US435614A - Book-stapling machine - Google Patents

Book-stapling machine Download PDF

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US435614A
US435614A US435614DA US435614A US 435614 A US435614 A US 435614A US 435614D A US435614D A US 435614DA US 435614 A US435614 A US 435614A
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staple
plate
head
bed
reciprocating
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B21MECHANICAL METAL-WORKING WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21FWORKING OR PROCESSING OF METAL WIRE
    • B21F45/00Wire-working in the manufacture of other particular articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B27WORKING OR PRESERVING WOOD OR SIMILAR MATERIAL; NAILING OR STAPLING MACHINES IN GENERAL
    • B27FDOVETAILED WORK; TENONS; SLOTTING MACHINES FOR WOOD OR SIMILAR MATERIAL; NAILING OR STAPLING MACHINES
    • B27F7/00Nailing or stapling; Nailed or stapled work
    • B27F7/17Stapling machines
    • B27F7/26Stapling machines without provision for bending the ends of the staples on to the work
    • B27F7/28Stapling machines without provision for bending the ends of the staples on to the work with means for forming the staples in the machine

Description

(No Model.) 6 Sheets-Sheet l.. P. P. ROSBAGK. BOOK STAPLING MACHINE.
Patented Sept. 2, 1890.
6 Sheets-Sheet 2.
(No Model.)
P. P. ROSBAGK. BOOK STAPLING MACHINE.
IMI. 7 ll pauw-uma, wAsmNcron n c (No Model.) 6 Sheets-Sheet 3.
1:'. P. ROSBAGK. BOOK SIAPLING MACHINE.
No. 4315.614. Patented Sept. Z, 1890.
(No Model.)` 6 Sheets-Sheet 4.
P. P. ROSBAOK. BooK STAPLING MACHINE.
No. 435,614. Patented Sept.f2, 1890.
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5. ...u e e h s .W e e h s 6 R .w KM MA M WDG Om L RM DLT S PK .0 0 B d. d* 0 M o m Patnted Sept. 2
III
(No Model.) y t 6 sheets-sheet e. F. 1?. ROSBAGK. BOOK STAPLING MACHINE.
No. 435,614. Patented Sept. 2, 1890.
UNITED STATES FREDRICK P. ROSBACK,
PATENT OFFICE.
OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.
BOOK-STAPLING MACHINE.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 435,614, dated September 2, 1890.
Application filed August 8, 1889.
To all whom it may concern:
3e it known that LFREDRIGK I. RosBAcK, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Book-Stitching Machines, of which the following is a specification.
My invention relates to an im provementin the class of machin es commonly referred to by theterm stitcher, and employed for binding books by forming and driving staples through the leaves to be secured together; and it relates particularly to an improvement in the kind of stitcher in which wire is fed to a stapleforming mechanism, which severs from the supply the section of wire to be formed into a staple, then forms the staple, and after the formation drives it into the work.
The more important obj ects of my improvement are to provide a stitcher which shall serve reliably to drive the staples it forms and without impairing them or injury to the machine through any desired thickness of the material to be bound, the driving, stapleforming, and wire-feeding mechanisms of which shall be readily adjustable to the thickness of the book or portion thereof to be stitched and with reference to the support for the work.
Further objects are to provide a construction of table and means for adjustably supporting it, whereby it may be readily converted from a table into a saddle and from a saddle into a table; to provide an improved construction of clincher, being the device for bending` the ends of the staples to secure them after they have been passed through the work, and to provide a generally-improved construction of stitcher.
My improved machine is fully illustrated in all its details and in a manner to demonstrate diagrammatically different stages of its operation in the accompanyingdrawings, in which- Figure 1 is a view in front elevation of my improved machine; Fig. 2, a broken sectional side elevation of the same, the section being taken on the line 2 of Fig. 1 and viewed in the direction of the arrow; Fig. 3, a rear elevation of the front vertically-reciprocating spring-head shown at the line 3 of Fig. 2; Fig. 4, a broken face View of the bracket portion of the standard with the spring-head removed; Fig. 5, a section taken on the line 5 of Fig. 2
Serial No. 320,133. (No model.)
