US3927665A - Lumbo-sacral support - Google Patents

Lumbo-sacral support Download PDF

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US3927665A
US3927665A US48163874A US3927665A US 3927665 A US3927665 A US 3927665A US 48163874 A US48163874 A US 48163874A US 3927665 A US3927665 A US 3927665A
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band
portions
tensioning
wearer
coupled
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Jerome R Wax
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Jerome R Wax
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • A61F5/01Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces
    • A61F5/02Orthopaedic corsets
    • A61F5/028Braces for providing support to the lower back, e.g. lumbo sacral supports

Abstract

A lumbo-sacral support includes an elastic body-encircling band, and a substantially inelastic tensioning system associated with the band to tension the band. The band further includes spaced para-spinal bars, and a portion of the tensioning system overlies the bars to press them into supporting engagement with the body of a wearer.

Description

United States Patent Wax 1451 Dec. 23, 1975 2 9,475 10,1940 Flaherty 123. 711 1 LUMBO-SACRAL SUPPORT Inventor: Jerome wax, /0 Poswrchek 53323323 311323 32?T.jjiiiiijijjj""" jijijjii: iii/33$ orthopffdic Products, Sham" 3.194.234 7/l965 Duckman 127/010. 15 Industr al Park Calcon H Road. 3,717,143 2/1973 Johnson 128/78 Sharon Hill, Pa. 19079 221 Filed: June 21, 1974 j' f'f fg i y x' ij' Gaud a. $515 an xammer- PP Nod 481.638 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Robert C. Podwil 1521 113.0. ..128/78 [57] ABSTRACT 51 1111. cm ..A6lF /02 A lumbo-sacral pp includes an elastic 58 Field of Search 128 78 95 96 DIG. l5 encll'cmg 1 a stanua Y me astlc 'l'bddb'll'l" ing system associated with the band to tension the [56] References Ci d band. The band further includes spaced para-spinal UNITED STATES PATENTS bars, and a portion of the tensioning system overlies the bars to press them into supporting engagement 21333233 :33; $331???111:1:""iijijjiiijijjii:33:1 153132 with body of a Wear/er- 2.117.309 5/l938 Fritsch l28/78 15 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures 1 1 ..1E\ :21 -.'."F:;1':- J

I. 1 'I. a I M '62 2 .17? 32 A017: l 34 y Q 1 g I l /8 I :1 l 5 1 64 is 2? as US. Patent Dec.23, 1975 Sheet 1 of2 3,927,665

U.S. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet2of2 3,927,665

1 LUMBO-SACRAL SUPPORT This invention relates to an orthopedic support, and more particularly, to an orthopedic support of the type designed to provide support for the lower spine and pelvis and generally referred to as a lumbo-sacral support.

A wide variety of lumbo-sacral support or corset constructions have heretofore been proposed. Those which are logically designed in accordance with the consensus of professional opinion as to their requirements are capable of (l) applying controlled circumferential compression to the pelvis to assist in binding the sacrum and left and right inominate bones together, thus establishing a base capable of receiving and properly distributing the weight transmitted to it by the lower lumbar spine, and (2) rigidifying and limiting movement of the lower spine.

Numerous prior patents have described structures seeking to achieve one or both of the above aims. Typical of these are the articles disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 2,104,699, issued to L. R. ODell; U.S. Pat. No. 2,793,368, issued to M. Nouel; U.S. Pat. No. 3,441,027, issued to 1. S. Lehman; U.S. Pat. No. 3,561,434, issued to R. W. Kilbey; and U.S. Pat. No. 3,717,143, issued to C. H. Johnson; among many others. The prior art devices include a variety of structures using elastic or inelastic body-encircling bands, and typically, flexible stays, the principal purpose of which, as stated, for example in U.S. Pat. No. 3,717,143, is to give the band body and to prevent rolling of upper and lower edges.

