US5526786A - Dual fuel engine having governor controlled pilot fuel injection system - Google Patents

Dual fuel engine having governor controlled pilot fuel injection system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US5526786A
US5526786A US08/377,279 US37727995A US5526786A US 5526786 A US5526786 A US 5526786A US 37727995 A US37727995 A US 37727995A US 5526786 A US5526786 A US 5526786A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
governor
engine
fuel
actuating lever
position
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Fee Related
Application number
US08/377,279
Inventor
Niels J. Beck
Robert L. Barkhimer
William E. Weseloh
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Clean Air Partners Inc
Original Assignee
Servojet Products International
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Servojet Products International filed Critical Servojet Products International
Priority to US08/377,279 priority Critical patent/US5526786A/en
Assigned to SERVOJET PRODUCTS INTERNATIONAL reassignment SERVOJET PRODUCTS INTERNATIONAL ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BARKHIMER, ROBERT L., BECK, NIELS J., WESELOH, WILLIAM E.
Assigned to CATERPILLAR INC. reassignment CATERPILLAR INC. SECURITY AGREEMENT Assignors: CLEAN AIR PARTNERS, INC.
Publication of US5526786A publication Critical patent/US5526786A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Assigned to CATERPILLAR INC. reassignment CATERPILLAR INC. SECURITY INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CLEAN AIR PARTNERS, INC.
Assigned to CLEAN AIR PARTNERS, INC. reassignment CLEAN AIR PARTNERS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: SERVOJET PRODUCTS INTERNATIONAL, INC.
Assigned to COMERICA BANK - CALIFORNIA reassignment COMERICA BANK - CALIFORNIA SECURITY AGREEMENT Assignors: CLEAN AIR PARTNERS, INC.
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D19/00Controlling engines characterised by their use of non-liquid fuels, pluralities of fuels, or non-fuel substances added to the combustible mixtures
    • F02D19/06Controlling engines characterised by their use of non-liquid fuels, pluralities of fuels, or non-fuel substances added to the combustible mixtures peculiar to engines working with pluralities of fuels, e.g. alternatively with light and heavy fuel oil, other than engines indifferent to the fuel consumed
    • F02D19/08Controlling engines characterised by their use of non-liquid fuels, pluralities of fuels, or non-fuel substances added to the combustible mixtures peculiar to engines working with pluralities of fuels, e.g. alternatively with light and heavy fuel oil, other than engines indifferent to the fuel consumed simultaneously using pluralities of fuels
    • F02D19/10Controlling engines characterised by their use of non-liquid fuels, pluralities of fuels, or non-fuel substances added to the combustible mixtures peculiar to engines working with pluralities of fuels, e.g. alternatively with light and heavy fuel oil, other than engines indifferent to the fuel consumed simultaneously using pluralities of fuels peculiar to compression-ignition engines in which the main fuel is gaseous
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D19/00Controlling engines characterised by their use of non-liquid fuels, pluralities of fuels, or non-fuel substances added to the combustible mixtures
    • F02D19/06Controlling engines characterised by their use of non-liquid fuels, pluralities of fuels, or non-fuel substances added to the combustible mixtures peculiar to engines working with pluralities of fuels, e.g. alternatively with light and heavy fuel oil, other than engines indifferent to the fuel consumed
    • F02D19/0602Control of components of the fuel supply system
    • F02D19/0605Control of components of the fuel supply system to adjust the fuel pressure or temperature
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D19/00Controlling engines characterised by their use of non-liquid fuels, pluralities of fuels, or non-fuel substances added to the combustible mixtures
    • F02D19/06Controlling engines characterised by their use of non-liquid fuels, pluralities of fuels, or non-fuel substances added to the combustible mixtures peculiar to engines working with pluralities of fuels, e.g. alternatively with light and heavy fuel oil, other than engines indifferent to the fuel consumed
    • F02D19/0602Control of components of the fuel supply system
    • F02D19/0607Control of components of the fuel supply system to adjust the fuel mass or volume flow
    • F02D19/061Control of components of the fuel supply system to adjust the fuel mass or volume flow by controlling fuel injectors
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D19/00Controlling engines characterised by their use of non-liquid fuels, pluralities of fuels, or non-fuel substances added to the combustible mixtures
    • F02D19/06Controlling engines characterised by their use of non-liquid fuels, pluralities of fuels, or non-fuel substances added to the combustible mixtures peculiar to engines working with pluralities of fuels, e.g. alternatively with light and heavy fuel oil, other than engines indifferent to the fuel consumed
    • F02D19/0663Details on the fuel supply system, e.g. tanks, valves, pipes, pumps, rails, injectors or mixers
    • F02D19/0684High pressure fuel injection systems; Details on pumps, rails or the arrangement of valves in the fuel supply and return systems
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/10Internal combustion engine [ICE] based vehicles
    • Y02T10/30Use of alternative fuels
    • Y02T10/36Multiple fuels, e.g. multi fuel engines

Abstract

A compression ignition engine can be quickly and easily converted into a dual fuel engine simply by adding a gaseous fuel supply system, by disconnecting the governor actuating lever from the throttle pedal, and by adding an electronic controller which controls the operation of the gaseous fuel supply system and which sets the governor actuating lever at a position which causes the engine to deliver pilot fuel at a desired quantity. Operation is simplified by setting the governor using a droop control technique inherent in governor operation. The system can be automatically calibrated to assure the supply of fuel at a precisely controlled quantity per stroke at all engine speeds. The pilot fuel injection system of the resulting engine is non-invasive and permits inherent safety features of the governor to be retained.

Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The invention relates to dual fuel engines and, more particularly, relates to a non-invasive system for controlling the supply of pilot fuel to a dual fuel engine by governor control and to a method of using such a system.

2. Discussion of the Related Art

Recent years have seen an increased demand for the use of gaseous fuels as a primary fuel source in compression ignition engines. Gaseous fuels such as propane or natural gas are considered by many to be superior to diesel fuel and the like because gaseous fuels are generally less expensive, provide equal or greater power with equal or better mileage, and produce significantly lower emissions. This last benefit renders gaseous fuels particularly attractive because recently enacted and pending worldwide regulations may tend to prohibit the use of diesel fuel in many engines. The attractiveness of gaseous fuels is further enhanced by the fact that existing compression ignition engine designs can be readily adapted to burn gaseous fuels.

One drawback of gaseous fuels is that they exhibit significantly higher autoignition temperatures than do diesel fuel, oil, and other liquid fuels traditionally used in compression ignition engines. Accordingly, the temperature of the gaseous fuels does not increase sufficiently during operation of standard compression ignition engines for self-ignition. This problem is overcome by injecting a small charge of a pilot fuel, typically diesel fuel, into the combustion cylinders of the engine in the presence of a charge of a compressed gaseous fuel/air mixture. The pilot fuel is distributed throughout the gas/air mixture, ignites upon injection and subsequent compression, and bums at a high enough temperature to ignite the gaseous fuel charge.

The cost of convening a pre-assembled compression ignition engine to a dual fuel engine or of assembling a new dual fuel engine can be minimized by employing the stock diesel fuel injection components of the engine as a pilot fuel supply system and by merely adding a gaseous fuel supply system to the otherwise unmodified diesel engine. In the case of engines employing rack-controlled high pressure in-line pumps for the supply of diesel fuel to liquid fuel injectors, this conversion has traditionally entailed the removal of the stock mechanical or electronic governor and the direct control of the rack using a pneumatic or hydraulic actuator. The actuator is controlled, based upon sensed engine operating parameters, to position the rack so as to deliver diesel pilot fuel to the cylinders at a quantity per stroke demanded by the instantaneous engine operating conditions. This technique, while effective, exhibits marked drawbacks and disadvantages.

