US587828A - District - Google Patents

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US587828A
US587828A US587828DA US587828A US 587828 A US587828 A US 587828A US 587828D A US587828D A US 587828DA US 587828 A US587828 A US 587828A
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tucking
belt
tube
tobacco
cigarette
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24CMACHINES FOR MAKING CIGARS OR CIGARETTES
    • A24C5/00Making cigarettes; Making tipping materials for, or attaching filters or mouthpieces to, cigars or cigarettes
    • A24C5/52Incorporating filters or mouthpieces into a cigarette rod or a tobacco rod

Description

(No Model.) 9 Sheets-Sheet 1-.
W. A.-HUDS0N & J. P. HARTIGAN. CONTINUOUS CIGARETTE MACHINE.
Patenteg Au (No Model.) 9 Sheets-Sheet 2. W. A. HUDSON 82; J. P. HARTIGAN. CONTINUOUS CIGARETTE MACHINE.
Pa. ented Au .Jll w m tk (No Model.) '9 Sheets-Sheet 3.
W. A. HUDSON 81; J. P. HARTIGAN.
w m M 1 k .1 0 m w m :S m
CONTINUOUS CIGARETTE MAOHINEi w m. w
m, vusumumu n c (No Model.) Sheets-Sheet 4. W. A. HUDSON & J. P. HARTIGAN. CONTINUOUS CIGARETTE MACHINE.
m E g====== a M m E Patented Aug. 10 1897.
(No Model.) 9 Sheets-Sheet 5.
W. A. HUDSON & J. P. HARTIGAN.
GONTINUDUS CIGARETTE MACHINE.
No. 587,828. Patented Aug. 10,1897.
W iine's sea 9 Sheets--Sheet 6.
(No Model.)
W. A. HUDSON & J. I. HARTIGAN. GONTINUOUS CIGARETTE MACHINE. No. 587,828. Patented Aug. 10,1897.
(No Model.) 9 Sheets-Sheet 7.
W. A. HUDSON 827 J. F. HARTIGAN.
CONTINUOUS CIGARETTE MAGHINE.
Patened Aug. 10,1897.
I RN
lllllllllll IIIV'IIII"! (No Model.) 9 Sheets-Sheet 8.
W. A. HUDSON & J. P. HARTIGAN. GONTIN'UOUS'GIGARETTE MACHINE.
No. 587,828. Patented Aug. 10,1897.
L n, if N 9 Sheets-Sheet 9. H
W. A. HUDSON & J. P. HARTIGAN. CONTINUOUS CIGARETTE MACHINE.
No. 587,828. Patented Aug- 10, 1897.
(No Model.)
UNITED STATES PATENT Orrro \VILLIAM A. HUDSON AND JOSEPH F. HARTIGAN, OF \VASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
CONTINUOUS-CIGARETTE MACHINE.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 587,828, dated August 10, 1897.
Application filed January 10,1896. Renewed December 22, 1896. Serial No. 616,683. (No model.)
To aZl whmn it 7mm, concern.
Be it known that we, WILLIAM A. HUDSON and JOSEPH F. HARTIGAN, citizens of the United States, residing at Washington, in the. District of Columbia, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Continuous- Cigarette Machines; and we do hereby de-' clare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.
Our invention consists in the novel features of construction and combination of parts hereinafter described, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, which illustrate one form in which we have contemplated embodying our invention and several slight modifications of parts hereof, and said invention is fully disclosed in the following description and claims.
Referring to the said drawings, Figure 1 represents a left side elevation of a cigarettelnachine embodying our invention, a portion of the machine being broken away. Fig. 2 represents a right side elevation of the same. Fig. 3 represents a top plan view of the machine, portions being broken away and the hopper being removed, but its position indicated by dotted lines. Fig. at representsacentral longitudinal vertical section of the machine. Fig. 5 represents a transverse sectional view on line 5 5 of Fig. 4. Fig. 6 represents a front end view of a portion of the machine, showing the tucking-tube and the upper and lower tucking-fingers. Figs. 7 and 8 are detail sectional views showing the tucker-tube and illustrating the action of the lower and upper tuckin g-fin gers,respectivel y, in tucking a cigarette. Fig. 9 is a detail View of aform of pastin g mechanism adapted for use in ourixnproved machine. Fig. 10 represents a vertical transverse section of the machine through the tobacco-hopper, showing one form of mechanism for feeding the desired quantity of tobacco. Fig. 11 represents a longitudinal vertical section of a machine, showing a modified form of forming and carrying belt and its adjuncts, the other parts of the machine being the same as in the preceding figures. Fig. 12 is a top plan view of a slightly-modified machine, showing the cutter located in a different position and a slightly difl'erent form of tucking-tube. Fig. 13 is a vertical longitudinal sectional View of the same. Fig. 14
is a transverse sectional view of the same. Fig. 15 represents a sectional view of a slightlymodified form of feeding device for feeding determinate quantities of granulated tobacco. Fig. 16 is a detail View of a part of the same. Fig. 17 represents a sectional View of a feeding device for longcut orleaf tobacco. Fig.