While the present support makes use of stays for particular purposes, desired rigidification and limitation of movement are derived not from stays, but from the interaction of rigid or semi-rigid bars disposed paraspinally, and a tensioning system associated with a body-encircling band to which the bars are affixed. The tensioning system of the present invention provides the sought-after circumferential compression of the pelvis and sacroiliac, and at the same time firmly and substantially uniformly presses the bars into engagement with the body of the wearer. It should be understood that the use of para-spinal bars has been proposed in patents such as U.S. Pat. No. 2,730,096, issued to l. M. Pease and U.S. Pat. No. 3,561,434, issued to R. W. Kilbey, but in neither of these is the present mechanism employed to uniformly and firmly apply force to the bars.

U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,201,933, M. W. Burk; 1,974,283 and 2,100,964, to A. B. Kendrick; 2,117,309, to L. A. Fritsch; 2,476,029, to .l. R. Dawson and 3,096,760 to H. G. Nelkin are other patents directed to various support constructions, but each is significantly lacking in important structural and functional aspects of the present invention.

Another aspect of this invention is the provision of a lumbo-sacral support wherein cooperative interaction between an elastic body-encircling band and a substantially inelastic tensioning system permits fitting of a given size of support to patients having a wide range of hipor waist-based sizes. This attribute of the present lumbo-sacral support makes it possible to reduce the number of sizes offered from eight to four, without affecting the efficacy of the support.

Accordingly, it is a principal object of the present invention to provide a novel lumbo-sacral support.

It is another and more particular object of this invention to provide a lumbo-sacral support in which essen- 2 tially rigid para-spinal bars provide support for the lumbo-sacral region of the wearers back.

It is another object of this invention to provide a novel lumbo-sacral support in which a given nominal hip-or waist-based size of support is suitable for fitting to patients within a wide range of individual sizes.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a lumbo-sacral support wherein a substantially inelastic tensioning system simultaneously provides the functions of tensioning an elastic body-encircling band so as to apply controlled circumferential compression to the pelvis ofa wearer; applying leveraged forces to a pair of rigid or semi-rigid para-spinal bars to rigidify and limit movement of lower spine; and, in conjunction with the elasticity of a body-encircling band and other features of the invention, providing for significant size adjustments in a support having a given nominal size.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

The foregoing and other objects of this invention are realized, in one presently preferred form of the invention, by an orthopedic support comprising an elastic body-encircling band, a pair-of spaced, substantially parallel upright bars coupled to and extending transversely with respect to the circumferential axis of the band, and a substantially inelastic tensioning means coupled to the band and adapted to apply tension to the band and leveraged forces uniformly and firmly distributed along a multiplicity of sections of the bars.

For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there are shown in the drawings forms which are presently preferred, it being understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

FIG. 1 is a plan view, showing a support in accordance with the invention disposed in a flat condition.

FIG. 2 is a pictorial view, showing a support in accordance with the invention as it would appear fastened to the body of a wearer and operatively disposed.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view, taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view, showing a typical paraspinal bar in accordance with the invention.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, wherein like numerals indicate like elements, there is seen in H6. 1 a support, designated generally by the reference numeral 10. The support 10 includes an elastic bodyencircling band, designated generally by the reference numeral 12, comprising leg portions l4, l6, l8 and 20 of elastic fabric, and a substantially inelastic back panel or portion 22. Respective edges of the leg portions l4, l6, l8 and 20 are joined to the back panel 22 at seams 24 and 26. Respective ends of the leg portions 14 and 16 and of the leg portions 18 and 20 are defined by fold lines 28 and 30. Thus, it will be seen that the leg portions 14, l6, l8 and 20 and the back panel 22 form a continuous band, capable of encircling the body of a wearer, and which is essentially elastic in character by virtue of the elasticity of the leg portions 14, 16, 18 and 20. Respective ends of the band 12 are provided with closure means 32 and 34. lnterengagement of the closure means 32 and 34 when the band 12 is operatively disposed creates, in effect, a continuous body-encircling band. The closure means 32 and 34 in the illus trated and presently preferred form of the invention are the commercially available material sold under the trademark Velcro. Other suitable closure means. such as snaps, hooks and eyes and the like, will occur to those skilled in the art. The closure means should per- 3 mit closing of the band within a range of nominal circumferential sizes, and this is accomplished in the illustrated embodiment by making the element 32 of the closure means 32 and 34 substantially longer in the direction of the circumferential axis of the band 12 than the element 34.