and viewed in the direction of the arrow; Fig. 6, a section taken on the line 6 of Fig. 1 and Viewed in the direction of the arrow; Fig. 7, a broken view, in rear elevation, of the clincher device having the upper rear cross-plate removed and showing by dotted lines the clincher-pawls in their raised position; Fig. S, an enlarged perspective view of one of the clincher-pawls; Fig. 9, a broken sectional view showing the mechanism inside the upper or horizontal portion of the standard, the section being taken on the line 9 of Fig. 1 and viewedin the direction of the arrow; Fig. 10, a section taken on the line 10 of Fig. 9 and viewed in the direction of the arrow; Fig. 11, a section taken on the line 11 of Fig. 9 and viewed in the direction of the arrow; Fig.'12, a section taken on the line 12 of Figs. 2 and 9 and viewed in the direction of the arrows; Fig. 13, a section taken on the line 13 of Figs. 1 and 9 and viewed in the direction of the arrows; Fig. 11, a View in front elevation of the vertically-adjustable bedplate with the forward end of the hood of the standard behind it, shown mainly by dotted lines; Fig. 15, a perspective view of the stationary obliquely-slotted anvil-block through which the wire is fed and in which it is held while being bent toward its opposite ends to form a staple; Fig. 16, a view in front elevation of the hood portion of the standard, showing through its opening the links for connecting the levers within it with the plunger and with the vertically-reciprocating head and the pivotal arms anking the levers, and which are to engage at their forward ends with recesses provided in the rear side of the vertically-adjustable bedplate, all as shown in Fig. 9; Fig. 17, a face view of the knife-supporting block, showing the guide-pin on its rear side by dotted lines; Fig. 1S, a sectional view showing the wire severing mechanism and the cam for actuating it; Fig. 19, a perspective View of the cutter. Figs. 2O and 21 are respectively front and rear perspective views of a detail; Fig. 22, a face view of the reciprocating head carrying the knife-cam and having the plates represented in Fig. 3 removed. Fig. 23 shows in front elevation the two front guide-plates for the driver and staple in normal relative position and detached; Fig. 24, an edge View IOO of the staple-formers detached and shown in normal relative positions; Fig. 25, a face view of each of the staple-formers shown in Fig. 24; Fig. 26, an enlarged broken face view of the lower end of one of the staple-formers shown in Fig. 25. Figs. 27, 28, and 29 are broken sectional Views of the staple-forming mechanism, illustrating progressively the relative positions of parts and their operations in forming a staple. Fig. 30 is a sectionalview showing the staple as being guided out of the kanvil-block in which it is formed into oblique side channels in the vertically-reciprocating formers. Fig. 3l shows the staple as guided into the channels which hold it in the path of the plunger. Figs. 32 and 33 are sections indicating the shape of the channels for guiding a staple to and holding it inthe path of the plunger, the sections being taken, respectively, on the lines 32 and 33 of Fig. 26 and viewed in the direction of the arrows. Fig. 34is a section taken on the line 34 of Fig. 30 and viewed in the direction of the arrow. Fig. 35 is a broken sectional view showing an enlarged top view of the finished staple; Fig. 36, a face view of the adjusting mechanism for the outer staple and driver guide-bars; Fig. 37, a section taken on the line 37 of Fig. 36 and viewed in the direction of the arrow; Fig. 38, a broken face View of the lower portion of the mechanism for controlling the feed of the wire, illustrating an adjustable attachment for controlling long lengths of wire fed to produce the larger staples; Fig. 39, a perspective viewVV of the attachment shown in Fig. 38; Fig. 40, a broken perspective View of a spring-held wire-clamp on the feed-arm; Fig. 4l, a section taken on the line 4l of Fig. l and viewed in the direction of the arrow; Fig. 42, a broken view illustrating the initial operation of the clincher device; Fig. 43, a similar view illustrating the final operation of the clincher device in bending the ends of a staple protruding from the under side of the work; Fig. 44, an enlarged bottom sectional elevation taken on the line 44 of Fig. 1 and viewed in the Idirection of the arrow; Fig. 45, a section taken on the line 45 of Fig. 44 and viewed in the direction of the arrow; Fig. 46, a view like that illustrated in Fig. 45, but showing the parts of the clutch in different relative positions; Figs. 47 and 48, sections taken, respectively, on the 4lines 47 and 48 of Fig. 44 and viewed in the direction of the arrows; Fig. 49, an enlarged partly-broken bottom perspective view of the adjustable and convertible table; and Fig. 50, an edge -view like that shown in Fig. 24, but enlarged and illustrating a modilied construction of the fianged groove of a stapleforming bar. f
The entire mechanism may be sustained on any suitable form of support; but the form of support I have foundv most suitable for the purpose, but to which l do not wish to be understood as limiting my improvement, is that illustrated in the drawings, and which comprises a hollow metal standard A, involving a vertical portion w, extending from an expanded hollow base w and terminating at its upper end in a horizontallyextending hood w?, bulging at its rear end, as shown at a', Figs. 2 and 9, and bell-shaped toward its mouth, and provided at one side of its mouth (the left side looking toward the front end of the hood) with an ear w3, having an oblique slot w, Fig. 16, formed in it and extending from the outer upper edge of the ear downward and inward at an angle of forty-five degrees, or thereabout.
B is the rotary shaft, from which all the parts hereinafter described (except the brake) are actuated, and which is journaled in opposite sides of the bulging part of the hood L02 and projects beyond one side of the same. On the projecting end of the shaft B is a beltpulley B on an elongated hub B2, held between collars n4 and o5, the latter having an opening v6, Figs. 45 and 46, through which projects a finger fu', extending laterally from a pin c', about one half of the diameter of which nearly throughout its length fits in a similarly-shaped groove in the shaft B, the other half being turned down to conform to the circumference of the shaft and of the inner surface of the hub. Thus an ordinary form of clutch is provided, whereby when the pin o fits into the recess in the shaft, as in Fig. 45, the pulley revolves without turning the shaft; but when it is turned to extend beyond the shaft into a semi-cylindrical recess v7 in the hub B2 it clutches the hub and produces rotation of the shaft with the belt-pulley. I give to the pin o a normal tendency to project beyond the circumference of the shaft by means of a spring '02, Fig. 44, secured at one end to a cap o3 at the outer end of the collar o4 and at its inner extremity to the adjacent end of the pin o.
C is a pedal fulcrumed at one end inside the base w', as shown in Fig. 2, and extending thence beyond the forward side of the base, being Vsustained between its extremities by a spring y, and from the pedal extends 'the pedal and having pivotally connected with its upper end a link t', passing through guides on the side of the standard A into the path of the finger fu. When the finger t" comes against the brake afforded by the rod t and link t', it is turned against the resistance of the spring v2 to turn the pin o to conform to the recess o6 in the shaft, thereby preventing rotation of the latter; but when the brake is removed froln the path of the finger bybearing down on the pedal and the groove in the shaft comes coincident with the groove o7 in the hub the spring forces the pin v to extend into the groove @7, and thus clutch the beltpulley to the shaft B.
D, Fig. 9, is a cam-block affording a combined cam and eccentric, the cam being in the form of a peculiarly-shaped groove D', as in- IOO IIO
dicated by dotted lines in said figure, on one side of the cam-block, and the eccentric D2 being in the form of a disk extending from the opposite side of the cam-block,with which it is preferably integral, and having the shaft B extending eecentrically through it, the eccentric D2 being encircled by a close-fitting collar D3, having a perforated ear s extending from its periphery.
