US568862A - Velocipede - Google Patents

Velocipede Download PDF

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US568862A
US568862A US568862DA US568862A US 568862 A US568862 A US 568862A US 568862D A US568862D A US 568862DA US 568862 A US568862 A US 568862A
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lever
pedal
crank
chain
driving
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B62LAND VEHICLES FOR TRAVELLING OTHERWISE THAN ON RAILS
    • B62KCYCLES; CYCLE FRAMES; CYCLE STEERING DEVICES; RIDER-OPERATED TERMINAL CONTROLS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR CYCLES; CYCLE AXLE SUSPENSIONS; CYCLE SIDE-CARS, FORECARS, OR THE LIKE
    • B62K3/00Bicycles
    • B62K3/12Tandems
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/21Elements
    • Y10T74/2164Cranks and pedals

Description

UNITED STATES PATENT FFICE.

ROBERT MIEHLE, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

VELOCIPEDE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 568,862, dated October 6, 1896.

Application filed December 3, 1894. Serial No. 530,698. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, ROBERT MIEHLE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Velocipedes, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact specification.

My invent-ion -relates to velocipedes and driving mechanism for that class of velocipedes and other forms of machineryin which the propelling power is applied through the intermediary of a crank-shaft, and more particularly to that class in which the power is transmitted from the crank-shaft to the driving-wheel by means of chain gearing and the crank-shaft is driven by adjustable or variable lever mechanism. I

The invention has for its especial purpose to guard against injury to the riders feet in propelling the machine, to render the leverage of the propelling-levers capable of being more readily adjusted or varied, to prevent backlash or to take up the slack of the driving-chain when the elliptical driving-gear is used, to hold the pedals in a convenient position, to render the machine readily convertible into a tandem, and to accomplish other ends of minor importance hereinafter described.

The circular movement of the pedal, beyond being objectionable to many riders be cause of the great extent of lateral movement the foot is caused to travel, is further objectionable because of the loss of leverage durin g periods when the pedal is rising and passing beyond dead-center, and when the elliptical sprocket is used the lateral or to-and-fro movement during rapid riding when the minor diameter of the sprocket is in engagementwith the chain is so rapid that it is difficult for the rider to keep his pedals. A strictly up-and-down movement, however, such as that produced by an ordinary oscillating lever, is not desirable, as it is an unnatural movement for the foot, it being unlike the motion of the foot in walking; and hence a more or less back-and-forth movement ing the pedals to travel in an orbit whose lateral axis or diameter is shorter than its upright or vertical axis or diameter.

Another object of my invention is to cause the pedals to pass thedead-center of their stroke at about the time the minor diameter of the sprocket comes into engagement with the chain or other means of connection between such sprocket-gear and the drivingwheel, whereby the rapid movement of such sprocket produced by the driving-wheel acting thereon will be offset by the slow movement of the pedals at such times.

Another object of my invention is to hold the driving-chain taut when the minor diameter of the elliptical sprocket is transverse to the folds of the chain, whereby backlash will be prevented.

A further object of my invention is to pro vide attachments whereby two may ride the same machine and both propel through the agency of the same driving-shaft and gearing.

With these ends in view my invention consists in certain features of novelty in the construction, combination, and arrangement of parts by which the said objects and certain other objects hereinafter appearing are attained, all as fully described, with reference to the accompanying drawings, an d more particularly pointed out in the claims.

v In'the said drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation of a velocipede embodying my improvements. Fig. 2 is a plan section thereof. Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail view showingthe device for taking up the slack or preventing backlash of the driving-chain shown in side elevation. Fig. 4 is an end or'front view thereof, partly in section. Fig. 5 is an enlarged detail View of one of the driving-levers and connected parts in sideelevation. Fig. 6 is a transverse sectional view thereof, taken on the line 6 6, Fig. 5. Fig. 7 is a plan view thereof. Fig. 8 is a detail perspective view of the device for limiting the oscillation of the pedals. Fig. 9 is a modification thereof, and Fig. 10 is a modification hereinafter described.

Like signs of reference indicate like parts throughout the several views.

