US533003A - Albert c - Google Patents

Albert c Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US533003A
US533003A US533003DA US533003A US 533003 A US533003 A US 533003A US 533003D A US533003D A US 533003DA US 533003 A US533003 A US 533003A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
sight
leaf
pawl
notch
arc
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Publication date
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US533003A publication Critical patent/US533003A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41GWEAPON SIGHTS; AIMING
    • F41G1/00Sighting devices
    • F41G1/06Rearsights
    • F41G1/16Adjusting mechanisms therefor; Mountings therefor
    • F41G1/18Clicking-indicators with spring detents

Description

A. C.4 DIEFFENBAGH.
REAR SIGHT FOR SMALL ARMS.
(No Model.)
Patented Jan. 2 2, 1895.
` FDL-1f.- El; Swwwbw 4o from the left of the said ligure.
45 is held at the desired elevation.
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
ALBERT C. DIEFFENBACH, OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY.
REAR SIGHT FOR SMALL-ARMS.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 583,003, dated January 22, 1895.
Application filed June 12, 1894:. Serial No. 514,313. (No model.)
To all whom it may concern.-
Be it known that I, ALBERT C. DIEEFEN- BACH, an ensign in the United States Navy, and a citizen of the United States, stationed at 5 Hartford, in the county of Hartford and State of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Sights for Riiies or other Small-Arms and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact de- Io scription of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.
My invention relates to improvements in sights for rifles or other small arms, and it I5 consists essentially in providing a simplified 2o of the rifie, and provided with a notch-arc which arc is adapted to be set at any desired elevation, and to be normally contained within the wood work of th'e stock. The sight is also provided with an improved form of sightl z5 notch, and with a marked line adapted to assist the eye in rapidly adjusting itself to the line of sight. These and the various other features of the herein described invention will be more clearly understood by reference to 3o the accompanying drawings, in which the ame parts are indicated by the same letters Figure l represents a perspective view of my improved rear sight as mounted on a rifle,
3 5 and as set for one thousand yards. Fig. 2 represents a side elevation of the sight and its base as detached from the gun and set for fifteen hundred yards. Fig. 3 represents a front view of the device shown in Fig. 2, or as seen Fig. 4 represents a section along the line x @cof Figs. 2 and 3, and looking down. Fig. 5 represents a perspective view of the sliding block and pawl carried thereby, by means of which the sight Fig. 6 represents a section similar to that shown in Fig. 4 with a slightly modified means of holding the pawl against the notched arc. Fig. 7 represents a perspective view of the sliding block 5o and pawl used in the modification shown in Fig. 6. Fig. 8 represents a side elevation of another modification for operating the pawl,
`of sight.
andFig. 9 represents a section along the line y y of Fig. 8, and looking to the right. Fig. 10 represents a rear view of the sight notch andthe front sight when the eye is in the proper position. view to that shown in Fig. l0, when the eye is to the left of the line of sight, and Fig. l2 represents a similar view to that shown in Fig. 10 when the eye is to the right of the line of sight.
A represents the riiie barrel which is partly inclosed in the ordinary wood cover A', and
`the forward portion B of the stock. This wooden cover A is cut away as at a and the stock is cut away to allow the bracket D4 carrying the notched arc d5 to swing freely thereinto.
The rear-sight D is pivoted as at e to the base or frame C which is secured to the barrel by means ofa screw passing through the hole c, or
byva plurality of screws passing through suit.
able holes, or is soldered to the gun or otherwise rigidly attached thereto in any convenient way.
The rear sight D is provided with a solid flat leaf D', which is knurled or otherwise darkened along the upper face as at d3 leaving a light streak D2 between the said knurlings, and in the same vertical plane with the line The forward end of this leaf terminates in a rounded portion D3 in which the sight notch D0 is cut. This sight notch D0 is provided with a cylindrical bottom cl2 and vertical, o r nearly Vertical sides d extending up to the edges d? and then flaring outward in the conical surfaces d. This peculiar shape of sight notch enables the same notch to be used for all elevations, and renders it possible to readily get the eye iii the prope/r line of sight, and to make adjustment for" elevation for shorter distances than the point-blank range as will be hereinafter more fully described. The edges of the'rounded portion D3 of the head of the sight are knurled as at d4 for convenience in grasping the sight and raising the same to the proper adjustment.
The leaf D is provided with a downwardly projecting bracket D4 which carries at its forward end a notched arc d5. This arc is provided with notches corresponding to given ranges or increments of range, which notches start at the point-blank range and continue Fig. ll represent-s a similar IOO up to the maximum range, upon which the small arm of the marksman may be relied for efficient service.