A pair of parallel pockets 36 and 38 are affixed to an outer face of the back panel 22, and adapted to receive a pair of bars 40 and 42, disposed para-spinally when the support is operatively disposed.

A tensioning system or means, designated generally by the reference numeral 44, is operatively associated with the band 12, and will now be described in detail. The tensioning system 44 comprises a system of substantially inelastic straps, so configured that they apply substantially uniform and widely distributed forces to the bars and 42 and provide leverage to project the bars 40 and 42 firmly into engagement with the back of a wearer of the support. In the illustrated embodiment, the tensioning system 44 includes first generally V- shaped anchorage straps, 46 and 48, the respective leg portions 46a and 48a of which are attached to the band 12 at zones of attachment defined by seams 24' and 26'. The anchorage straps 46 and 48 are so configured that their respective vertices 46b and 48b lie on opposite sides of the bars 40 and 42 from the zones of attachment of the leg portions 46a and 48a to the band 12. Thus, as is apparent in FIGS. 1 and 3, portions of both of the anchorage straps 46 and 48 are adapted to overlie each of the bars 40 and 42 when the support 10 is operatively disposed.

Coupled to the anchorage straps 46 and 48 are respective straps 50 and 52, made adjustable as to length by self-locking buckles 54 and 56 of conventional type. The straps 50 and 52 are anchored to the band 12 at their remote or distal ends, in presently preferred forms of the apparatus by means of V-shaped straps 58 and 60. The anchorage straps 46 and 48 may be coupled to the straps 50 and 52, and the straps 50 and 52 coupled to the straps 58 and 60 by means of links 62 or other suitable means capable of accommodating relative sliding or running" movement between the respective straps which they interconnect. The various straps which make up the tensioning system 44 are substantially inelastic, and may be made of heavy weight nonelastic webbing or the like.

Referring again to FIG. 1, the seams 24, 24', 26 and 26' define, in the illustrated form of the invention, pockets adapted to receive and retain flexible stays 64, 66, 68 and 70.

Referring now to FIG. 2, in its usage, the support 10 is first wrapped around the body of the wearer and the closure means 32 and 34 interengaged. In interengaging the closure means 32 and 34, the leg portions l4, 16, 18 and 20 may be stretched by hand tension to give the wearer a feeling of snugness. The elasticity of the band 12 and adjustability of the closure means 32 and 34 provide a measure of custom fitting of the support 10 to a particular wearer. Operative tensioning of the tensioning system 44 is accomplished by manipulation of the straps 50 and 52 and the buckles 54 and 56, and tension in the strap 50 is transmitted through the links 62 to the anchorage strap 48 and strap 58. Similarly, tensioning of the strap 52, not seen in FIG. 2, applies tension through the links 62 to the anchorage strap 46 and strap 60.

Operative tension in the anchorage straps 46 and 48 induced by tension in the straps 50 and 52 may cause the formation of pleats in the back panel 22 adjacent to the seams 24' and 26', although it is preferred that the band 12 maintain the essentially smooth configuration shown in FIG. 2. Pleat formation will, in some cases, serve as another mechanism whereby the circumference of the band can be adjusted for the purpose of fit. lt will be noted that media] portions of the legs 46a of the anchorage strap 46 and also portions of the anchorage strap 48 overlie portions of the pocket 36 containing the bar 40, and that similarly, medial portions of the legs 48a of the anchorage strap 48 and also portions of the anchorage strap 46 overlie portions of the pocket 38 containing the bar 42.