To attain the said objects of my invention I apply the power to the crank through the medium of a driving-lever having a floating or shifting pivot, and when the elliptical sprocket or gear is used I arrange the crank on the short or minor diameter of the ellipse, the pedal being carried by the free end of the lever and the crank being pivoted to the latter at a point between the pedal and the said shifting or floating pivot by means of an attachment whichis capable of being readily adjusted and secured at various points in the length of the lever, whereby the leverage may be readily diminished or increased; and in order that the riders feet may not be caught between such lever and the crank linterpose a guard between the plane of movement of the pedal and the crank and against which the riders foot would strike in the event it should shift toward the crank. In order that the pedals may remain in a convenient position forlhe application of the feet of the rider and that the toe-clips, when the same are employed, may remain in the proper position, the pedals are provided with stops or shoulders for limiting their oscillation or extent of rotation. The greater part of the slack of the sprocket-chain is taken up by means of a roller which is so arranged with reference to the sprocket-wheel that it will touch or be slightly above the chain when the major diameter of such u heel is transverse to the folds of the chain. If desired, the floating lever and the supporting-link for the end thereof may be provided with rearward extensions thereof on each side of the velocipedc and these provided with pedals, so that by arranging an additional seatover the rear wheel the velocipede is converted into a tandem and may be propelled by both riders through the intermediary of the same crank-shaft and gearing.

My invention is shown in the drawil'lgs as applied to the ordinary chaiirgeared bicycle, but it will of course be understood that this is but an example of the many forms of footpropelled vehicles or pedal machinery generally to which my improvements may be ap plied.

In the example shown, upon each side of the saddle-post or centenbrace l of the bicycle-frame is supported a horizontal shaft or pin 2 by any suitable means, such as a bear ing-sleeve 3, secured to a two-part clamping sleeve or collar 4, which latter embraces the saddle-post 1 and is preferably clamped thereto with capability of adjustment in order that my improvements may be applied to any bicycle and readily adjusted to suit the varying conditions.

To the outer end of each of the shafts or pins 2 is pivoted a swinging link or support 5, to the lower end of which is pivoted the rear end of the aforesaid driving-lever (5, whose other or free end carries the pedal 7.

S are the cranks,which are of the usual construction and secured to the ordinary crankshaft. These are pivoted, respectively, to the levers (5 between the shifting or floating pivots 9 of such levers and the pedals 7.

10 represents the sprocketgear-wheel,which is elliptical and on the minor diameter of which the cranks 8 are arranged, the gear 10 being connected to the driving-wheel by a sprocket-chain 11 in the ordinary manner.

By the employment of the lever (5, having the floating or shifting pivot and being pivoted to the crank, as described, it will be seen that the crank may be much shorter than heretofore, and the lateral movement of the pedal will at no time exceed the diameter of the are described by the crank, while the vertical movement of the pedal will be of greater extent and depend upon the length of the lever, the pedals traveling in an orbit whose upright diameter or axis is of much greater length than its lateral diameter or axis, and the forward side of such orbit being formed on a sharper curve than the rearward side, as indicated in Fig. 1 by the dotted line 12. It will also be seen by this construction that the dead-centers are passed while the pedals are rising. Hence the leveron one side is assisted to pass the dead-centers by the lever on the other side making its downward stroke, and the full downward stroke of each lever is effective on the crank-shaft throughout its entire rotation.

The sprocket 10 might of course, if desired, be circular, but I prefer to employ an elliptical sprocket because the same has many advantages which are well known and the said advantages may be gained when it is used in connection with my invention without'cxperiencing the disadvantages already described, and not-ably the rapid lateral movement of the pedal as it passes rearwardly under and comes forward over the dead-center. This advantage of my invention is evident from the fact that at such times as the minor diameter of the sprocket is in engagement with the chain and the sprocket is making its fastest movement the pedalsare almost at the extremity of their stroke and are passing in almost a strictly upward or a strictly downward direction and not in a long lateral sweep, as heretofore.