First, it is relatively complex and invasive. The existing governor must be removed and the existing pump disassembled and modified to provide access to the rack by the actuator. In the case of a retrofit operation, this conversion may necessitate the removal of the entire engine from the associated vehicle and render retro-fitting cost prohibitive. Second, elimination of an existing governor necessarily eliminates the inherent safety features of the governor, namely, the setting of minimum and maximum fuel delivery quantities per stroke independently of governor actuating lever position.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is therefore an object of the invention to control the supply of pilot fuel to a dual fuel engine with only minimal modifications to the stock engine design and without eliminating safety features provided by the governor of the engine.

This object is achieved by controlling pilot fuel injection by governor input command rather than pump rack control. The method includes first providing a dual fuel internal combustion engine which includes a combustion cylinder, a primary fuel supply system which supplies a gaseous fuel to the combustion cylinder, a pilot fuel supply system which supplies a liquid pilot fuel to the combustion cylinder and which includes a pump and a fuel supply rack which is connected to the pump and which is movable to vary the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of the pump, and a governor which sets the position of the rack. Subsequent steps include commanding an engine operating condition, determining a pilot liquid fuel delivery quantity per stroke required for the commanded engine operating condition, and then automatically controlling the governor in-put command to move the rack to a position which causes the pump to deliver liquid fuel at the desired quantity per stroke.

Preferably, the controlling step comprises automatically displacing an actuating lever of the governor, and the displacing step comprises actuating a piston and cylinder device to which the actuating lever is coupled.

Control of pilot fuel injection using a stock governor requires knowledge or at least an estimate of fuel delivery quantity versus governor position at various engine speeds. Precise control of pilot fuel injection can be facilitated by calibrating the system based upon the operational characteristics of the governor, and it is therefore another object of the invention to provide a method of automatically calibrating a pilot fuel supply system in this manner.

This object is achieved by sensing governor actuating lever positions at designated liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke and storing the sensed positions in an electronic memory. Preferably the calibrating operation further comprises sensing engine speeds under engine operating conditions at which liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke required to obtain the engine speeds are known, sensing governor actuating lever positions at each of the sensed engine speeds, and creating and storing a table of governor actuating lever position versus engine speed and liquid fuel delivery quantity per stroke.

Yet another object of the invention is to convert a preassembled diesel or other compression ignition engine to a dual fuel compression ignition engine with minimal modifications to the engine.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, this object is achieved by providing an engine which is operable in single fuel mode and which includes a combustion cylinder, a liquid fuel supply system which supplies liquid fuel to the combustion cylinder and which includes a fuel pump, a fuel supply rack which is connected to the pump and which is movable to vary the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of the pump, and a governor which sets the position of the rack. The governor includes an actuating lever which is mechanically coupled to the throttle pedal and the position of which determines the position of the rack. Subsequent steps include detaching the governor actuating lever from the throttle pedal, adding a primary fuel supply system which supplies a gaseous fuel to the combustion cylinder, and adding an electronically controlled actuator and coupling the actuator to the governor actuating lever. The actuator displaces the governor actuating lever a sufficient amount to cause the liquid fuel supply system to supply an amount of liquid pilot fuel to the combustion cylinder commanded by the controller.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a novel dual fuel engine. This object is achieved by providing a combustion cylinder, a primary fuel supply system which supplies a gaseous primary fuel to the combustion cylinder, a pilot fuel supply system, and an actuator. The pilot fuel supply system supplies a liquid pilot fuel to the combustion cylinder and includes a pump, a rack which is connected to the pump and which is movable to vary the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of the pump, and a governor which is connected to the rack, the governor including an actuating lever which is displaceable to set the position of the rack. The actuator automatically displaces the governor actuating lever to indirectly but effectively control the position of the rack and thus the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of the pump.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a system for calibrating a pilot liquid fuel supply system of a dual fuel internal combustion engine.

In accordance with still another aspect of the invention, this object is achieved by providing means for determining governor actuating lever positions at designated liquid fuel delivery quantity per strokes, and means for storing the determined positions and the designated liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke in an electronic memory.

Preferably, the system further includes means for sensing engine speeds under engine operating conditions at which liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke required to obtain said engine speeds are known, and the means for storing preferably comprises means for creating and storing in said memory a table of governor actuating lever position versus fuel delivery quantities per stroke and engine speeds.

Also, the converted engine retains the capability for full diesel operation and maintains diesel thermal efficiency.

These and other objects, features and advantages will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description and the accompanying drawings. It should be understood, however, that the detailed description and specific examples, while indicating preferred embodiments of the present invention, are given by way of illustration and not of limitation. Many changes and modifications could be made in the scope of the present invention without departing from the spirit thereof, and the invention includes all such modifications.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A preferred exemplary embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which like reference numerals represent like parts throughout, and in which:

FIG. 1 schematically represents a prior art compression ignition engine, appropriately labeled "PRIOR ART";

FIG. 2 is a graph illustrating the relationship between throttle pedal position/governor actuating lever position and torque or fuel delivery quantity per pump stroke, and is appropriately labeled "PRIOR ART";

FIG. 3 is a graph illustrating the relationship between throttle pedal position/governor actuating lever position and commanded engine speed, and is appropriately labeled "PRIOR ART";

FIG. 4 is a graph representing engine speed versus fuel delivery quantity for a particular governor actuating lever position of the engine of FIG. 1, and is appropriately labeled "PRIOR ART";

FIG. 5 schematically illustrates a dual fuel engine producible through conversion of the engine of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 6 and 7 are graphs of governor actuating lever position versus engine speed and fuel delivery quantity for the dual fuel engine of FIG. 5; and

FIG. 8 is a graph of governor actuating lever position versus pilot fuel delivery quantity for the engine in FIG. 5.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

1. Resume

Pursuant to the invention, a compression ignition engine can be quickly and easily converted into a dual fuel engine simply by adding a gaseous fuel supply system, by disconnecting the governor actuating lever from the throttle pedal, and by adding an electronic controller which controls the operation of the gaseous fuel supply system and which sets the governor actuating lever at a position which causes the engine to deliver pilot fuel at a desired quantity. Operation is simplified by setting the governor using a droop control technique inherent in governor operation. The system can be automatically calibrated to assure the supply of fuel at a precisely controlled quantity per stroke at all engine speeds. The pilot fuel injection system of the resulting engine is non-invasive and permits inherent safety features of the governor to be retained.

2. Construction and Operation of Standard Compression Ignition Engine

Referring now to FIG. 1, a compression ignition engine 10 which is amenable to operation in dual fuel mode includes, as is standard in the art, a number of cylinders 12 supplied with diesel or other liquid fuel via a plurality of injectors 14 to supply torque to an output shaft (not shown). Fuel is supplied to the injectors 14 by a high pressure pump which may for example be an in-line piston pump 16. Pump 16 delivers fuel at a quantity per stroke determined by an internal rack 18 the position of which is in turn determined by the operation of a governor 20. The governor 20 may be either electronically or mechanically controlled and, in the illustrated embodiment, is a mechanically controlled governor having an actuating lever 22 connected to a throttle pedal 24 by a link 26. In the discussion that follows, "governor position" and "governor actuating lever position" will be used interchangeably, it being understood that the former is a direct function of the latter influenced only by engine speed. The manner in which the governor 20 is responsive to the throttle pedal 24 and engine speed to control delivery of fuel to the engine 10 is well known and will be described only in passing.

Displacement of the throttle pedal 24 indicates a command for an increased engine torque requiring an increase in fuel as represented by the curve 27 in FIG. 2. Displacement of the throttle pedal 24 also commands an engine speed which varies with progressive displacement of the throttle pedal 24 from low idle to high idle as represented by the curve 28 in FIG. 3. Hence, displacing the throttle pedal 24 and thus the governor actuating lever 22 to the position P will command an engine speed B. It is significant to note that the low idle and high idle speed values are independent of throttle pedal position and thus define a safe operating range which will not be exceeded by the engine 10 even if the relationship between the throttle pedal 24 and the governor 20 is somehow disturbed, e.g., by severing the link 26.

