US602184A - Machine for nailing soles to uppers - Google Patents

Machine for nailing soles to uppers Download PDF

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US602184A
US602184A US602184DA US602184A US 602184 A US602184 A US 602184A US 602184D A US602184D A US 602184DA US 602184 A US602184 A US 602184A
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wire
lever
spindle
machine
shaft
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R43/00Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current collectors or for joining electric conductors
    • H01R43/20Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current collectors or for joining electric conductors for assembling or disassembling contact members with insulating base, case or sleeve
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/51Plural diverse manufacturing apparatus including means for metal shaping or assembling
    • Y10T29/5136Separate tool stations for selective or successive operation on work
    • Y10T29/5137Separate tool stations for selective or successive operation on work including assembling or disassembling station
    • Y10T29/5142Separate tool stations for selective or successive operation on work including assembling or disassembling station and means to sever work from supply

Definitions

  • the invention consists of a machine provided with certain features of construction and larrangement of parts, such as clearly illustrated upon the accompanying drawings and now to be described in detail, and pointed out in the claims hereto'annexed.
  • Figure 1 represents in side elevation one form of machine which I have selected for the purpose of illustrating an embodiment of the invention.
  • Fig. 2 represents a side elevation of the head of the machine somewhat enlarged.
  • Fig. 3 represents a front elevation of the same.
  • Fig. 4 represents an elevation from the other side of the machine.
  • Fig. 5 represents in vertical longitudinal section the spindle.
  • Fig. 6 represents in detail the work or shoe feed.
  • Fig. 7 shows a section on the line 7 7 of Fig. 5 and represents automatically-operating devices for feeding the wire.
  • Figs. 7L and 7b show in detail a different mounting for the feedrolls.
  • Fig. 8 represents in longitudinal vertical section a portion of the spindle and the mechanism for holding the wire against back thrust.
  • FIGs. 11, 12, 13, and 14 show in detail the mechanism which controls the reciprocation of the horn and pre- ⁇ 5o vents the horn from being moved when there Serial No. 642,101. (No model.)
  • Fig. 15 represents in detail the cams and levers for actuating the shoe or work feeding devices and the mechanism for operating the cutters which sever the wire after it has been fed a sufficient distance into the work.
  • Fig..16 shows in detail the friction devices for the wire-reel.
  • Figs. 17 and 18 illustrate the arrangement of the footlevers and the manner of supporting them.
  • a indicates a standard having a base a' and a head a2, the latter being secured upon the standard by bolts @23 in the ordinary manner.
  • the standard is formed or provided with brackets a3, which provide bearings for the main drivingshaft b, which is mounted therein and which is rotated by a band wheel or pulley, as is usually the case.
  • the shaft On its end the shaft has keyed thereto a band-wheel b', from whicha belt h2 passes around idler-pulleys b3 b3, suitably j ournaled in an extension of the head a2, and around a pulley b4 in threaded engagement with the upper end of the spindle c.
  • a belt-tighte-ner consisting of a lever b5, journaled on the shaft b and having on its end a loose pulley h6, is pressed against the belt b2 by a spring 197, as shown in Fig. 1.
  • the spindle c before referred to,is arranged vertically, as it is usual, and is provided with a yoke c to receive a wire-reel c2, from which the wire is fed through a longitudinaly aperture c3, which extends through the spindle, as
  • the head a2 is formed with a spherical casing a4 to receive the yoke and the wire-reel c2, there being a hinged door a5 to cover an aperture in its face, through which roo access may be had to the rcel to pass the wire through the duct or aperture in the spindle c to the wire-feeding devices.
  • the wire-reel c2 is formed with a hub w and end iianges w', each of which has an unbroken friction-rim 102, as shown in Fig. 2, and three apertures w3, through which access may be had to the wire to remove the binders therefrom.
  • a pin Q04 Through the hub of the reel passes a pin Q04, having an enlarged head 105 and a portion w next to the head, which is formed with a left thread to engage internal threads in the yoke c.
  • the outer end of the pin which is not shown, is smooth and'non-threaded, the threads w being alone relied upon for holding it in place.
  • a cap a having a bearing consisting of a tubular extension a7, which is flared at as.
  • a hard brass bushing a is inserted between the spindle c and the tubular extension, and in the flaring portion of the latter there is a hard-metal ring am, between which and the ring a, upon which the hub of the pulley b4 rests, is placed a series of antifrictioncones am.
  • a bearing @33 in the lower portion of the casing a4 is another bushing (L42, through which the spindle passes, so that the spindle is mounted in bearings both above and below the reel, whereby it is held against lateral vibration in case the corrugated or threaded wire is wound unevenly upon the reel.
  • the head a2 is provided with a third bearing on an arm a, through which the spindle also passes, there being another bushing am arranged between the spindle and the bearing thus afforded, this last-mentioned bearing being relatively near the lower end of the spindle, whereby the latter is held in bearings at its ends and at a point intermediate thereof and is at all times properly centered.
  • a throat-piece d In the lower end of the spindle is inserted a throat-piece d, the aperture or throat of which is only large enough to receive the Wire, which ts snugly therein, said throat-piece being held in place by a screw (Z, as shown in Fig. 5.
  • a sleeve d2 Surrounding the lower end of the spindle is a sleeve d2, having inwardly-projecting guides cl3, secured thereto by screws d4 and projecting into grooves cdin the spindle. Preferably there are three of these guides, although I may use any other number, if desired.
  • the sleeve is provided at its upper end with a shoulder di", between which and a collar (Z6, threaded thereon, is placed a ring CZ7, there being suitable antifriction-cones d8 inserted between the ring and the collar and the shoulder.
  • the ring di is supported in the yoke e on an arm e, secured to a verticallyrcciprocatory shaft e2, as shown in Fig. 2, and which I shall afterward describe.
  • the sleeve is connected with the spindle, so as to turn therewith, but is free to be reci procated longitudinally thereof to feed the wire therethrough by feeding-disks supported by the sleeve.
  • the spindle and the throat-piece are provided with three longitudinal slots in alinement with the grooves c4, and in each slot there is placed a serrated wire-feed roll f.
  • Each roll is placed in a cavity in a frictionblock f and is provided with studs or gudgeons projecting loosely into enlarged sockets in two bell-crank levers f3 f3, arranged on both sides of the block f.
  • the levers and the block are pivoted upon a screw-pin f4, passed through apertures in the sleeve, such as shown in Figs. 6 and 7, there being a spring f5 for each pair of levers f3 f3, by which the feeding-disks are held in engagement with the wire.
  • the axes of the feed-rolls ff are in-a plane below the plane of the axes of the screw-pins f4, so that, although the rolls will roll over the wire when the sleeve d is being raised, they will tightly wedge or grip the wire between them when the sleeve d2 is moved downward, so as to carry the wire with them through the aperture in the spindle and the throat-piece.
  • I may dispense with the additional bellcrank levers, if desired, and also with the springs by forming the frictionblocks as shown in Figs. 7"L and 7b and by placing the rolls loosely i-n the cavities therein.
  • the blocks f7 f7 for the rolls are relatively wide and are provided with upwardlyprojecting ends fS f S, which operate as weights by centrifugal action to throw the rolls inward to grip the wire when the roll-carrying sleeve is moved upward.
  • a collar g is secured to the spindle by one or more screws g', and that placed loosely upon the spindle above said collar is a cup or flanged collar g2, having oppositely-arrauged leaf-sprin gs g3.
  • the spindle is formed with a transverse aperture (Z9 to receive two roll-carrying friction-blocks g4 g5, between which are placed rolls g Q7, having serrated edges to engage the wire between them.