Pivoted to the wristpin 8 is a box or clamp 13, through the upper part of which the pedallever 6 passes. In order that the lever U may be readily adjusted or shifted end wise with reference to the box 13, it is arranged loosely within the box, and its under or lower edge is provided with a number of notches 14, in

any of which engages one or more pins or lugs 15, passing through the box 13. The opening in the box through which the lever 6 passes is of greater depth than the width of the lever, so as to permit of independent vertical movement of the latter, whereby it may be disengaged from the lugs and shifted lengthwise with reference to the box; and in order that the lever may remain normally in engagement with the lugs 15 I provide the upper side of the box 13 with 'a spring or cushion 16, which bears normally upon the lever with sufficient pressure to hold it from disengagement with the lugs 15 under ordinary circumstances, but which, when the lever is given a kick or thrust on either end, will yield sufficiently to permit it to disengage from the lugs 15. By this construction it will be seen that the rider is enabled to vary the leverage without di'smounting, the pivots 9 being laterally elongated, as more clearly shown in Fig. 2, to enable the rider to effect this adjustment in the described manner. Such pivots 9 are normally elongated forthe further purpose of forming foot-rests or coasters and mounting and 'disinounting steps. For the latter purpose they are more advantageous than the pedal, inasmuch as the'rider may bear his weight upon them for a mounting or di'sm'ounting without regard to the position of the pedal.

ing being formed in the lower part of the box 13 in the manner more clearly'shown in Fig.- 6. The edge of the opening in the box 13 is provided with a groove for the balls 17, and such balls are held'in place on one side by a cone 18, which passes axially through the wrist-pin S and is secured in place at its inner end by means of a'nut 19, while the balls are held in place on the other side by means of a cone formed on the end of the wrist-pin 8*, as clearly shown" in the drawings. Thus I am enabled to adjustably connect the lever 6 to the crank 8 and at the same time provide the same with an antifriction-bearing'and arrange it in close proximity to the face of the crank and thereby avoid increasing the width of the tread.

The described antifriction-bearing will of course be formed directly in the lever 6 instead of in the box 13, which will not be used when the lever is connected permanently to the crank. It is desirable to arrange the lever 6 in the same vertical plane with the wrist-pin instead of to one side of it in order to avoid making the angle of the toggle formed by the link 5 and lever b'too obtuse. The rear end of the lever is curved downward, it being understood that'to either shorten or raise the link 5 would result in increasing the angle formed by such link and the lever 6, and would also be objectionable for the further reason that the pivot 9 would be too high with reference to the crank-shaft. The outer end of the lever 6, which carries the pedal, might of course be straight, but in order that the riders feet may not be raised to an awkward elevation I prefer to curve the outer ends of the levers downward also, so that the pivot 9, wrist-pin 8, and the axis of the pedal will be in substantially a straight line.

The lever 6, throughout the greater portion of its intermediate length, is strai ght,whereby its longitudinal adjustment will not change the described relation of the pivot 9, pin 8, and pedal axis.

To prevent the lever 6 from being shifted too far in either direction it is provided on each side of the box 13 with a stop-pin 20.

With a driving mechanism thus constructed the foot of the rider is in danger of being pinched between the lever 6 and the crank 8 as they approach the parallel, and in order to avoid such an accident I arrange the guard 21 between the crank and the plane of movement of the pedal, as before mentioned. This guard 21 may be best located upon the lever 6-itself and secured theretoinany suitable manner, as shown in the drawings.

Inasmuch as the pedals 7 need not be different from the ordinary pedals it is desirable to have the construction such that a pair of ordinary pedals may be attached to the levers 6 and thus avoid the expense of additional pedals when it is desired to apply my improved driving mechanism to a'velocipede of the ordinary construction, but inasmuch as such ordinary pedals arerotatable upon theirpsupporting-pins 22 and it is neither necessary nor desirable that the pedals, when employed on the lever 6, make complete rotations, because when the toe-clips 23, which are essential in rapid riding, are employed they unbalance the pedals and place them in inconvenient positions, I provide stops or shoulders 24 for limiting the oscillation of the pedals. These stops or shoulders'are so constructed that they may be applied to the ordinary pedal and they are preferably so arranged under the inner end bar of the pedal that the latter will strike them'=when oscillating in either direction. The shoulders 24 are formed on a platev 25, which is provided with an opening 26, through which the pin 22 of the pedal passes, the opening 26 being formed with a fiat side which fits against the ordinary flat side of the pin 22, thusholding the plate 25 from rotating on the pin 22 it being understood that the pin 22 is. fixed against rotation. The stops or shoulders 24 may be formed by two projections, as shown in Fig. 8, or by striking up a circular flange on the lower edge of the plate 25, as shown in Fig. 9. By the employment of these stops for limiting the oscillation of the pedal it will be seen that the pedal is free to move IIO independently of the lever 6 throughout the stroke, but at the same time it is normally presented in the proper position for the receptionof the riders foot.