Conventional mechanical governors operate to control the pump rack 18 to vary the fuel delivery quantity per stroke or fuel delivery quantity per stroke of the pump 16 based upon droop. Droop is defined as the percentage difference between commanded engine speed and actual engine speed in relation to a given throttle pedal and governor settings. The quantity of fuel required per pump stroke at a designated governor actuating lever position to increase actual engine speed to commanded engine speed increases proportionally with this droop. Thus, as represented by the curve 30 in FIG. 4, centrifugal weights or other internal control mechanisms of the governor 20 control the rack 18 to increase fuel delivery quantity per stroke from IDLE to 100% of maximum based on the percentage difference between a commanded engine speed B and the actual engine speed. If the actual speed is equal to or greater than the commanded speed B, there is no need to supply additional power to the engine 10, and the governor 20 sets the rack 18 to maintain fuel delivery quantity per stroke at IDLE. However, if the actual engine speed decreases due to increased load, the amount of fuel required to increase engine speed to the commanded speed B increases, and the governor 20 adjusts the rack position to increase the amount of fuel delivered per pump stroke by an amount equal to the droop or percentage difference between the commanded engine speed B and the actual engine speed. Thus, if the droop between the commanded engine speed B and an actual engine speed C is 50%, the governor 20 will control the rack 18 to deliver fuel at a rate of 50% of the maximum quantity per pump stroke. If the droop between the commanded engine speed B and an actual engine speed A is 100% or greater, the governor 20 will control the rack 18 to deliver fuel at a rate of 100% of the maximum quantity per pump stroke. It should be noted that the curve 30 of FIG. 4 is but one of a family of curves each of which represents droop control at a different constant governor actuating lever position.

It has been discovered that the relationship between commanded speed, governor position, and fuel delivery quantity per pump stroke can be used to automatically control a governor to deliver a pilot fuel at a desired quantity per stroke if engine speed is known. A process and system for effecting such control will now be described.

3. Construction and Operation of Dual Fuel Engine Having Governor Controlled Pilot Fuel Injection System

Referring to FIG. 5, the engine 10 of FIG. 1 can be modified to function as a dual fuel engine simply by adding a primary fuel supply system 32 (typically comprising a compressed natural gas or CNG supply system) and a corresponding controller 34 and by controlling the governor 20 by the controller 34 rather than by the throttle pedal 24 so that the diesel or other liquid fuel supply system functions as a pilot fuel supply system. The engine 10 remains essentially unchanged and includes the cylinders 12, the injectors 14, the output shaft, the pump 16 including the rack 18, and the governor 20. The engine 10 is modified only by replacing the mechanical link 26 of FIG. 1 with an actuator 36, by adding the primary fuel supply system 32, and by adding the controller 34 and associated sensors.

The primary fuel supply system 32 could supply gaseous fuel to the engine manifold via a single metering valve but preferably comprises a plurality of electronically controlled CNG injectors emptying into the intake ports of the respective cylinders 12 and receiving gas from a common gas manifold connected to a conventional source. The gaseous fuel thus supplied could be natural gas, propane, or any other suitable gaseous fuel.

The actuator 36 may comprise a pneumatic cylinder, an electric actuator, or any device which displaces the lever 22 of the governor 20 under action of the controller 34 and preferably comprises either a single or a double acting hydrualic cylinder. In the illustrated embodiment, the actuator comprises a single acting hydrualic cylinder 36 controlled by a valve 38. The valve 38 is a two position three-way proportional solenoid valve having a control port 40 connected a cylinder end 54 of the cylinder 36, a discharge port 44 emptying into a tank 46, and a supply port 48 which receives pressurized fluid from the tank 46 via a pump 50. A solenoid coil 52 receives electrical current from the controller 34 to modulate the valve 38 to set the pressure in the cylinder end 54 of cylinder 36 at a designated, variable level and hence setting the lever 22 a designated position.

The controller 34 may comprise any electronic device capable of monitoring engine operation and of controlling the primary and pilot fuel supply systems and, in the illustrated embodiment, comprises a programmable digital microprocessor or electronic control unit (ECU) having a RAM, ROM, BUSS, and conventional peripheral devices preferably including an interface connection for a lap-top computer. ECU 34 receives signals indicative of throttle position or power command, governor actuating lever position, and engine speed from respective sensors 58, 60, and 62. ECU 34 also receives signals from additional sensors such as an intake manifold pressure sensor, an air charge temperature sensor, and a gaseous fuel composition sensor (collectively denoted by block 64) and combines these signals and the signals from sensors 58, 60 and 62 (1) to set the desired delivery quantities of primary fuel and pilot fuel based upon instantaneous operating conditions and to (2) control the primary fuel supply system 32 and the pilot fuel supply system accordingly. The manner in which the primary fuel supply system 32 is operated and in which the primary and pilot fuel delivery quantities are commanded are, per se, well known and will not be described in further detail. The manner in which the governor 20 is controlled to supply pilot fuel at the commanded quantity per stroke will now be detailed.

Referring again to FIG. 4, the diesel fuel delivery quantity Qdiesel supply per pump stroke can be determined at a designated governor position and a designated actual engine speed. For instance, at a designated governor position represented by the curve 30 and at a designated actual engine speed C, the fuel delivery quantity per stroke is known to be 50% of a known quantity per stroke. It is then a simple matter to create a map storing pilot fuel quantities at various governor actuating lever positions and engine speeds as illustrated by the family of curves 66, 68 and 70 in FIG. 8, and to set the governor actuating lever position to control the rack 18 and the pump 16 to supply a commanded pilot fuel quantity per stroke. Thus, assuming that the engine speed as detected by sensor 62 is 1,600 RPM, and assuming that the quantity of pilot fuel per stroke commanded by the controller is at a level Q1, the controller 34 can use the curve 68 to determine the governor actuating lever position P1 required to supply the desired amount of fuel Q1 per stroke at the sensed actual engine speed. Controller or ECU 34 then displaces the governor actuating lever 22 accordingly using the actuator 36 and feedback from the sensor 60. FIG. 8 also illustrates that different governor actuating lever positions P2 or P3 would be required to provide this same injection quantity Q1 if the actual engine speed as detected by sensor were at 700 or 2400 RPM.

The map of pilot fuel supply quantity per stroke versus governor actuating lever position and engine speed as represented graphically in FIG. 8 is stored in the RAM of the ECU 34 and is generated based upon sensed operating conditions of a particular governor 20 using droop principals as discussed in Section 2 above. The data required for generation of this map could be obtained entirely theoretically based upon information about the governor 20 and engine 10 obtained from the respective manufacturers. However, in order to control more precisely the supply of pilot fuel to the engine 10, the system is preferably automatically precalibrated, and the data from this autocalibration is used to create the map illustrated by the curves in FIG. 8 using droop principles as described above. A curve 72 producible through the autocalibration routine is illustrated in FIG. 6 and illustrates fuel delivery quantities per pump stroke and governor actuating lever positions A'-J' under no-load conditions at designated engine speeds A-J ranging from 700-2400 RPM. Curve 72 is reproduced as Table A and is obtained as follows:

First, a lap-top computer (not shown) or some other external device is coupled to the controller 34, the transmission (not shown) is placed in neutral to place the engine 10 under a no-load condition, and an internal routine of the external device commands the engine 10 to run on liquid fuel only. A governor actuating lever position A' is then detected at a first engine speed A. Fuel delivery quantity per stroke as a function of engine speed is easily obtainable either through measurement or through data available from the engine manufacturer, thus permitting the determination of pilot fuel supply quantity per stroke at the governor actuating lever position A'. The values A, A', and pilot fuel quantity per stroke are then stored in the ECU RAM, and the measurements are repeated at engine speeds B-J commanded by the controller 34 to create the autocalibration curve 72. It is then a simple matter to shift mathematically the autocalibration curve to the left or to the right as illustrated by the phantom curves 74 and 76 in FIG. 7, using droop principals, to calculate fuel delivery quantities per stroke through the full range of engine speeds and governor actuating lever positions. This data can then be tabulated into the map represented graphically in FIG. 8 which, as discussed above, can be used to set the governor actuating lever position to supply a commanded pilot fuel quantity per stroke.