E and E are levers, Figs. 9 to 12, flanked, respectively, by arms r and a", and all pivot ally connected together near their centers by a pin r2. The shaft B passes through the rear ends of the arms r and r', which surround it loosely, while the rear end of the lever E is provided with a thimble q, Fig. 11,which enters the cam-groove D and the rear end of the lever E is pivotally connected with the ear s on the collar D3 of the eccentric D2. Thus it will be seen that when the cam-block D, which is rigidly secured to the shaft B, rotates with the latter the eccentric D2 rocks the lever E with a regular up-anddown motion, while the cam D rocks the levcrE with an irregular upand-down motion, and that raising or lowering of the arms r and r toward their forward ends similarly moves the levers toward their adjacent ends, but without altering the relative positions of the cam and eccentric and their respect-ive levers. It may here be mentioned that raising and lowcring of the arms 7' and r is produced by adjusting the bedplate, (which supports the wire feeding and severing and the staple forming and driving mechanisms, all as hereinafter dcscribed,) according to the thickness of the work and the length of staple to be formed with regard to such thickness.
F is the bed-plate, Figs. 1, 9, &c., of general rectangular shape, with a rectangular opening through it somewhat shorter and narrower than that at the mouth of the hood 102, on the top of which it is supported at a flange p, extending at a right angle from its upper end and havinga threaded perforation, constituting it a nut for ascrewp, extending through it against a bearing p3 on the top of the hood wz, the screw being provided at its upper end with a hand-wheel p2. The bedplate F is provided with lateral guide-flanges o, and is held from lateral and forward displacement by means of angle-bars 0 and 02, extending over its sides from the opposite sides of the hood wz near its month, and to which sides they are bolted, Figs. 12 and 13. In the rear side of the bed-plate F, on opposite sides of its opening and near the base thereof, are two rectangular recesses r3, Figs.
f 13 and 14, into which extend the forward ends n", and obviously, also, the levers E and-E',
owing to the connection of the latter with the arms by means of the pin r2. An ear 105 extends from the lower edge of the bed-plate over the ear w3 on the hood, and is provided with a horizontal slot w, crossing the oblique slot 104 in the ear w3.
Below the opening in the bed-plate F and rigidly secured to it centrally between its lateral edges is a block G, Figs. 14 and 15, which, from the nature of its purpose, I term an anvil-block. I provide it in the rectangular form shown, and it is screwed in position through an opening The anvilblock is provided with a transverse perforation fa, from which extends obliquely to the front surface of the block a slot n.
II 4is a rectangular plate, (clearly shown in Fig. 22,) termed by me the vertically-reciprocating head, and provided centrally and longitudinally with a rectangular slot, which need extend only from near the transverse center of the plate short of its lower end. The head Il is flanged laterally, as shown at n2, 12 and 13, and fits with its flanges n2 between the lateral flanges on the bed-plate F, and it is held to be guided between the flanges on the bed-plate by the angle-plates o and o2, which overlap its flanges a2. The opposing inner sides of the slot in the head I-I are cut out to form offsets adapted to receive edgewise the bars I and I', used in forming the staple, and which are clearly illustrated in Figs. 2l to 26. Each of the staple-forming bars comprises a rectangular strip of plate metal adapted to fit edgewise in the offsets provided to extend along the front edges of the opposing sides of the slot in the head H, though they may, if desired, be integral with the vertically-reciprocating head. Toward the'lower ends of the bars I and I they are provided, respectively, with openings or longitudinal slots m and m', the latter being slightly longer than the lirst-named, for a purpose hereinafter explained. Each of the staple-forming bars has formed in its front inner edge an offset or rectangular groove Z, extending from its upper end toa point short of the upper end of the longitudinal slot, whence to that end of the slot extends obliquely a shallow 4channel or groove Z. From a considerable distance above each opening m and m (that is, from a short distance below the longitudinal center of each staplefor1ning bar) the opposing surfaces of the bars I and Ilaterallyof the grooves Zare:
slightly hollowed out, as shown at Z2 in Fig. 25, to make room or afford a chamber between the two bars for the anvil-block G, along the sides of which the limits of reciprocation of the head H, with which the staple-forming bars are practically integral, about equal the length of the hollowed-out portions Z2. The grooves Z extend continuously to points below the slots m and m', but should widen slightly in lateral directions toward their lower extremities from above the slots, as shown at Z3, Fig. 25. From their lower extremities the grooves Z proceed to the lower ends of the bars I and I as shal- IOO IIO
lower grooves Z4, somewhat rounded or oval in form, preferably as indicated in Fig. 35, whereby the inner edges of the grooves are slightly flanged, as indicated, but somewhat exaggerated, at Z5, and, more particularly to adapt the staple-formers to permit staples to be driven through work of considerable thickness, the flanged grooves Z4 are curved inwardly near their lower extremities, as shown in Fig. 50, and the forming-bar cut away on its rear surface near the lower end to render it springy.
K is the driver, comprising a bar of a width slightly less than that of the space between the opposing faces of the bars I and I', and having flangesk extending laterally from its rear side, which enter the grooves Z, and the driver is held at its anges 7a to permit it to be guided in its reciprocating movements in the grooves Z by fiat bars L and L', fastened to the face of the reciprocating head H, respectively, in'positions to cover the flanges 7c, and the inner edges of which are preferably, but not necessarily, provided on their inner faces with grooves like the grooves Z Z4 in the staple-forrning bars I and I', and with which they would coincide. The bar L' is recessed, as shown in Fig. 23, to make room for the laterally-movable wire cutting and gaging mechanism hereinafter described. The forward end of the lever E, Fig. 9, is pivotally connected by a link i with a lug t" on the rear side of the head H to one side of its center, and which projects through the opening in the bed-plate F into the mouth of the hood du?, and the corresponding end of the lever E is similarly connected with the rear side of the driverK.