18 is a'detail view of the tobacco-knife forming part of the same. Fig. 19 is a detail perspective View of the slotted belt.
Our inventidn is an improvement on the machine described and claimed in the prior application for Letters Patent of the United States filed by William A. Hudson, one of the inventors herein, dated June 11, 1895, and given Serial No. 552,388, and we do not therefore claim herein any of the subject-matter covered by the claims in the said prior application. 7
In the drawings, A represents the main frame of the machine, which consists in this instance of two parallel side pieces adapted to be supported upon a suitable table or support and held at a short distance apart to allow portions of the machine to be placed between them. Upon the upper faces of these side pieces we have shown suitable guides a,- adapted to engage and support a dovetailedslide on the bottom'of a longitudinally-movable carriage B,which extends in this instance the entire length of the main frame,although this is not essential.
The side pieces I) b of the sliding carriage B are secured together by suitable braces, in this instance brackets or hangers b b, which also serve to support the stem-forming tube O, which is held thereby, said hangers being removably secured to said side pieces I) b so as to be removable from the sliding carriage when desired. This forming-tube C is cut open at its rear end and is flattened, as shown 9 5 at c, and is provided adjacent to the flattened portion with gradually-inclined sides leading up to the cylindrical portion of the tube. Adjacent to the said cylindrical portion one side, or'edge of the'tube is provided with a folding- 10o lip c and a curved slot 0 adjacent thereto, by means of which one edge of the paper wrapper will be folded over the other in a vwell-known way.
D represents the endless stem-formin g belt, the upper portion of which extends through a portion of the forming-tube C, leaving it by means of a suitable aperture 0 adjacent to its forward end, the said tube being pro vided with a flaring guiding-flange c adjacent to said aperture, to guide the belt as it leaves the tube. This belt is supported upon an idle-roller E, preferably grooved, the shaft,
of which is mounted int-he main frame adjacent to the rear end of the machine, and a driving-roller E (also preferably grooved) on the driving-shaft F of the machine, (also mounted in bearings in the main frame,) by means of which the belt is driven continuously at the desired speed. The shaft of the idle-roller E is provided, preferably, with a suitable belt-tightenin g device E '(see Figs. 1 2, and 3) of any usual or desired construction. We also provide a device (shown in Fig. at) for preventing the slipping of the belt on the driving-roller E. Thisconsists in this instance of a friction-roller g, supported in the end of a pivoted lever G, thelower end of which is provided with a screw-threaded adjusting device g for regulating the pressure I of the roller upon said belt.
. the vertical standard H, and thereby trans mitting rapid rotary motion to the knife or cutter as the knife-carrying frame is moved up and down. In this instance we have shown a knife-operating shaft I, mounted in the main frame forward of the driving-shaft and provided with pinions i t', which engage gears ff on said driving-shaft. Thepinions t- 1 are also provided with cran k-pins z" 2', connected by links-0L i with a cross-bar. i secured to the upper end of the knife-carrying frame, thus raising and lowering the frame and operating the knife or cutter.
The tube 0 is separated slight-1y just beneath the knife to allow the knife to pass through the stem and tube in severing the stem into individual cigarettes, as is clearly shown in Fig. 4.
Forward of the knife or cutter the movable carriage is provided with the tucking devices for tucking the ends of the individual cigarettes. These devices consist of the upper tucking fingers J J mounted on transversely-extending shafts K K respectively, and the lower tucking-fingers-J J mounted on the shafts K K, supported in thecarriage below shafts K K respectively; The uppertucker shafts K K are provided with intermeshing gears k W, (see Fig. 2,) Whichinsure the simultaneous'operation of the upper tucking-fingers in opposite directions. Thelowertucker shafts K K are provided with similar intermeshing gears 10 k, which are conveniently located on the side of the machine opposite the gears k (see Fig. 1) and which cause said shafts to rotate in opposite directions.
