Preliminary", Intel Corporation, Nov. 1993, Order No. 290459-004, pp. 2-24 through 2-46.
"iFX8160 10ns FLEXlogic FPGA with SRAM Option; Advance Information", Intel Corporation, Oct. 1993, pp. 2-47 through 2-56.
"Next Generation FPGAs; Xilinx Next Generation FPGAs Deliver World-Class Performance", The Power of Innovation 1997, Xilinx, Inc., San Jose, CA, p. 7-7.
A. Kaviani et al., "Hybrid FPGA Architecture", Proceedings 4th International Symposium on FPGAs (FPGA 96), Feb. 1996.
A. Kaviani et al., Hybrid FPGA Architecture , Proceedings 4th International Symposium on FPGAs (FPGA 96), Feb. 1996. *
A. Stansfield et al., "The Design of a New FPGA Architecture", Proceedings Field Programmable Logic (FPL) 1995, Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science 975, pp. 1-14.
A. Stansfield et al., The Design of a New FPGA Architecture , Proceedings Field Programmable Logic (FPL) 1995, Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science 975, pp. 1 14. *
Altera Enables System Level Integration with Raphael Family of Embedded PLDs , Altera Corporation, San Jose, California, Aug. 31, 1998. *
Altera Unveils New Name for Raphael: Advanced Programmable Embedded Matrix (APEX) , Altera Corporation, San Jose, California, Oct. 7, 1998. *
Apex 20K Device Family; Breakthrough MultiCore Architecture , Altera Corporation, San Jose, California, after Aug. 31, 1998. *
Apex 20K Programmable Logic Device Family; Advance Product Brief , Altera Corporation, San Jose, California, Oct. 1998, pp. 1, 2, and 9. *
C. Barre, "L'utilisation du FPLA; Evaluez les Applications d'un Composant Puissant qui se Reveler tres Economique", Electronique & Applications Industrielles, EAI 250, Apr. 1, 1978, pp. 21-25.
C. Barre, L utilisation du FPLA; Evaluez les Applications d un Composant Puissant qui se Reveler tr e s Economique , Electronique & Applications Industrielles, EAI 250, Apr. 1, 1978, pp. 21 25. *
D. Bursky, "Combination RAM/PLD Opens New Application Options", Electronic Design, May 23, 1991, pp. 138-140.
D. Bursky, Combination RAM/PLD Opens New Application Options , Electronic Design, May 23, 1991, pp. 138 140. *
F. Heile et al., "Hybrid Product Term and LUT Based Architecture Using Embedded Memory Blocks", Proceedings of FPGA 1999 Conference, Feb. 21-23, 1999, Monterey, California.
F. Heile et al., Hybrid Product Term and LUT Based Architecture Using Embedded Memory Blocks , Proceedings of FPGA 1999 Conference, Feb. 21 23, 1999, Monterey, California. *
IFX780 10ns FLEXlogic FPGA with SRAM Option; Preliminary , Intel Corporation, Nov. 1993, Order No. 290459 004, pp. 2 24 through 2 46. *
iFX8160 10ns FLEXlogic FPGA with SRAM Option; Advance Information , Intel Corporation, Oct. 1993, pp. 2 47 through 2 56. *
Next Generation FPGAs; Xilinx Next Generation FPGAs Deliver World Class Performance , The Power of Innovation 1997 , Xilinx, Inc., San Jose, CA, p. 7 7. *
T. K K. Ngai, An SRAM Programmable Field Reconfigurable Memory , Master of Applied Science degree thesis submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering of the University of Toronto, 1994. *
T. K-K. Ngai, "An SRAM-Programmable Field-Reconfigurable Memory", Master of Applied Science degree thesis submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering of the University of Toronto, 1994.

