US539423A - Jacob emig - Google Patents

Jacob emig Download PDF

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US539423A
US539423A US539423DA US539423A US 539423 A US539423 A US 539423A US 539423D A US539423D A US 539423DA US 539423 A US539423 A US 539423A
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drill
portion
socket
handle
socketed
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23GTHREAD CUTTING; WORKING OF SCREWS, BOLT HEADS, OR NUTS, IN CONJUNCTION THEREWITH
    • B23G1/00Thread cutting; Automatic machines specially designed therefor
    • B23G1/44Equipment or accessories specially designed for machines or devices for thread cutting
    • B23G1/48Equipment or accessories specially designed for machines or devices for thread cutting for guiding the threading tools
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T408/00Cutting by use of rotating axially moving tool
    • Y10T408/63Tool or tool-support with torque-applying ratchet
    • Y10T408/637Tool or tool-support with torque-applying ratchet with thrust applying means
    • Y10T408/639Reversible ratchet

Description

(No Model.)

J. EMIG.

RATGHET DRILL.

No. 539,423. lPatented My 21, 1895.

F ig.1

NVitnesses:

Attorney.

UNTTED STATES PATENT EEicE JACOB EMIG, OF BUFFALO, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO GUSTAVUS A. SOHAEFER AND HENRY L. SCHAEFER, OF SAME PLACE. l

RATO H 5T-DRILL.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent N o. 539,423, dated May 21, 1,895.

Application filed April 10, 1894. Serial No. 507,030. (No model.)

To @ZZ whom t may concern,.-

Be it known that I, JACOB EMIG, a citizen of the United States, residing in Buffalo, in the county of Erie and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Ratchet-Drills, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to certain improvements inthe construction of ratchet drills by which their operation is rendered more convenient and effective, all of which will -be fully and clearly hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in whichy Figure] is a side elevation of a ratchetd'rill made in accordance with my invention. Fig. 2 is a detached side elevation of the socketed portion of the drill-socket holder. Fig. 3 is ahorizontal section on or about line a a, Fig. 2. Fig. 4 represents a vertical longitudinal central section through a completed drill, cutting centrally through all parts eX- cept a portion of the drill-socket, the removable pawl, and its several parts. Fig. 5 is a top view of the drillfhead and a portion of the handle. Fig. 6 representsa side elevation of a socketed wrench portion adapted to be used and operated with this ratchet-drill. Fig. 7 is an under side end view of the same.

Referring to said drawings, the operating sleeve 1, is provided with an interior screw threaded portion 2, which is rigidly secured to the inside of the sleeve 1, by being driven tightly in place through an opening in the top of the sleeve. At the,top on the outside, is the usual center or hardened steel point 3, which is formed in one piece with the screw 2, but it may be made separate and secured to it in any well known way. Near the ltop of the sleeve is a series of radially arranged holes 3a whereby a small bar may be used to turn it when necessary.

The drill head 4, is'provided with the usual opening 5, adapted to receive the drill socket, and a hollow portion 6, projecting from one side of the same and having a screw threaded portion 7, adapted to receive the end of the handle 8, which is rigidly securedA to it substantially as shown in Fig. 4.

The socketed portion of the drill is provided with a body portion 9,/,flaving a series of depressions l0, forming ratchet teeth l0?. Below the teeth is a shoulder 11, and above them is a screw portion 12, adapted to receive the nut 13, to hold. the drill-head and socket portion in place. The portion 14, extending above the screw portion is adapted to t and pass easily into the case 1. The sides of the depressions 10, are both alike and extend straight inward toward the center of the 6o socket portion. The teeth 10a, therefore are of substantially the same thickness throughout their-length.

Just above the screw portion l2, is a rectangular transverse opening 15, which leaves a rectangular opening at the bottom of the tapering drill socket to receive the attened end of the drill socket shank and thereby prevent it from turning. y

` 16 represents the ordinary removable drill 7o socket. It is provided with atapering shank 16a, and with the usual square hole 17, (see Fig. 4,) adapted to receive the square shank of a drill. Within the part 6, is a short cy lindrical bar 18, having a flat pawl tooth 19, adapted to fit between the teeth, or in the openings 10. One side of the tooth 19,'is beveled off in the usual way so that the front side only will catch against and push a tooth in operating with the device. The beveled side 8o allows the pawl While being moved backward over the teeth 10a, to be forced up as the beveled side passes over a tooth, and when being moved in the opposite direction, or forward; the flat side of the pawl tooth catches the flat 8 5 sides of the teeth and operates the device, so that by reciprocating the handle 8, an intermittent rotary motion will be given to the drill in one direction.