The autocalibration operation need only be done once--during assembly of the governor controlled pilot fuel supply system. A default value for curve 72 should be permanently stored in the ECU RAM should calibration be neglected or should the autocalibration data be lost, e.g., through a sudden and complete loss of power to the ECU.

The governor controlled pilot fuel supply system described above, being noninvasive, is simpler to construct and to install and is thus more readily adapted to a retrofit operation than are conventional rack controlled pilot injection systems. Moreover, minimum and maximum fuel delivery quantities per stroke are retained by the internal control mechanisms of the governor 20 even in the event of controller failure or actuator failure. This important safety feature is eliminated when the governor is eliminated or modified during construction of conventional rack controlled systems.

Many changes and modifications could be made to the invention without departing from the spirit thereof. For instance, although the invention is described in conjunction with an in-line pump and a mechanical governor, the inventive governor controlled pilot fuel supply system and method are equally applicable to other pumps and to electronically controlled governors, so long as the governors operate on the principal of droop. In addition the engine governor can be used to control the illustrated engine or an engine lacking a gaseous fuel injection system in diesel only mode. Furthermore, while the invention has been discussed primarily in conjunction with mechanical governors and racks, it is equally applicable to electronic controlled governors and racks. The scope of these and other changes will become apparent from the appended claims.

              TABLE A______________________________________       GOVERNORENGINE      LEVERRPM         POSITION    Q(MM/STROKE)______________________________________2400        A, B, C,    162200        D           141900        E           121600        F           111300        G           10.51000        H           10.0 700        I, J        9.5______________________________________

Claims (19)

