US5395361A - Expandable fiberoptic catheter and method of intraluminal laser transmission - Google Patents

Expandable fiberoptic catheter and method of intraluminal laser transmission Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US5395361A
US5395361A US08260818 US26081894A US5395361A US 5395361 A US5395361 A US 5395361A US 08260818 US08260818 US 08260818 US 26081894 A US26081894 A US 26081894A US 5395361 A US5395361 A US 5395361A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
catheter
balloon
fibers
sheath
optical fibers
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US08260818
Inventor
Kenneth R. Fox
A. Arthur Coster
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
MENDELSON RICHARD S SPECIAL RECEIVER LAND CLARK CARROLL MENDELSON & BLAIR PC
WHITE STAR HOLDINGS Ltd
Original Assignee
Pillco LP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/18Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves
    • A61B18/20Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser
    • A61B18/22Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser the beam being directed along or through a flexible conduit, e.g. an optical fibre; Couplings or hand-pieces therefor
    • A61B18/24Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser the beam being directed along or through a flexible conduit, e.g. an optical fibre; Couplings or hand-pieces therefor with a catheter
    • A61B18/245Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser the beam being directed along or through a flexible conduit, e.g. an optical fibre; Couplings or hand-pieces therefor with a catheter for removing obstructions in blood vessels or calculi
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/18Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves
    • A61B18/20Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser
    • A61B18/22Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser the beam being directed along or through a flexible conduit, e.g. an optical fibre; Couplings or hand-pieces therefor
    • A61B18/26Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using laser the beam being directed along or through a flexible conduit, e.g. an optical fibre; Couplings or hand-pieces therefor for producing a shock wave, e.g. laser lithotripsy
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/22Implements for squeezing-off ulcers or the like on the inside of inner organs of the body; Implements for scraping-out cavities of body organs, e.g. bones; Calculus removers; Calculus smashing apparatus; Apparatus for removing obstructions in blood vessels, not otherwise provided for
    • A61B2017/22038Implements for squeezing-off ulcers or the like on the inside of inner organs of the body; Implements for scraping-out cavities of body organs, e.g. bones; Calculus removers; Calculus smashing apparatus; Apparatus for removing obstructions in blood vessels, not otherwise provided for with a guide wire
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/22Implements for squeezing-off ulcers or the like on the inside of inner organs of the body; Implements for scraping-out cavities of body organs, e.g. bones; Calculus removers; Calculus smashing apparatus; Apparatus for removing obstructions in blood vessels, not otherwise provided for
    • A61B2017/22051Implements for squeezing-off ulcers or the like on the inside of inner organs of the body; Implements for scraping-out cavities of body organs, e.g. bones; Calculus removers; Calculus smashing apparatus; Apparatus for removing obstructions in blood vessels, not otherwise provided for with an inflatable part, e.g. balloon, for positioning, blocking, or immobilisation
    • A61B2017/22061Implements for squeezing-off ulcers or the like on the inside of inner organs of the body; Implements for scraping-out cavities of body organs, e.g. bones; Calculus removers; Calculus smashing apparatus; Apparatus for removing obstructions in blood vessels, not otherwise provided for with an inflatable part, e.g. balloon, for positioning, blocking, or immobilisation for spreading elements apart

Abstract

A catheter system for intraluminal laser surgery is disclosed. The catheter system comprises an elastically expansible catheter sheath housing a plurality of optical fibers arranged in a circular array about an inflatable balloon. Inflation and deflation of the balloon expands and contracts the diameters of both the optical fiber array and the catheter. Throughout inflation and deflation of the balloon the distal ends of the fiberoptic light guides are maintained generally parallel to the lumen wall thereby maximizing the safety and efficacy of the procedure.

Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to an expandable fiberoptic catheter and a method of transmitting laser energy through a catheter, especially for intraluminal surgical procedures such as laser angioplasty, laser atherectomy, laser thrombolysis, laser lithotripsy and the like.

It is well known that laser energy may be transmitted through a plurality of optical fibers housed in a relatively flexible tubular catheter which may be inserted into a body lumen, such as a blood vessel, ureter, fallopian tube, cerebral artery, etc., to remove obstructions in the lumen. Our prior U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,784,132; 4,800,876; 4,848,336 and 5,041,108, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference, describe apparatus, including catheters, and methods that may be used for the intraluminal transmission of laser energy through a plurality of optical fibers to remove obstructions in a body lumen. U.S. Pat. No. 5,250,045 discloses another type of catheter that may also be used for the intraluminal transmission of laser energy. Such catheters as are in use at the present time for laser angioplasty and similar procedures typically have a central passage or tube which receives a guide wire inserted into the body lumen prior to introduction of the catheter.

Typical of commercially available laser angioplasty equipment are the CVX-300 Excimer Laser Angioplasty System and Extreme and Vitesse catheters manufactured by The Spectranetics Corporation of Colorado Springs, Colo. and the DYMER 200+ Excimer Laser Angioplasty System and LITVACK catheters manufactured by Advanced Interventional Systems, Inc. of Irvine, Calif.

One common drawback of most catheters which house a plurality of optical fibers, especially those for use in removing obstruction from small diameter body lumens, such as blood vessels, is that the longitudinal axes of the fibers are spaced radially inwardly from the inner wall of the lumen to a significant degree. Such spacing includes, for example, the thickness of the catheter sheath and any cladding on the optical fibers as well as the radial spacing between the outside periphery of the catheter and the inner lumen wall. Typically, the outermost diameter of the catheter is substantially less than the diameter of the lumen so that the catheter can pass through the lumen without difficulty. Where the laser energy is used to vaporize an obstruction in the body lumen such radial spacing of the optical fibers from the lumen wall results in drilling one or several relatively small diameter holes in the central area of the obstruction thereby leaving a substantial annular portion of the obstruction against the lumen wall.

In the case of laser angioplasty, it has been a common practice to perform a subsequent adjunctive balloon angioplasty procedure in the hope of compacting to some extent the annular portion of the obstruction that remains after the laser angioplasty procedure has been completed. Not only is the balloon angioplasty procedure a time-consuming and expensive adjunct to the laser angioplasty procedure, it adds significantly to the possibility of mechanical damage or trauma to the vessel wall and, if anything, results in a greater likelihood of restenosis than with laser angioplasty alone.

It would be desirable therefore to provide a catheter designed to enable the laser energy to impinge upon and remove or vaporize an obstruction in a body lumen as close as possible to the wall of the body lumen without thermal or mechanical damage to the lumen wall itself.