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6344989B1 (en) 1998-06-26 2002-02-05 Altera Corporation Programmable logic devices with improved content addressable memory capabilities
US20040032283A1 (en) * 1999-02-25 2004-02-19 Xilinx, Inc. Configurable logic element with expander structures
US7248073B2 (en) 1999-02-25 2007-07-24 Xilinx, Inc. Configurable logic element with expander structures
US20070035328A1 (en) * 1999-02-25 2007-02-15 Xilinx, Inc. Configurable logic element with expander structures
US6501296B2 (en) * 1999-02-25 2002-12-31 Xilinx, Inc. Logic/memory circuit having a plurality of operating modes
US7145360B2 (en) 1999-02-25 2006-12-05 Xilinx, Inc. Configurable logic element with expander structures
US6630841B2 (en) 1999-02-25 2003-10-07 Xilinx, Inc. Configurable logic element with expander structures
US6847229B2 (en) 1999-02-25 2005-01-25 Xilinx, Inc. Configurable logic element with expander structures
US20050062498A1 (en) * 1999-02-25 2005-03-24 Xilinx, Inc. Configurable logic element with expander structures
US7839167B2 (en) 1999-03-04 2010-11-23 Altera Corporation Interconnection and input/output resources for programmable logic integrated circuit devices
US20040251930A1 (en) * 1999-03-04 2004-12-16 Altera Corporation Interconnection and input/output resources for programmable logic integrated circuit devices
US20030210073A1 (en) * 1999-03-04 2003-11-13 Tony Ngai Interconnection and input/output resources for programmable logic integrated circuit devices
US6614261B2 (en) 1999-03-04 2003-09-02 Altera Corp Interconnection and input/output resources for programable logic integrated circuit devices
US6894533B2 (en) 1999-03-04 2005-05-17 Altera Corporation Interconnection and input/output resources for programmable logic integrated circuit devices
US6989689B2 (en) 1999-03-04 2006-01-24 Altera Corporation Interconnection and input/output resources for programmable logic integrated circuit devices
US6400635B1 (en) 2000-03-15 2002-06-04 Altera Corporation Memory circuitry for programmable logic integrated circuit devices
US6556502B2 (en) 2000-03-15 2003-04-29 Altera Corporation Memory circuitry for programmable logic integrated circuit devices
US6351143B1 (en) * 2000-05-01 2002-02-26 Xilinx, Inc. Content-addressable memory implemented using programmable logic
US9934011B2 (en) * 2001-03-22 2018-04-03 Cornami, Inc. Method and apparatus for a compiler and related components for stream-based computations for a general-purpose, multiple-core system
US6915323B1 (en) 2002-02-11 2005-07-05 Lattice Semiconductor Corporation Macrocells supporting a carry cascade
US6765408B2 (en) 2002-02-11 2004-07-20 Lattice Semiconductor Corporation Device and method with generic logic blocks
US6903573B1 (en) 2002-02-11 2005-06-07 Lattice Semiconductor Corporation Programmable logic device with enhanced wide input product term cascading
US6754766B1 (en) 2002-02-14 2004-06-22 Altera Corporation Emulation of content-addressable memories
US7902864B1 (en) 2005-12-01 2011-03-08 Altera Corporation Heterogeneous labs
US10318260B2 (en) 2010-08-06 2019-06-11 Cornami, Inc. Method and apparatus for a compiler and related components for stream-based computations for a general-purpose, multiple-core system
US9983990B1 (en) * 2013-11-21 2018-05-29 Altera Corporation Configurable storage circuits with embedded processing and control circuitry
US9779785B2 (en) 2015-05-11 2017-10-03 Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Computer architecture using compute/storage tiles

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US6344989B1 (en) 2002-02-05

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5796267A (en) Tri-Statable input/output circuitry for programmable logic
US5481486A (en) Look up table implementation of fast carry arithmetic and exclusive-OR operations
JP3708541B2 (en) fpga with a microprocessor-based
US6208163B1 (en) FPGA configurable logic block with multi-purpose logic/memory circuit
US5838167A (en) Method and structure for loading data into several IC devices
CA2022056C (en) Distributed memory architecture for a configurable logic array and method for using distributed memory
US5802003A (en) System for implementing write, initialization, and reset in a memory array using a single cell write port
US6434735B1 (en) Method for programming an FPGA and implementing an FPGA interconnect
US6484271B1 (en) Memory redundancy techniques
US6986004B1 (en) FIFO memory with programmable data port widths
US6091263A (en) Rapidly reconfigurable FPGA having a multiple region architecture with reconfiguration caches useable as data RAM
US5848285A (en) Macrocell having a dual purpose input register for use in a logic device
US4670749A (en) Integrated circuit programmable cross-point connection technique
US4648077A (en) Video serial accessed memory with midline load
US6066961A (en) Individually accessible macrocell
US6614259B2 (en) Configuration memory integrated circuit
US6314550B1 (en) Cascaded programming with multiple-purpose pins
US4592019A (en) Bus oriented LIFO/FIFO memory
EP0183231B1 (en) Data processor
US5581198A (en) Shadow DRAM for programmable logic devices
US6014038A (en) Function block architecture for gate array
KR940008133B1 (en) Semiconductor memory circuit
EP0650631B1 (en) Non-disruptive, randomly addressable memory system
US6069487A (en) Programmable logic device circuitry for improving multiplier speed and/or efficiency
EP0786871A2 (en) programmable logic array integrated circuits

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: ALTERA CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HEILE, FRANCIS B.;REEL/FRAME:009916/0810

Effective date: 19990409

STCF Information on status: patent grant

Free format text: PATENTED CASE

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 12