We claim:
1. A method comprising:
(A) providing a dual fuel internal combustion engine which includes
(1) a combustion cylinder,
(2) a primary fuel supply system which supplies a primary gaseous fuel to said combustion cylinder,
(3) a pilot fuel supply system which supplies a liquid pilot fuel to said combustion cylinder and which includes a pump and a fuel supply rack which is connected to said pump and which is movable to vary the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of said pump, and
(4) a governor, wherein said governor includes an actuating lever the position of which determines the position of said rack and a portion of which is positioned externally of said engine;
(B) commanding an engine operating condition;
(C) sensing engine operating conditions;
(D) determining, based upon said steps (B) and (C), a desired pilot liquid fuel delivery quantity per stroke required for the commanded engine operating condition;
(E) determining, based upon said steps B and C, a desired primary gaseous fuel delivery rate required for the commanded engine operating condition;
(F) supplying said primary fuel to said combustion cylinder from said primary fuel supply system at said desired primary fuel delivery rate;
(G) determining, based upon said step (D), a governor setting required to cause said pump to supply said pilot liquid fuel at said desired pilot liquid fuel delivery quantity per stroke; and
(H) during said step (F), automatically displacing said portion of said governor actuating lever to move said rack to a position which causes said pump to deliver said pilot liquid fuel at said desired quantity per stroke, wherein said steps (F) and (H) continue during engine speed changes.
2. A method as defined in claim 1, wherein said displacing step comprises actuating a piston and cylinder device to which said actuating lever is coupled.
3. A method as defined in claim 1, wherein said determining step comprises sensing a throttle pedal position and engine speed.
4. A method as defined in claim 3, further comprising sensing a governor actuating lever position.
5. A method as defined in claim 1, further comprising calibrating said system by determining governor actuating lever positions providing designated pilot liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke under designated engine operating conditions.
6. A method as defined in claim 5, wherein said calibrating step further comprises
(1) sensing engine speeds under engine operating conditions at which liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke required to obtain said engine speeds are known,
(2) sensing governor actuating lever positions at each of the sensed engine speeds, and
(3) creating and storing a table of governor actuating lever position versus engine speed and liquid fuel delivery quantity per stroke.
7. A method as defined in claim 1, wherein said step of commanding an engine operating condition comprises displacing a throttle pedal to command an engine speed.
8. A method comprising:
(A) determining a desired pilot liquid fuel delivery quantity per stroke required for a commanded engine operating condition for a dual fuel engine, said engine being fueled primarily by a gaseous fuel; and then
(B) automatically controlling a governor of said engine to cause a pump of said engine to deliver said liquid fuel at said desired quantity per stroke, wherein said governor is a type which is designed to use a principle of governor droop to set said pump at a position required to cause an actual engine speed to approach a commanded engine speed, wherein said step (B) is performed while said gaseous fuel is being supplied to said engine, and wherein said gaseous fuel and said pilot liquid fuel continue to be supplied to said engine during engine speed changes.
9. A method of calibrating a pilot liquid fuel supply system of a dual fuel internal combustion engine, comprising sensing governor actuating lever positions at designated liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke and storing the sensed positions in an electronic memory, wherein said calibrating step further comprises
(1) sensing engine speeds under engine operating conditions at which liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke required to obtain said engine speeds are known,
(2) sensing governor actuating lever positions at each of the sensed engine speeds, and
(3) creating and storing in said memory a table of governor actuating lever position verse liquid fuel delivery quantity per stroke and engine speed.
10. A method comprising:
(A) providing an internal combustion engine which includes
(1) a combustion cylinder;
(2) a pilot fuel supply which supplies a liquid fuel to said combustion cylinder and which includes a pump and fuel supply rack which is connected to said pump and which is movable to vary the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of said pump,
(3) a primary fuel supply system which supplies a primary gaseous fuel to said combustion cylinder, and
(4) a governor which includes and actuating lever the position of which determines the position of said rack and a portion of which is positioned externally of said engine, said governor being of a type which is designed to use a principle of governor droop to said said rack at a position required to cause an actual engine speed to approach a commanded engine speed;
(B) commanding an engine operating condition;
(C) electronically determining a pilot liquid fuel delivery quantity per stroke required for the commanded engine operating condition; and
(D) determining, based upon said step B, a desired primary fuel delivery rate required for the commanded engine operating condition;
(E) supplying said primary gaseous fuel to said combustion cylinder from said primary fuel supply system at said desired primary fuel delivery rate;
(F) automatically and electronically controlling an actuator, coupled to said portion of said governor actuating lever, to displace said governor actuating lever to move said rack to a position which causes said pump to deliver said pilot liquid fuel at said desired quantity per stroke, wherein said steps (E) and (F) continue during engine speed changes.
11. A method of converting an internal combustion engine from single fuel mode to dual fuel mode, said method comprising
(A) providing an engine which is operable in single fuel mode and which includes
(1) a combustion cylinder,
(2) a liquid fuel supply system which supplies liquid fuel to said combustion cylinder and which includes a fuel pump, a fuel supply rack which is connected to said pump and which is movable to vary the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of said pump, and a governor which sets the position of said rack, said governor including an actuating lever the position of which determines the position of said rack and a portion of which is positioned externally of said engine, said governor being of a type which is designed to use a principle of governor droop to set the position of said rack at a position required to cause an actual engine speed to approach a commanded engine speed; and
(3) a throttle pedal which is mechanically coupled to said governor actuating lever;
(B) detaching said governor actuating lever from said throttle pedal;
(C) adding a primary fuel supply system which supplies a primary gaseous fuel to said combustion cylinder;
(D) adding an electronically controlled actuator and coupling said actuator to said portion of said governor actuating lever; and
(E) adding a electronic controller which is coupled to said primary fuel supply system and to said actuator, said controller controlling said actuator to displace said governor actuating lever a sufficient amount to cause said liquid fuel supply system to supply an amount of liquid pilot fuel to said combustion cylinder commanded by said controller, said controller controlling said actuator and said primary fuel supply system to continue to supply both said primary gaseous fuel and said liquid pilot fuel to said cylinder during engine speed changes.
12. A method as defined in claim 11, further comprising automatically calibrating said system following said step D based upon sensed operating characteristics of said governor.
13. A method of converting an internal combustion engine from single fuel mode to dual fuel mode, said method comprising
(A) providing an engine which is operable in single fuel mode and which includes
(1) a combustion cylinder,
(2) a liquid fuel supply system which supplies liquid fuel to said combustion cylinder and which includes a fuel pump, an electronically controlled fuel supply rack which is connected to said pump and which is electronically movable to vary the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of said pump, and an electronically controlled governor which sets the position of said rack to cause said pump to deliver fuel at a commanded quantity per stroke, said governor including an actuating lever a portion of which is positioned externally of said engine and the position of which determines the position of said rack; and
(3) a throttle pedal which is mechanically coupled to said governor actuating lever;
(B) detaching said governor actuating lever from said throttle pedal;
(C) adding a primary fuel supply system which supplies a primary gaseous fuel to said combustion cylinder;
(D) adding an electronically controlled actuator and coupling said actuator to said portion of said governor actuating lever; and
(E) adding an electronic controller which is coupled to said primary fuel supply system and to said actuator, said controller controlling said actuator to displace said governor actuating lever a sufficient amount to cause said liquid fuel supply system to supply an amount of liquid pilot fuel to said combustion cylinder commanded by said controller, said controller controlling said actuator and said primary fuel supply system to continue to supply both said primary gaseous fuel and said pilot liquid fuel to said cylinder during engine speed changes.
14. A dual fuel engine comprising:
(A) a combustion cylinder;
(B) a primary fuel supply system which supplies a gaseous primary fuel to said combustion cylinder;
(C) a pilot fuel supply system which supplies a liquid pilot fuel to said combustion cylinder and which includes
(1) a pump,
(2) a rack which is connected to said pump and which is movable to vary the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of said pump, and
(3) a governor which is connected to said rack, said governor including an actuating lever which is displaceable to set the position of said rack and a portion of which is positioned externally of said engine;
(D) an actuator which is coupled to said portion of said actuating lever; and
(E) an electric controller which is coupled to said primary fuel supply system and to said actuator, said controller causing said actuator to automatically displace said governor actuating lever to control the position of said rack and thus the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of said pump, said controller controlling said actuator and said primary fuel supply system to continue to supply both said primary gaseous fuel and said pilot liquid fuel to said cylinder during engine speed changes.
15. An engine as defined in claim 14, wherein said actuator comprises a piston and cylinder device.
16. An engine as defined in claim 15, wherein said piston and cylinder device is a hydrualic piston and cylinder device, and further comprising a valve supplying pressurized liquid to at least one side of the piston of said hydraulic piston and cylinder device.
17. An engine as defined in claim 14, further comprising
(A) a throttle pedal position sensor;
(B) a governor actuating lever position sensor;
(C) (1) an engine speed sensor; and
(D) a foot pedal position sensor, wherein said electronic control unit is coupled to said actuator, said foot pedal position sensor, said governor actuating lever position sensor, and said engine speed sensor.
18. A system for calibrating a pilot liquid fuel supply system of a dual fuel internal combustion engine, comprising
(A) means for determining governor actuating lever positions at designated liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke;
(B) means for storing the determining positions and the designated liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke in an electronic memory; and
(C) means for sensing engine speeds under engine operating conditions at which liquid fuel delivery quantities per stroke required to obtain said engine speeds are known, and wherein said means for storing comprises means for creating and storing in said memory a table of governor actuating lever position verse fuel delivery quantities per stroke and engine speeds.
19. A method comprising:
(A) providing an internal combustion engine which includes
(1) a combustion cylinder,
(2) a pilot fuel supply system which supplies a pilot liquid fuel to said combustion cylinder and which includes a pump and a fuel supply rack which is connected to said pump and which is movable to vary the fuel delivery quantity per stroke of said pump,
(3) a primary fuel supply system which supplies a primary gaseous fuel to said combustion cylinder,
(4) a mechanical governor which mechanically sets the position of said rack, said governor a) having a governor actuating lever the position of which determines the position of said rack and a portion of which is positioned externally of said engine b) being of a type which is designed to use a principle of governor droop to set said rack at a position required to cause an actual engine speed to approach a commanded engine speed,
(5) an actuator coupled to said portion of said governor actuating lever,
(6) a throttle pedal,
(7) a throttle pedal position sensor coupled to said throttle pedal,
(8) an engine speed sensor,
(9) a governor actuating lever position sensor, and
(10) an electronic controller coupled to said primary fuel supply system, said actuator, said throttle pedal position sensor, said governor actuating lever position sensor, and said engine speed sensor;
(B) commanding an engine operating speed using said throttle pedal sensor;
(C) sensing engine operating conditions,
(D) electronically determining, based on said steps (B) and (C), a desired primary gaseous fuel delivery rate required for the commanded engine operating speed;
(E) electronically determining, based on said steps (B) and (C), a pilot liquid fuel delivery quantity per stroke required for the commanded engine operating condition;
(F) determining, based upon a prevailing sensed engine speed and upon a principle of governor droop, a governor actuating lever setting required to move said rack to a position which causes said pump to deliver said pilot liquid fuel at said desired quantity per stroke,
(G) automatically and electronically controlling said primary fuel supply system to supply said primary gaseous fuel to said combustion cylinder at said desired primary gaseous fuel delivery rate;
(H) automatically and electronically controlling said actuator to displace said governor actuating lever into said required setting, wherein said steps (G) and (H) continue during engine speed changes.
US08/377,279 1995-01-23 1995-01-23 Dual fuel engine having governor controlled pilot fuel injection system Expired - Fee Related US5526786A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08/377,279 US5526786A (en) 1995-01-23 1995-01-23 Dual fuel engine having governor controlled pilot fuel injection system

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08/377,279 US5526786A (en) 1995-01-23 1995-01-23 Dual fuel engine having governor controlled pilot fuel injection system

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US5526786A true US5526786A (en) 1996-06-18

Family

ID=23488474

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08/377,279 Expired - Fee Related US5526786A (en) 1995-01-23 1995-01-23 Dual fuel engine having governor controlled pilot fuel injection system

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US5526786A (en)