It has been suggested that inflatable balloons might be used to move the optical fibers radially inwardly and outwardly relative to the longitudinal axis of the catheter. Our aforementioned patents disclose a catheter in which an array of four optical fibers is moved along a radial plane by a balloon. U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,790,310; 5,066,292; 5,176,674; and 5,203,779 all disclose catheters which can transmit laser energy for use in laser angioplasty in which a balloon or other inflatable component is used to alter the positions of the optical fibers housed in the catheter. However, some of the prior art catheters have certain drawbacks that make their use less than optimum and in some cases potentially dangerous. For example, the aforesaid U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,790,310; 5,066,292; and 5,203,799 position the axes of the optical fibers at an outwardly diverging angle relative to the axis of the catheter. Such orientation of the optical fibers presents the danger that the laser energy will impinge upon the wall of the lumen and possibly vaporize or perforate the lumen wall. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,176,674 and 5,203,779 teach embedding the optical fibers in the wall of the inflatable member which requires the wall to be of a greater thickness than necessary to contain the inflating fluid and therefore more difficult to inflate.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention overcomes the drawbacks and disadvantages of the prior art catheter devices by providing an elastically expandable catheter containing a plurality of optical fibers arranged in an array, such as a circular array, so that each of the optical fibers is movable along a radial plane in an orientation substantially parallel to the central longitudinal axis of the catheter. The catheter of the invention is also useful in carrying out a novel method of transmitting laser energy intraluminally, and especially for use in vaporizing or removing obstructions in a body lumen, although other uses will be apparent to the skilled artisan.

Preferably, the catheter is moved to the site within the body lumen where the laser surgical procedure is to be performed by a conventional guide wire which passes through a central tube extending along a longitudinal axis of the catheter. The central tube through which the guide wire passes is flexible but need not be and is preferably not radially elastic.

A longitudinally elongate annular balloon is disposed about the central guide wire tube so as to be radially outwardly inflatable from a collapsed or deflated condition. The outermost wall of the balloon has a cylindrical shape and retains that shape as it is inflated and deflated. A plurality of optical fibers are arranged, preferably in concentric equiangular spaced relation, about the outermost periphery of the balloon and may be attached to the outermost cylindrical wall of the balloon near the distal end of the catheter. Surrounding the concentric array of optical fibers is a catheter sheath which is also elastically expandable and, preferably, has a relatively thin wall.

In this embodiment, as the balloon is inflated to expand the catheter, the spacing between the axes of adjacent fibers will increase thereby creating "dead spaces" where laser energy does not impinge upon an obstruction, for example. Such dead spaces do not pose a problem, however, since the catheter may be rotated incrementally to provide laser coverage for the dead spaces.

In an alternate embodiment of the invention, the annular space between the outermost cylindrical surface of the balloon and the innermost surface of the catheter is relatively densely packed with a plurality of optical fibers which may comprise one or more concentric rows or layers of optical fibers. The fibers are preferably not attached to the balloon nor to the catheter sheath nor to one another, but rather are permitted to shift relative to each other in the annular space between the sheath and the balloon. This arrangement provides maximum density of laser coverage at a given radius from the center of the catheter and avoids the need to rotate the catheter to obtain complete coverage.

Preferably, the free ends of the optical fibers are flush with the distal end surface of the catheter so that the ends of the fibers are in close proximity to the luminal obstruction. Inflation of the balloon moves the distal end portions of the optical fibers radially outwardly generally parallel to the longitudinal axis of the catheter so that for each inflation diameter, laser beams carried by the fibers will impinge on a different annular region. In this way, substantially full area coverage of the lumen is possible between the deflated condition and the fully inflated condition where the catheter sheath outer diameter equals the lumen diameter.

It is also contemplated within the scope of the invention that the optical fibers may be eccentrically arranged in only a limited arcuate portion of the catheter. The optical fibers are preferably quartz silica fibers suitable for transmitting most types of laser energy transmissible through an optical fiber, including continuous wave (CW), chopped and pulsed laser energy, etc., at wavelengths from about 300 nanometers up to about 2.2 microns. If desired, the proximal ends of the fibers may be scanned with a laser beam as described in our aforementioned patents with an optical or mechanical scanner or with any other suitable fiber scanning mechanism. Such scanning may be simultaneous, sequential, selective or random as is necessary for a particular application or surgical procedure. Fluid inflow and outflow to the laser surgical site is preferably achieved by the use of the central guide wire passage or by tubes extending through the central guide wire passage.

According to the method aspects of the invention, after the guide wire is inserted into the body lumen, the guide tube of the expandable catheter is threaded onto the guide wire and advanced to the surgical site, e.g., an obstruction in the lumen. When the distal end of the catheter is advanced into close proximity to or in abutment with the obstruction, the laser is energized and laser energy, e.g., pulsed laser energy, is transmitted through the optical fibers so as to impinge upon the obstruction in a first annular region located at a first radial distance from the catheter axis. Thereafter, the balloon is inflated a given amount to move the fibers radially outwardly to a greater distance so that laser energy transmitted through the fibers impinges on a second annular region located at a second radial distance from the catheter axis greater than the first radial distance. That process of inflation and laser firing is repeated with or without catheter rotation as necessary until the outermost periphery of the catheter sheath engages the inner peripheral wall of the body lumen. At that position, a thin annular rim of the obstruction substantially equal to the thickness of the catheter sheath remains disposed about the lumen wall. For safety purposes such thin rim should remain so that the laser beam does not impinge directly upon the tissue of the lumen wall.

It is a significant advantage of the present invention that a single catheter can be used in safely and effectively carrying out laser surgical procedures in body lumens of different diameters without danger of perforation or thermal damage to the lumen walls. Moreover, because the laser fibers can be positioned at different radial distances from the catheter axis by incrementally inflating the balloon, a greater area of coverage is possible with a given number of optical fibers. Because the catheter can be advanced to the surgical site in its smallest diameter deflated condition, the catheter of the invention is more readily negotiated past deviations of the body lumen from a straight line.

With the foregoing and other objects, advantages and features of the invention that will become hereinafter apparent, the nature of the invention may be more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description of the invention, the appended claims and to the several views illustrated in the attached drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the distal end of the catheter of the present invention with the balloon deflated;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the distal end of the catheter of the present invention with the balloon inflated;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the catheter along line 3--3 of FIG. 1 showing the catheter with the balloon deflated in a body lumen adjacent a partial occlusion of the lumen;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the catheter along line 4--4 with the balloon inflated in a body lumen adjacent a partial occlusion of the lumen;

FIG. 5 is an end view of the distal end of the catheter of the present invention, with the balloon deflated;

FIG. 6 is an end view of the distal end of the catheter with the balloon inflated;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary detail of an end view of the distal end of an alternate embodiment of the catheter of the present invention with the balloon deflated; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary detail of an end view of the distal end of the FIG. 7 alternate embodiment of the catheter with the balloon inflated.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring now in detail to the drawings wherein like parts are designated by like reference numerals throughout, there is illustrated in FIG. 1 a perspective view of the distal end 11 of the catheter system of the present invention which is designated generally by reference numeral 10. Catheter system 10 generally comprises an elastically expansible catheter sheath 12 housing a plurality of optical fibers 14 arranged in a circular array about an inflatable balloon 16. Inflation and deflation of balloon 16 expands and contracts the diameters of both the optical fiber array 14 and the catheter sheath 12.