  • the rolls gf (/7 are maintained at the same distance apart, but their rotation may be retarded bythe sprn gs g3 g3 bearing against the block g5.
  • the block g5 will yield when the wire is drawn down between the rolls; but as soon as the tension upon the wire ceases the IOO IIO
  • Figs. 9 and 10 another backstay or locking mechanism for the wire is shown in which the toothed or serrated rolls are movable toward and from each other and are held against backward rotation by the engagement of their friction-blocks.
  • the blocks g1() being divided horizontally, as in Fig. 8, they are divided vertically and each is provided with a socket to receive one ofthe rolls g5 or g7 and also with an aperture gl1 to receive the wire.
  • the springs Q12 are secured to the collar g2, so as to bear inwardly against the friction-blocks, and by this arrangement the rolls allow the wire to be drawn down freely under the draft of the feed-rolls, but operate to prevent any backward movement thereof, except under a powerful draft from above.
  • the pressure of the springs Q12 may be increased or decreased by rotating the collar g2.
  • the sleeve cl2 on which the feed-disks are mounted is reciprocated by the following devices:
  • the shaft is held raised by a strong spring e5, having one end attached to the shaft and the' other end placed over a hook e4, extending out from the casing a4.
  • a sleeve e5 is secured to the shaft e2 by a clamping-bolt e6 and a screw e7 and is provided with a forwardly-projecting arm es, constructed with downwardly and laterally extending arms e9, in which is journaled a roll el".
  • One of the arms e9 is extended, as shown in Fig. 4, and is provided with another roller ell, placed on the' outer face thereof.
  • a horizontal shaft Zt is mounted in bearings a als and is provided with a worm-wheel h', intermeshing with a worm cl2, rigidly secured upon the spindle c.
  • a cam h2 is secured upon the end of the shaft Zt by a collar h5 and is provided with two rises h5 h5, as shown in Fig.'3, and it extends between lips or lugs eiprojecting u pwardly from the arms e9. These lips or lugs operate to center the shaft e2 and to hold the roll e10 in parallelism with the cam h2. Now it will be seen that as the spindle c rotates it transmits power to the shaft h through the worm and worm-wheel 012 Zt, and that, therefore, a complete rotation of the cam h2 causes two reciprocations of the shaft e2 by the rises on the cam engaging the roll @10, mounted on -the sleeve e5.
  • the horn is mounted or secured to a shaft movable in a vertical guideway or bearing 2, supported by the standard or post a, and to the lower end of the shaft t" is secured an v arm 5, which is connected by a connecting-rod 4 with a lever 5, fulcrumed at its center upon a stud 6, extending out from the head a2.
  • the lever 5 On its end the lever 5 isl formed with a block t'7 to operate as a stop to limit the upward movement of the shaft e2, the arm c on the last-Vv 5 is tilted so that 'the block 7 prevents the shaft e2 from rising; but if the tip of the horn be lowered to receive a sole between it and the said guard-plate Zr the block 7 will be raised a corresponding distance, so that the shaft e2 may be reciprocated through a distance equal to the thickness of the sole.
  • cam-blocks m m on the disk m alternately engage to tilt the lever and operate the knives to cut the wire.
  • the cam-blocks m m maybe made of hardened steel and may be replaced when worn out, being removably mounted-in the cam-disk m and held therein by screw m2.
  • the said cam-disk m is mounted upon the shaft 7L, as shown in Fig. 4.
  • the parts are so timed that as soon as the feed-disks have reached the lowest limit of their movement, so that the wire has been fed in through the sole of the shoe a proper distance, the cutters ZZ are brought together with an equal movement, and the wire is severed before the sleeve d2 begins to move upward.
  • the guard or work plate 7. is secured to one of the holders for the knives.
  • a rack-slide n is mounted in guides below the head a2 and is adapted to be moved in and out by a handle n', clamped on the end of a shaft, on which is mounted a small pinion n2, as shown in dotted lines inFig. 2.
  • the slide By turning the handle the slide may be adjusted to any desired position, but is held from movement, except under considerable pressure, by pins n3 and flat springs n4, which press the pins against the slide at the sides thereof.
  • the slide is cut away, as shown in Fig.
  • a lever a5 pivoted at n and having segmental ratchet-teeth a7, which are eccentric or in a spiral line with respect to the pivot ai'.
  • the end of the lever is provided with a spherical socket 'a8 to receive the balllike end n of a connecting-rod n10, pivoted to a pin or swivel n, set in the end of a camlever m12, as shown in Fig. 15.
  • the end of the slide n is provided with upwardly-projecting iianges or guards 91,13, (best shown in Fig. 3,) beyond which the teeth of the segmental lever project.
  • the lever w12 is provided with an elongated hub 72,14 and is fulcrumed on a sleeve 0, supported in a bearing al, afforded by a bracket extending out from the head a2.
  • the free end of the lever 71.12 is provided with a roll w15, bearing against a cam p, secured upon the shaft h, and is also provided with a bunter or adjustable screw nl, which is arranged to strike against the bearings als and limit the inward movement of the said upper end of the lever n.12.
  • a bunter or adjustable screw nl which is arranged to strike against the bearings als and limit the inward movement of the said upper end of the lever n.12.
  • the movement of the feed-lever may be varied to regulate the distance between the nails in the sole by adjusting the bunterscrew which limits the rearward movement of the said lever and adjusting the arm n around the hub n of the lever w12, so that when it is forced outward to its greatest eX- tent by a rise on the cam p the bunter will be against the bearing als.
  • I provide for automatically raising and lowering the horn to grip or release the shoe or work by the following devices:
  • a path-cam Q which extends through an aperture in the head a2 and which is formed with its groove to receive a roller on the endof a forked lever Q/, journaled on a stud-shaft Q2, extending through a bearing @21, formed in the head, as shown in Figs. 2 and l1.
  • a toothed wheel o In the end of the lever Q" is journaled a toothed wheel o, having an axiallyarranged stop-bar r and formed in one face with clutch-teeth r2, so that the said wheel constitutes one member of a clutch.
  • a stationary sleeve r3 is threaded into the ⁇ arm Q4 of the forked lever Q and is likewise formed with clutch-teeth r4, so as to constitute a stationary member of a clutch with which the movable rotatable clutch may be engaged.
  • Passing through the said sleeve r3 is an axially-movable stndshaftr5, rigidly connected to the clutch-wheel r, and which when moved acts to disengage it from the stationary clutch member, and which also has a conical head T7.
  • a spring rs is arranged in a socket in the opposite arm Q5 of the forked lever Q and operates to normally hold the two members of the clutch together, whereby the clutch member r is prevented from rotating in one direction, but is free to slip over the teeth of the stationary member in the other directionthat is, the direction of the arrow in Fig. 13.
  • an adjustable stop r In the said arm Q4 of the lever Q is secured an adjustable stop r, against the end of which the end of the stop bar or block r' may engage to hold the two clutch members apart.
  • a roll r1@ is journaled upon a stud r11, extending between the two arms Q4 Q5 of the shaft Q', and operates to hold a rack sin engagement or in mesh ICO IIO
  • the said rack s is threaded upon the end of a rod s', whose lower end is pivoted to the end of a lever s2, fulcrumed upon the pivot pin or stud 5 j* and having its other end connected to the extension j' of the shaft i', before referred to.
  • a foot-lever s3 is connected to the studj4, so that by depressing the said lever the horn may be lowered for the insertion of work between it and the guard 7c below the spindle.
  • the connectingrod s is raised slightly, as will be readily seen, which it is free to do, since the clutch T is always at liberty to rotate in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 13.
