US602931A - batey - Google Patents

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US602931A
US602931A US602931DA US602931A US 602931 A US602931 A US 602931A US 602931D A US602931D A US 602931DA US 602931 A US602931 A US 602931A
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Prior art keywords
wire
gripper
lever
carriage
slide
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B21MECHANICAL METAL-WORKING WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21FWORKING OR PROCESSING OF METAL WIRE
    • B21F3/00Coiling wire into particular forms
    • B21F3/02Coiling wire into particular forms helically
    • B21F3/04Coiling wire into particular forms helically externally on a mandrel or the like

Definitions

  • the object of this invention is to provide automatic mechanism for straightening and dividing wire into lengths suitable for wire spokes for wheels.
  • the drawings hereunto annexed show the machine I have devised for effecting this object.
  • the wire to be straightened is led in a zigzag course between pins which project up from a curved surface, which gives to the wire a definite curvature.
  • the wire is led in a zigzag course over and under rollers which take out this curvature, and then through an eye or eyes for its end to be seized by a gripper on a sliding carriage.
  • the movable jaw of the gripper is actuated by toggle-levers.
  • the central joint of the togglelevers is coupled by a connecting-rod to an oscillating lever. As the lever oscillates it opens and closes the gripper and moves the slide to and from the eyes above mentioned.
  • the next movement of the lever closes the gripper and causes it to seize the wire and then moves the sliding carriage forward, the gripper drawing forward the wire along with it.
  • a definite length of wire is so drawn forward and passed between cutters. At the end of the forward stroke the cutters are caused to commence to out the wire.
  • the next backward movement of the lever first opens the gripper and then moves back the carriage. The cutters then complete their cut and the same operations are repeated.
  • Figure 1 is a side elevation, and Fig. 2 an end view, of the machine.
  • Fig. 3 is a side elevation, and Fig. 4 an end view, of the curved surface over which the wire is first led.
  • Fig. 5 is an end view, on a larger scale, of dies used for holding the wire and acting to some extent as a draw-plate hole after the wire has been straightened.
  • Fig. 6 is an end view with cover-plate removed,and Fig. 7 a longitudinal section of the sliding carriage and gripper carried by it.
  • Fig. 10 is an end view, and Fig. 11 a horizontal sec tion, on an enlarged scale, of the cutting mechanism.
  • A is a drum having wound around it the wire to be straightened.
  • B is a brake-block carried by a level-arm on an axis B and made to bear down upon the wire by the weight B carried by another lever-arm on the same axis.
  • C is a guide carried at the lower end of this surface.
  • C is an eye through which the wire is led after passing over the guide.
  • D D D D are flanged rollers under and over which the wire is led.
  • the first roller D can be raised or lowered, so as more or less to deflect the wire from a straight line as it passes below and over the rollers D.
  • E is a fixed block having an eye or hole formed through it of a size to fit the wire closely and of sufficient length to take out any short sharp bends which may still remain in it.
  • F F are two half-dies carried by ablock F and which nip the wire between them.
  • G2 is a link passing from the central joint of the toggle-levers to the upper end of a lever-arm J.
  • This arm can be rocked on the axis J at its lower end by a connecting-rod K, passing from it to a crank-pin projecting from a disk L, which is fast on the main or driving shaft M.
  • the crank-pin can be slid along a radial slot in the disk and set nearer to or farther from the shaft to adjust the extent of movement given to the lever.
  • N is a roller 011 the lower end of a vertical slide on the carriage H. It is pressed downward by a spring N, and when the carriage is at the end of its traverse nearest to the dies F it enters ahollow in'a bracket-piece O and tends to retain the carriage in this position, but can yield if sufficient force is exerted to move the carriage along its guides.
  • P P are the cutters for severing the wire, (marked X in Figs. 10 and 11,) and Q an eye through which the wire is led just before passing to the cutters.
  • the cutters are formed, as shown at Figs. 8 and 9, of two small rings through which the wire passes.
  • One ring P lies in a corresponding recess in the end face of the block Q, by which the eye Q is carried, the other in a recess in the face of a lever P, which turns on a fulcrum at P
  • the two rings are held together face to face by the lever being held up toward the end of the block Q in the manner shown.
  • One end of the lever P is weighted with a weight P
  • the other is coupled by a connecting-rod P with one arm of a lever B, another arm of which carries a truck or roller R, which rests on a cam S on the main shaft M.
  • the cam I form in such manner that the cutters commence to partially cut the wire just as the sliding carriage I-I completes its forward movement, and they complete their out just before the carriage commences its next forward movement.
  • the ring which lies in the recess in the block Q has a hole in the center a little larger than the Wire to be cut and the other a much larger hole.
  • the holes are somewhat eccentric to one another. Aslight tendency is thereby given to the rings to make a partial turn at each cut.
  • the whole edge of the central hole in each ring is thereby made available as a cutting edge, each portion of the edge being at one time or anotherbrought into action.
  • What I claim is 1.
  • the cutter formed of two rings held together, face to face, and capable of being moved one over the other, and both free to turn while in action, substantially as described.