Balloon 16 is formed as an elongated cylindrical tube or toroidal element with inner and outer cylindrical walls 18, 20, respectively (FIG. 2) and annular front and rear end walls 22, 24, respectively, which define an internal cavity or space 26. Cavity 26 in the deflated condition has essentially zero volume as shown in FIG. 3 and may be inflated with a gas, such as carbon dioxide or the like, via an inflation tube 28.

The inner wall 18 of balloon 16 is supported by a flexible, but radially substantially non-elastic, central tube 30 having a bore 32 through which a guide wire 34 passes generally along the longitudinal axis A of the catheter 10. Central tube 30 has a sufficiently large diameter for the passage of fluids to and from a surgical site at the distal end 11 of the catheter 10 through bore 32 or through other tubes (not shown) disposed in bore 32. It is also contemplated that the tube 30 may have a smaller diameter sufficient to accommodate only the guide wire 34. In such case, the flow of fluids to and from the surgical site may be accomplished through the passages or interstices between the optical fibers or through separate tubes (not shown) positioned between the optical fibers.

Optical fibers 14 are arranged about the outer wall 20 of the balloon 16 preferably in equiangular spaced relation. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-6, twenty (20) fibers are used for illustrative purposes only, it being understood that a greater or lesser number of fibers may be used in the annular space between the balloon 16 and sheath 12. Conventional cladded optical fibers made of quartz silica are preferably used and may have diameters in the range of about 50-200 microns. Although the overall diameter of the catheter 10 will vary depending on the particular surgical application involved, for laser angioplasty, diameters in the range of from about 1.2 to about 2.2 millimeters for the deflated condition of the balloon and from about 2.0 to about 3.0 millimeters for the fully inflated condition of the balloon are contemplated, it being understood that such ranges are not to be considered to limit the invention.

As shown in FIG. 1, in the fully deflated condition, a slight bend 36 is preferably formed in the optical fiber 14 in the transition region 38 between the distal end portion 11 housing the balloon 16 and the intermediate portion 40 of the catheter extending to the proximal end thereof (not shown). In the fully inflated condition shown in FIG. 2, the "slack" represented by bend 36 in FIG. 1 has been taken up by the elongation of the transition region 38 and the fibers 14 each have a straight inclined portion 36' in the transition region 38.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4 which illustrate in cross-section the catheter 10 of FIGS. 1 and 2, respectively, in the deflated and inflated conditions, the fibers 14 are shown as being attached to the outer wall 20 of the balloon by an adhesive layer 42 which is preferably a flexible adhesive, such as a silicon rubber adhesive. The adhesive layer holds each optical fiber 14 in proper orientation and does not significantly affect the elasticity of the outer wall 20 of the balloon 16.

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate end views of the distal end portion 11 of the catheter 10 of FIGS. 1 and 3 and FIGS. 2 and 4, respectively. FIG. 5 shows the catheter distal end 11 with the balloon 16 in the deflated or uninflated condition with the overall diameter of the catheter distal end 11 at a first dimension d1. FIG. 6 shows the distal end 11 with the balloon in the fully inflated condition and the overall diameter of the distal end 11 at a second dimension d2 greater than the first dimension d1. While the angular spacing B between adjacent fibers 14 remains the same in the deflated and inflated conditions of FIGS. 5 and 6, the linear or chordal spacing c between fibers in the deflated c condition is less than the spacing e between fibers in the inflated condition. The length of the distal end 11 of the catheter is sufficient to maintain the straight and parallel orientation of the optical fibers 14 for the full range of inflation of the balloon 16. This advantageously maintains the distal ends of the fibers coplanar with the front face of the catheter so that laser energy is emitted from the ends of the fibers in an orientation parallel to the longitudinal axis A of the catheter, thus preventing undesirable impingement of laser energy on the wall of the body lumen.

Referring again to FIGS. 3 and 4, one example of use of the catheter at a surgical site will be described. As shown in FIG. 3, the guide wire 34 has been advanced in a conventional manner through a body lumen L such as a blood vessel, in which an obstruction O partially blocks the lumen. The distal end 11 of the catheter is shown with the balloon 16 in its deflated condition and the bore 32 of guide tube 30 threaded onto the guide wire 34. The catheter distal end 11 has a diameter d1 (FIG. 5) less than the diameter of the lumen L so that the catheter can pass relatively easily through the lumen until the forward face of the catheter abuts the obstruction O. When that occurs, laser energy, such as pulsed laser energy, is transmitted through the optical fibers, simultaneously, sequentially or in any other appropriate manner, to vaporize or remove those portions of the obstruction confronting the fibers. The same procedure is repeated after the catheter has been rotated so that the laser beams impinge on new areas of the obstruction and is continued until the central opening in the obstruction has been enlarged to a diameter corresponding to the diameter of the optical fiber array.

Next, a gaseous fluid, such as carbon dioxide, is introduced to inflation tube 28 so as to incrementally inflate balloon 16 and move the fibers 14 radially and parallelly outwardly. Laser energy is again transmitted through the fibers to vaporize or remove additional portions of the obstruction as described above. The above steps are repeated until the distal end of the catheter is fully inflated to the position shown in FIG. 4. After treatment of the obstruction by the laser beam at the FIG. 4 position the obstruction O will be removed out to the diameter f defined by the phantom lines in FIG. 4 leaving only a thin annular rim portion R of the obstruction in the body lumen.

Gases or vapors resulting from the vaporization of the obstruction O as well as any particulate matter resulting from impingement of the laser beams on the obstruction may be carried away by suction applied to the proximal end of central tube 30 or a separate suction tube (not shown) extending through tube 30. After insertion of the catheter into abutment with the obstruction O, it may be possible to inflate the balloon to the fully inflated condition shown in FIG. 4 before operating the laser. In such case, the unvaporized material of the obstruction which is cut away from the lumen wall may be withdrawn by suction through tube 30. Advantageously, the distal end surfaces of the optical fibers directly abut the obstruction to enhance the transmission of laser energy to the obstruction.

Now referring to FIGS. 7 and 8, an alternative embodiment of the invention is illustrated. In this embodiment, the annular space between the balloon 16 and catheter sheath 12 is relatively densely packed with two or more radially extending layers of optical fibers 14 comprising, for example, 100 or more fibers. In the deflated condition of the balloon 16 shown in FIG. 7, the effective radius of the optical fiber array is represented by radius r1. Upon inflation of balloon 16, the optical fibers 14 tend to realign themselves relative to one another as shown in FIG. 8 with radius r2 representing the new and greater effective radius of the fiber array. Continued inflation beyond the radius shown in FIG. 8 will cause the fibers to shift into a single layer of fibers with still another effective radius greater than radius r2. In this embodiment, the innermost layer of fibers may be bonded to the outer surface of balloon 16 and the outermost layer of fibers may be bonded to the inner surface of catheter sheath 12. Alternately, the fibers need not be bonded to the balloon or sheath, but are permitted to assume their natural positions relative one another.