  • a stationary cam t is mounted in a bracket t on the head a2 and engages the conical end T7 of the stud-shaft T5 when the lever q is in its lowest position to thrust the said lshaft longitudinally and disengage the clutch member T from the clutch member T3, whereby the said member T is free to be revolved i either direction. ⁇ A Y When there is no work in the machine, the stops T' and T9 are in alinement and in contact and the clutches are held apart, so that the reciprocation of the lever q does not affect the clutch T, as the face of the stop T9 slides against the face of the stop T', which is elongated for this purpose.
  • a slide a is mounted in a guideway extending out from the lower part of the bearing-arm a and is provided with a rod or extension u', which extends through the sleeve o, before referred to, and is normally held forward by a spring u2.
  • a collar a3 On the end-the rod u' is provided with a collar a3, having its face beveled o or wedge-shaped in longitudinal section.
  • a rod o sliding in a bearing o', is connected at its lower end to a foot-lever o2, fulcrumed in ears in the base of the standard a, and has its upper end forked and wedgeshaped, as at v3, so that when the foot-lever is depressed the rod is -forced upward and its upper end engages the collar w3 and moves the locking-slide u longitudinally into ⁇ its guide.
  • the sleeve e5 which, as before stated, is secured upon the vertically-reciprocating shaft e2 and is provided with the roll en, is so arranged with relation to the locking-bar u that when the bar u is Withdrawn the roll e slides upand down in front of the end thereof, and when the said shaft e2 is in its lowest position the roll en is directly beneath the locking-bar u.
  • the said shaft e2 is free to be reciprocated so long as the operator keeps his foot upon the treadle or foot-lever o2, but when the foot is removed and the rod 'U drops the spring u2 throws the locking bar or stop u outward to engage the roll e', since-l the cam h2 forces the roll el@ down far enough, as shown in Fig. 4.
  • the locking bar or stop u holds the shaft e2 and the sleeve d2 against movement so long as the treadle o2 remains undepressed.
  • the feeding mechanism is under the direct control of the operator, as he may stop the action of the said feeding mechanism after each reciprocation thereof, if he so desires.
  • treadle o2 is located beside and just below the horn-operating treadle s3, so that immediately after the horn has been depressed he may shift or drop his foot fromv the treadle s3 to the treadle r2.
  • the latter is located near the ground, so that the operator may stand with his foot upon it during the operation of nailing a shoe without experiencing any discomfort therefrom.
  • the said shaft e2 begins to descend it carries with it the sleeve d2, and upon the first motion of the sleeve the wire-feeding rolls engage the wire, so that as the sleeve continues to descend the wire is carried slowly down, and the spindle being rotated a relatively high rate of speed the nail is screwed into the sole of the shoe.
  • the said sleeve cl2 reaching the lowest limit of its movement one of the cam projections m on the camdisk m strikes the lever ZS and causes the cutters to be moved together with an equal movement to sever the wire fiush with the surface of the sole.
  • the wire is fed positively into the shoe by a mechanism which grips it firmly, and it is prevented from moving backward when the feed-rolls are being carried upward to again grip the wire.
  • feeding-rolls such as I have shown in Figs. 5, 7, and '7" and arranging them to grip the wire between them I am enabled to force the wire down positively and to prevent it from slipping.
  • the feed-rolls roll easily over the wire when their supporting-sleeve (Pis being raised; but immediately upon the sleeve being lowered ⁇ means for holding the reel in the yoke.
  • the mechanism for holding back or cheeking the backward movement of the wires is very simple; but it operates in a highly-efficient manner, since it immediately locks the wire as soon as the downward tension thereupon ceases.
  • Another feature of this invention is tlIie tion of the reel frequently causes severe injury to the machine and endangers the life and limb of the operator, and hence where a nutted bolt is employed the liability of the operator forgetting to screw the nut in place is a constant source of danger.
  • a nailing-machine in combination, a rotaryspindle, and means for feeding the wire therethrough comprising loosely mounted rolls arranged to roll over the wire when moved in one'direction and to grip it between them when moved in the other direction.
  • a nailing-machine in combination, a rota-ry spindle, and means for feeding a threaded wire therethrough comprising oppositely-arranged loosely-mounted toothed rc lls IOS IIO
  • a rotary spindle and means for feeding the Wire therethrough consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable With the spindle, serrated rolls, and means for supporting said rolls on said sleeve, said means being constructed and arranged to permit the rolls to pass over the Wire When moved in one direction, and to positively grip and feed the Wire when moved in the other direction.
  • a rotary spindle in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feedingthe Wire therethrough consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable With the spindle, a series of coacting serrated rolls, and friction-blocks for said rolls, supported by the sleeve.
  • a rotary spindle in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feeding the wire therethrough, consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable with the spindle, a series of loose serrated Wire-feeding rolls, and a friction-block for each roll pivoted on the said sleeve.
  • a rotary spindle in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feeding the Wire therethrough, consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable with the spindle, a series of loose serrated Wire-feeding rolls, and a friction-block for each roll pivoted on the said sleeve, the axes of movement of the frictionblocks being out of the plane of the axes of the rolls.
  • a rotary spindle in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feeding the wire therethrough, consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable with the spindle, a series of loose serrated Wire-feeding rolls, a frictionblock for each roll pivoted on the said sleeve, and springs for thrusting the rolls into engagement with the wire.
  • a rotary spindle in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feeding the Wire therethrough, consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable With the spindle, a series of loose serrated Wire-feeding rolls, a frictionblock for each roll pivoted on the said sleeve, and spring-held means for thrusting the rolls into engagement With the wire.
  • a rotary spindle in combination, means for feeding the Wire therethrough, and means for checking a backward movement of the Wire comprising springpressed serrated rollers.
  • a nailing-machine in combination, a rotary spindle, means for feeding the wire therethrough, and means for checkingaback- Ward movement of the Wire comprising serrated rollers and friction blocks for said rollers.
  • a rotary spindle means for feeding the Wire therethrough, and means for checking a backward movement of the Wire comprising ser- .rated rollers and spring-pressed friction- 13.-
  • a nailing-machine in combination, a rotary spindle, means for feeding the Wire therethrough, and means for checking a backward movement of the Wire comprising ser- .rated rollers and spring-pressed friction- 13.
  • rotary spindle having a through -aperture, friction-blocks inserted in said aperture, coacting serrated rolls supported by the blocks, a collar on said spindle, and springs supported by said collar and bearing against the friction-blocks.
  • a rotary spindle having an aperture in its lower end, a cylindrical throat-piece inserted in said spindle and having a projecting end, a reciprocatory sleeve, and feeding-rolls supported by said sleeve and projecting through slots in the throat-piece and spindle to grip the Wire.
  • a spindle in combination, a spindle, means for feeding Wire therethrough, a roll supported by the spindle, and having friction-rims, spring-pressed friction brakeshoes bearing against said friction-rims to retard the rotation of the reel and a spring connecting said shoes.
  • a yoke connected With the spindle, a Wirereel supported in the yoke, and a journal-pin headed at one end and threaded at said end to engage the yoke.
  • a nailing-machine in combination, a rotary spindle, a reciprocatory sleeve having means for feeding the Wire through the spindle, a transversely-arranged rotary shaft having a cam, a reciprocatory shaft arranged parallel to the spindle, an arm carried by said reciprocatory shaft and having cheeks or lugs embracing said cam, a roller on said arm, and means for connecting said reciprocatory shaft with said sleeve.
  • a spindle in combination, a spindle, means for feeding the Wire through the spindle, a reciprocatory shaft from which motion is transmitted to the feeding means, means for reciprocating said shaft, and mechanism for controlling the movements of said shaft, comprising a locking-stop and a footlever fulcrumed at the base of the machine and connected to said stop.