From the foregoing description of parts it will be understood that when the shaft B is in motion by the pulley B' being clutched to it the eccentric D2, by regularly rocking the lever E' on its fulcrum afforded by the pin r2, (constituted a fulcrum by the arms r and r' being supported at their opposite ends,) regularly reciprocates the driver K, and that the cam D', through the lever E, irregularly reciprocates the head II,with its staple-formers I and I', along the sides of the anvilblock G.
M' is a bracket, Fig. 1, fastened to a side of the hood w2 to extend laterally therefrom, and having fulcrumed to it at :r2 a lever M, bent or curved toward one end, as shown,the bent portion being preferably one-half the length of the straight portion and the fulcruln m2 being provided at a point corresponding with two-thirds of the length of the lever measured from its lower end, so that the extent of sweep of the lower end of the lever will be twice that of the opposite end. These relations are of course subject to change, according to requirement; but the lower end of the lever should always have an extent of sweep equal vto twice the thickness of the work to be stitched. A spring x3 serves to afford yielding resistance to the turning of the lever M on its fulcrurn, and the end of the bent arm of the lever extends into the path of a lug K', rigid on the front surface of the driver K.
N, Figs. 17 and 18, is the cutter-bloclghaving a guide-pin h extending from its rear side and tongues h' on its upper and lower edges,which enter guide-grooves, respectively, in the upper and lower edges of the blocks N' and N2, secured below and above the cutter-blocks on the face of the head H to the left (looking toward the front of the hood wz) I of its longitudinal slot; and when the block N is adjusted in position between its guideblocks the pin Zz projects through the horizontal slot 'L06 in the ear w5 on the'bed-plate F and through the oblique slot 104 in the ear w3 on the hood 102.
To the inner end of the knifeblock N is pivoted a knife O, Figs. 18 and 19, the cutting-edge O' of which extends across the line of feed of the wire-supply, hereinafter described, which is passed through an opening u, formed through the block N near its base, the knife-edge being maintained normally away from the line of feed by a spring u' and being advanced at the proper time to cut the wire by a cam u2, Figs. 18, 22, 27, 28, and 29, on the front surface of the reciprocating head H, the advancement forcing the knifeedge into engagement with a knife-plate O2, (shown clearly in Figs. 2O and 21,) secured in proper position in the block N and permitting the knife O to operate by a shearing cut.
The supply of wire is provided on a spool P, Fig. l, suitably supported to revolve in thc feeding on an arm of the bracket M'. The wire P' is passed from the spool P through an eye g, Figs. l and 4l, secured to the outer edge near the lower end of the lever M, and having extended from it toward the knifeblock N a light flat spring g', having an eye g2 on its upper side and overlapping ashorter but similar spring g3, provided with an cye g4 and extending from the outer edge of the block N, to which it is fastened at the base of the opening u. The springs g' and g3 thus afford a yielding guide to the opening u in the knife-block for the wire P', which is held against slipping by a spring-cam Q' and fed by the forward movement (produced as hereinafter described) of the lower part of the lever M `through the medium of a spring-cam Q, like the cam Q', but supported on the lever, as shown in Figs. l and 40, to bear against the wire.
From the foregoing description it will be seen that by manipulating the screw p' to raise or lower the bed-plate F and parts it carries the knife-block N is moved outward or inward the exact or nearly the exact distance the bed-plate is so raised or lowered, owing to the angle of forty-five degrees of the oblique slot L04 in the stationary ear w3. This, as will hereinafter be seen, regulates the length of wire to be fed and cut 0E by the knife to form staples of particular lengths, and when the block N is moved outward to IIO feed a considerable length ot' wire to be cut a clamping-finger R, Figs. 38 and 89, which is pivoted at one end to the block N', may be adjusted to extend over and against the length of wire between the knifeblock and adjacent staple-former I to prevent buckling of the wire, and when not required it may be turned out of the way.
S is an arm or bracket, Fig. 2, secured to the front side of the part w of the standard near its base and curving thence in an upward and outward direction, extending below the bed-plate F, where it terminates in a fiat rigid bed-plate f. From the rear side, near the upper end of the bed-plate f and on opposite sides of the web of the arm S, project stationary studs f, and directly below the studs f', near the lower end of the bed-plate, are elongated openings f2, Fig. 4.
T is a dat reciprocating plate or head having longitudinally along the center throughout one (the rear) side a rectangular recess e3 and a cross-bar e4 at the upper end of the head, let into the sides of the recess to be flush with the faces of such sides and affording a covering for and narrowing the recess where it crosses the same. A similarly-adjusted cross-bar e5 extends across the recess c3 near the center of the head.
In the recess c3 between the two cross-bars is a plate c, having tongues e7 and e8 formed at its opposite ends to enter the recess between the respective cross-bars, the plate being rigidly fastened to the face of the bedplate f. Recessed dogs U are pivotally supported, as shown, at the upper end of the head T between the cross-bar e* and base of the recess e3, being normally in the relative positions shown by the full lines in Fig. 7, which they assume by their own gravity, and from which they are raised to the position indicated by dotted lines for the purpose of clinching the ends of a staple in the manner hereinafter described.
Directly below the eross-bar c5 is an openez, formed through the head T, and which is overlapped on the rear or recessed side of the head by a plate e, pivotally supported near its upper end in the recess c3, and beveled, as shown in Fig. 6, at its lower end, toward which it is normally held yieldingly away from the base of the recess e3 by a spring e, extending against it through the opening c2 from the front side of the plate T.