Other configurations of fiber optic arrays are contemplated within the scope of the present invention, it being understood that the invention is not intended to be limited to the two fiber optic arrays illustrated in the drawings.

Although certain presently preferred embodiments of the invention have been described herein, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which the invention pertains that variations and modifications of the described embodiment may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, it is intended that the invention be limited only to the extent required by the appended claims and the applicable rules of law.

Claims (20)

What we claim is:
1. A catheter for the intraluminal transmission of laser energy comprising:
an outer sheath having a distal end, a longitudinal axis and inner and outer surfaces;
an inflatable balloon disposed substantially concentrically in said sheath and having a substantially cylindrical outer peripheral surface;
a plurality of optical fibers, each having an axis and a distal end portion and being disposed in an annular space between the outer peripheral surface of said balloon and the inner surface of the sheath such that the distal end portions of said fibers are arranged substantially parallel to one another and to the longitudinal axis of the sheath;
means for inflating said balloon from a deflated condition in which the axes of said optical fibers are located at a first radial distance from the longitudinal axis of the sheath to an inflated condition in which the axes of said optical fibers are located at a second radial distance from the longitudinal axis of the sheath greater than the first radial distance.
2. The catheter of claim 1, wherein said optical fibers are affixed to the outer peripheral surface of the balloon.
3. The catheter of claim 2, wherein said optical fibers are equiangularly spaced about the longitudinal axis of the catheter sheath.
4. The catheter of claim 1, including a central tube surrounding the longitudinal axis of the outer sheath for receiving a guide wire, said balloon having a substantially cylindrical inner peripheral surface through which said central tube extends.
5. The catheter of claim 1, wherein said optical fibers each have an end surface, the end surfaces of said optical fibers being substantially parallel to one another and oriented at substantially right angles to the longitudinal axis of the outer sheath.
6. The catheter of claim 1, wherein said optical fibers are densely packed in the annular space between the balloon and the outer sheath.
7. The catheter of claim 1, wherein said outer sheath has a substantially cylindrical shape in the inflated and deflated conditions of said balloon.
8. The catheter of claim 1, wherein said outer sheath is made of an elastically expansible material.
9. The catheter of claim 1, wherein said optical fibers comprise quartz silica fibers adapted to transmit laser energy having wavelengths in the range of from about 300 nanometers up to about 2.2 microns.
10. The catheter of claim 10, wherein said optical fibers have a diameter in the range of about 50-200 microns.
11. The catheter of claim 1, wherein said optical fibers are affixed to said balloon with a flexible adhesive.
12. The catheter of claim 1, including a tube for flowing fluid to and from the distal end of the outer sheath, said tube being disposed along the longitudinal axis of the outer sheath.
13. A catheter for the intraluminal transmission of laser energy comprising:
a central tube having a longitudinal axis through which a guide wire is adapted to pass;
an inflatable balloon having an elongated toroidal shape disposed about said central tube and having an exterior cylindrical surface;
a plurality of optical fibers each having an optical axis and being affixed to the exterior cylindrical surface of said balloon such that, upon inflation of said balloon from a deflated to an inflated condition, the optical axes of said fibers are moved radially outwardly relative to the longitudinal axis of the central tube;
an outer elastic sheath disposed concentrically about said optical fibers, said balloon and said central tube; and
means for inflating and deflating said balloon to enlarge the diameter of said catheter and move the axes of the fibers radially outwardly.
14. The catheter of claim 13, wherein said fibers are densely packed in the space between the balloon and outer sheath.
15. The catheter of claim 13, wherein the optical fibers each have a planar end surface, the end surfaces of said fibers being arranged in substantially coplanar relation.
16. The catheter of claim 13, wherein said optical fibers comprise quartz glass fibers having a diameter of from about 50-200 microns.
17. A method of operating a catheter for intraluminal laser surgery wherein said catheter comprises an outer sheath having a distal end, a longitudinal axis and inner and outer surfaces, an inflatable balloon disposed substantially concentrically in said sheath and having a substantially cylindrical outer peripheral surface, a plurality of optical fibers, each having an axis and a distal end portion and being disposed in an annular space between the outer peripheral surface of said balloon and the inner surface of the sheath such that the distal end portions of said fibers are arranged substantially parallel to one another and to the longitudinal axis of the sheath, comprising the steps of:
inserting the catheter with the balloon deflated into a body lumen up to an obstruction site in the lumen;
placing the distal end portions of the fibers into abutting relation with the obstruction;
transmitting laser energy through the fibers;
inflating the balloon such that the distal end portions of the fibers move radially and parallelly outwardly relative to each other and to the longitudinal axis of the sheath; and
transmitting laser energy through the fibers.
18. The method of claim 17, including the step of inserting a guide wire into the body lumen prior to inserting the catheter into the lumen and guiding the catheter to the site of the obstruction on the guide wire.
19. The method of claim 17, including the steps of:
deflating the balloon from its inflated condition;
rotating the catheter about the longitudinal axis of the sheath;
inflating the balloon such that the distal end portions of the fibers move radially and parallelly outwardly relative to each other and to the longitudinal axis of the sheath; and
transmitting laser energy through the filter.
20. The method of claim 17, wherein the optical fibers have end surfaces and including the step of placing the end surfaces of the fibers into contacting relation with the obstruction.
US08260818 1994-06-16 1994-06-16 Expandable fiberoptic catheter and method of intraluminal laser transmission Expired - Lifetime US5395361A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08260818 US5395361A (en) 1994-06-16 1994-06-16 Expandable fiberoptic catheter and method of intraluminal laser transmission

Applications Claiming Priority (6)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08260818 US5395361A (en) 1994-06-16 1994-06-16 Expandable fiberoptic catheter and method of intraluminal laser transmission
DE1995121298 DE19521298A1 (en) 1994-06-16 1995-06-10 Catheter for transmitting laser energy into body cavities and method of operating the catheter
KR19950015569A KR100188468B1 (en) 1994-06-16 1995-06-13 Expandable fiberoptic catheter and method of intraluminal laser transmission
JP14847195A JPH08634A (en) 1994-06-16 1995-06-15 Catheter for transmitting laser energy into canal-cavity and its use
FR9507146A FR2722085B1 (en) 1994-06-16 1995-06-15 expandable catheter has fiber optic and laser transmission method in a free passage
ZA9504995A ZA9504995B (en) 1994-06-16 1995-06-15 Basket-style carrier with retainer tabs

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US5395361A true US5395361A (en) 1995-03-07