  • a spindle means for feeding the Wire through the spindle, a reciprocatory shaft from which motion is transmitted to the feeding means, means for reciprocating said shaft, and mechanism for controlling the movements of said shaft comprising a sliding stop, a verticallyacting Wedge to engage said stop, and a lever connected to said Wedge.
  • spindle means for feeding the wire therethrough, a reciprocatory shaft for operating the wire-feeding means, an arm on said shaft having a roller, and mechanism for controlling said shaft comprising a spring-held sliding stop, a wedge to engage the stop, a connecting-rod, and treadle to operate as described.
  • a reciprocatory toothed feed-lever in combination, a lever for moving the feed-lever in one direction, an arm adjnstably connected to the said lever for moving said feed-lever in the other direction, and two cams for acting on the said levereand the arm connected therewith.
  • a reciprocatory toothed feed-lever in combination, a reciprocatory toothed feed-lever, a two-armed lever for moving the feed-lever positively in each direction, cams for acting on said arms alternately, and means for limiting the degree of movement of the said two-armed lever.
  • a reciprocatory toothed feed-lever in combination, a reciprocatory toothed feed-lever, a two-armed lever for moving the feed-lever positively in each direction, cams for acting on said arms alternately, means for adjusting one of said arms relatively to the other, and an adj ust-- ing-screw for limiting the degree ot' movement of the said two-armed lever.
  • a nailing-machine in combination, a reciprocatory horn, a vibrating lever, and a clutch mechanism having a laterally-movable member for connecting the lever and horn only when the horn is partially depressed.
  • a nailing-machine in combination, a reciprocatory horn, a vibrating lever, a rod connected with the horn and having a rack, a stationary toothed clutch on the lever, and a revoluble clutch in engagement with the rack, said parts being constructed and arranged whereby when the horn is in its inoperative position the two clutches are out of engagement.
  • a reciprocatory horn in combination, a reciprocatory horn, a vibrating lever, a rack connected with the horn, a toothed clutchroll mounted on said lever, a stationary clutch confronting the revoluble clutch, stops on said clutches, and a spring for thrusting the clutches into engagement, said parts being constructed and arranged whereby the horn is not reciprocated when there is no shoe upon it.
  • a nailing-machine in combination, a reciprocatory horn, a vibrating lever, a rack connected with the horn, a treadle for depressing ilie horn, a stationary toothed clutch on the lever, a rotary clutch mounted on the said lever and meshing with the rack, coacting stops carried by said clutches, and a cam for acting on the rotary clutch to throw it out of engagement with the stationary clutch.
  • a nailing-machine in combination, a reciprocatory horn, a vibrating lever, a rack connected with the horn, a toothed clutch-roll j ournaled on said lever, a stationary toothed clutch on said lever, a spring for thrusting said clutches into engagement, coacting stops carried by the said clutches, and a cam for thrusting said clutches out of engagement.
  • a spindle in combination, a spindle, means for feeding the wire through said spindle, mechanism for controlling the said wire-feeding means, a horn, means for depressing said horn, and treadles or footlevers arranged in proximity and one below the other, one treadle connected to the horndepressing means, and the other connected to the Wire-feed Controlling means.

Description

(No Model.) 5 Sheets- Sheet 1.
0.1ASHTON. l MACHINE PoR NAILING soLEs To UPPBRS. No. 602,184. Patented Apr. 12,1898.
A .by l-nmm (t l E '5 i f Y# m0 Modem 5 sheets-sheet 2.
0. ASHTON.
MACHINE EUR NAILING SOLES T'o UPPBRS.'
No. 6`0'2,l14. l Patented Apr. 12, 1898.
7i, M1-1255555 l |NVENTUR:
(No Model.) 5 sheets-sheen 3.
0. ASHTON.. MACHINE FORNAILING SULES T0 UPPERS. v N0.`602,184. 1898.
w ,ff/f AMV A/ D.. a t
W. d v 0 Lf? mm O e Je fop@ f m @Q ya lila. w IL I l Il@ |i l m\\i HHM/d l y Halli m W m m l /HJT ,1 ll 1e m m a W e. e @w L n W/ uw anu...
(No Model.) 5 Sheets-Sheet 4.
0. ASHTON.
MACHINE POR NAILING SOLES TUUPPBRS; No. 602,184. PatentedApr. 12, 1.898.
(No Model) .5 Sheets-Sheet 5.
0, ASHTON.
.MACHINE FOR NAILING SOLES T0 UPPBRS.
No. 602,184. Patented'Apr. 12,1898.
TSJ v NrTED STATES PATENT FFICE.
ORRELL ASHTON, OF LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO JAMES WV. BROOKS, PRINCIPAL TRUSTEE, OF PETERSHAM, AND F. F. STANLEY, ASSOCIATE TRUSTEE, OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.
SPECIFICATION forming pare of Letters Patent No. 602,184, dated April 12, 1898.
Application ined me 24, 1897.'
feed of the wire being automatically regur lated according to the thickness of Athe sole.
The invention consists of a machine provided with certain features of construction and larrangement of parts, such as clearly illustrated upon the accompanying drawings and now to be described in detail, and pointed out in the claims hereto'annexed.
Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters marked thereon,
forming a part of this specification, the same letters designating the same parts or features, as the case may be, wherever they occur.
Of the drawings, Figure 1 represents in side elevation one form of machine which I have selected for the purpose of illustrating an embodiment of the invention. Fig. 2 represents a side elevation of the head of the machine somewhat enlarged. Fig. 3 represents a front elevation of the same. Fig. 4 represents an elevation from the other side of the machine. Fig. 5 represents in vertical longitudinal section the spindle. Fig. 6 represents in detail the work or shoe feed. Fig. 7 shows a section on the line 7 7 of Fig. 5 and represents automatically-operating devices for feeding the wire. Figs. 7L and 7b show in detail a different mounting for the feedrolls. Fig. 8 represents in longitudinal vertical section a portion of the spindle and the mechanism for holding the wire against back thrust. Figs. 9 and IOshow in detail another arrangement 4for preventing the backward movement of the wire. Figs. 11, 12, 13, and 14 show in detail the mechanism which controls the reciprocation of the horn and pre-` 5o vents the horn from being moved when there Serial No. 642,101. (No model.)
is no work between it and the nose or the 'guard-plate. Fig. 15 represents in detail the cams and levers for actuating the shoe or work feeding devices and the mechanism for operating the cutters which sever the wire after it has been fed a sufficient distance into the work. Fig..16 shows in detail the friction devices for the wire-reel. Figs. 17 and 18 illustrate the arrangement of the footlevers and the manner of supporting them.
Before proceeding to describe the machine referred to in the foregoing brief description -of the figures of the drawings I desire to have it understood that that particular machine has been selected by me only for the purpose of illustrating one embodiment of the invention and that I do not limit myself to the particular details of construction thereof, as the invention is capable of being expressed in many different ways, and the parts thereof may be varied as desired to suit particular requirements.
Referring to the drawings, a indicates a standard having a base a' and a head a2, the latter being secured upon the standard by bolts @23 in the ordinary manner. The standard is formed or provided with brackets a3, which provide bearings for the main drivingshaft b, which is mounted therein and which is rotated by a band wheel or pulley, as is usually the case. On its end the shaft has keyed thereto a band-wheel b', from whicha belt h2 passes around idler-pulleys b3 b3, suitably j ournaled in an extension of the head a2, and around a pulley b4 in threaded engagement with the upper end of the spindle c.
A belt-tighte-ner consisting of a lever b5, journaled on the shaft b and having on its end a loose pulley h6, is pressed against the belt b2 by a spring 197, as shown in Fig. 1.