An operating-lever L is mounted pivotally upon the shaft K and is connected by a link I with an arm L, rigidly connected with the shaft K for moving the upper tucking-fingers,
and the said operating-lever is also provided with a downwardly-extending arm l, adapted to be engaged by the operating means hereinafter described. A spring 1 connected to the link Z and to a part of the knife-support.-
in g standard,serves to return the tucking-fin gers to their normal positions after operat' by drawing the arm L against a suitable bu fer on the standard; but other means can be substituted to accomplish thev same result.
The shaft K is provided with an operating! I, (see Fig. 2,) which revolves in the direc- The zoo knife-operatin g shaft 1 is, provided with a cam tion indicated by the arrow in Fig. 2 andfirst strikes the lever L thereby operating the lower tucking-fingers, forcing them intotho opposite ends of a severed cigarette, as indicated in Fig. 7, after which the spring I restores them to their normal position. The cam in its further movement then strikes the. lower arm Z of the lever L, and thus operates.
and L is such that the movement of thecarriage B, carrying with it the tucking devices, does not affect the proper operation of the parts.
no the upper tucking-fingers,which complete the tucking of the cigarette, as indicated in Fig.8. The relation of the cam I and the levers L When the tucking-fingers tuck the ends of r the cigarette, the tobacco in the wrapper is pushed back from the ends and slightly compressed, thereby oifering a compact body against which the paper is pressed by the tucking-fingers and assisting in the crimping This carriage is givenafor ward movement with the belt at the same rate of speed and a rearward movement at the same speed, the distance it moves in each direction being substantially equal to onehalf the length of a cigarette before it is tucked. This movement may be effected in any desired way. In this instance we have shown one of the pinions 'i on the knife-operating shaft (see Figs. 1 and 3) provided with a crank-pin connected by a pitmanmod 1 the forward end of which is connected pivotally with a bracket 1 connected with the carriage. By this means (the parts being properly timed) the carriage will move forward with the cigarette-stem and at the same rate of speed during the operation of the cutter and of the tucking devices, after which it moves rearwardly. In moving rearwardly half the length of a cigarette the belt moving continuously all the time will have carried the stem forward full length of a cigarette, so that the operations of cutting and tucking will be repeated on the next forward movement of the carriage. In this manner the cutting and tucking operations will not interrupt the progress of the cigarette-stem and will not bruise or buoklc the cigarettes or the wrappers thereof.
The paper will preferably be drawn from a roll N, supported by brackets at the rear end of the machine and provided with a suitable tension device, as indicated at n.
In feeding granulated tobacco we use a hopper O, of any usual or preferred form, secured to the main frame of the machine and having a narrowed vertical discharge-passage 0, located above the paper and belt and forward of the rear belt-roller E, and we prefer to provide the said hopper with a mechanism for feeding a measured quantity of tobacco. In Figs. 1, 2, 4, and 10 we have shown one form of measuring device which we contemplate using. In these figures, 0 0 represent horizontal slides mounted in grooved guides 0 secured tot-he exterior of the hopper, said slides being adapted to be forced alternately into the interior of the delivery-passage 0 through slots in the opposite sides. These slides are arranged in different horizontal planes, the space within said passage 0 between the slides containing the quantity of tobacco which it is desired to feed.
In the lower part of the main frame below the roller E is a transversely-sliding bar 0, which moves in guiding-slots in the frame and has a yoke 0 which is engaged by acam P on a longitudinally-extending shaft P, driven in this instance by a belt from the shaft of belt-roller E. The ends of the transverse slide-bar O are connected by levers O O with the slides 0 0 said levers being fulcrumed in brackets secured to the main frame of the machine. The operation of the slides will be understood from Fig. 10. Then the slide-bar O is in the position shown in that figure, the tobacco is permitted to fall down upon the lower slide. When the slide-bar O is shifted by the cam to its opposite position,
the upper slide will be pushed in to cut ofi the supply of tobacco and the lower slide will be withdrawn to permit the amountof tobacco between the two slides to fall upon the paper. In order to prevent clogging of the hopper, we prefer to employ a stirrer 0 (see Figs. 10 and 4,) which is driven by a belt from the shaft of belt-roller E, as shown.