From the construction' above described, it 9o is obvious that the action of the drill can be easily reversed and should it become necessary at any time to cause the socketed portion, or the drill holder, to rotate ina reverse direction all that is necessary to do is to pull the milled knob 25, out until stopped by the end of the handle 8, which limits its movement in that direction, thereby removing the end of thev pawl from between the teeth 10a, and then give it a onehalf turn around and al- 'roo low the spring 23 to force it back in between the teeth again. The flat side of the pawl will now operate against the opposite sides of the teeth and thereby reverse the action of the drill when the handle 8, is reciprocated in the same manner as before.

A small rod, 21, is secured by a pin 22, to the pawl bar 18, and is provided with a spiral spring 23, interposed between the bar 18 and a shoulder 24, within the handle 8, and at the opposite end is a milled knob 25, having a shank 26, which tits the opening through the handle. The shank 26, is secured to the rod 21, by a pin 27. A small washer28, keeps the rod 2l, central within the handle.

In Figs. 6 and 7, I have shown a socketed wrench portion adapted to lit and be secured in the drill head so as to be operated the same as the socketed drill portion, having the same parts 9, depressions 10, and ratchet teeth 10, and nut 13.

The operation will be readily understood from the drawings and foregoing description.

The screw portion 2, screws down into the screw threaded opening 29, through the portion 14, (see Figs. 2 and @and is unscrewed in the usual way to force the drill forward while drilling with it in the ordinary way.

It often happens that the socketed drill holder shank 16, gets stuck tight in the tapering opening in which it is fitted so that it cannot be pulled out by hand. In this case all that is necessary to do is to turn the sleeve portion 1, until the end of the screw 2, touches the end of the shank 16, which easily pushes it out or loosens it from the socket. This construction is important, because it imparts to the sleeve or feed nut two oiiices-firs for feeding the drill forward, and, second, for ejecting the drill socket when required, and it avoids the use of a hammer or other objec tionable means for forcing the drill holder out of the socket.

When it becomes necessary to put in some other holder, or a socketed wrench similar to that shown in Fig. 6, for instance, all that is required is to take oft' the nut 13, then remove the drill-holder from the head and insert the socket wrench and secure it in place by the nut 13, which is adapted to tit on the screw portion 12. Shown in said Fig. 6.

It will be noticed that the pawl cylinder 18, is pivoted loosely to the rod 21, so that the handle 8, can be bent considerably out of true and still the device will be operative, which is an important advantage in this construction.

I claim as my invention- 1. In a ratchet drill, an operating sleeve or feed nut 1, having an interior portion 2, extending from the inner top side of said sleeve (to which it is rigidly secured) down near to the bottom of the same and provided with an outside screvT thread in combination with a socketed drillholder having a longitudinal screw threaded opening adapted to receive the screw threaded portion 2, and extending through and` communicating with the socketed portion, means for keeping the drill head and socketed portion together, and a tapering drill holder adapted to t the tapering socket portion and extend up within reach of the lower end of the screw threaded portion 2, when nearly down to its lowest point, whereby the screw force of the feed nut may be used to eject the drill holder substantially as described.

2. In a ratchet drill, the combination with an operating handle having a central longitudinal opening through it, of a pawl cylinder 18, inclosed in a space limiting its longiY tudinal movement, atrod 21, of smaller diameter secured loosely to the pawl cylinder, a spiral spring on said rod interposed between the pawl cylinder and a shoulder within the handle, and a milled knob secu red to the outer end of the rod 2l, whereby the operation of the drill may be reversed and it will be operative even it the handle 8, should be bent out of shape, substantially1 as described.

JACOB EMIG.

Witnesses:

JAMES SANGSTER, HENRY C. ASHBERY.

US539423A Jacob emig Expired - Lifetime US539423A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2647420A (en) * 1952-01-02 1953-08-04 Jay B Linker Ratchet-type drill

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2647420A (en) * 1952-01-02 1953-08-04 Jay B Linker Ratchet-type drill

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