The spindle c, before referred to,is arranged vertically, as it is usual, and is provided with a yoke c to receive a wire-reel c2, from which the wire is fed through a longitudinaly aperture c3, which extends through the spindle, as
shown in Fig. 5, from the yoke to the lower end thereof. The head a2 is formed with a spherical casing a4 to receive the yoke and the wire-reel c2, there being a hinged door a5 to cover an aperture in its face, through which roo access may be had to the rcel to pass the wire through the duct or aperture in the spindle c to the wire-feeding devices.
The wire-reel c2 is formed with a hub w and end iianges w', each of which has an unbroken friction-rim 102, as shown in Fig. 2, and three apertures w3, through which access may be had to the wire to remove the binders therefrom. Through the hub of the reel passes a pin Q04, having an enlarged head 105 and a portion w next to the head, which is formed with a left thread to engage internal threads in the yoke c. The outer end of the pin, which is not shown, is smooth and'non-threaded, the threads w being alone relied upon for holding it in place. Secured to the yoke are friction-shoes w7,bearing against the frictionrims 102 of the reel and drawn toward each other by a spring w8. Thus the rotation of the wire-reel is frictionally retarded to prevent the wire from being drawn from it too rapidly, so as to loop or bend.
To the upper portion of the tubular casing is secured a cap a, having a bearing consisting of a tubular extension a7, which is flared at as. A hard brass bushing a is inserted between the spindle c and the tubular extension, and in the flaring portion of the latter there is a hard-metal ring am, between which and the ring a, upon which the hub of the pulley b4 rests, is placed a series of antifrictioncones am.
In a bearing @33 in the lower portion of the casing a4 is another bushing (L42, through which the spindle passes, so that the spindle is mounted in bearings both above and below the reel, whereby it is held against lateral vibration in case the corrugated or threaded wire is wound unevenly upon the reel.
The head a2 is provided with a third bearing on an arm a, through which the spindle also passes, there being another bushing am arranged between the spindle and the bearing thus afforded, this last-mentioned bearing being relatively near the lower end of the spindle, whereby the latter is held in bearings at its ends and at a point intermediate thereof and is at all times properly centered.
I shall now proceed to describe the devices which feed the wire through the spindle.
In the lower end of the spindle is inserted a throat-piece d, the aperture or throat of which is only large enough to receive the Wire, which ts snugly therein, said throat-piece being held in place by a screw (Z, as shown in Fig. 5. Surrounding the lower end of the spindle is a sleeve d2, having inwardly-projecting guides cl3, secured thereto by screws d4 and projecting into grooves cdin the spindle. Preferably there are three of these guides, although I may use any other number, if desired. The sleeve is provided at its upper end with a shoulder di", between which and a collar (Z6, threaded thereon, is placed a ring CZ7, there being suitable antifriction-cones d8 inserted between the ring and the collar and the shoulder. The ring di is supported in the yoke e on an arm e, secured to a verticallyrcciprocatory shaft e2, as shown in Fig. 2, and which I shall afterward describe. Thus the sleeve is connected with the spindle, so as to turn therewith, but is free to be reci procated longitudinally thereof to feed the wire therethrough by feeding-disks supported by the sleeve.
The spindle and the throat-piece are provided with three longitudinal slots in alinement with the grooves c4, and in each slot there is placed a serrated wire-feed roll f. Each roll is placed in a cavity in a frictionblock f and is provided with studs or gudgeons projecting loosely into enlarged sockets in two bell-crank levers f3 f3, arranged on both sides of the block f. The levers and the block are pivoted upon a screw-pin f4, passed through apertures in the sleeve, such as shown in Figs. 6 and 7, there being a spring f5 for each pair of levers f3 f3, by which the feeding-disks are held in engagement with the wire.
By examining Fig. 5 it will be noticed that the axes of the feed-rolls ff are in-a plane below the plane of the axes of the screw-pins f4, so that, although the rolls will roll over the wire when the sleeve d is being raised, they will tightly wedge or grip the wire between them when the sleeve d2 is moved downward, so as to carry the wire with them through the aperture in the spindle and the throat-piece.
I may dispense with the additional bellcrank levers, if desired, and also with the springs by forming the frictionblocks as shown in Figs. 7"L and 7b and by placing the rolls loosely i-n the cavities therein. In this event the blocks f7 f7 for the rolls are relatively wide and are provided with upwardlyprojecting ends fS f S, which operate as weights by centrifugal action to throw the rolls inward to grip the wire when the roll-carrying sleeve is moved upward.
In order to prevent any backward or upward movement of the Wire when the sleeve d is being raised for the disk to obtain afresh grip prior to feeding the wire down through the spindle, I employ a backstay or locking mechanism for the wire, such as shown in Fig. 8 or in Figs. 9 and l0.
First, referring to Fig. S in connection with Fig. 5, it will be seen that a collar gis secured to the spindle by one or more screws g', and that placed loosely upon the spindle above said collar is a cup or flanged collar g2, having oppositely-arrauged leaf-sprin gs g3. The spindle is formed with a transverse aperture (Z9 to receive two roll-carrying friction-blocks g4 g5, between which are placed rolls g Q7, having serrated edges to engage the wire between them. In this case the rolls gf (/7 are maintained at the same distance apart, but their rotation may be retarded bythe sprn gs g3 g3 bearing against the block g5. By this arrangement the block g5 will yield when the wire is drawn down between the rolls; but as soon as the tension upon the wire ceases the IOO IIO
rolls are immediately locked against rotation by the springs g3 pressing the block g5 upward and the wire is prevented from moving in the slighest degree backward past the disks. The tension of the springs g5 may be increased or diminished by rotating the anged collar g2 about the spindle, as will be readily understood.
In Figs. 9 and 10 another backstay or locking mechanism for the wire is shown in which the toothed or serrated rolls are movable toward and from each other and are held against backward rotation by the engagement of their friction-blocks. Instead of the blocks g1() being divided horizontally, as in Fig. 8, they are divided vertically and each is provided with a socket to receive one ofthe rolls g5 or g7 and also with an aperture gl1 to receive the wire. The springs Q12 are secured to the collar g2, so as to bear inwardly against the friction-blocks, and by this arrangement the rolls allow the wire to be drawn down freely under the draft of the feed-rolls, but operate to prevent any backward movement thereof, except under a powerful draft from above. The pressure of the springs Q12 may be increased or decreased by rotating the collar g2.
The sleeve cl2 on which the feed-disks are mounted is reciprocated by the following devices: The shaft e2, before referred to, which was described as having an arm e with the yoke e to receive the ring (Z7, is mounted in bearings 1,15 a, as shown in Fig. 2, projecting out from the head a2. The shaft is held raised bya strong spring e5, having one end attached to the shaft and the' other end placed over a hook e4, extending out from the casing a4. A sleeve e5 is secured to the shaft e2 by a clamping-bolt e6 and a screw e7 and is provided with a forwardly-projecting arm es, constructed with downwardly and laterally extending arms e9, in which is journaled a roll el". One of the arms e9 is extended, as shown in Fig. 4, and is provided with another roller ell, placed on the' outer face thereof. A horizontal shaft Zt is mounted in bearings a als and is provided with a worm-wheel h', intermeshing with a worm cl2, rigidly secured upon the spindle c. A cam h2 is secured upon the end of the shaft Zt by a collar h5 and is provided with two rises h5 h5, as shown in Fig.'3, and it extends between lips or lugs eiprojecting u pwardly from the arms e9. These lips or lugs operate to center the shaft e2 and to hold the roll e10 in parallelism with the cam h2. Now it will be seen that as the spindle c rotates it transmits power to the shaft h through the worm and worm-wheel 012 Zt, and that, therefore, a complete rotation of the cam h2 causes two reciprocations of the shaft e2 by the rises on the cam engaging the roll @10, mounted on -the sleeve e5.