Cited By (59)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5868121A (en) * 1997-12-19 1999-02-09 Caterpillar Inc. Method and apparatus for relieving a differential pressure across a gaseous fuel admission valve of a dual fuel engine
US5937800A (en) * 1998-03-06 1999-08-17 Caterpillar Inc. Method for enabling a substantially constant total fuel energy rate within a dual fuel engine
US5975050A (en) * 1998-03-06 1999-11-02 Caterpillar Inc. Method for determining the energy content of a fuel delivered to an engine
US5979403A (en) * 1998-07-28 1999-11-09 Teledyne Industries, Inc. Fuel control system for an engine
US6000384A (en) * 1998-03-06 1999-12-14 Caterpillar Inc. Method for balancing the air/fuel ratio to each cylinder of an engine
US6009860A (en) * 1998-03-11 2000-01-04 Caterpillar Inc. Method for responding to detection of an open fault condition in a gaseous fuel admission valve of an engine
US6044806A (en) * 1997-12-19 2000-04-04 Caterpillar Inc. Method and apparatus for detecting gaseous fuel leakage through a gaseous fuel admission valve within an engine
US6055963A (en) * 1998-03-06 2000-05-02 Caterpillar Inc. Method for determining the energy content of a fuel delivered to an engine
US6062197A (en) * 1998-06-15 2000-05-16 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Hybrid power governor
US6073592A (en) * 1998-03-06 2000-06-13 Caterpillar Inc. Apparatus for an engine control system
US6085725A (en) * 1998-03-02 2000-07-11 Cummins Engine Co., Inc. Throttle control response selection system
US6101986A (en) * 1998-03-06 2000-08-15 Caterpillar Inc. Method for a controlled transition between operating modes of a dual fuel engine
US6112765A (en) * 1998-05-26 2000-09-05 Caterpillar Inc. Method and apparatus for monitoring operation of a gaseous fuel admission valve
US6152197A (en) * 1996-06-24 2000-11-28 Gerardot; Nolan P. Motor fuel dispensing method
US6230683B1 (en) 1997-08-22 2001-05-15 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Premixed charge compression ignition engine with optimal combustion control
US6276334B1 (en) 1998-02-23 2001-08-21 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Premixed charge compression ignition engine with optimal combustion control
US6286482B1 (en) 1996-08-23 2001-09-11 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Premixed charge compression ignition engine with optimal combustion control
US6289871B1 (en) 1998-03-06 2001-09-18 Caterpillar Inc. Method for achieving minimum liquid pilot fuel delivery to each cylinder of a dual fuel engine while operating in a dual fuel mode
US6336598B1 (en) * 1998-09-16 2002-01-08 Westport Research Inc. Gaseous and liquid fuel injector with a two way hydraulic fluid control valve
US6336430B2 (en) * 1998-06-29 2002-01-08 Fatpower Inc. Hydrogen generating apparatus
US6386149B1 (en) 1998-02-18 2002-05-14 Clean Fuel Technology, Inc. Method of operating an engine with a mixture of gaseous fuel and emulsified pilot fuel to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions
WO2002073017A1 (en) * 2001-03-13 2002-09-19 Etra S.P.A. Ecologic Transportation Systems Combined control of a dual fuel system for diesel cycle internal combustion engines
US6463907B1 (en) 1999-09-15 2002-10-15 Caterpillar Inc Homogeneous charge compression ignition dual fuel engine and method for operation
WO2003076788A1 (en) * 2002-03-08 2003-09-18 I-Sense Pty Ltd Dual fuel engine control
WO2004029438A1 (en) * 2002-09-24 2004-04-08 Engine Control Technology, Llc Methods and apparatus for operation of multiple fuel engines
US20040112333A1 (en) * 2002-12-12 2004-06-17 Robert Mitchell Governor stabilizer
US20040129236A1 (en) * 2001-02-27 2004-07-08 Ulanovsky Eduard Alexandrovich Regulating method for gas and liquid internal combustion engine
US6863034B2 (en) 2003-01-17 2005-03-08 Robert D. Kern Method of controlling a bi-fuel generator set
WO2005038227A2 (en) * 2003-10-20 2005-04-28 Mike Thompson Engine management system
US20050126515A1 (en) * 2001-01-19 2005-06-16 Fatpower Inc. Hydrogen generating apparatus and components therefor
WO2005064144A1 (en) * 2003-12-30 2005-07-14 Kruger Ventures Pty Ltd Compression ignition engine improvements
US7019626B1 (en) 2005-03-03 2006-03-28 Omnitek Engineering, Inc. Multi-fuel engine conversion system and method
US20090312935A1 (en) * 2006-06-01 2009-12-17 Jin-Woo Song Method and apparatus for supplying fuel of lpg car having lpi system
US20100076669A1 (en) * 2008-09-19 2010-03-25 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Motorcycle provided with engine setting system
US20110282545A1 (en) * 2010-05-11 2011-11-17 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Vehicle pedal apparatus with user actuation sensor, and related operating method
US20120060800A1 (en) * 2010-09-14 2012-03-15 Jason Eric Green Fuel mixture control system
US8726882B2 (en) 2010-03-16 2014-05-20 Briggs & Stratton Corporation Engine speed control system
US8820289B2 (en) 2011-09-27 2014-09-02 Jason Green Module containment of fuel control system for a vehicle
US8882071B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2014-11-11 Jason Green Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a containment area and mounting assembly for an alternate fuel
US8881933B2 (en) 2011-10-17 2014-11-11 Jason E. Green Vehicle mounting assembly for a fuel supply
US8910616B2 (en) 2011-04-21 2014-12-16 Briggs & Stratton Corporation Carburetor system for outdoor power equipment
US8915231B2 (en) 2010-03-16 2014-12-23 Briggs & Stratton Corporation Engine speed control system
RU2548334C1 (en) * 2014-04-02 2015-04-20 Федеральное государственное бюджетное образовательное учреждение высшего профессионального образования "Пензенская государственная сельскохозяйственная академия" Feed system of tractor diesel engine with manual feed control of mixed fuel
US9031763B2 (en) 2013-07-22 2015-05-12 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Fuel mixture system and assembly
US9248736B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2016-02-02 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a containment area and mounting assembly for an alternate fuel
US9254849B1 (en) 2014-10-07 2016-02-09 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Device and method for interfacing with a locomotive engine
US9278614B2 (en) 2011-10-17 2016-03-08 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Vehicle mounting assembly for a fuel supply
US9316175B2 (en) 2010-03-16 2016-04-19 Briggs & Stratton Corporation Variable venturi and zero droop vacuum assist
US9394841B1 (en) 2013-07-22 2016-07-19 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Fuel mixture system and assembly
US20160215723A1 (en) * 2013-10-10 2016-07-28 Cummins Inc. Fuel control for dual fuel engines
US9421861B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2016-08-23 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a containment area and mounting assembly for an alternate fuel
US9428047B2 (en) 2014-10-22 2016-08-30 Jason Green Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a hybrid fuel assembly and system
US9696066B1 (en) 2013-01-21 2017-07-04 Jason E. Green Bi-fuel refrigeration system and method of retrofitting
US9738154B2 (en) 2011-10-17 2017-08-22 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Vehicle mounting assembly for a fuel supply
US9845744B2 (en) 2013-07-22 2017-12-19 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Fuel mixture system and assembly
DE102016211792A1 (en) 2016-06-30 2018-01-04 Continental Automotive Gmbh Gas engine with auxiliary start system and method for operating a gas engine
US9885318B2 (en) 2015-01-07 2018-02-06 Jason E Green Mixing assembly
US9931929B2 (en) 2014-10-22 2018-04-03 Jason Green Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a hybrid fuel assembly and system
US10086694B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2018-10-02 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a containment area and mounting assembly for an alternate fuel

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2708916A (en) * 1952-11-22 1955-05-24 Fairbanks Morse & Co Fuel control system for internal combustion engines
US4603674A (en) * 1981-06-19 1986-08-05 Yanmar Diesel Engine Co., Ltd. Gas-diesel dual fuel engine
US4640245A (en) * 1984-05-31 1987-02-03 Kabushiki Kaisha Komatsu Seisakusho Method of controlling an engine mounted on a construction vehicle
US4757791A (en) * 1986-02-19 1988-07-19 Nippondenso Co., Ltd. Speed-governing apparatus for internal combustion engine
US4817568A (en) * 1985-08-24 1989-04-04 Gaspower International Limited Dual fuel compression ignition engine
US5224457A (en) * 1992-02-28 1993-07-06 Deere & Company Dual fuel electronic control system
US5315981A (en) * 1992-08-18 1994-05-31 Tecogen Inc. Method for converting a diesel engine to a natural gas fueled engine
US5355854A (en) * 1993-03-12 1994-10-18 Aubee Thomas A Supplemental gaseous fuel system for a diesel engine
US5370097A (en) * 1993-03-22 1994-12-06 Davis Family Trust Combined diesel and natural gas engine fuel control system and method of using such
US5408957A (en) * 1993-04-28 1995-04-25 Crowley; Timothy J. Continuous combustible gas injection into conventionally fueled internal combustion engines