Family

ID=22990742

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08260818 Expired - Lifetime US5395361A (en) 1994-06-16 1994-06-16 Expandable fiberoptic catheter and method of intraluminal laser transmission

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (1) US5395361A (en)
JP (1) JPH08634A (en)
KR (1) KR100188468B1 (en)
DE (1) DE19521298A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2722085B1 (en)

Cited By (61)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5624433A (en) * 1995-04-24 1997-04-29 Interventional Technologies Inc. Angioplasty balloon with light incisor
US5776129A (en) * 1996-06-12 1998-07-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Endometrial ablation apparatus and method
WO1998043703A1 (en) * 1997-03-31 1998-10-08 Prescott Marvin A Method and apparatus for therapeutic laser treatment
WO1999020189A1 (en) * 1997-10-21 1999-04-29 The Regents Of The University Of California Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels
US6022309A (en) * 1996-04-24 2000-02-08 The Regents Of The University Of California Opto-acoustic thrombolysis
US6129721A (en) * 1997-06-04 2000-10-10 J. Morita Manufacturing Corporation Medical laser treatment device and laser probe for the same
US6156028A (en) * 1994-03-21 2000-12-05 Prescott; Marvin A. Method and apparatus for therapeutic laser treatment of wounds
US6368318B1 (en) 1998-01-23 2002-04-09 The Regents Of The University Of California Opto-acoustic recanilization delivery system
US20020045890A1 (en) * 1996-04-24 2002-04-18 The Regents Of The University O F California Opto-acoustic thrombolysis
US6375651B2 (en) 1999-02-19 2002-04-23 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Laser lithotripsy device with suction
US6384915B1 (en) * 1998-03-30 2002-05-07 The Regents Of The University Of California Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry
US6673070B2 (en) * 1994-06-24 2004-01-06 Curon Medical, Inc. Sphincter treatment apparatus
US20040204651A1 (en) * 1998-09-03 2004-10-14 Freeman Jenny E. Infrared endoscopic balloon probes
US20040230178A1 (en) * 2003-05-12 2004-11-18 Show-Mean Wu Cutting balloon catheter with improved pushability
US20050033225A1 (en) * 2003-08-08 2005-02-10 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Catheter shaft for regulation of inflation and deflation
US20050038383A1 (en) * 2003-08-14 2005-02-17 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Catheter having a cutting balloon including multiple cavities or multiple channels
US20050201759A1 (en) * 2004-02-12 2005-09-15 Wenshen Wang Photonic RF distribution system
US20060106412A1 (en) * 2004-11-12 2006-05-18 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having a segmented blade
US20060106413A1 (en) * 2004-11-12 2006-05-18 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having flexible atherotomes
US20060173446A1 (en) * 2005-01-28 2006-08-03 Alcon, Inc. Surgical apparatus
US20060184191A1 (en) * 2005-02-11 2006-08-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having increased flexibility regions
US20060253112A1 (en) * 2005-05-05 2006-11-09 Ceramoptec Industries, Inc. Cosmetic laser treatment device and method for localized lipodystrophies and flaccidity
US20070208257A1 (en) * 2006-03-03 2007-09-06 Furnish Simon M Lateral Viewing Optical Catheters
US20070219451A1 (en) * 2006-03-03 2007-09-20 John Kula Optical Imaging Balloon Catheters
US20070270787A1 (en) * 1998-08-13 2007-11-22 Winston Thomas R Expandable laser catheter
US20080123083A1 (en) * 2006-11-29 2008-05-29 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan System and Method for Photoacoustic Guided Diffuse Optical Imaging
US20080173093A1 (en) * 2007-01-18 2008-07-24 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan System and method for photoacoustic tomography of joints
US20080221647A1 (en) * 2007-02-23 2008-09-11 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan System and method for monitoring photodynamic therapy
US20080304074A1 (en) * 2007-06-08 2008-12-11 Brennan Iii James F Optical catheter configurations combining raman spectroscopy with optical fiber-based low coherence reflectometry
US20090054763A1 (en) * 2006-01-19 2009-02-26 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan System and method for spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography
US20090182315A1 (en) * 2007-12-07 2009-07-16 Ceramoptec Industries Inc. Laser liposuction system and method
US20090254072A1 (en) * 2008-04-02 2009-10-08 Yazan Khatib Laser Catheter with an Adjustable Distal Tip for Increasing the Laser Target Zone
US20090287143A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-11-19 Casey Line Small Gauge Mechanical Tissue Cutter/Aspirator Probe For Glaucoma Surgery
US20090287233A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-11-19 Huculak John C Small Gauge Mechanical Tissue Cutter/Aspirator Probe For Glaucoma Surgery
US20100049177A1 (en) * 2008-08-22 2010-02-25 Emed, Inc. Microdermabrasion System with Combination Skin Therapies
US20100113906A1 (en) * 2008-11-06 2010-05-06 Prescient Medical, Inc. Hybrid basket catheters
US7754047B2 (en) 2004-04-08 2010-07-13 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter and method for blade mounting
US7758604B2 (en) 2003-05-29 2010-07-20 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter with improved balloon configuration
US20100204651A1 (en) * 2009-02-06 2010-08-12 Mark Stringham Automatic safety occluder
US20100312232A1 (en) * 2009-06-03 2010-12-09 Guangyao Jia Capsulotomy Repair Device and Method for Capsulotomy Repair
US20100312252A1 (en) * 2009-06-03 2010-12-09 Guangyao Jia Capsularhexis device with flexible heating element having an angled transitional neck
US20100318027A1 (en) * 2006-10-25 2010-12-16 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Instrument with an inflatable balloon
US20110202049A1 (en) * 2010-02-18 2011-08-18 Alcon Research, Ltd. Small Gauge Ablation Probe For Glaucoma Surgery
US8137344B2 (en) 2008-12-10 2012-03-20 Alcon Research, Ltd. Flexible, automated capsulorhexis device
US8157797B2 (en) 2009-01-12 2012-04-17 Alcon Research, Ltd. Capsularhexis device with retractable bipolar electrodes
US20120289947A1 (en) * 2010-01-18 2012-11-15 Wolfgang Neuberger Device and method for removing veins
US20130123714A1 (en) * 2011-11-15 2013-05-16 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Vessel protection membrane
CN103584829A (en) * 2013-10-24 2014-02-19 上海交通大学 Endoscope surgical instrument outer sheath with variable rigidity
US20140114298A1 (en) * 2004-09-17 2014-04-24 The Spectranetics Coparation Rapid exchange bias laser catheter design
USD707818S1 (en) 2013-03-05 2014-06-24 Alcon Research Ltd. Capsulorhexis handpiece
US8945047B2 (en) 2004-04-21 2015-02-03 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Traction balloon
EP2763618A4 (en) * 2011-10-03 2015-06-24 Biolase Inc Surgical laser cutting device
USD737438S1 (en) 2014-03-04 2015-08-25 Novartis Ag Capsulorhexis handpiece
US9125720B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2015-09-08 Alcon Research, Ltd. Capsularhexis device with flexible heating element
US9149388B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2015-10-06 Alcon Research, Ltd. Attenuated RF power for automated capsulorhexis
US9241755B2 (en) 2010-05-11 2016-01-26 Alcon Research, Ltd. Capsule polishing device and method for capsule polishing
US9539052B2 (en) 1998-02-19 2017-01-10 Mederi Therapeutics, Inc. Sphincter treatment apparatus
US9623211B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-04-18 The Spectranetics Corporation Catheter movement control
US9700655B2 (en) 2011-10-14 2017-07-11 Ra Medical Systems, Inc. Small flexible liquid core catheter for laser ablation in body lumens and methods for use
US9757200B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-09-12 The Spectranetics Corporation Intelligent catheter
US9962527B2 (en) 2013-10-16 2018-05-08 Ra Medical Systems, Inc. Methods and devices for treatment of stenosis of arteriovenous fistula shunts