Below the pivotal plate e in the recess c3 is a plate e9, rigidly secured to the face of the bed-plate f, and having its upper edge beveled to coincide with the bevel on the lower edge of the pivotal plate.
The head T has projecting from its rear side, near its lower end, studs el", Figs. 5 and 6, which project through the elongated openingsf2 in the lower end of the bed-plate f,
and which are yieldingly connected, by stiff springs d with the studs f on the rearside of the bed-plate, whereby the head T is yieldingly supported directly underneath the head H against thefront side of the bed-plate f, the upper end of the recess e3 being in direct line with the driver K.
V is the table for supporting the work to be stitched, and which is of a form and construction and sustained by means to adapt it to be readily converted into a saddle. It involves two plates c and c', secured together edge to edge to extend at right angles to each other by means of brackets h, fastened to the under sides of the plates, as clearly shown in Fig. 49, to cause the head T to fit edgewise between them, and each having perforations b and h2, one above the other, in their bases. The plate c is provided with a slot a., and a slot d is providedat the junction of the two plates c and c.
To support the device V as a table, it is screwed through the lower openings b into coincident threaded openings in the opposite edges of the head T, the slot @being then coincident with and embracing the upper end of the said head. To convert it into a saddle, the screws are removed or loosened and the table caused to straddle the head T, thus bringing the slot a coincident with and to embrace the upper end of the head, which causes the upper openings b2 to coincide with the threaded openings in the edges of the head, when the screws are adjusted to hold it.
As it may sometimes be desirable, for different thicknesses of wire, to adjust the plates L and L toward their lower ends closer to or farther from the staple-forming bars l and I', the heads j and j of the screws jg, Figs. 36 and 37, are concaved peripherally,
as shown, and provided circumferentially with worm-threads, with which engage the correspondingthreads of ascrewj, supported in a suit-able bearing, as illustrated. Turning of the screw jg in one direction 0r the other turns the heads 7' and j and screws jg to move the plates L and L outward or inward toward their lower ends with reference to the bars I and I.
The operation is as follows: The shaft Bis first turned (on pressing upon the pedal C to clutch to the shaft the hub B2) to cause the cam D and eccentric D2 to aetuate the levers E and E to bring the lower ends of the head ll and driver K coincident, (which can only occur when the staple-forming head H. and driver are at t-he lowest extremity of their reciprocating play,) when the screw p is manipulated to raise or lower the bed-plate F and the driver and staple-forming mechanism it carries for the purpose of gaging their downward play to the thickness of the work or book W to be stitched, and which play is slightly beyond the width of space between the clincher mechanism and upper surface of the book, in order that when the driver and staple-forming head H are pressed against the book they may force through the latter the head T down against the resistance of the springs d, Fig. 2, and cause the dogs U to rise, as hereinafter described, to clinch IOO IIO
Ilo
the protruding ends of the driven staple X. The distance of raising or lowering the bedplate F with reference to the clincher mechanism of course determines the width of space between them, which should, as aforesaid, When the bed-plate F and parts it carries (driver K and head Il) are atV the lowest limit of their reciprocating play, about equal the thickness of the work. Vertical movement 0f the bed-plate F a certain distance obviously moves the knife-plate N laterally the same distance. Thus, if the bed-plate F be moved up or down one inch, the plate N will simultaneously be laterally moved outward or inward the same distance, since, being coniined against vertical play by its stationary guideplates N and N2, it cannot independently move vertically; but as the horizontal slot 'we in the ear @U5 moves with the bed-plate F, of which the ear forms a rigid part, it carries the plate NY with it, the pin h thereby being moved along the fort-y-live-degree inclined slot 104 in the immovable ear w3, and thus moving the plate N laterally the same distance that the bed-plate F is moved vertically. Therefore the extent of movement of the plate N with reference to the inner edge of a stationary guide-plate N or N2 may be used to indicate the thickness of the work to stitch which the machine is adjusted, or the distance of extension of the bed-plate F beyond the upper ends of the stationary angle-plates o and o2 may be used for the same indication. For the first-named use of the adjust mont Il provide a gage-plate Y, Fig. l, on the movable knife-plate N and a similar plate Y parallel with the plate Y, secured to the stationary guide-plate N2 and extending` vertically over the plate N, between which gageplates the work may be clamped at one edge to gage it. It willbe seen that raising or lowering of the bed-plate F in the manner and for the purpose described does not aiect the relation between the cam D" and eccentric D2 and their respect-ive levers E and E', the only eect on the latter being to raise or lower them toward their forward ends on theirful- VVcrum-pin Yr2 through the movement with the bed-plate of the arms r and r and without reducing or enlarging the extent of their reciprocation. When the width of space to receive the Work W has been gaged, as described, (or, if desired, before that time,) the machine is threaded by extending the wire P through the guide-eyes g2 and g4, thence through the opening u, Fig. 18, iny the knifeplate N and the openings m and m in the staple-forming bars I and I and opening n in the intermediate anvil-block G, and beyond the bar I through a coincident opening in the adjacent liange of the headY H, the length of space for the wire to extend beyond the bar I being equal to the extreme length of the space between the knife-plate N when moved laterally to its outward limit and the bar I. When the machine has been once threaded, the wire does not require to be again manipulated until the supply on the spool P gives out, when, of course, a new supply has to be threaded.
In the initial operation of the machine rotation of the shaft B carries the driver K to descend independently of the head H, and the latter also to descend, but more slowly than the driver, owing to the relations between the eccentric D2 and cam D. .As the bars I and I descend with the head l-I, the upper end of the slot m in the bar I (which slot is slightly shorter than the slot m in the bar I) first comes against the protruding end of the wire P in its path and bends it downward through the slot against the adjacent side of the anvil-block G. .I ust before the upper edge of the slot m reaches the wire P, extending across its path, the cam u2 engages with the pivotal knife O, forcing its cuttingedge O against the wire and severing it, when it is bent by the staple-forming bar I through its slot m against the adjacent side ofthe anvil-block.