In the use of the elliptical driving-gears it is found that the driving-chain becomes so slack when the minor diameter of the gear is transverse to the folds of the chain that backlash and an objectionable jerk is produced. In order to avoid this and at the same time avoid producing undue friction upon the driving-chain, I arrange an antifriction-roller 27 immediately above the lower fold of the chain, so as to be almost in contact therewith when the major diameter of the sprocket is transverse to the folds of the chain and the chain is consequently under its greatest tension on both sides. Hence when the minor diameter of the sprocket becomes transverse' to the folds of the chain and the slack is no longer taken up by the sprocket itself the lower fold of the chain will nevertheless be under the same tension that it was when the major diameter of the sprocket was transverse to it and the up-anddown vibration or backlash of the lower fold, produced by the major and minor diameters of the sprocket alternately coming into ongagement therewith, will be prevented.

The roller 27 may be mounted upon the bar 28 of the frame by means of a clamp 29, having a depending arm 30, through which the pintle 31 of the roller passes. The roller may be composed of laminated rawhide or other suitable material.

\Vhen it is desired to convert the velocipede into a tandem, the ordinary saddle may be removed and in its stead secured a bar 32, having a pair of handle-bars and an eye 34 for the passage of the brace-bar 35, on whose forward end is arranged a saddle 36 for the forward rider, while a saddle 37 for the rear rider is arranged at its other end. The rear end of this brace-bar 35 is supported by a pair of standards or braces 88, which are detachably secured to the shaft or pin 39, upon which the braces 28 and 40 are sup ported, as usual.

Extending rearwardly from each of the pivots 0 is an arm 41, whose rear end is supported by an arm 42, pivoted thereto and also pivoted at the upper end of the link 5 on the pin 2, and at the pivotal point of the bars 41 42 is arranged a pedal 43, whereby the rear rider may assist in propelling the machine.

In order to prevent lateral swinging movement of the pedals 43, which might result in the arm 42 striking the bar 28 or some other part of the machine, I carry the forward end of the arm 41 as far outward as possible and the forward end of the arm 42 as far inward as possible, so that in plan View these two arms will be at an angle to and brace each other.

In order to avoid accidental shifting of the lever 6 by pressure upon the pedal 43, I pro vide the upper side of the box 13 with a setscrew 44, which, when the tandem attachment is employed, may be screwed down against the spring 16 and thus firmly hold the lever (J in place.

Having thus described my invcution,what I claim as new therein, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-- 1. A velocipede having in combination a driving-shaft having a crank, a driving-lever having a floating pivot and being provided with lug-and-notch connection with said crank whereby it may be adjusted, and means for yieldingly holding said lug and notch in engagement substantially as set forth.

2. A velocipede having in combination a driving-shaft having a crank, a floating drivin g-lever having notches or catches,a box pivoted to said crank and through which said lever passes, a pin or lug carried by said box and engaging in said notches, and a spring or cushion for holding said pin and notches normally in engagement, substantially as set forth.

3. A velocipede having in combination a driving-shaft provided with a crank, a driving-lever adjustably connected to said crank and having a floating pivot, and a lateral projection located at said pivot for enabling the rider to adjust said lever by means of his foot, substantially as set forth.

4. A velocipede having in combination an elliptical sprocket-wheel, a sprocket-chain passing around said wheel for communicating motion to the driving-wheel, and an idler arranged between the folds of the chain and in the line of or immediately above the slack side of the chain when the majo diameter of the sprocket-wheel is transverse to such portion of the chain, whereby said idler will be substantially out of contact With the chain when the latter is taut and the major diameters of the sprocket are acting thereon substantially as set forth.