The cross-section of a wearers body is such that the above-described configuration of the tensioning means 44 in relation to the bars 40 and 42 results in leveraging of the forces applied to the bars 40 and 42. Moreover, the width of the anchorage straps 46 and 48, and their operative disposition with respect to the bars 40 and 42 causes them to apply to the bars 40 and 42 widely distributed forces, tending to firmly and substantially evenly press the bars 40 and 42 into supporting engagement with the body of a wearer. FIG. 4 serves to illustrate the typical configuration of the bars 40 and 42, curved to conform to the lumbo-sacral curve of a wearer. The application of well-distributed forces to the bars 40 and 42 enhances the effectiveness of the bars. In one present operative embodiment of the support 10, the bars 40 and 42 are roughly 10% inches in length, and the portions of the anchorage straps 46 and 48 which overlie them have a combined effective width of nearly 9 inches.

Certain of the unique structural aspects of the present support 10, particularly the elasticity of the leg portions l4, 16, 18 and 20 and the ability of the closure means 32 and 34 to provide a range in which they are interengageable, serve to reduce the number of sizes in which the support 10 need be made. A typical size offering for prior art supports, for example, would include eight sizes (e.g., in hip-based sizes, 30-44 inclusive, in two inch increments), but the present support 10 can be provided in as few as four sizes due to its ability to take up considerable size differences without compromise of its function.

In a modified form of the invention, the straps 50 and 52 can be made with a limited degree of initial elasticity, it having been found that the sensation imparted by yielding of the straps 50 and 52 upon tensioning of the tensioning system 44 gives the wearer a satisfying feeling of snugness." Thus, referring to FIG. 1, the segments 50a and 52a of the straps 50 and 52 may be made of an elastic material similar to the material of the leg portions 14, 16, 18 and 20. Material of this type may be capable of elongation to percent of its initial length but when elongated to its elastic limit is substantially inelastic. Proper adjustment of the straps 50 and 52 upon tensioning of the tensioning system 44 will gradually draw the segments 50a and 52a to their ultimate lengths, and in their operative condition, the straps 50 and 52 will be substantially inelastic.

The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from its spirit or essential attributes, and accordingly, reference should be made to the appended claims, rather than to the foregoing specification, as indicating the scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. An orthopedic support comprising a substantially elastic band member adapted to encircle the body and to overlie the lumbo-sacral region of the back of a wearer, a pair of spaced substantially upright bars coupled to and extending transversely with respect to the circumferential axis of said band member and disposed on opposite sides of the spine of a wearer when the support is operatively disposed, and substantially inelastic tensioning means coupled to said band member and adapted to tension said band member so as to apply circumferential compression to the pelvis of a wearer, said tensioning means having end portions thereof anchored to respective zones of attachment on said band member disposed on opposite sides of the spine of a wearer and further portions thereof extending across the spine of a wearer when said support is operatively disposed, said end portions extending across and over lying said bars so as to apply distributed forces thereto to press said bars into supporting engagement with the lower back of the wearer.

2. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 1, wherein said band member comprises a substantially nonelastic portion adapted to overlie the back of a wearer and elastic portions coupled to said non-elastic portion adjacent respective lateral edges of said nonelastic portion, said zones of attachment for said tensioning means being so disposed that adjustment of said tensioning means is adapted to form pleats extending transversely with respect to the circumferential axis of said band member so as to adjust the effective circumference of said band member.

3. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 1, and said end portions of said tensioning means comprising generally V-shaped members having respective leg portions thereof secured to said band member and respective vertex portions thereof adapted to extend across the spine of a wearer from said respective zones of attachment, said tensioning means further comprising strap portions coupled to said vertex portions and having distal end portions thereof coupled to portions of said band member adjacent distal ends of said band member.

4. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 3, wherein said strap portions include means facilitating adjustment of said web portions as to length.

5. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 3, wherein said strap portions include distal end portions thereof coupled to said band member at locations remote from said respective zones of attachment.

6. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 1, wherein said tensioning means include distal end portions thereof coupled to said band member at locations remote from said respective zones of attachment.

7. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 6, wherein said tensioning means include elastic portions thereof adapted to be extended to the limit of their elasticity when said tensioning means are operatively disposed.

8. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 6, wherein said band member comprises a substantially non-elastic portion adapted to overlie the back of a wearer and elastic portions coupled to said non-elastic portion adjacent respective lateral edges of said nonelastic portion, said zones of attachment for said tensioning means being so disposed that adjustment of said tensioning means is adapted to form pleats extending transversely with respect to the circumferential axis of said band so as to adjust the effective circumference of said band.

9. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 8, and said end portions of said tensioning means comprising generally V-shaped members having respective leg portions thereof secured to said band and respective vertex portions thereof adapted to extend across the spine of a wearer from said respective zones of attachment, said tensioning means further comprising web portions coupled to said vertex portions and having distal end portions thereof coupled to portions of said band member adjacent distal ends of said band member.

10. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 9, and means coupled to respective ends of said band member for operatively coupling said ends within a range of circumferentially spaced positions.

11. In an orthopedic support comprising a continuous substantially elastic band member adapted to encircle the body of a wearer, and substantially inelastic tensioning means coupled to said band member and adapted to tension said band member so as to apply circumferential compression to the body of a wearer,

said tensioning means having end portions thereof anchored to respective zones of attachment on said band disposed on opposite sides of and spaced from the spine of a wearer and further portions thereof extending from said zones of attachment across the spine of a wearer when said support is operatively disposed, and spaced paraspinal bars coupled to said band member and disposed on opposite sides of the spine of a wearer when said support is operatively disposed, said tensioning means overlying said bars when said support is operatively disposed so as to press said bars into supporting engagement with the lower back of a wearer.

12. In an orthopedic support in accordance with claim 11, said zones of attachment for said tensioning means being so disposed that adjustment of said tensioning means is adapted to form a pair of pleats extending transversely with respect to the circumferential axis of said band member so as to adjust the effective circumference of said band member.

13. In an orthopedic support in accordance with claim 11, means coupled to respective ends of said band member for operatively coupling said ends within a range of circumferentially spaced positions.

14. In an orthopedic support in accordance with claim 13, said band member comprising a substantially nonelastic portion adapted to overlie the back of a wearer and elastic portions couplcd to said nonelastic portion adjacent respective lateral edges of said nonelastic portion.

15. In an orthopedic support in accordance with claim 13, said end portions of said tensioning means comprising generally V-shaped members having respective leg portions thereof secured to said band and respective vertex portions thereof adapted to extend across the spine of a wearer from said respective zones of attachment and to overlie said bars, said tensioning means further comprising web portions coupled to said vertex portions and having distal end portions thereof coupled to portions of said band adjacent distal ends of said band.

l l l I

Claims (15)