The arrangement whereby the bending of the wire toward its outer or free end is first performed is advantageous, inasmuch as if both barsI and I were to act simultaneously the severing operation of the knife mechanism would have to precede, and would tend (as in cutting by hand with scissors) to'cause the severed section toY fly off lengthwise in the direction of its extension, and thereby produce a longer extent of projection from the farther side of the anvil-block than from the opposite side, thus rendering the shanks of the staples of unequal lengths. Vhen the staple-forming bars I andrI have completedVY the formation of a staple, as described, both they and the driver K proceed to the lowest limit of their reciprocating play and would there engage with the clincher mechanism through the work V if interposed, though such engagement in the initial operation of the machine would be without effect as to stitching the work, since no staple would be in the path of the descending driver. As the bars I and I, after bending the wire at opposite sides of the anvil-block and thus forming the staple X, proceed on their downward course, the inclined channels Z in their opposing faces (and which extend at their lower ends to or about to the rear sides at the upper ends of the slots m and m) engage the bent vertical ends or Shanks of the staple, and thereby gradually move its cross-head from the perforation fa in the anvil-block down the oblique slot 'a' by switching the shanks in to the grooves Z, so that by the time the bars I and I and drivel' have reached the lowest limit of their play the staple, still held in the mouth of the oblique slot of the anvilblock by the face of the latter being covered by the driver, is in the grooves Z with its shank portions. Continued rotation of the shaft B raises the head I-I, and more rapidly the driver K, the head in rising leading the staple-Shanks into the more expanded grooves IOO IIO
ZS, as indicated in Fig. 30, and the latter rising above the oblique slot n in the anvil-block, whereby the cross-head of the staple is freed to spring out into the path of the driver, as indicated in Fig. 3l which then descends with the head Il, but more rapidly than the latter, (both the driver and head eventually reaching their lowest positions simultaneously,) and drives the staple through the shallower lianged grooves l* into and through the work \V. The flanges on the grooves Z4 (assisted by the corresponding grooved flanges, if provided, iu the covering-plates L and L) coincide with the extreme ends of the cross-head ot' the staple near its junction with the shank portions, and because the iauges of the grooves narrow the latter to a width less than that of the wire they cut into and notch the wire near the opposite ends of the cross-head of the staple, as indicated in Figs. 32 and 33, thus holding the staple firmly against the effect of the strain of the driver on the cross- Vhead, tending to bend the latter downward between its extremities, which is prevented by thehold at the notches resisting the tendency of the strain on the cross-head to draw upward in the grooves the shank portions of the staple, and thus lengthen the cross-head sufficiently togenable it to be bent. The rigidity of hold on the staple while being driven and the provision of a close-fitting guide for it throughout the driving operation enable me to drive through exceptionally unyielding or hard work lV staples or even continuous straight lengths of wire, even of a very fine quality,without bending or buckling the wire, and I regard the feature of my improvement permitting this as of great importance. It will be observed that the wire P is unwound from underneath the spool I), the winding on which renders it curved and springy, and that when the bars I and I bend a length of it against the anvil-block the bending is produced in the contrary direction to the curve of the section of wire, whereby the Shanks of the staple have a normal tendency to curve outward. This tendency is restrained, of course, while the staple is confined in the grooves of the forming-bars; but in the drivr ing, especially through work of considerable thickness, (say an inch or more,) it is found that the Shanks of the staple spread so much, and thereby pass through the work obliquely, as to present great resistance to the driving. I overcome this tendency by curving inward the groove Z4 at the lower end of each staple-forming bar, as shown in Fig. 50, and beveling in an inward and downward direction, as shown at 005 in that figure, the rear surface of each bar toward its lower end, whereby it is rendered springy. lVhen the driver K descends into the curved portions of the grooves Z4, it spreads the beveled ends of the bars I and I slightly apart and effects, as I find, straight driving of the staple. In reaching the lowest extremity of their reciprocation and lodging the staple in the work lV thehead H and plunger K compress the work against the head T of the clincher device, forcing the latter downward against the resistance of its snstainingsprings d, which is permitted by the beveled edge of the pivotal plate e', Fig. G, passing that of the rigid plate e, and which lowers the free ends of the recessed dogs U against the upper end or tongues c7 of the rigid plate e, thereby raising the dogs on their pivotsand causing them to bend toward each other or clinch (see Figs 42 and 43) the ends of the staple which protrude into their path from the lower surface of the work lV. The rise of the driver K to free the staple (formed as described) from the anvil-block G brought its lug or strikeublock K against the end of the feedlever M extending into its path, and by striking against the latter actuated the opposite end of the lever M to feed a length of the wire P from the spool M through the block N, anvil-block Gr, and head II, (including the staple-forming bars I and I,) and as the parts descended to drive the staple first formed another staple was formed in the manner already described of the formation of the first staple. So it will be understood that after forming the first staple the machine always has one staple in reserve, which is formed while that produced before it is being driven.