Families Citing this family (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP6344930B2 (en) * 2014-02-25 2018-06-20 大日本印刷株式会社 Laser probes and laser equipment
DE102016111363A1 (en) * 2016-06-21 2017-12-21 Olympus Winter & Ibe Gmbh Endoscope having flexible light guides glued

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4790310A (en) * 1987-02-04 1988-12-13 Robert Ginsburg Laser catheter having wide angle sweep
US5176674A (en) * 1990-03-05 1993-01-05 Schneider (Europe) Ag Angioplasty light guide catheter for the removal of stenoses using laser light energy
US5203777A (en) * 1992-03-19 1993-04-20 Lee Peter Y Radiopaque marker system for a tubular device
US5226430A (en) * 1984-10-24 1993-07-13 The Beth Israel Hospital Method for angioplasty

Family Cites Families (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5041108A (en) * 1981-12-11 1991-08-20 Pillco Limited Partnership Method for laser treatment of body lumens
US4784132B1 (en) * 1983-03-25 1990-03-13 R Fox Kenneth
US4800876B1 (en) * 1981-12-11 1991-07-09 R Fox Kenneth
US4848336A (en) * 1981-12-11 1989-07-18 Fox Kenneth R Apparatus for laser treatment of body lumens
DE3406294A1 (en) * 1984-02-22 1985-09-05 Hubmann Max Catheter
JPS60176641A (en) * 1984-02-23 1985-09-10 Shiley Inc Laser catheter having fixed focus
EP0387755A1 (en) * 1989-03-17 1990-09-19 Schott Glaswerke Catheter system for revascularisation in the human body
US5203779A (en) * 1989-03-17 1993-04-20 Schott Glaswerke Catheter system for vessel recanalization in the human body
FR2651440B1 (en) * 1989-09-01 1997-11-28 Georges Boussignac Catheter for bodily conduit, such as a blood vessel.
FR2675388B1 (en) * 1991-04-22 1993-07-30 Boussignac Georges Catheter indicated to be introduced into a body channel.
US5250045A (en) * 1991-06-11 1993-10-05 The Spectranetics Corporation Optical fiber catheter with spaced optical fiber

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5226430A (en) * 1984-10-24 1993-07-13 The Beth Israel Hospital Method for angioplasty
US4790310A (en) * 1987-02-04 1988-12-13 Robert Ginsburg Laser catheter having wide angle sweep
US5176674A (en) * 1990-03-05 1993-01-05 Schneider (Europe) Ag Angioplasty light guide catheter for the removal of stenoses using laser light energy
US5203777A (en) * 1992-03-19 1993-04-20 Lee Peter Y Radiopaque marker system for a tubular device