For ordinary naval or military purposes, I preferably adjust the sight so that all under five hundred yards shall be point-blank range, and above this a notch is provided for each one-hundred yards of additional range up to two thousand yards which is as far as the arm of the marksman can be depended upon.
A springoperated pawl engages at the various notches as will be hereinafter more fully described.
In order that there may be less tendency of the pawl to slip over two, or three, or more, of the upper and finer notches, I preferably have the notched arc cutin toward the upper end, and make each of the upper notches project a little beyond the notch above. In this way if the pawl is moved back far enough to slip over one notch it will be more likely to catch on the tooth below, and so the pawl is more likely to catch on each tooth as the sight is elevated. This-is of especial importance in .firing at night, when each click of the pawl will indicate an additional hundred yards of elevation.
For use with the herein described sight any convenient form of pawl may be adopted and I have shown several forms in the drawings, any one of which might be used, but preferablythat shown in Figs. l to 5. In these figures the base C, which should preferably be cut away as at c to lighten the same, is provided with a solid portion c2 into which the screwthreaded end h of the bolt H engages. This base C is also provided with a cylindrical groove c3 into which the hollow sleeve F slides. This sleeve F is rigidlyattached to the pawl F2 andthe block F, which block is provided with an arrowfand an index edge f which indicate the e evation on the notched arc. The pawl is olrdinarily held in engagement by means of the spring K which is held between a shoulder at the bottom of the sleeve F', and the shoulder 7L near the head of the screw I-I.
In the modification shown in Figs. 6 and 7, the screw I-I engages in the nut F4 carried by the block F, which nut is screw-threaded as at f4, shown in Fig. 7, the spring K being held between the head of the said bolt H, and the shoulder c5 at the end of the cylindrical groove c4 in the base G. In this form of device the bolt H and the block F move together, and the spring K normally holds the pawl F2 in engagement with the notched arc These sliding blocks carrying the pawls should be knurled or otherwise roughened as at f2 for convenience of manipulation.
In the form of device shown in Figs. 8 and 9 a sliding block F(i is pivotally connected to the pawl F5, which pawl is normally pressed forward by the spring f 6 shown in dotted lines in Fig. 8. The pawl F5 is pivoted on the screw f5 set in the base C. The block F6 should be provided with the arrow f and index edge f', and should be roughened as already described with reference to the block F, but thesefeatures have been omitted from the drawings for the sake of clearness therein.
S, shown only in Figs. 10 to 12, represents the front sight, and when in the proper position, the point of the vsaid front sight should be in the vertical plane passing through a center ofthe rear sight notch D0.
The relative positions of the sides of the front sight with the annular edges do will enable the marksman to rapidly get the eye in the line of sight. It will be seen that, with a little practice, variations in the speed of the object aimed at may be readily compensated for; and that also by slightvariations in the height that the point of the front sight extends above the annular edges do. Adjustments for' sighting within pointblank range, or between any of the ranges indicated on the notched arc may be made. These adjustments are a matter of practice and will depend upon the skill of the marksman.
In order to use the sight, it should be left down or in the initial position for all ranges less than the point-blank range indicated on the notched arc, and any adjustments inside of this range should be made by the eye of' the marksman. To set the sight, say at a thousand yards, the leaf D is swung upward about its. pivot e, until the pawl has clicked tive times, or until the arrow or index edge points to ten.
To lower the sight, draw back the block F, and ease the leaf D down to the initial position.
Since the pawl will click as it passes over each tooth on the notched arc, the herein described sight is eminently adapted for use at night, or when the marksman desires to keep his eye on the target while adjusting the sight.
the sliding block and allows the sight to fall into the initial position, that for point-blank range. This is done to make sure that the sight has notbeen set at any elevation. Then if the marksman raises the sight slowly until the pawl has clicked five times he will be sure that the sight is set at the right elevation.
In order to prevent the inertia of the recoil from disengaging the pawl, the spring should be strong enough to overcome the inertia of the block F and the parts connected thereto, and also as an additional preventive, the notches on the arc are undercut, and the pawl is inclined slightly upward, as is shown most clearly in Fig. 2. The sight is thus firmly held in position until the marksman desires to alter the elevation of the same.