The adjustment higher or lower of the bedplate F, which, as hereinbefore described, regulates the extent of descent of the driver and head II with reference to the clincher mechanism and the length of wire severed by the knife, also regulates the length of wire fed by the feed-lever M, since the higher or lower the plunger is adjusted by adjusting the bed-plate F with manipulation of the screw p the higher or less high it will move in its reci procation with a corresponding turn of the feedslever by theimpingement against it of the lug K. If, therefore, to illustrate, the bed-plate and parts it carries be adjusted by raising it from any position one-half an inch to adapt the machine to work IV of a particular thickness requiring a staple the shanks of which shall, by the half-inch addition to the length of each, be adapted to pass through and be clinched on the under side of the work, the curved arm of the feed-lever will be correspondingly raised on its fulcrum, and the opposite end of the straight part of the lever M (which, as will be remembered should be twice the length of the curved part) will thereby be moved inward a Whole inch, thus feeding that additional length of the wire or additional one-half inch o n each side of the anvil-block G. It may further be mentioned that when, after the driving operation, the driver and head H rise from the clincher mechanism the springs d raise the head T to its normal position, thereby readjustiug the pawls U and other parts of the clincher mechanism to their normal relative positions, and also that when the head II rises it removes the knife-cam u2 from engagement with the IOO IIO
knife O, freeing the latter and permitting it to be thrown back out of the path of the feed by the resilience of the spring u'.
What I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-
1. In a boolestapling` machine, the combination, with a standard, driving mechanism, and a support for the Work, of a bed-plate supporting reciprocating staple-formin g mechanism and a reciprocating driver and adjustably supported on the standard, whereby it, with the said staple-formng mechanism and driver, may be raised and lowered with relation to the said support, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
2. In a book-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard, driving mechanism, and a support for the work, of abcd-plate supporting reciprocating staple-forming and Wire-cutting mechanisms and a reciprocating driver and adj ustably supported on the standard, whereby it, with the said stapleforming and Wire-cuttingv mechanisms and driver, may be raised and lowered with relation to the said support, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
3. In a book-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard, driving mechanism, and a support for the work, of a bed-'plate F, supporting reciprocating staple-forming mechanism and a reciprocating driver and having a nut p, a set-screw p', extending through the nut against a bearing on the standard and adj ustably supporting the bedplate on the standard, and a guide on the standard for the said bed-plate, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
4. In a book-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard, driving mechanism, anda support for the work, of a bed-plate F, an anvil-block G, secured to the bed-plate and having an oblique slot n', reciprocating staple-forming bars I and I', supported on the bed-plate at opposite sides of the anvil-block and provided with openings m and m and grooved, substantially as described, plates L and L', secured to extend over the bars I and and I', and a reciprocating driver K, movable in grooves of the staple-forming bars, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
5. In abook-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard, driving mechanism, a support for the work, and an automatic feed and severing mechanism for the Wire, of a bed-plate F and anvil-block G, secured to the bed-plate and having an oblique slot fn', reciprocating staple-forming bars I and I', supported on the bed-plate at opposite sides of the anvil-block and provided, respectively, with a longitudinal opening m and a longer longitudinal opening m' and grooved, substantially as described, plates L and L', secured to extend over the bars I and I', and a reciprocating driver K, movable in grooves of the staple-forming bars, substantially as and for the purpose yset forth.
- 6. In a book-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard, driving mechanism, and a support for the work, of a bed-plate F, an anvil-block G, secured to the bed-plate and having an oblique slot n', reciprocating staple-forming bars I and I', supported on the bed-plate at opposite sides of the anvil-block, and provided with openings m and m' and with grooves ZZ', and Z3 and anged grooves Z4, plates L and L', secured to extend over the bars I and I', and a reciprocating driver K, movable in grooves of the staple-forming bars, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
7. In a book-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard and a support for the work, of a bed-plate F, an anvil-block G, secured to the bed-plate and having-an oblique slot n', a reciprocating head II, carrying staple-forming bars I and I', provided with openings m and m and with grooves Z, Z', and Z3 and iianged grooves Z4, plates L and L', secured to extend over the bars I and I', a reciprocating driver K, movable in grooves of the staple-forming bars, a driving-shaft B, carrying to rotate with it a cam and an eccentric, and levers E and E', fulcrumed between their extremities and connected at adjacent ends, respectively, with the cam and eccentric and linked at their opposite ends, respectively, to the head II and driver K, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
8. In a book-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard and a support for the work, of a bed-plate F, an anvil-block G, secured to the bed-plate and having an oblique slot n', a reciprocating head H, carrying staple-forming bars I and I', provided with openings m and m' and With grooves Z, Z', and Z3 and anged grooves Z, plates L and L', secured to extend over the bars I and I', a reeiprocating driver K, movable in grooves of the staple-forming bars, a driving-shaft B, carrying to rotate with it a cam and an eccentric, arms r and r', loosely connected at their rear ends with the driving-shaft and connected at their opposite ends with the bedplate F, and levers E and E', pivotally connected between their extremities with the said arms, connected at their rear ends, respectively, with the cam and eccentric, and linked at their opposite ends,respectively, to the head H and driver K, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
9. In a book-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard, driving mechanism, and a support for the work, of a verticallyadjustable bed-plate F, an anvil-block G, secured to the bed-plate and having an oblique slot n', aknife-block N, supported on the bedplate and laterally adjustable thereon automatically by adjustment of the said bedplate, reciprocating staple-forming bars I and I', supported on the bed-plate at opposite sides of the anvil-block and providedwith openings m and m' and grooved, substantially as described, lplates L and L', secured to extend over the bars I and I', a reciprocating driver K, movable in grooves of the staple- IOO IIO
IZO
forming bars, and an automatic feed M for the Wire, actuated by the reciprocating driver, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