Cited By (98)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6156028A (en) * 1994-03-21 2000-12-05 Prescott; Marvin A. Method and apparatus for therapeutic laser treatment of wounds
US6454791B1 (en) 1994-03-21 2002-09-24 Marvin A. Prescott Laser therapy for foot conditions
US5989245A (en) * 1994-03-21 1999-11-23 Prescott; Marvin A. Method and apparatus for therapeutic laser treatment
US6673070B2 (en) * 1994-06-24 2004-01-06 Curon Medical, Inc. Sphincter treatment apparatus
US7125407B2 (en) 1994-06-24 2006-10-24 Curon Medical, Inc. Sphincter treatment apparatus
US20070032788A1 (en) * 1994-06-24 2007-02-08 Curon Medical, Inc. Sphincter treatment apparatus
US5624433A (en) * 1995-04-24 1997-04-29 Interventional Technologies Inc. Angioplasty balloon with light incisor
US6022309A (en) * 1996-04-24 2000-02-08 The Regents Of The University Of California Opto-acoustic thrombolysis
US20020045890A1 (en) * 1996-04-24 2002-04-18 The Regents Of The University O F California Opto-acoustic thrombolysis
US5776129A (en) * 1996-06-12 1998-07-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Endometrial ablation apparatus and method
WO1998043703A1 (en) * 1997-03-31 1998-10-08 Prescott Marvin A Method and apparatus for therapeutic laser treatment
US6129721A (en) * 1997-06-04 2000-10-10 J. Morita Manufacturing Corporation Medical laser treatment device and laser probe for the same
WO1999020189A1 (en) * 1997-10-21 1999-04-29 The Regents Of The University Of California Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels
US20050021013A1 (en) * 1997-10-21 2005-01-27 Endo Vasix, Inc. Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels
US6368318B1 (en) 1998-01-23 2002-04-09 The Regents Of The University Of California Opto-acoustic recanilization delivery system
US9539052B2 (en) 1998-02-19 2017-01-10 Mederi Therapeutics, Inc. Sphincter treatment apparatus
US6384915B1 (en) * 1998-03-30 2002-05-07 The Regents Of The University Of California Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry
US20130253486A1 (en) * 1998-08-13 2013-09-26 The Spectranetics Corporation Expandable laser catheter
US9254175B2 (en) * 1998-08-13 2016-02-09 The Spectranetics Corporation Expandable laser catheter
US8182474B2 (en) * 1998-08-13 2012-05-22 The Spectranetics Corp. Expandable laser catheter
US8465480B2 (en) * 1998-08-13 2013-06-18 The Spectranetics Corporation Expandable laser catheter
US20160135893A1 (en) * 1998-08-13 2016-05-19 The Spectranetics Corporation Expandable laser catheter
US9566116B2 (en) * 1998-08-13 2017-02-14 The Spectranetics Corporation Expandable laser catheter
US20070270787A1 (en) * 1998-08-13 2007-11-22 Winston Thomas R Expandable laser catheter
US8538507B2 (en) 1998-09-03 2013-09-17 Hypermed Imaging, Inc. Infrared endoscopic balloon probes
US8024027B2 (en) * 1998-09-03 2011-09-20 Hyperspectral Imaging, Inc. Infrared endoscopic balloon probes
US20040204651A1 (en) * 1998-09-03 2004-10-14 Freeman Jenny E. Infrared endoscopic balloon probes
US7104983B2 (en) 1999-02-19 2006-09-12 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Laser lithotripsy device with suction
US20040243123A1 (en) * 1999-02-19 2004-12-02 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Laser lithotripsy device with suction
US6726681B2 (en) 1999-02-19 2004-04-27 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Laser lithotripsy device with suction
US6375651B2 (en) 1999-02-19 2002-04-23 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Laser lithotripsy device with suction
US8617193B2 (en) 2003-05-12 2013-12-31 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Balloon catheter with improved pushability
US20040230178A1 (en) * 2003-05-12 2004-11-18 Show-Mean Wu Cutting balloon catheter with improved pushability
US8172864B2 (en) 2003-05-12 2012-05-08 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Balloon catheter with improved pushability
US7758604B2 (en) 2003-05-29 2010-07-20 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter with improved balloon configuration
US7780626B2 (en) 2003-08-08 2010-08-24 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Catheter shaft for regulation of inflation and deflation
US20050033225A1 (en) * 2003-08-08 2005-02-10 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Catheter shaft for regulation of inflation and deflation
US20050038383A1 (en) * 2003-08-14 2005-02-17 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Catheter having a cutting balloon including multiple cavities or multiple channels
US7887557B2 (en) 2003-08-14 2011-02-15 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Catheter having a cutting balloon including multiple cavities or multiple channels
US20050201759A1 (en) * 2004-02-12 2005-09-15 Wenshen Wang Photonic RF distribution system
US7754047B2 (en) 2004-04-08 2010-07-13 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter and method for blade mounting
US8945047B2 (en) 2004-04-21 2015-02-03 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Traction balloon
US9308047B2 (en) * 2004-09-17 2016-04-12 The Spectranetics Corporation Rapid exchange bias laser catheter design
US20140114298A1 (en) * 2004-09-17 2014-04-24 The Spectranetics Coparation Rapid exchange bias laser catheter design
US10111709B2 (en) 2004-09-17 2018-10-30 The Spectranetics Corporation Rapid exchange bias laser catheter design
US20060106412A1 (en) * 2004-11-12 2006-05-18 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having a segmented blade
US9017353B2 (en) 2004-11-12 2015-04-28 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having flexible atherotomes
US8361096B2 (en) 2004-11-12 2013-01-29 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having flexible atherotomes
US9603619B2 (en) 2004-11-12 2017-03-28 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having flexible atherotomes
US20060106413A1 (en) * 2004-11-12 2006-05-18 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having flexible atherotomes
US8038691B2 (en) 2004-11-12 2011-10-18 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having flexible atherotomes
US8690903B2 (en) 2004-11-12 2014-04-08 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having flexible atherotomes
US20060173446A1 (en) * 2005-01-28 2006-08-03 Alcon, Inc. Surgical apparatus
US20060184191A1 (en) * 2005-02-11 2006-08-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having increased flexibility regions
US7993358B2 (en) 2005-02-11 2011-08-09 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cutting balloon catheter having increased flexibility regions
US20060253112A1 (en) * 2005-05-05 2006-11-09 Ceramoptec Industries, Inc. Cosmetic laser treatment device and method for localized lipodystrophies and flaccidity
US8801764B2 (en) * 2005-05-05 2014-08-12 Biolitec Pharma Marketing Ltd Cosmetic laser treatment device and method for localized lipodystrophies and flaccidity
US20090054763A1 (en) * 2006-01-19 2009-02-26 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan System and method for spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography
US20070219451A1 (en) * 2006-03-03 2007-09-20 John Kula Optical Imaging Balloon Catheters
US20070208257A1 (en) * 2006-03-03 2007-09-06 Furnish Simon M Lateral Viewing Optical Catheters
US20100318027A1 (en) * 2006-10-25 2010-12-16 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Instrument with an inflatable balloon
US8702743B2 (en) 2006-10-25 2014-04-22 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Instrument with an inflatable balloon
US20080123083A1 (en) * 2006-11-29 2008-05-29 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan System and Method for Photoacoustic Guided Diffuse Optical Imaging
US20080173093A1 (en) * 2007-01-18 2008-07-24 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan System and method for photoacoustic tomography of joints
US20080221647A1 (en) * 2007-02-23 2008-09-11 The Regents Of The University Of Michigan System and method for monitoring photodynamic therapy
US20080304074A1 (en) * 2007-06-08 2008-12-11 Brennan Iii James F Optical catheter configurations combining raman spectroscopy with optical fiber-based low coherence reflectometry
US7952719B2 (en) 2007-06-08 2011-05-31 Prescient Medical, Inc. Optical catheter configurations combining raman spectroscopy with optical fiber-based low coherence reflectometry
US20090182315A1 (en) * 2007-12-07 2009-07-16 Ceramoptec Industries Inc. Laser liposuction system and method
US20090254072A1 (en) * 2008-04-02 2009-10-08 Yazan Khatib Laser Catheter with an Adjustable Distal Tip for Increasing the Laser Target Zone
US20090287143A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-11-19 Casey Line Small Gauge Mechanical Tissue Cutter/Aspirator Probe For Glaucoma Surgery
US20090287233A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-11-19 Huculak John C Small Gauge Mechanical Tissue Cutter/Aspirator Probe For Glaucoma Surgery
US20100049177A1 (en) * 2008-08-22 2010-02-25 Emed, Inc. Microdermabrasion System with Combination Skin Therapies
US8945104B2 (en) * 2008-08-22 2015-02-03 Envy Medical, Inc. Microdermabrasion system with combination skin therapies
US9125720B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2015-09-08 Alcon Research, Ltd. Capsularhexis device with flexible heating element
US20100113906A1 (en) * 2008-11-06 2010-05-06 Prescient Medical, Inc. Hybrid basket catheters
US8137344B2 (en) 2008-12-10 2012-03-20 Alcon Research, Ltd. Flexible, automated capsulorhexis device
US8157797B2 (en) 2009-01-12 2012-04-17 Alcon Research, Ltd. Capsularhexis device with retractable bipolar electrodes
US20100204651A1 (en) * 2009-02-06 2010-08-12 Mark Stringham Automatic safety occluder
US20100312232A1 (en) * 2009-06-03 2010-12-09 Guangyao Jia Capsulotomy Repair Device and Method for Capsulotomy Repair
US8814854B2 (en) 2009-06-03 2014-08-26 Alcon Research, Ltd. Capsulotomy repair device and method for capsulotomy repair
US20100312252A1 (en) * 2009-06-03 2010-12-09 Guangyao Jia Capsularhexis device with flexible heating element having an angled transitional neck
US20120289947A1 (en) * 2010-01-18 2012-11-15 Wolfgang Neuberger Device and method for removing veins
US20110202049A1 (en) * 2010-02-18 2011-08-18 Alcon Research, Ltd. Small Gauge Ablation Probe For Glaucoma Surgery
US9241755B2 (en) 2010-05-11 2016-01-26 Alcon Research, Ltd. Capsule polishing device and method for capsule polishing
US9351872B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2016-05-31 Alcon Research, Ltd. Attenuated RF power for automated capsulorhexis
US9149388B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2015-10-06 Alcon Research, Ltd. Attenuated RF power for automated capsulorhexis
EP2763618A4 (en) * 2011-10-03 2015-06-24 Biolase Inc Surgical laser cutting device
US9700655B2 (en) 2011-10-14 2017-07-11 Ra Medical Systems, Inc. Small flexible liquid core catheter for laser ablation in body lumens and methods for use
US20130123714A1 (en) * 2011-11-15 2013-05-16 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Vessel protection membrane
USD707818S1 (en) 2013-03-05 2014-06-24 Alcon Research Ltd. Capsulorhexis handpiece
US9623211B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-04-18 The Spectranetics Corporation Catheter movement control
US9827055B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-11-28 The Spectranetics Corporation Catheter movement control
US10092363B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-10-09 The Spectranetics Corporation Intelligent catheter
US9757200B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-09-12 The Spectranetics Corporation Intelligent catheter
US9962527B2 (en) 2013-10-16 2018-05-08 Ra Medical Systems, Inc. Methods and devices for treatment of stenosis of arteriovenous fistula shunts
CN103584829A (en) * 2013-10-24 2014-02-19 上海交通大学 Endoscope surgical instrument outer sheath with variable rigidity
CN103584829B (en) * 2013-10-24 2015-07-08 上海交通大学 Endoscope surgical instrument outer sheath with variable rigidity
USD737438S1 (en) 2014-03-04 2015-08-25 Novartis Ag Capsulorhexis handpiece