Description

(No Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet 1.
J. BATEY.
MANUFACTURE OF WIRE SPOK-ES FOR WHEELS. No. Q02,931 Patented Apr. 26, 1898.
(No Model.) 4 sheets sheet 2.
J. BATEY. MANUFACTURE OF WIRE SPOKES FOR WHEELS.
No. 602,931. Patented Apr. 26, 1898.
1N5 wants vzrzns ca. anmauwa. WASHINGYDPL n c.
(No- Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet, s.
J.BATB Y.
MANUFACTURE OF WIRE SPOKES FOR'WHEELSL No. 602,931. Patented Apr. 26,1898.
Tm: "cams vc rns cu. Puwaummvnsumsran, 07c.
(No Model) 4 Sheets8heet 4 w J. BATEY. MANUFACTURE OF WIRE SPOKBS FOR WHEELS.
No. 602,931. I Patented Apr. 26, 1898.
m wins 00. PHOXO-UYRO. wunmsw. D. Q
UNITED STATES PATENT rricn.
JOHN BATEY, OF DUBLIN, IRELAND.
MANUFACTURE OF WIRE SPOKES FOR WHEELS.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent N 0. 602,931, dated April 26, 1898.
Application filed October 2, 1897. Serial lilo. 653,788, (No model.)
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that 1, JOHN BATEY, a subject of the Queen of Great Britain, residing at 47 Heytesbury street, Dublin, Ireland, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Machinery for Straightening and Dividing Wire into Lengths Applicable Especially for the Manufacture of Tim Spokes for W'heels, of which the following is a specification.
The object of this invention is to provide automatic mechanism for straightening and dividing wire into lengths suitable for wire spokes for wheels. The drawings hereunto annexed show the machine I have devised for effecting this object.
In this machine the wire to be straightened is led in a zigzag course between pins which project up from a curved surface, which gives to the wire a definite curvature. Afterward the wire is led in a zigzag course over and under rollers which take out this curvature, and then through an eye or eyes for its end to be seized by a gripper on a sliding carriage. The movable jaw of the gripper is actuated by toggle-levers. The central joint of the togglelevers is coupled by a connecting-rod to an oscillating lever. As the lever oscillates it opens and closes the gripper and moves the slide to and from the eyes above mentioned. When the slide is at the end of its travel nearest to the eyes, the next movement of the lever closes the gripper and causes it to seize the wire and then moves the sliding carriage forward, the gripper drawing forward the wire along with it. A definite length of wire is so drawn forward and passed between cutters. At the end of the forward stroke the cutters are caused to commence to out the wire. The next backward movement of the lever first opens the gripper and then moves back the carriage. The cutters then complete their cut and the same operations are repeated.
Figure 1 is a side elevation, and Fig. 2 an end view, of the machine. Fig. 3 is a side elevation, and Fig. 4 an end view, of the curved surface over which the wire is first led. Fig. 5 is an end view, on a larger scale, of dies used for holding the wire and acting to some extent as a draw-plate hole after the wire has been straightened. Fig. 6 is an end view with cover-plate removed,and Fig. 7 a longitudinal section of the sliding carriage and gripper carried by it. Fig. Sis an end view, and Fig. 9 a plan, of the cutting mechanism. Fig. 10 is an end view, and Fig. 11 a horizontal sec tion, on an enlarged scale, of the cutting mechanism.
A is a drum having wound around it the wire to be straightened.
B is a brake-block carried by a level-arm on an axis B and made to bear down upon the wire by the weight B carried by another lever-arm on the same axis.
0 is a fixed curved surface having pins 0' projecting from it in a zigzag line. C is a guide carried at the lower end of this surface.
C is an eye through which the wire is led after passing over the guide.
D D D D are flanged rollers under and over which the wire is led. The first roller D can be raised or lowered, so as more or less to deflect the wire from a straight line as it passes below and over the rollers D.
E is a fixed block having an eye or hole formed through it of a size to fit the wire closely and of sufficient length to take out any short sharp bends which may still remain in it.
F F are two half-dies carried by ablock F and which nip the wire between them. The
lower one is fixed and the upper one pressed down toward it by a lever F acted on by a spring F G G are two half-dies mounted on asliding carriage H. The upper die is fixed to the carriage. The lower one can be slid toward or away from the upper die.
G are toggle-levers jointed at their upper end to the lower die G and at their lower end to a fixed point on the carriage.
G2 is a link passing from the central joint of the toggle-levers to the upper end of a lever-arm J. This arm can be rocked on the axis J at its lower end by a connecting-rod K, passing from it to a crank-pin projecting from a disk L, which is fast on the main or driving shaft M. The crank-pin can be slid along a radial slot in the disk and set nearer to or farther from the shaft to adjust the extent of movement given to the lever.