The block F is placed within easy reach of the left-hand of the marksman, and he can thus operate the sight by the use of one hand. Moreover should the pawl-spring get broken or fail to operate, which is not likely to hap- IOO IIO
pen, the marksman may readily hold the block F with his thumb While tiring, and thus insure the permanent elevation of the leaf D It Will be obvious that when the sight is not in use, the leaf will lie close along the barrel, and will not be likely to be accidentally injured. Moreover the adjustable parts project but little when in use, the pawl and its attachments being close along the barrel, and the notched arc being ordinarily mainly inclosed within the stock. The drift should be compensated for by properly setting the front sight. Correction for wind is considered a needless reinement for the practical purposes of the military or naval service.
It will be seen that in the sight herein described only one sight notch, one set of marks, and one origin are used; and thus the often needless and generally bewildering array of figures and the complicated adj ustmentsfof the sights most ordinarily in use are obviated.
It will be seen that the herein described sightis rigid, is not displaced by the recoil, has a small amount of projection either when set or when not in use, is not delicate enough to be easily put out of order, and is not difficult to repair.
It will also be evident that the herein den scribed sight with or without minor modifications is adapted for use in rapid fire guns and other ordnance.
These and the various other advantages of the herein described invention will readily suggest themselves to any one skilled 'in the use of firearms or cannon. l
Having thus described my invention, what I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is-- 1. In a sight, the combination with a sight leaf pivoted approximately horizontally and connected to the gun, and being provided with a sight notch and a bright strip in the same vertical plane with the line of sight, of means for raising and lowering said pivoted leaf and of holding the same at any desired elevation, substantially as described.
2. In a sight, the combination with a sight leaf pivoted approximately horizontally and connected to the gun, the upper face of said leaf being striped longitudinally, a rear sight piece carried by said pivoted leaf, and means for raising and lowering said pivoted leaf and of holding the same at any desired elevation, substantially as described.
3. A rear sight for guns consisting essentially of avertically movable sight piece pro` vided with a Y-shaped notch therein, the sides of said notch being bent outward at an angle toward their upper ends and being annular in shape, thus forming an annular edge at or near the center of the sides of said notch, substantially as and for the purposes described.
4. In a sight, the combination with a sight 6 5 leaf pivoted approximately horizontally near its rear end and connected to the gun, and being provided with a sight notch near its forwardend anda bright strip in the same vertical plane with the line of sight, of means for raising and lowering said pivoted leaf and of holding the same at any desired elevation, substantially as described.
5. In a sight, the combination with a sight leaf. pivoted approximately horizontallynear its rear end and connected to the gun, the upper face of said leaf being striped longitudinally, a rear sight piece carried by said pivoted leaf near the front end thereof, and means .for raising and lowering said pivoted leaf and of holding the same at any desired elevation, substantially as described.
6. In a sight, the combination with a sight leaf pivoted approximately horizontally and connected to the gun, and being provided with a sight notch of a graduated toothed arc rigidly connected to said leaf and moving therewith, the teeth being shorter near the upper end of said arc and each succeeding tooth projecting beyond theone above, and a pawl engaging in said teeth and locking said are at any desired elevation, substantially as described.
7. In a sight, the combination with a sight leaf pivoted approximately horizontally and connected to the gun, being provided with a sight notch, of a graduated toothed arc rig.
' idly connected to said leaf and moving therewith, the teeth being shorter near the upper end of said arc and each succeeding tooth projecting beyond theone above, and aspring operated pawl adapted to lock said arc at any desired elevation, substantially as described.
8. In a sight, the combination with a sight leaf pivoted approximately horizontally and connected to the gun, and being provided with a sight notch and a bright strip in the same vertical plane with the line of sight, of a notched arc projecting from the said leaf and rigidly connected thereto, and a pawl holding said notched arc in any desired position, substantially as described.
9. In a sight, the combination with a sight leaf pivoted approximately horizontally and connected to the gun, the upper face of said leaf being striped longitudinally, a rear sight piece carried by said pivoted leaf, a notched arc projecting from said leaf and rigidly connected thereto, and a spring operated pawl holding said are in any desired position, substantially as describe In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses.
ALBERT C. DIEFFENBAOH.
Witnesses:
JOHN C. WILSON, MAURICE J. SIoUssA.
IOO
IIO
US533003D Albert c Expired - Lifetime US533003A (en)