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2708916A (en) * 1952-11-22 1955-05-24 Fairbanks Morse & Co Fuel control system for internal combustion engines
US4603674A (en) * 1981-06-19 1986-08-05 Yanmar Diesel Engine Co., Ltd. Gas-diesel dual fuel engine
US4640245A (en) * 1984-05-31 1987-02-03 Kabushiki Kaisha Komatsu Seisakusho Method of controlling an engine mounted on a construction vehicle
US4817568A (en) * 1985-08-24 1989-04-04 Gaspower International Limited Dual fuel compression ignition engine
US4757791A (en) * 1986-02-19 1988-07-19 Nippondenso Co., Ltd. Speed-governing apparatus for internal combustion engine
US5224457A (en) * 1992-02-28 1993-07-06 Deere & Company Dual fuel electronic control system
US5315981A (en) * 1992-08-18 1994-05-31 Tecogen Inc. Method for converting a diesel engine to a natural gas fueled engine
US5355854A (en) * 1993-03-12 1994-10-18 Aubee Thomas A Supplemental gaseous fuel system for a diesel engine
US5370097A (en) * 1993-03-22 1994-12-06 Davis Family Trust Combined diesel and natural gas engine fuel control system and method of using such
US5408957A (en) * 1993-04-28 1995-04-25 Crowley; Timothy J. Continuous combustible gas injection into conventionally fueled internal combustion engines

Cited By (81)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6152197A (en) * 1996-06-24 2000-11-28 Gerardot; Nolan P. Motor fuel dispensing method
US6286482B1 (en) 1996-08-23 2001-09-11 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Premixed charge compression ignition engine with optimal combustion control
US20040103860A1 (en) * 1996-08-23 2004-06-03 Cummins Inc. Premixed charge compression ignition engine with optimal combustion control
US6230683B1 (en) 1997-08-22 2001-05-15 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Premixed charge compression ignition engine with optimal combustion control
US5868121A (en) * 1997-12-19 1999-02-09 Caterpillar Inc. Method and apparatus for relieving a differential pressure across a gaseous fuel admission valve of a dual fuel engine
US6044806A (en) * 1997-12-19 2000-04-04 Caterpillar Inc. Method and apparatus for detecting gaseous fuel leakage through a gaseous fuel admission valve within an engine
US6386149B1 (en) 1998-02-18 2002-05-14 Clean Fuel Technology, Inc. Method of operating an engine with a mixture of gaseous fuel and emulsified pilot fuel to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions
US6276334B1 (en) 1998-02-23 2001-08-21 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Premixed charge compression ignition engine with optimal combustion control
US6085725A (en) * 1998-03-02 2000-07-11 Cummins Engine Co., Inc. Throttle control response selection system
US6289871B1 (en) 1998-03-06 2001-09-18 Caterpillar Inc. Method for achieving minimum liquid pilot fuel delivery to each cylinder of a dual fuel engine while operating in a dual fuel mode
US6055963A (en) * 1998-03-06 2000-05-02 Caterpillar Inc. Method for determining the energy content of a fuel delivered to an engine
US6000384A (en) * 1998-03-06 1999-12-14 Caterpillar Inc. Method for balancing the air/fuel ratio to each cylinder of an engine
US6101986A (en) * 1998-03-06 2000-08-15 Caterpillar Inc. Method for a controlled transition between operating modes of a dual fuel engine
US6073592A (en) * 1998-03-06 2000-06-13 Caterpillar Inc. Apparatus for an engine control system
US5975050A (en) * 1998-03-06 1999-11-02 Caterpillar Inc. Method for determining the energy content of a fuel delivered to an engine
US6158418A (en) * 1998-03-06 2000-12-12 Caterpillar Inc. Method for balancing the air/fuel ratio to each cylinder of an engine
US5937800A (en) * 1998-03-06 1999-08-17 Caterpillar Inc. Method for enabling a substantially constant total fuel energy rate within a dual fuel engine
US6009860A (en) * 1998-03-11 2000-01-04 Caterpillar Inc. Method for responding to detection of an open fault condition in a gaseous fuel admission valve of an engine
US6112765A (en) * 1998-05-26 2000-09-05 Caterpillar Inc. Method and apparatus for monitoring operation of a gaseous fuel admission valve
US6062197A (en) * 1998-06-15 2000-05-16 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Hybrid power governor
US6336430B2 (en) * 1998-06-29 2002-01-08 Fatpower Inc. Hydrogen generating apparatus
WO2000006878A1 (en) * 1998-07-28 2000-02-10 Teledyne Technologies Incorporated A fuel control system for an engine
US5979403A (en) * 1998-07-28 1999-11-09 Teledyne Industries, Inc. Fuel control system for an engine
US6336598B1 (en) * 1998-09-16 2002-01-08 Westport Research Inc. Gaseous and liquid fuel injector with a two way hydraulic fluid control valve
US6463907B1 (en) 1999-09-15 2002-10-15 Caterpillar Inc Homogeneous charge compression ignition dual fuel engine and method for operation
US20060219190A1 (en) * 2001-01-19 2006-10-05 Hy-Drive Technologies Ltd. Hydrogen generating apparatus and components therefor
US7240641B2 (en) 2001-01-19 2007-07-10 Hy-Drive Technologies Ltd. Hydrogen generating apparatus and components therefor
US20050126515A1 (en) * 2001-01-19 2005-06-16 Fatpower Inc. Hydrogen generating apparatus and components therefor
US20040129236A1 (en) * 2001-02-27 2004-07-08 Ulanovsky Eduard Alexandrovich Regulating method for gas and liquid internal combustion engine
WO2002073017A1 (en) * 2001-03-13 2002-09-19 Etra S.P.A. Ecologic Transportation Systems Combined control of a dual fuel system for diesel cycle internal combustion engines
EP1243776A1 (en) * 2001-03-13 2002-09-25 Etra S.p.A. Ecologic Transportation Systems Combined control of dual fuel system for diesel cycle engines
AU2003206503B2 (en) * 2002-03-08 2006-09-21 Morris, Beverley Jane Dual fuel engine control
US7093588B2 (en) 2002-03-08 2006-08-22 I-Sense Pty Ltd Dual fuel engine control
WO2003076788A1 (en) * 2002-03-08 2003-09-18 I-Sense Pty Ltd Dual fuel engine control
US20050121005A1 (en) * 2002-03-08 2005-06-09 I-Sense Pty Ltd Dual fuel engine control
US20070295316A1 (en) * 2002-09-24 2007-12-27 Davis Frank J Methods and Apparatus for Operation of Multiple Fuel Engines
CN100414082C (en) * 2002-09-24 2008-08-27 发动机控制技术有限责任公司 Methods and apparatus for operation of multiple fuel engines
US7509209B2 (en) 2002-09-24 2009-03-24 Engine Control Technology, Llc Methods and apparatus for operation of multiple fuel engines
WO2004029438A1 (en) * 2002-09-24 2004-04-08 Engine Control Technology, Llc Methods and apparatus for operation of multiple fuel engines
US7222015B2 (en) 2002-09-24 2007-05-22 Engine Control Technology, Llc Methods and apparatus for operation of multiple fuel engines
US20040111210A1 (en) * 2002-09-24 2004-06-10 Davis Frank J. Methods and apparatus for operation of multiple fuel engines
US6983736B2 (en) 2002-12-12 2006-01-10 Briggs & Stratton Corporation Governor stabilizer
US20040112333A1 (en) * 2002-12-12 2004-06-17 Robert Mitchell Governor stabilizer
US6863034B2 (en) 2003-01-17 2005-03-08 Robert D. Kern Method of controlling a bi-fuel generator set
WO2005038227A3 (en) * 2003-10-20 2005-06-16 Mike Thompson Engine management system
WO2005038227A2 (en) * 2003-10-20 2005-04-28 Mike Thompson Engine management system
WO2005064144A1 (en) * 2003-12-30 2005-07-14 Kruger Ventures Pty Ltd Compression ignition engine improvements
US7019626B1 (en) 2005-03-03 2006-03-28 Omnitek Engineering, Inc. Multi-fuel engine conversion system and method
US20090312935A1 (en) * 2006-06-01 2009-12-17 Jin-Woo Song Method and apparatus for supplying fuel of lpg car having lpi system
US7949460B2 (en) * 2006-06-01 2011-05-24 Continental Automotive Systems Corporation Method and apparatus for supplying fuel of LPG car having LPI system
US20100076669A1 (en) * 2008-09-19 2010-03-25 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Motorcycle provided with engine setting system
US7912626B2 (en) * 2008-09-19 2011-03-22 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Motorcycle provided with engine setting system
US8915231B2 (en) 2010-03-16 2014-12-23 Briggs & Stratton Corporation Engine speed control system
US9316175B2 (en) 2010-03-16 2016-04-19 Briggs & Stratton Corporation Variable venturi and zero droop vacuum assist
US8726882B2 (en) 2010-03-16 2014-05-20 Briggs & Stratton Corporation Engine speed control system
US8340863B2 (en) * 2010-05-11 2012-12-25 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Vehicle pedal apparatus with user actuation sensor, and related operating method
US20110282545A1 (en) * 2010-05-11 2011-11-17 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Vehicle pedal apparatus with user actuation sensor, and related operating method
US9528447B2 (en) * 2010-09-14 2016-12-27 Jason Eric Green Fuel mixture control system
US20120060800A1 (en) * 2010-09-14 2012-03-15 Jason Eric Green Fuel mixture control system
US8910616B2 (en) 2011-04-21 2014-12-16 Briggs & Stratton Corporation Carburetor system for outdoor power equipment
US9598828B2 (en) 2011-04-21 2017-03-21 Briggs & Stratton Corporation Snowthrower including power boost system
US8882071B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2014-11-11 Jason Green Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a containment area and mounting assembly for an alternate fuel
US9421861B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2016-08-23 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a containment area and mounting assembly for an alternate fuel
US9248736B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2016-02-02 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a containment area and mounting assembly for an alternate fuel
US10086694B2 (en) 2011-09-16 2018-10-02 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a containment area and mounting assembly for an alternate fuel
US8820289B2 (en) 2011-09-27 2014-09-02 Jason Green Module containment of fuel control system for a vehicle
US8881933B2 (en) 2011-10-17 2014-11-11 Jason E. Green Vehicle mounting assembly for a fuel supply
US9738154B2 (en) 2011-10-17 2017-08-22 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Vehicle mounting assembly for a fuel supply
US9278614B2 (en) 2011-10-17 2016-03-08 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Vehicle mounting assembly for a fuel supply
US9696066B1 (en) 2013-01-21 2017-07-04 Jason E. Green Bi-fuel refrigeration system and method of retrofitting
US9394841B1 (en) 2013-07-22 2016-07-19 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Fuel mixture system and assembly
US9031763B2 (en) 2013-07-22 2015-05-12 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Fuel mixture system and assembly
US9845744B2 (en) 2013-07-22 2017-12-19 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Fuel mixture system and assembly
US20160215723A1 (en) * 2013-10-10 2016-07-28 Cummins Inc. Fuel control for dual fuel engines
RU2548334C1 (en) * 2014-04-02 2015-04-20 Федеральное государственное бюджетное образовательное учреждение высшего профессионального образования "Пензенская государственная сельскохозяйственная академия" Feed system of tractor diesel engine with manual feed control of mixed fuel
US9254849B1 (en) 2014-10-07 2016-02-09 Gaseous Fuel Systems, Corp. Device and method for interfacing with a locomotive engine
US9428047B2 (en) 2014-10-22 2016-08-30 Jason Green Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a hybrid fuel assembly and system
US9931929B2 (en) 2014-10-22 2018-04-03 Jason Green Modification of an industrial vehicle to include a hybrid fuel assembly and system
US9885318B2 (en) 2015-01-07 2018-02-06 Jason E Green Mixing assembly
DE102016211792A1 (en) 2016-06-30 2018-01-04 Continental Automotive Gmbh Gas engine with auxiliary start system and method for operating a gas engine
WO2018001606A1 (en) 2016-06-30 2018-01-04 Continental Automotive Gmbh Gas internal combustion engine with auxiliary starting system, and method for operating a gas internal combustion engine