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DE19521298A1 (en) 1995-12-21 application
FR2722085A1 (en) 1996-01-12 application
KR100188468B1 (en) 1999-06-01 grant
JPH08634A (en) 1996-01-09 application
FR2722085B1 (en) 1998-09-11 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5817144A (en) Method for contemporaneous application OF laser energy and localized pharmacologic therapy
US5514128A (en) Fiber optic guide wire and support catheter therefor
US4646737A (en) Localized heat applying medical device
USRE36764E (en) Expandable tip atherectomy method and apparatus
US5634935A (en) Balloon dissection instrument and method of dissection
US5728123A (en) Balloon actuated catheter
US5137512A (en) Multisegment balloon protector for dilatation catheter
US7935108B2 (en) Deflectable sheath catheters
US4732448A (en) Delivery system for high-energy pulsed ultraviolet laser light
US6022309A (en) Opto-acoustic thrombolysis
US5855563A (en) Method and apparatus for sequentially performing multiple intraluminal procedures
US5308323A (en) Multiple compartment balloon catheter
US5593404A (en) Method of treatment of prostate
US5423846A (en) Dottering auger catheter system
US6626861B1 (en) Balloon catheter apparatus and method
US5441497A (en) Light diffusing guidewire
US6273880B1 (en) Catheters with integrated lumen and methods of their manufacture and use
US4631052A (en) Method and apparatus for surgically removing remote deposits
US4798586A (en) Method and apparatus for aiding dilatation catheterization
US5176675A (en) Use of lasers to break down objects for removal from within the body
US5458573A (en) Everting toposcopic dilation catheter
US5762631A (en) Method and system for reduced friction introduction of coaxial catheters
US5222966A (en) Balloon connection and inflation lumen for atherectomy catheter
US6527763B2 (en) Flow apparatus for the disruption of occlusions
US5458575A (en) Perfusion catheter having a cylindrical array of balloons

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: PILLCO LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, VIRGINIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:FOX, KENNETH R.;COSTER, A. ARTHUR;REEL/FRAME:007049/0770

Effective date: 19940608

AS Assignment

Owner name: INTERLASE LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, VIRGINIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PILLCO LIMITED PARTNERSHIP;REEL/FRAME:007803/0990

Effective date: 19960212

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

AS Assignment

Owner name: WHITE STAR HOLDINGS LTD., TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS

Free format text: DUPLICATE RECORDING;ASSIGNOR:INTERLASE LIMITED PARTNERSHIP;REEL/FRAME:009479/0575

Effective date: 19980911

Owner name: RICHARD COLOMBIK, ILLINOIS

Free format text: DUPLICATE RECORDING;ASSIGNOR:INTERLASE LIMITED PARTNERSHIP;REEL/FRAME:009479/0575

Effective date: 19980911

AS Assignment

Owner name: WHITE STAR HOLDINGS LTD., TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:INTERLASE LIMITED PARTNERSHIP;REEL/FRAME:009342/0631

Effective date: 19980911

AS Assignment

Owner name: MENDELSON, RICHARD S., SPECIAL RECEIVER LAND, CLAR

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNOR S INTEREST BY WAY OF COURT ORDER CHANCERY NO. 98-505 APPOINTING SPECIAL RECEIVER (ASSIGNMENT RECORDED AT REEL 9342, FRAME 0631 FROM INTERLASE LIMITED PARTNERSHIP TO WHITE STAR HOLDINGS LTD. WAS DEEMED FRAUDULENT AND VOID BY JUDGE KENDRICK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY F ARLINGTON, VA, CHANCERY NO.98-505, DATED DECEMBER 18, 1998).;ASSIGNOR:WHITESTAR HOLDINGS LTD.;REEL/FRAME:009580/0547

Effective date: 19980914

AS Assignment

Owner name: SPECIAL RECEIVER OF INTERLASE, LP FOR BENEFIT OF C

Free format text: COURT ORDER;ASSIGNOR:ARLINGTON COUNTY VIRGINIA CIRCUIT COURT;REEL/FRAME:010710/0232

Effective date: 20000320

REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
REIN Reinstatement after maintenance fee payment confirmed
FP Expired due to failure to pay maintenance fee

Effective date: 20030307

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8

SULP Surcharge for late payment
PRDP Patent reinstated due to the acceptance of a late maintenance fee

Effective date: 20030522

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 12

AS Assignment

Owner name: THE SPECTRANETICS CORPORATION, COLORADO

Free format text: TRUSTEE S QUIT-CLAIM BILL OF SALE;ASSIGNOR:GOLD, H. JASON;REEL/FRAME:023750/0701

Effective date: 20090910

AS Assignment

Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, COLORADO

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:THE SPECTRANETICS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:026100/0647

Effective date: 20110225

AS Assignment

Owner name: THE SPECTRANETICS CORPORATION, COLORADO

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION;REEL/FRAME:037261/0819

Effective date: 20151208