Itis necessary that the degree of movement given to the shaft c2 and the sleeve d2 should be regulated by the thickness of the sole of the shoe which is being nailed in orderthat aV nail of the proper length should be .screwed into the sole, and hence I provide means for varying the length of feed of the wire, as I shall now describe.
The horn is mounted or secured to a shaft movable in a vertical guideway or bearing 2, supported by the standard or post a, and to the lower end of the shaft t" is secured an v arm 5, which is connected by a connecting-rod 4 with a lever 5, fulcrumed at its center upon a stud 6, extending out from the head a2.. On its end the lever 5 isl formed with a block t'7 to operate as a stop to limit the upward movement of the shaft e2, the arm c on the last-Vv 5 is tilted so that 'the block 7 prevents the shaft e2 from rising; but if the tip of the horn be lowered to receive a sole between it and the said guard-plate Zr the block 7 will be raised a corresponding distance, so that the shaft e2 may be reciprocated through a distance equal to the thickness of the sole. The rises h4 h5 on the cam h2 always force the shaft e2 down to the same point; but the distance traversed by the shaft @2in rising, and therefore by the sleeve (Z2 and the feed-disks, will be only equal to the .distance the tip of the horn has been moved from its normal position by the sole being placed between it and the plate Zt. Therefore when the spindle is rotating and the machine is in operation the nails or screws will be forced into the sole for a distance equalto the thickness of thev sole, and after they have been thus fed they will be cut oif by cutting mechanism -consisting of two cutters Z Z, as shown in'Figs. 5 and l5. Two disks Z2 Z3 are journaled on the stud extending out from the head a5, and in guide- The two disks are provided v IOC yIIO
5. On the end of the lever Z8 is a hard-metal bar or block' Zn, with which two cam-blocks m m on the disk m alternately engage to tilt the lever and operate the knives to cut the wire. The cam-blocks m m maybe made of hardened steel and may be replaced when worn out, being removably mounted-in the cam-disk m and held therein by screw m2. The said cam-disk m is mounted upon the shaft 7L, as shown in Fig. 4.
The parts are so timed that as soon as the feed-disks have reached the lowest limit of their movement, so that the wire has been fed in through the sole of the shoe a proper distance, the cutters ZZ are brought together with an equal movement, and the wire is severed before the sleeve d2 begins to move upward. The guard or work plate 7.: is secured to one of the holders for the knives.
In order to feed the shoes or work laterally, I provide the improved mechanism shown in Figs. 2, 4, 6, and l5. A rack-slide n is mounted in guides below the head a2 and is adapted to be moved in and out by a handle n', clamped on the end of a shaft, on which is mounted a small pinion n2, as shown in dotted lines inFig. 2. By turning the handle the slide may be adjusted to any desired position, but is held from movement, except under considerable pressure, by pins n3 and flat springs n4, which press the pins against the slide at the sides thereof. At its front end the slide is cut away, as shown in Fig. 6, to receive a lever a5, pivoted at n and having segmental ratchet-teeth a7, which are eccentric or in a spiral line with respect to the pivot ai'. The end of the lever is provided with a spherical socket 'a8 to receive the balllike end n of a connecting-rod n10, pivoted to a pin or swivel n, set in the end of a camlever m12, as shown in Fig. 15. The end of the slide n is provided with upwardly-projecting iianges or guards 91,13, (best shown in Fig. 3,) beyond which the teeth of the segmental lever project.
When the shoe is placed upon the horn, the edge of the sole is held against the segment-lever by the operator, so that when said lever is rocked in the direction of the arrow in Fig. G the work will be fed forward, and by reason of the teeth being eccentric the work will be released as the teeth move backward, as will be readily understood. The lever w12 is provided with an elongated hub 72,14 and is fulcrumed on a sleeve 0, supported in a bearing al, afforded by a bracket extending out from the head a2. The free end of the lever 71.12 is provided with a roll w15, bearing against a cam p, secured upon the shaft h, and is also provided with a bunter or adjustable screw nl, which is arranged to strike against the bearings als and limit the inward movement of the said upper end of the lever n.12. Upon the hub n of the lever n@ is clamped an arm nl?, having a roll als, bearing against a cam p' on the shaft h, the cams p p' being placed on both sides of the cam-disk m', before referred to. The said I find it desirable to employ this positive mechanism for returning the segment-lever to its normal position after having fed the work forward, for the reason that unless a mechanism of this kind be employed in lieu of a spring the segment-lever will sometimes remain in engagement with the work and will not return at the end of a stroke.
When the work is being fed forward, the horn is depressed and the sleeve in which the wire-feed rolls are mounted is at rest, so that the work is free; but when the workfeed lever is returned to its normal position after having fed the work forward the work is clamped against the guard k by the horn, so that thc said lever is free to return without it.
The movement of the feed-lever may be varied to regulate the distance between the nails in the sole by adjusting the bunterscrew which limits the rearward movement of the said lever and adjusting the arm n around the hub n of the lever w12, so that when it is forced outward to its greatest eX- tent by a rise on the cam p the bunter will be against the bearing als.
I provide for automatically raising and lowering the horn to grip or release the shoe or work by the following devices: Upon the shaft h is placed a path-cam Q, which extends through an aperture in the head a2 and which is formed with its groove to receive a roller on the endof a forked lever Q/, journaled on a stud-shaft Q2, extending through a bearing @21, formed in the head, as shown in Figs. 2 and l1. In the end of the lever Q" is journaled a toothed wheel o, having an axiallyarranged stop-bar r and formed in one face with clutch-teeth r2, so that the said wheel constitutes one member of a clutch. A stationary sleeve r3 is threaded into the `arm Q4 of the forked lever Q and is likewise formed with clutch-teeth r4, so as to constitute a stationary member of a clutch with which the movable rotatable clutch may be engaged. Passing through the said sleeve r3 is an axially-movable stndshaftr5, rigidly connected to the clutch-wheel r, and which when moved acts to disengage it from the stationary clutch member, and which also has a conical head T7.
A spring rs is arranged in a socket in the opposite arm Q5 of the forked lever Q and operates to normally hold the two members of the clutch together, whereby the clutch member r is prevented from rotating in one direction, but is free to slip over the teeth of the stationary member in the other directionthat is, the direction of the arrow in Fig. 13. In the said arm Q4 of the lever Q is secured an adjustable stop r, against the end of which the end of the stop bar or block r' may engage to hold the two clutch members apart.
Normally-z'. e., when there is no work inthe machinethe two stops are in alinement and contact with each other. A roll r1@ is journaled upon a stud r11, extending between the two arms Q4 Q5 of the shaft Q', and operates to hold a rack sin engagement or in mesh ICO IIO
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with the toothed clutch member T. The said rack s is threaded upon the end of a rod s', whose lower end is pivoted to the end of a lever s2, fulcrumed upon the pivot pin or stud 5 j* and having its other end connected to the extension j' of the shaft i', before referred to. A foot-lever s3 is connected to the studj4, so that by depressing the said lever the horn may be lowered for the insertion of work between it and the guard 7c below the spindle. When the horn is so lowered, the connectingrod s is raised slightly, as will be readily seen, which it is free to do, since the clutch T is always at liberty to rotate in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 13.
A stationary cam t is mounted in a bracket t on the head a2 and engages the conical end T7 of the stud-shaft T5 when the lever q is in its lowest position to thrust the said lshaft longitudinally and disengage the clutch member T from the clutch member T3, whereby the said member T is free to be revolved i either direction.` A Y When there is no work in the machine, the stops T' and T9 are in alinement and in contact and the clutches are held apart, so that the reciprocation of the lever q does not affect the clutch T, as the face of the stop T9 slides against the face of the stop T', which is elongated for this purpose.