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
DE102015103621B4 (en) Method for setting a torque capacity of a machine using a model prediction controller
US8417436B2 (en) Boosted engine control responsive to driver selected performance
CN103016177B (en) For consolidating the system and method for engine torque request
DE102009051874B4 (en) Engine control system and method
AU2008300435B2 (en) Dual fuel engine control unit
EP1170492B1 (en) Method and system for engine control
DE3103183C2 (en)
EP0923665B1 (en) Method for operating an internal combustion engine, in particular for a motor vehicle
EP0679219B1 (en) Engine control unit
DE102010018573B4 (en) A method and system for controlling torque during a vehicle launch condition
DE4335866C2 (en) Non-return fuel delivery system
CN100347429C (en) Control system for internal combustion engine
US7277788B2 (en) Charge density control for an internal combustion engine
AU2010202193B2 (en) Method and apparatus for controlling liquid fuel delivery during transition between modes in a multimode engine
US5875743A (en) Apparatus and method for reducing emissions in a dual combustion mode diesel engine
EP0760424B1 (en) Gaseous fuel direct injection system for internal combustion engines
US6814062B2 (en) Method for operating an internal combustion engine
CN100414082C (en) Methods and apparatus for operation of multiple fuel engines
US6679221B2 (en) Controlling the injection in a fuel system selectively operable with gasoline or fuel gas
AU716458B2 (en) Fixed throttle torque demand strategy
KR870000168B1 (en) Apparatus for controlling a hydraulic power system
US6279531B1 (en) System and method for controlling engine torque
DE102009003948B4 (en) Engine control system and engine control method
US6298824B1 (en) Engine control system using an air and fuel control strategy based on torque demand
US6092507A (en) Control arrangement for a direct-injecting internal combustion engine

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SERVOJET PRODUCTS INTERNATIONAL, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BECK, NIELS J.;BARKHIMER, ROBERT L.;WESELOH, WILLIAM E.;REEL/FRAME:007423/0119

Effective date: 19950214

AS Assignment

Owner name: CATERPILLAR INC., ILLINOIS

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CLEAN AIR PARTNERS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:007894/0226

Effective date: 19960222

REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
LAPS Lapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
FP Expired due to failure to pay maintenance fee

Effective date: 20000618

AS Assignment

Owner name: CATERPILLAR INC., ILLINOIS

Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CLEAN AIR PARTNERS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:011177/0258

Effective date: 19980108

AS Assignment

Owner name: CLEAN AIR PARTNERS, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SERVOJET PRODUCTS INTERNATIONAL, INC.;REEL/FRAME:013563/0519

Effective date: 20010126

AS Assignment

Owner name: COMERICA BANK - CALIFORNIA, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CLEAN AIR PARTNERS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:013897/0728

Effective date: 20030219

STCH Information on status: patent discontinuation

Free format text: PATENT EXPIRED DUE TO NONPAYMENT OF MAINTENANCE FEES UNDER 37 CFR 1.362