N is a roller 011 the lower end of a vertical slide on the carriage H. It is pressed downward by a spring N, and when the carriage is at the end of its traverse nearest to the dies F it enters ahollow in'a bracket-piece O and tends to retain the carriage in this position, but can yield if sufficient force is exerted to move the carriage along its guides.
P P are the cutters for severing the wire, (marked X in Figs. 10 and 11,) and Q an eye through which the wire is led just before passing to the cutters. Preferably the cutters are formed, as shown at Figs. 8 and 9, of two small rings through which the wire passes. One ring P lies in a corresponding recess in the end face of the block Q, by which the eye Q is carried, the other in a recess in the face of a lever P, which turns on a fulcrum at P The two rings are held together face to face by the lever being held up toward the end of the block Q in the manner shown. One end of the lever P is weighted with a weight P The other is coupled by a connecting-rod P with one arm of a lever B, another arm of which carries a truck or roller R, which rests on a cam S on the main shaft M. The cam I form in such manner that the cutters commence to partially cut the wire just as the sliding carriage I-I completes its forward movement, and they complete their out just before the carriage commences its next forward movement. The ring which lies in the recess in the block Q has a hole in the center a little larger than the Wire to be cut and the other a much larger hole. The holes are somewhat eccentric to one another. Aslight tendency is thereby given to the rings to make a partial turn at each cut. The whole edge of the central hole in each ring is thereby made available as a cutting edge, each portion of the edge being at one time or anotherbrought into action.
What I claim is 1. The combination of a drum upon which the wire to be straightened is wound, abrake bearing on the wire, a curved surface with pins projecting from it in zigzag'course over which the wire is first led to bend the wire in one direction, the rollers for subsequently bending the wire in the opposite direction, the gripper carried by a slide, the toggle-levers for actuating the gripper, the rod jointed to the central, joints of the toggle-levers, and mechanism for giving a to-and-fro end-way movement to this rod so as when the rod is moved in one direction to first close the gripper and then move the slide endwise to draw the wire forward through the straightening appliances, and when the rod is moved in the opposite direction to first open the gripper and then move the slide backward, and the cutter for cutting off a length of wire which projects beyond the gripper.
2. The combination of wire-straightening appliances, the gripper, the slide by which it is carried, the toggle-levers, the to-and-fro end-way-moving rod, jointed to the central joints of the toggle-levers, the cutter, and mechanism for causing the cutter to partially cut through the wire when the slide completes its forward movement and to complete the out just before the slide commences its next forward movement.
3. The cutter formed of two rings held together, face to face, and capable of being moved one over the other, and both free to turn while in action, substantially as described.
4. The combination of the curved surface over which the wire is first led, the bendingrollers through which the wire next passes, and mechanism for first closing the gripper onto the wire and then moving it endwise to draw the wire forward and afterward to open the gripper and then move it backward.
5. The combination of the curved surface with pins projecting from it in a zigzag course, over which the wire is first led to bend the wire in one direction, the rollers for subsequently bending the wire in the opposite direction, the gripper, the slide by which it is carried, the toggle-levers, the to-and-fro endway-moving rod jointed to the central joint of the toggle-levers, and the cutter for cutting ofi lengths of wire after they have been drawn forward by the gripper.
JOHN BATEY.
Witnesses:
JAMES CARSON, JAMES CARLYLE.
US602931D batey Expired - Lifetime US602931A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2518029A (en) * 1943-12-20 1950-08-08 Western Electric Co Article forming apparatus
US2742077A (en) * 1952-08-08 1956-04-17 American Marietta Co Machine for shaping an elliptical wire cage
US2783817A (en) * 1951-10-15 1957-03-05 Rene A Leroy Construction roll screen unwinder and straightener
US2829698A (en) * 1955-05-04 1958-04-08 Robert M Stikeleather Rotating tube-straightening machine
US3429163A (en) * 1966-01-08 1969-02-25 Ungerer Irma Plant for straightening and severing strip metal

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2518029A (en) * 1943-12-20 1950-08-08 Western Electric Co Article forming apparatus
US2783817A (en) * 1951-10-15 1957-03-05 Rene A Leroy Construction roll screen unwinder and straightener
US2742077A (en) * 1952-08-08 1956-04-17 American Marietta Co Machine for shaping an elliptical wire cage
US2829698A (en) * 1955-05-04 1958-04-08 Robert M Stikeleather Rotating tube-straightening machine
US3429163A (en) * 1966-01-08 1969-02-25 Ungerer Irma Plant for straightening and severing strip metal

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