Upon the treadle s3 being depressed and a shoe being placed on the horn the rack s is lifted and partially rotates the clutch T and throws the said stops out of alinement and contact, as shown' in Fig. I3, whereupon the spring T8 causes the engagement of the clutches. So long, therefore, as the shoe remains upon the horn the clutches will be locked together (except during those instants when the end of the shaft T5 is in engagement with the cam t) and the lever q will reciprocate the horn, during which period the work will be fed forward at each depression of said horn. Hence although when the machine is in operation the lever q' is continuously reciprocated, yet the horn remains quiescent except when there is a shoe upon it. In this way I am enabled to avoid a wastage of power and to greatly prolong the life of the machine, as will be readily appreciated.
I am aware that it is not broadly novel to automatically stop the' reciprocation of the horn when there is novshoe upon it but the mechanism above described is more efficient in operation than any heretofore used and is a feature of the present invention. Prior to this time a pawl and ratchet have been employed for holding the toothed wheel stationaryg'but they were faulty because of the entire strain being borne by a single tooth with which the pawl engaged, whereas I provide'confronting clutches provided with a large number of radial teeth which engage simultaneously as the clutches are brought together, so that the strain is borne by all of them. In addition to-these features I also provide mechanism' foi1 preventing a reciprocation of the sleeve4 Referring to Figs. 1 and 4, it will be seen that a slide a is mounted in a guideway extending out from the lower part of the bearing-arm a and is provided with a rod or extension u', which extends through the sleeve o, before referred to, and is normally held forward by a spring u2. On the end-the rod u' is provided with a collar a3, having its face beveled o or wedge-shaped in longitudinal section. A rod o, sliding in a bearing o', is connected at its lower end to a foot-lever o2, fulcrumed in ears in the base of the standard a, and has its upper end forked and wedgeshaped, as at v3, so that when the foot-lever is depressed the rod is -forced upward and its upper end engages the collar w3 and moves the locking-slide u longitudinally into `its guide. The sleeve e5, which, as before stated, is secured upon the vertically-reciprocating shaft e2 and is provided with the roll en, is so arranged with relation to the locking-bar u that when the bar u is Withdrawn the roll e slides upand down in front of the end thereof, and when the said shaft e2 is in its lowest position the roll en is directly beneath the locking-bar u. Hence the said shaft e2 is free to be reciprocated so long as the operator keeps his foot upon the treadle or foot-lever o2, but when the foot is removed and the rod 'U drops the spring u2 throws the locking bar or stop u outward to engage the roll e', since-l the cam h2 forces the roll el@ down far enough, as shown in Fig. 4. The locking bar or stop u holds the shaft e2 and the sleeve d2 against movement so long as the treadle o2 remains undepressed. Thus 'the feeding mechanism is under the direct control of the operator, as he may stop the action of the said feeding mechanism after each reciprocation thereof, if he so desires.
It will be observed that the treadle o2 is located beside and just below the horn-operating treadle s3, so that immediately after the horn has been depressed he may shift or drop his foot fromv the treadle s3 to the treadle r2. The latter is located near the ground, so that the operator may stand with his foot upon it during the operation of nailing a shoe without experiencing any discomfort therefrom.
The operation of the machine is as follows: The parts being in the position shown in Fig. lfthe operator placing his foot upon the treadle s3 depresses it and lowers the horn sufficiently to place a shoe upon it'. The shoe is arranged with the heel to the left and with the edge of the sole bearing against the segmental feed-lever m5. As the horn is being lowered the rod s' and the rack s on the upper end thereof are free to move relatively to the lever q', as the teethof the clutchl T will slide over the teeth of the stationary clutch, as has been previously explained. When the foot is removed from the treadle s?, the spring IOO IOS
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j elevates the horn and causes itto press the sole of the shoe against the guard or work plate 7a, the thickness of the sole preventing the horn from returning` to its original position. rlhe clutch member r is at this time partially rotated, as shown in Fig. 13, so as to bring the stop r out of alinement with the stop-bar r9, as shown in Fig. 13, whereby the subsequent reciprocation of the said lever q will cause the rod s to be moved up and down with it, since the two clutch members will be engaged by the spring rs each time the shaft T5 leaves the cam Hence so long as the shoe remains upon the horn the latter willbe reciprocated by the said lever q. The depression of the horn by the sole shifted the lever 115, so that the block 7 now permits the shaft e2 to be raised a distance equal to the thickness of the sole'. Then the operator, placing his foot upon the treadle '02, withdraws the locking bar or stop u and permits the shaft e2 to rise until the roller 8 engages the block 7. Then as the cam h2 revolves one of its rises engages the roll el@ and depresses it, forcing down the shaft c2 a distance equal to the thickness of the sole. As the said shaft e2 begins to descend it carries with it the sleeve d2, and upon the first motion of the sleeve the wire-feeding rolls engage the wire, so that as the sleeve continues to descend the wire is carried slowly down, and the spindle being rotated a relatively high rate of speed the nail is screwed into the sole of the shoe. Immediately upon the said sleeve cl2 reaching the lowest limit of its movement one of the cam projections m on the camdisk m strikes the lever ZS and causes the cutters to be moved together with an equal movement to sever the wire fiush with the surface of the sole. Then as the sleeve d2 rises the horn is depressed by the said lever q', the rack s, the rod s', and the lever s2, whereupon the lever 71.12 is operated by the cam QJ to swing the segment work-feeding lever a5 in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 6 to feed the work forward. During this time the backstay prevents the wire from rising. After the work has thus been moved forward the horn is again raised and another nail is screwed in to the sole by a similar cycle of operations.
From the foregoing it will be observed that I have provided a machine which though possessing a minimum of parts operates to nail a shoe in a thorough and efficient way.
The wire is fed positively into the shoe by a mechanism which grips it firmly, and it is prevented from moving backward when the feed-rolls are being carried upward to again grip the wire. By employing feeding-rolls such as I have shown in Figs. 5, 7, and '7" and arranging them to grip the wire between them I am enabled to force the wire down positively and to prevent it from slipping.
The feed-rolls roll easily over the wire when their supporting-sleeve (Pis being raised; but immediately upon the sleeve being lowered `means for holding the reel in the yoke.
employing machines of this class the dislocathey automatically move inward to engage the wire. By forming the gripping devices in the shape of rolls the teeth of the latter remain sharp for a greater length of time than they would if said devices were in the nature of non-revoluble toothed plates or dogs. i
Again, by reason of the rolls being continuously engaged with the wire (and the wire being held against backward movement and being frictionally held against downward movement) the rolls gripit immediately upon their being moved downward to the slightest degree, and hence there is no lost motion of any of the parts, and, moreover, the rolls grip the wire positively and powerfully, although they do not deface or injure it in any way, which, it will bereeognized, is of considerable importance.
Upon examining Fig. 5 it will be noticed that by employing this feeding mechanism for the wire I am enabled to employ a very simple form of spindle. The throat is set into the spindle almost its entire length and is cylindrical in shape, with longitudinal slots to permit movement of the feeding rolls. Thus it may be easily constructed and costs little when compared with the throat-pieces necessary in other machines of this class.
The mechanism for holding back or cheeking the backward movement of the wires is very simple; but it operates in a highly-efficient manner, since it immediately locks the wire as soon as the downward tension thereupon ceases.