It will be seen that the successive charges of tobacco will be deposited upon the paper end to end, so as to form a continuous filler.
In some instances we may desire to paste the paper wrapper as it passes through the stem-forming tube, and in Fig. 9 we have shown a form of pasting mechanism which is advantageously employed in this connection.
In such case the stem-forming tube is slotted for a short distance, as shown at Q in dotted lines, Fig. 3, to allow the paste-wheel to engage one edge of the continuous wrapper.
As shown in Fig. 9, Q represents a pastereceptacle having a tapered spout, the end of which is closed by a horizontal roll q on a 0 vertical shaft q. The paste-roller Q is vertical and is supported on a horizontal shaft (1 in position to properly engage the paper through the slot Q. The shaft g is driven by means of the pulley g in any desired way, 5 and the vertical shaft g is driven by a belt or cord from the shaft g as shown. The small roller q will take the paste from the spout of the receptacle Q and will distribute it upon the surface of the paste-roller, adja- 10o cent to the periphery of the same, thereby securing an even feed of the paste and also grinding it and smoothing it, so as to remove lumps and put it into the best condition to be transferred to the paper.
In Figs. 11 and 19 we have shown a slightmodification of our invention in which the elements are the same as in the machine just described except that the carrying-belt is of peculiar construction and extends entirely through the tube past the tucking mechanism to the front of the machine, where it passes over a driving-roller R on a shaft R, which is driven from the driving-shaft of the machine by means of sprocket-gearing, as in- 1 15 dicated in dotted lines. Just beneath the cutter the belt makes a dip, leaving the tube, passing beneath a guide rod or roller 4", and entering the tube again beyond the knife. This construction prevents the knife from cutting the belt when it severs the continuous cigarette-stem.- The belt S is provided at suitable intervals with longitudinal slots or apertures s, which are provided for the purpose of allowing the lower tucking-fingers 1 2 5 to pass up through the belt to tuck the cigarettes, as clearly appears in Fig. 11. These apertures are formed in any desired Way and are arranged at the required intervals throughout the length of the belt. This'con- 13o struction is found to be very advantageous, as the belt positively carries the cigarette through the entire length of the tube instead of having the severed cigarettes pushed out adjacent to the tucking mechanism, so that by the moving continuous stem, as in the construction first described. This perforated belt, however, is not claimed herein, it being included in the subject-matter of another application, filed by WVilliam A. Hudson, dated January 10, 1896, and given Serial No. 574,972.
In both of the constructions previously described it will be seen that at all times during the operation of the machine there are two severed cigarettes in the tube which must be moved onward, one in the tucking devices and another between said devices and the cutter. In order to avoid this efiect and have only one severed I cigarette in the tube, we sometimes employ the construction illustrated in Figs. 12, 13, and 14. In these figures the knife-standard, cutter, and cutteroperating devices are of the same construction, except that they are turned around so that the knife is on the side of the standard as soon as a cigarette is severed it is cut OE and the intermediate cigarette, which exists in the form of machine previously described, is done away with. In order to secure the proper operation of the parts, the tuckingtube T is made separate from the main tube and is mounted to reciprocate longitudinally in guides t t, secured to the inner sides of the sliding carriage which carries the tube and cutting mechanism. Above the tuckers is a vertically-disposed operating-lever t, pivoted at t to a suitable support and pivotally connected to the tucking-tube T. The upper end of lever t is slotted, as shown, and is engaged by a pin on an arm i rigidly secured to the vertically moving knife carrying frame. WVhen the knife descends and severs a cigarette from the continuous stem in the usual manner, it will leave the severed cigarette in the tucking-tube, but not in proper relation with the tuckers. The knife-frame, however, instantly rises and the arm 2?, acting on lever t, moves the tucker-tube forward in the direction of the arrow, Fig. 13,
so as to carry it past the rear tucking-fingers,
and thus places it in exactly the proper position with respect to the tucking-fingers before they are operated. It will be understood that the carriage has in this instance the same reciprocating movement previously described and the movements of the tucking-tube are with respect to said carriage.