1. An orthopedic support comprising a substantially elastic band member adapted to encircle the body and to overlie the lumbosacral region of the back of a wearer, a pair of spaced substantially upright bars coupled to and extending transversely with respect to the circumferential axis of said band member and disposed on opposite sides of the spine of a wearer when the support is operatively disposed, and substantially inelastic tensioning means coupled to said band member and adapted to tension said band member so as to apply circumferential compression to the pelvis of a wearer, said tensioning means having end portions thereof anchored to respective zones of Attachment on said band member disposed on opposite sides of the spine of a wearer and further portions thereof extending across the spine of a wearer when said support is operatively disposed, said end portions extending across and overlying said bars so as to apply distributed forces thereto to press said bars into supporting engagement with the lower back of the wearer.
2. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 1, wherein said band member comprises a substantially nonelastic portion adapted to overlie the back of a wearer and elastic portions coupled to said non-elastic portion adjacent respective lateral edges of said non-elastic portion, said zones of attachment for said tensioning means being so disposed that adjustment of said tensioning means is adapted to form pleats extending transversely with respect to the circumferential axis of said band member so as to adjust the effective circumference of said band member.
3. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 1, and said end portions of said tensioning means comprising generally V-shaped members having respective leg portions thereof secured to said band member and respective vertex portions thereof adapted to extend across the spine of a wearer from said respective zones of attachment, said tensioning means further comprising strap portions coupled to said vertex portions and having distal end portions thereof coupled to portions of said band member adjacent distal ends of said band member.
4. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 3, wherein said strap portions include means facilitating adjustment of said web portions as to length.
5. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 3, wherein said strap portions include distal end portions thereof coupled to said band member at locations remote from said respective zones of attachment.
6. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 1, wherein said tensioning means include distal end portions thereof coupled to said band member at locations remote from said respective zones of attachment.
7. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 6, wherein said tensioning means include elastic portions thereof adapted to be extended to the limit of their elasticity when said tensioning means are operatively disposed.
8. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 6, wherein said band member comprises a substantially non-elastic portion adapted to overlie the back of a wearer and elastic portions coupled to said non-elastic portion adjacent respective lateral edges of said non-elastic portion, said zones of attachment for said tensioning means being so disposed that adjustment of said tensioning means is adapted to form pleats extending transversely with respect to the circumferential axis of said band so as to adjust the effective circumference of said band.
9. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 8, and said end portions of said tensioning means comprising generally V-shaped members having respective leg portions thereof secured to said band and respective vertex portions thereof adapted to extend across the spine of a wearer from said respective zones of attachment, said tensioning means further comprising web portions coupled to said vertex portions and having distal end portions thereof coupled to portions of said band member adjacent distal ends of said band member.
10. An orthopedic support in accordance with claim 9, and means coupled to respective ends of said band member for operatively coupling said ends within a range of circumferentially spaced positions.
11. In an orthopedic support comprising a continuous substantially elastic band member adapted to encircle the body of a wearer, and substantially inelastic tensioning means coupled to said band member and adapted to tension said band member so as to apply circumferential compression to the body of a wearer, said tensioning means having end portions thereof anchored to respective zones of attachment on said band disposed on opposite sides of And spaced from the spine of a wearer and further portions thereof extending from said zones of attachment across the spine of a wearer when said support is operatively disposed, and spaced paraspinal bars coupled to said band member and disposed on opposite sides of the spine of a wearer when said support is operatively disposed, said tensioning means overlying said bars when said support is operatively disposed so as to press said bars into supporting engagement with the lower back of a wearer.
12. In an orthopedic support in accordance with claim 11, said zones of attachment for said tensioning means being so disposed that adjustment of said tensioning means is adapted to form a pair of pleats extending transversely with respect to the circumferential axis of said band member so as to adjust the effective circumference of said band member.
13. In an orthopedic support in accordance with claim 11, means coupled to respective ends of said band member for operatively coupling said ends within a range of circumferentially spaced positions.
14. In an orthopedic support in accordance with claim 13, said band member comprising a substantially nonelastic portion adapted to overlie the back of a wearer and elastic portions coupled to said non-elastic portion adjacent respective lateral edges of said non-elastic portion.
15. In an orthopedic support in accordance with claim 13, said end portions of said tensioning means comprising generally V-shaped members having respective leg portions thereof secured to said band and respective vertex portions thereof adapted to extend across the spine of a wearer from said respective zones of attachment and to overlie said bars, said tensioning means further comprising web portions coupled to said vertex portions and having distal end portions thereof coupled to portions of said band adjacent distal ends of said band.
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US9554935B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2017-01-31 Ossur Hf Orthopedic device for treating complications of the hip
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