5. A velocipede having in combination a driving-shaft provided with a crank, a floating pedal-lever connected to said crank and having a pedal, a rearwardly-projectin g pivoted arm, a second pedal supported by said arm and a second arm pivoted to said second pedal and to said lever, substantially as set forth.

6. A velocipede having in combination a driving-shaft provided with a crank, a floating pedal-lever pivoted to said crank and havin g a pedal, an arm pivotally connected to the rear end of said pedal-lever, a second arm pivotally supported on the machine and connected with said first arm, a pedal supported on said arms and said arms being arranged in diverging vertical planes, substantially as set forth.

7. A velocipede having in combination a frame, the post 32 adj ustably secured to said frame and having an eye 34, a bar passing through and detachably secured in said eye for carrying two saddles, and the rear end of i said bar being detaehably supported upon porting the rear end of said bar, substanthe frame, substantially as set forth. tially as set forth.

8. A velocipede having in combination a 1 frame, a post 32 detachably supported on said ROBERT MIEHLE' 5 frame,-a handle-bar secured to said post, a W'itnesses:

bar extending through said post and carry- F. A. HOPKINS, ing a saddle at each end, and means for sup- EDNA B. JOHNSON.

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2723132A (en) * 1951-12-20 1955-11-08 Alfred R Oberwegner Auxiliary operating mechanism for bicycles
US4708356A (en) * 1985-12-16 1987-11-24 Shmuel Levavi Human powered vehicles and mechanism particularly useful therein
US20080296862A1 (en) * 2007-06-04 2008-12-04 Far East University Multi-mode tandem bicycle
US20130207367A1 (en) * 2012-02-10 2013-08-15 Martin A. Dolan Multi-rider or occupant human powered vehicles with rearward facing rider or occupant
US20160052596A1 (en) * 2011-12-06 2016-02-25 Sram, Llc Chainring
US20170146109A1 (en) * 2015-07-03 2017-05-25 Sram Deutschland Gmbh Sprocket wheel for a bicycle drive
US10703441B2 (en) 2015-07-03 2020-07-07 Sram Deutschland Gmbh Drive arrangement for a bicycle

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2723132A (en) * 1951-12-20 1955-11-08 Alfred R Oberwegner Auxiliary operating mechanism for bicycles
US4708356A (en) * 1985-12-16 1987-11-24 Shmuel Levavi Human powered vehicles and mechanism particularly useful therein
US20080296862A1 (en) * 2007-06-04 2008-12-04 Far East University Multi-mode tandem bicycle
US8070174B2 (en) * 2007-06-04 2011-12-06 Far East University Multi-mode tandem bicycle
US9731791B2 (en) * 2011-12-06 2017-08-15 Sram, Llc Chainring
US9862456B2 (en) * 2011-12-06 2018-01-09 Sram, Llc Chainring
US9731790B2 (en) * 2011-12-06 2017-08-15 Sram, Llc Chainring
US20160052596A1 (en) * 2011-12-06 2016-02-25 Sram, Llc Chainring
US20160052599A1 (en) * 2011-12-06 2016-02-25 Sram, Llc Chainring
US20160052597A1 (en) * 2011-12-06 2016-02-25 Sram, Llc Chainring
US9493211B2 (en) * 2011-12-06 2016-11-15 Sram, Llc Chainring
US9650107B2 (en) 2011-12-06 2017-05-16 Sram, Llc Chainring
US20160121966A1 (en) * 2011-12-06 2016-05-05 Sram, Llc Chainring
US8752852B2 (en) * 2012-02-10 2014-06-17 Martin A. Dolan Multi-rider or occupant human powered vehicles with rearward facing rider or occupant
US20130207367A1 (en) * 2012-02-10 2013-08-15 Martin A. Dolan Multi-rider or occupant human powered vehicles with rearward facing rider or occupant
US20170146109A1 (en) * 2015-07-03 2017-05-25 Sram Deutschland Gmbh Sprocket wheel for a bicycle drive
US10578201B2 (en) * 2015-07-03 2020-03-03 Sram Deutschland Gmbh Sprocket wheel for a bicycle drive
US10703441B2 (en) 2015-07-03 2020-07-07 Sram Deutschland Gmbh Drive arrangement for a bicycle

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