In Figs. 15 and 16 we have shown a tobacco feeding and measuring device which is a slight modification of that shown in Fig-., 10. In these figures, U represents the hopper, having the contracted delivery-passage. u, u, and a represent a pair of semicylindrical cups, each of which is rigidly secured to a rock-shaft a mounted in brackets on the exterior of said passage to in such a manner that when the cups are rocked upwardly their lower opposing edges overlap and their upper edges separate or open and when rocked downwardly do the reverse. In this manner the cups can be alternately filled and emptied by rocking them simultaneously upwardly and then downwardly, thereby delivering a charge of tobacco upon the paper and belt beneath. To secure a simultaneousmovement of these cups, the rock-shafts 103 10 are provided with intermeshing gears or gearsegments 10 M, as shown, and one of said gears or segments is provided with an operating-arm, which in this instance is engaged have shown one of the cups to a provided with a rake a, which agitates the tobacco above the cups and prevents clogging. In order to prevent the tobacco from dropping in rear of said cups, we provide strips 10 u", of canvas or other flexible material, secured to the upper edges of the cups and to the sides of the passage to.
In Figs. 17 and 18 we have shown another slightly-modified form of feeding mechanism which is intended for use in feeding longcut or fibrous tobacco or for feeding leaftobacco and cutting it into long cut as it is fed to the paper. In these figures, V repre- The slot a in the bar The sents the hopper, which is provided on opposite sides with conveying-aprons o '0, adapted to be driven in any desired way for feeding the tobacco downward and compressing it into a stream or column. Below the conveyers are the cups 4; v similar to the cups u a just described and operated in the same manner by a bar V, secured to the reciprocating carriage. NV represents a tobaccoknife which is preferably secured to a reciprocating shank which is provided with inclined slots to, through which pass studs 10', which secure it to the top of one ofthe side frames. The delivery-passage of the hopper V.is provided with a slot for the admission of the knife W just below the conveyers v 4;, so
that when the knife is forced inward it will cut off a quantity of the tobacco, which will fall into the cups 1) v beneath. The shank of the'knife is secured to the carriage preferably as shown in Fig. 18, in which it is illustrated as being provided with a slot 20 cugaged by a pin 10 on the carriage, so that as the carriage reciprocates the knife will be moved in and out by means of the inclined slots w w. it is placed in the hopper and fed down by the conveyers o 'v in a sheet, so that each.
time the knife is forced inward it will cut off a quantity of the tobacco, which falls into the cups, as before stated. As the cups move from their uppermost position to their lowest When long-cut tobacco is used,-
position the tobacco will be slightly com-W pressed into a 'rod form and then dropped upon the paper.
lVhen leaf-tobacco is used, the leaves will be fed to the conveyers c c in a thick layer, and each movement of the knife will cut off a quantity of the tobacco, which as it falls into the cups 1; 12 will have its strands lying parallel, thus producing straight-cut cigarettes in which the fibers will run lengthwise of the cigarette.
"When using the device with leaf-tobacco, it may be necessary to impart several movements to the knife to each reciprocation of the carriage, and, if so, this can be readily accomplished by slightly-varying the con nection between the knife-shank and carriage without departing from our invention.
lVe do not desire to be limited to the exact details of construction herein shown and described, as variations may be made in the same without departing from the spirit of our invention.
lVhat we claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is
1. The combination with mechanism for forminga continuous tobacco rod and folding a wrapper about the same, of a cutter for severing said wrapped rod into individual cigarettes and tucking devices operatively connected with the continuous-cigarette-forrnin g devices for crimping the wrapper at each end of a severed cigarette after it is severed, and operating means, substantially as described.
2. The combination with mechanism for forming a continuous tobacco rod and folding a wrapper about the same, of a cutter for severing said wrapped rod into individual cigarettes, tucking devices operatively connected with the continuous cigarette -formiug devices adapted to engage the wrapper at opposite ends of the severed cigarette and means for moving the wrapper-engaging portions of said tuckers toward each other to crimp the paper at both ends of the severed cig'arette simultaneously, substantially as described.
3. The combination With devices for forming a tobacco rod, and foldinga Wrapper about the same including the longitudinally-reciprocatingforming-tube, the traveling belt having a portion extending through said tube, the cutter and tucking devices operatively connected with the continuous cigaretteforming devices, substantially as described.