Another feature of this invention is tlIie tion of the reel frequently causes severe injury to the machine and endangers the life and limb of the operator, and hence where a nutted bolt is employed the liability of the operator forgetting to screw the nut in place is a constant source of danger. I employ, as before described, a pin having at the head end left-hand threads, whereby when it is screwed into the yoke there is no danger of its working loose and whereby it must be secured in place before the reel can be used.
There are other important features of the invention, which I have hereinbefore described and to which I need not again refer.
Having thus explained the nature of the invention and described a way of constructing and using the same,though without attempt ing to set forth all of the forms in which it may be made, I declare that what I claim isl. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotaryspindle, and means for feeding the wire therethrough comprising loosely mounted rolls arranged to roll over the wire when moved in one'direction and to grip it between them when moved in the other direction.
2. In a nailing-machine in combination, a rota-ry spindle, and means for feeding a threaded wire therethrough comprising oppositely-arranged loosely-mounted toothed rc lls IOS IIO
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arranged to roll over the Wire when moved in one direction and to grip it when moved in the other direction, and means for supporting and reciprocating said rolls.
3. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feeding the Wire therethrough consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable With the spindle, serrated rolls, and means for supporting said rolls on said sleeve, said means being constructed and arranged to permit the rolls to pass over the Wire When moved in one direction, and to positively grip and feed the Wire when moved in the other direction.
4. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feedingthe Wire therethrough consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable With the spindle, a series of coacting serrated rolls, and friction-blocks for said rolls, supported by the sleeve.
5. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feeding the wire therethrough, consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable with the spindle, a series of loose serrated Wire-feeding rolls, and a friction-block for each roll pivoted on the said sleeve.-
6. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feeding the Wire therethrough, consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable with the spindle, a series of loose serrated Wire-feeding rolls, and a friction-block for each roll pivoted on the said sleeve, the axes of movement of the frictionblocks being out of the plane of the axes of the rolls.
7. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feeding the wire therethrough, consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable with the spindle, a series of loose serrated Wire-feeding rolls, a frictionblock for each roll pivoted on the said sleeve, and springs for thrusting the rolls into engagement with the wire.
8. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle, and means for feeding the Wire therethrough, consisting of a reciprocatory sleeve rotatable With the spindle, a series of loose serrated Wire-feeding rolls, a frictionblock for each roll pivoted on the said sleeve, and spring-held means for thrusting the rolls into engagement With the wire.
9. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle, means for feeding the Wire therethrough, and means for checking a backward movement of the Wire comprising springpressed serrated rollers.
10. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle, means for feeding the wire therethrough, and means for checkingaback- Ward movement of the Wire comprising serrated rollers and friction blocks for said rollers.
11. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle, means for feeding the Wire therethrough, and means for checking a backward movement of the Wire comprising ser- .rated rollers and spring-pressed friction- 13.- In a nailing-machine, in combination, a
rotary spindle having a through -aperture, friction-blocks inserted in said aperture, coacting serrated rolls supported by the blocks, a collar on said spindle, and springs supported by said collar and bearing against the friction-blocks.
14. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle having an aperture in its lower end, a cylindrical throat-piece inserted in said spindle and having a projecting end, a reciprocatory sleeve, and feeding-rolls supported by said sleeve and projecting through slots in the throat-piece and spindle to grip the Wire.
15. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a spindle, means for feeding Wire therethrough, a roll supported by the spindle, and having friction-rims, spring-pressed friction brakeshoes bearing against said friction-rims to retard the rotation of the reel and a spring connecting said shoes.
16. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a spindle, means for feeding Wire therethrough,
a yoke connected With the spindle, a Wirereel supported in the yoke, and a journal-pin headed at one end and threaded at said end to engage the yoke.
17 In a nailing-machine, in combination, a rotary spindle, a reciprocatory sleeve having means for feeding the Wire through the spindle, a transversely-arranged rotary shaft having a cam, a reciprocatory shaft arranged parallel to the spindle, an arm carried by said reciprocatory shaft and having cheeks or lugs embracing said cam, a roller on said arm, and means for connecting said reciprocatory shaft with said sleeve.'
18. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a spindle, means for feeding the Wire through the spindle, a reciprocatory shaft from which motion is transmitted to the feeding means, means for reciprocating said shaft, and mechanism for controlling the movements of said shaft, comprising a locking-stop and a footlever fulcrumed at the base of the machine and connected to said stop.
19. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a spindle, means for feeding the Wire through the spindle, a reciprocatory shaft from which motion is transmitted to the feeding means, means for reciprocating said shaft, and mechanism for controlling the movements of said shaft comprising a sliding stop, a verticallyacting Wedge to engage said stop, and a lever connected to said Wedge.
20. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a
IOO
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spindle, means for feeding the wire therethrough, a reciprocatory shaft for operating the wire-feeding means, an arm on said shaft having a roller, and mechanism for controlling said shaft comprisinga spring-held sliding stop, a wedge to engage the stop, a connecting-rod, and treadle to operate as described.
21. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a reciprocatory toothed feed-lever, a lever for moving the feed-lever in one direction, an arm adjnstably connected to the said lever for moving said feed-lever in the other direction, and two cams for acting on the said levereand the arm connected therewith.
22. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a reciprocatory toothed feed-lever, a two-armed lever for moving the feed-lever positively in each direction, cams for acting on said arms alternately, and means for limiting the degree of movement of the said two-armed lever.
23. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a reciprocatory toothed feed-lever, a two-armed lever for moving the feed-lever positively in each direction, cams for acting on said arms alternately, means for adjusting one of said arms relatively to the other, and an adj ust-- ing-screw for limiting the degree ot' movement of the said two-armed lever.
24. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a reciprocatory horn, a vibrating lever, and a clutch mechanism having a laterally-movable member for connecting the lever and horn only when the horn is partially depressed.
25. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a reciprocatory horn, a vibrating lever, a rod connected with the horn and having a rack, a stationary toothed clutch on the lever, and a revoluble clutch in engagement with the rack, said parts being constructed and arranged whereby when the horn is in its inoperative position the two clutches are out of engagement.
26. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a reciprocatory horn, a vibrating lever, a rack connected with the horn, a toothed clutchroll mounted on said lever, a stationary clutch confronting the revoluble clutch, stops on said clutches, and a spring for thrusting the clutches into engagement, said parts being constructed and arranged whereby the horn is not reciprocated when there is no shoe upon it.
27. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a reciprocatory horn, a vibrating lever, a rack connected with the horn, a treadle for depressing ilie horn, a stationary toothed clutch on the lever, a rotary clutch mounted on the said lever and meshing with the rack, coacting stops carried by said clutches, and a cam for acting on the rotary clutch to throw it out of engagement with the stationary clutch.
28. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a reciprocatory horn, a vibrating lever, a rack connected with the horn, a toothed clutch-roll j ournaled on said lever, a stationary toothed clutch on said lever, a spring for thrusting said clutches into engagement, coacting stops carried by the said clutches, and a cam for thrusting said clutches out of engagement.
29. In a nailing-machine, in combination, a spindle, means for feeding the wire through said spindle, mechanism for controlling the said wire-feeding means, a horn, means for depressing said horn, and treadles or footlevers arranged in proximity and one below the other, one treadle connected to the horndepressing means, and the other connected to the Wire-feed Controlling means.
In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification, in the presence of two subscribing witnesses, this 19th day of June, A. D. 1897.
ORRELL ASHTON. Witnesses:
M. B. MAY, C. F. BROWN.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1921451A2 (en) 2001-05-22 2008-05-14 Cygene, Inc. Complement mediated assays for in vivo and in vitro methods

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1921451A2 (en) 2001-05-22 2008-05-14 Cygene, Inc. Complement mediated assays for in vivo and in vitro methods

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