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US533003A true US533003A (en) 1895-01-22

Family

ID=2601769

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US533003D Expired - Lifetime US533003A (en) Albert c

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US533003A (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2927374A (en) * 1958-09-02 1960-03-08 Murchison William Gun aim controller device
US4120096A (en) * 1977-06-13 1978-10-17 Keller Charles R Bow sight
US4660289A (en) * 1986-06-13 1987-04-28 Wilhide Robert A Adjustable bow sight mount
US4977676A (en) * 1989-09-25 1990-12-18 Toupin David J Rapidly adjustable gunsight
US6662486B2 (en) * 2001-06-18 2003-12-16 Franz Komberger Universal gun sight mount, adjustable for range
US20090113780A1 (en) * 2007-01-08 2009-05-07 Jere F. Irwin Shotgun sight and adjustable gun sight

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2927374A (en) * 1958-09-02 1960-03-08 Murchison William Gun aim controller device
US4120096A (en) * 1977-06-13 1978-10-17 Keller Charles R Bow sight
US4660289A (en) * 1986-06-13 1987-04-28 Wilhide Robert A Adjustable bow sight mount
US4977676A (en) * 1989-09-25 1990-12-18 Toupin David J Rapidly adjustable gunsight
US6662486B2 (en) * 2001-06-18 2003-12-16 Franz Komberger Universal gun sight mount, adjustable for range
US20090113780A1 (en) * 2007-01-08 2009-05-07 Jere F. Irwin Shotgun sight and adjustable gun sight
US7540108B2 (en) 2007-01-08 2009-06-02 Irwin Jere F Shotgun sight and adjustable gun sight

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1195777A (en) burton
US533003A (en) Albert c
US2032648A (en) Gun-sighting device
US1205756A (en) Gun-sight.
US1087747A (en) Front gun-sight.
US1455071A (en) Rear sight for firearms
US803791A (en) Sighting attachment for firearms.
US846173A (en) Gun-sight.
US2762127A (en) Gun sight
US1501446A (en) Firearm
US1376357A (en) Apparatus for training troops in the pointing of guns
US647123A (en) Point-blank gun-sight.
US564514A (en) Fourth to guy ii
US1147469A (en) Gun-sight.
US298659A (en) Sight for fire-arms
US453828A (en) Gun-sight
US1371964A (en) Sitascope
US616512A (en) wendelstadt
US613240A (en) Bethel burton
US1088352A (en) Gun-sight.
US421943A (en) George alban lewes
US766447A (en) Combination rifle-sight.
US360678A (en) Eobeet gaskin
US761706A (en) Sight for firearms.
US1167490A (en) Gun-sight.