IO. In a book-stapling machine, the combination of a standard A, having a horizontal portion 102, provided With an ear 103, containin g the oblique slot 104, a support for the Work, a vertically-adj ustable bed-plate F, secured to the part 102 of the standard and having an ear 105, provided with a slot 106, crossing the slot in the ear 104, a laterally-adj ustable knifeblock N, having a guide-pin 71 extending through the slots 106 and 104 and carrying a pivotal knife O and supported in guides on the bed-plate, an anvil-block G, secured to the bed-plate and having an oblique slot 11,', a reciprocating head H on the bed-plate carrying staple-forming bars I and I at opposite sides of the anvil-block and provided with openings m and m and grooved, substantially as described, plates L and L', secured to extend over the bars I and I', a cam 112 on the head II for actuating the knife O, a reciprocating driver K, movable in grooves in the staple-forming bars, and a pivotal lever M, extending at one end into the path of the driver K and at its opposite end into the path of the wire to be fed and provided with suitable clamping mechanism for the wire, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
ll. In a book-stapling machine, the combination of a hollow standard A, having a hori- Zontal portion or hood 102, provided with an ear 103, containing the oblique slot 104, a driving-shaft B, j ournaled in the hood 102 and carrying loosely a driving-wheel B and an automatic spring-clutch, a brake normally engaging with the spring-clutch and controlled from a pedal C, a cam D and an eccentric D2 D2, secured upon the shaft to rotate with it, a support for the work, a vertically-adj ustable bed-plate F, supported at the front end of the hood 102 and having an ear 105, provided with a slot 10G, crossing the slot in the ear 104, a laterally-adjustable knife-block N, having a guide-pin 71. extending through the slots 10G and 104 and carrying a pivotal springcontrolled knife O and supported in guides on the bed-plate, an anvil-block G, secured to the bed-plate and having an oblique slot 1i', a reciprocating head II on the bed-plate carrying staple-formingbars I and I at opposite sides of the anvil-block and provided with openings m and m and grooved, substantially as described, plates L and L', secured to extend over the bars I and I', a cam 102 on the head II for actuating the knife O, a reciprocating driver K, movable in grooves in plate F, and levers E and E', connected, respectively, at their rear ends lwith the cam and eccentric, linked at their opposite ends to the head H and driver K, and fulcrumed between their extremities to the arms 1' and 1", the whole being constructed and arranged to operate substantially as and for thepurpose set forth.
12. In a book-stapling machine, the combination,with a standard supporting a vertically-adjustable bed-plate carrying reciprocating staple-forming mechanism, a reciprocating driver, and means for actuating the staple-forming mechanism and driver, of staple-clinching mechanism having a spring- `held head T, supported in line with the vertically-reciprocating parts of the staple-forming mechanism and vertically-reciprocating driver and carrying pivotal clincher-pawls U and a stationary stop e6 in line with the pawls, substantially as and for the purpose set forth. y
13. In a book-stapling machine employing reciprocating staple-forming mechanism and a reciprocating driver supported on a standard and vertically adjustable thereon, the combination therewith of a non-adjustable clincher device havingpivotal clincher-pawls U on a vertically-yielding support and a stop in the path of the pawls, whereby when the support for the pawls is lowered by the pressure against it o,f the reciprocating stapleforming mechanism the pawls are actuated by the stop, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
14. In a book-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard supporting a vertically-adjustable bed-plate carrying reciprocating staple-forming mechanism, a reciprocating driver, and means for actuating the staple forming mechanism and driver, of staple-clinching mechanism having a springheld recessedY head T, supported in line with the vertically-reciprocating part-s of the staple-forming mechanism and vertically-reciprocating driver and carrying in its recess pivotal clincher-pawls U, a stationary stop e in line with the pawls, and a pivotal plate c in the recess of the head, controlled by a spring e, and having its free edge beveled and held by the spring normally against the beveled edge of a stationary plate e9, extending into the recess of the head T, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
l5. In a book-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard supporting a vertically-adj ustable bed-plate carrying reciprocating staple-forming mechanism, a reciprocating driver, and means for actuating the staple-forming mechanism and driver, of an arm S on the standard, having a bed-platef, provided with studs f and elongated open ings f2, a recessed head T, having studs em extending through the openings f2 and connected with. the studs f by springs d, clincher-pawls U, pivotally supported in the recess e2 of the said head, a stop e, secured to the bed-plate IOO f and extending into the recess e3 in line With the pawls, a plate e', pivotally supported in the said recess and extending over an opening e2 in thehead T and beveled on its free edge, a spring e, extending against the front side of the pivotal plate, and a beveled stopplate e9, secured to the bed-plate f and extending into the recess e2, with its beveled edge normally against that of the pivotal plate e', substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
16. In a book-stapling machine employing reciprocating staple-forming mechanism, a reciprocating driver supported on a standard, and clincher mechanism, a table V, comprising plates c and c', joined at adjacent edges Y and slotted at their junction, and one of the vwith a bed-plate f, having yieldingly connected with it a head TY in line with the reciprocating staple-forming mechanism and carrying pivotal clincher-pawls U, a stop e6 in the path of thevpawls, and a table V, supported on brackets b, adjustable on the head T and convertible by its adjustment from a table into a saddle and from a saddle into a table, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
18. In a book-stapling machine employing a reciprocating driver, staple-forming mechanism, and clincher mechanism, and having parts adjustable with reference to each other to the thickness of the Work to be stitched, al
gage set automatically by the adjustment of said parts to the Width of the Work, substantially as described.
19. In a book-stapling machine, the combination, with a standard, driving mechanism, and a support for the Work, of vertically-reciprocating longitudinallygrooved stapleforming bars supported on the standard and having the longitudinal grooves curved in- Ward toward their lower ends, the said bars being resiliently yielding toward their lower ends, and a reciprocating plunger K, movable in the grooves of the staple-forming bars, substantially as described.
FREDRICK P. ROSBACK.
In presence of J. H. DYRENFORTH, M. J. FROST.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2021069937A1 (en) * 2019-10-08 2021-04-15 Myron Nouris Stitching head monoblock drive unit

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2021069937A1 (en) * 2019-10-08 2021-04-15 Myron Nouris Stitching head monoblock drive unit

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