4. The combination with the longitudinally reciprocating formingtube, and tobacco-carrying belt having a part extending through said tube, means for moving said belt continuously in one direction, a cutter and tucking devices operatively connected with the continuous cigarette forming devices, substantially as described.
5. The combination with the longitudinally-reciprocating forming-tube, and the tobacco-carrying belt having a part passing through said tube, the cutter and the tucking devices, of means for moving said belt continuously and devices for reciprocating said tube, cutter and tucking devices simultaneously, substantially as described;
' 6. The combination with the main frame and the tobacco-feeding belt supported therein, of the longitudinally-movable carriage, a
forming-tube carried thereby and engaging a portion of said belt, a cutter mounted on said carriage, tucking devices also mounted on said carriage, means for moving said belt continuously and means for reciprocating the vices and having parts adapted to passthrough the perforations of said belt, substantially as described.
8. The combination with the forming-tube, of a'forming-belt provided with perforations located at intervals throughout its length and having a part passing through said tube, of a cutter and the tucking devices, the latter having parts adapted to engage said perforations, substantially as described.
9. The combination with the longitudinally-reciprocating forming-tube, of the belt provided with perforations located at intervals throughout the length thereof, the cutter, tucking devices for tucking the ends of severed cigarettes, said tucking devices having parts adapted to pass through the said perforations of said belt, means for moving saidbelt continuously and means for reciprocating said tube, substantially as described.
10. The combination with means for formin g a tobacco rod and folding a wrapper about the same','of a pasting mechanism for pasting the Wrapper, a cutter for severing said Wrapped and pasted rod intoindividual cigarettes and tucking devices operatively connected with the continuous-cigarette-forming devices for crimping the Wrapper at each end of a severed cigarette after it has been severed, substantially as described.
11. The combination with means-for forming a tobacco rod and folding a wrapper about the same, of a paste-receptacle, a paste-supplying wheel closing the delivery-mouth of said receptacle, a pasting-wheel engaging said supplying-wheel having its axis of rotation perpendicular to the axis of said supplyingwheel, a cutter and tucking devices operatively connected with the continuous-cigarette-forming devices, substantially as de scribed.
12. The combination with the main frame, of the longitudinally-reciprocating carriage thereon, the tobacco-carrying belt, the forming-tube carried by said carriage and engaging a portion of said belt, the cutter carried by said carriage, the tucker-tube movable longitudinally in said carriage, the tucking devices adapted to crimp the ends of a ciga rette in said tucking-tube, devices for reciprocating said carriage and devices for moving said tucking-tube independently of said carriage, substantially as described.
13. The combination with the mechanism for forming a tobacco rod and folding a wrapper about the same, the cutter and tucking devices operatively connected with the contin uous-cigarette-forming devices, of a tobacco-hopper and devices for feeding deteratively connected with said continuous-cigarette-forming devices, of a tobacco-hopper,
the opposing semicylindrical pivoted cups,
and devices connected operatively with said forming-tube for oscillating said cups simultaneously to feed a determined quantity of tobacco to said belt, substantially as de-.
scribed.
16. The combination with mechanism for forminga continuous cigarette including the forming-tube and belt, the cutter and tucking devices operatively connected with the continuous-cigarette-forming devices, of the tobacco-hopper having the tobacco-cutting knife, the pivoted semicylindrical opposing cups below said knife and means for oscillat ing saidcups simultaneously, substantially as described.
In testimony whereof we affix our signatures in presence of two witnesses.
WILLIAM A. HUDSON. JOSEPH F. HARTIGAN.
\Vitnesses:
L. P. WHITAKER, J. D. KINGSBnRY.
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2669996A (en) * 1949-08-10 1954-02-23 Edward W Berriman Method for manufacturing cigars and preformed fillers therefor
US3029749A (en) * 1960-02-16 1962-04-17 Jersey Arthur Leslie De Machines for making sausage rolls and the like
AU776871B2 (en) * 1999-04-19 2004-09-23 Oracle International Corporation Web servers with queryable dynamic caches

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2669996A (en) * 1949-08-10 1954-02-23 Edward W Berriman Method for manufacturing cigars and preformed fillers therefor
US3029749A (en) * 1960-02-16 1962-04-17 Jersey Arthur Leslie De Machines for making sausage rolls and the like
AU776871B2 (en) * 1999-04-19 2004-09-23 Oracle International Corporation Web servers with queryable dynamic caches

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