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US3921050A - Programmed battery charging system - Google Patents

Programmed battery charging system Download PDF

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Publication number
US3921050A
US3921050A US51131874A US3921050A US 3921050 A US3921050 A US 3921050A US 51131874 A US51131874 A US 51131874A US 3921050 A US3921050 A US 3921050A
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Prior art keywords
charging
battery
circuit
system
connected
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Expired - Lifetime
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Clifford A Rowas
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Schauer Manufacturing Corp
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Schauer Manufacturing Corp
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J7/00Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries
    • H02J7/0013Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries for charging several batteries simultaneously or sequentially
    • H02J7/0022Management of charging with batteries permanently connected to charge circuit
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S320/00Electricity: battery or capacitor charging or discharging
    • Y10S320/18Indicator or display
    • Y10S320/21State of charge of battery

Abstract

A circuit controlling a battery charging system adapted to progressively boost charge a succession of banks of series connected, newly manufactured batteries, said circuit including a stand-by switch means adapted to periodically initiate the battery charging system whereby to maintain all the batteries in satisfactory charged conditions for the ultimate users thereof.

Description

United States Patent [191 Rowas [451 Nov. 18, 1975 PROGRAMMED BATTERY CHARGING I SYSTEM [75] Inventor: Clifford A. Rowas, Cincinnati, Ohio [73] Assignee: Schauer Manufacturing Corporation, Cincinnati, Ohio [22] Filed: Oct. 2, 1974 [2]] App]. No.: 511,318

[52] US. Cl. 320/19; 320/21; 320/38 [51] Int. Cl. H02J 7/00 [58] Field of Search 320/14-21,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1961 Medlar 320/21 X 3/1974 Mauch et al 320/14 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS l,222,279 2/l97l United Kingdom 307/41 Primary Examiner- D. Miller Assistant Examiner-Robert J. Hickey Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Walter S. Murray [57] ABSTRACT A circuit controlling a battery charging system adapted to progressively boost charge a succession of banks of series connected, newly manufactured batteries, said circuit including a stand-by switch means adapted to periodically initiate the battery charging system whereby to maintain all the batteries in satisfactory charged conditions for the ultimate users thereof.

3 Claims, 1 Drawing Figure US. Patent Nov; 18, 1975 3,921,050

PROGRAMME) batteries stored in warehouse, distributor or jobber inventories, or in retail sales outlets, such as service stations, automotive dealers and stores, and the like.

It has been known that electro-chemical batteries lose some of their charge between the time they'are activated and when they are put into use, the decrease-in charge being in part due to the elapsed shelf period and/or to some extent the circumambiant tempera'tur conditions during that period.

It is, therefore, the principal object .of the invention to provide an automatic stand-by system that maintains one or a plurality of new electro-chemical batteries in.

gether; the system being programmed to repeat the, boost charge step of the banks at predeterminedrelatively long time intervals.

Another object of the invention is to provide in a; bat-Q tery charging system having the foregoing characteris tics a battery bank series connection manual checkout system to selectively verify the correct series connection of batteries in each separate battery bank.

These and other objects of the invention will be ap A parent from the following specification when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which the single figure therein is a schematic diagram of an exemplary embodiment of my invention.

With reference to the drawing thecharger system is designed to operate from a 120 volt', f60 cycle source which is most frequently encountered in practise and introduced to the system through grounded line plug 5 in turn connected to the primary winding 6 of a transformer T; a master switch S1 and a manual reset circuit breaker CB1 being wired in series in .the line. A pilot light PLl is shunted across the primary winding of the transformer to indicate that the transformer is operative.

The secondary winding 7 of the transformer T is connected to the input terminals 8 and 9 of a fully regulated A/C to D/C, solid state converter 10, which, ideally provides a constant current of 4 amperes in main charging circuit lines 11 and 12 connected to the out.- put terminals 13 and 14, respectively, of the converter 10.

A suitable frame 15 is adapted to removeably hold one or a plurality of lead acid, 12 volt, 6 cell batteries 16 arranged in banks 17, each bank containing a number of the batteries 16 that are series connected together. The positive lead terminal of each battery bank 17 is connected to the main charging line 11, while the negative lead terminal of each battery bank 17 is connected by an individual conductor I8 to the main charging circuit line 12. Each individual line 18 has a controlled rectifier 19 interposed therein poled to normally preclude the flow of current from the main :ATTERY CHARG-INLG-YSYSIEMLQ charging circuit through its connected bank of batterg tifi ers 19 are individually and prog 'ressively fired j and to breakdown because of the poential introduceditherelto through conductors 20 and hereby connect each battery bank 17 to the charging .circuit, the conductors being connected to a control unit 21 of a programmed sequencer 22. A power unit 23 operates the control unit 21 and is actuated by a center tapped memory battery assembly 24 connected to the power unit by conductors 2525. The center tap is connected by a line 26 to the main charging cir- 'cuit line 12. The power unit is also connected to a center tapped secondary winding 27 of the transformer T -by terminal lines 28 and 29 and a center line 30, the lines 28 and 30 having automatic reset circuit breakers CB2 and CB3, respectively, interposed therein. The programmed sequencer is connected to a manual, normally closed momentary reset switch S2 to provide a means of resettingthe automatic sequenced system back to the initial condition of charging the first bank of batteries.

A series connected manual checkout switch S3 has its arm connected to the main line 11 by conductor 31 with a voltmeter 32 interposed therein, the taps 33 of the switch each connected to an individual conductor 18 of each bank 17 of series connected batteries 16.

A conductor 34 is shunted across the main circuit lines 11 and 12 and'has a controlled rectifier 35 therein which is fired by thesequencer control unit 21 independently of the battery charging controlled rectifiers V 19, said conductorhaving a pilot light PL2 therein with a resistance R2 shunted across its terminals.

OPERATION When the switch S1 is manually switched to the ON position the charging and timing of the entire battery .charging control program is started. In the charging phase of my system the control unit 21 switches the first of the nine battery banks to the charging circuit FQlines 11 and 12 of the constant current converter 10 for 1 hour to returni4 ampere hours of charge to the first of the nine battery banks 17. At the end of the first hour, the program sequencer 21 functions to disconnect this direct current output circuit from the first bank and connect-the second bank of the nine banks to the constant current converter direct current output for 1 hour to return 4 ampere hours to the second of the nine battery banks :17. This 1 hour charging step is progressively continued through each of the remaining battery banks, one at a time, to return 4 ampere hours to each of the remaining battery banks 17.

After the ninth battery charging direct current output circuit and its battery bank 17 has been disconnected the stand-by phase of the system is initiated by the control unit 21 of the programmed sequencer 22 by firing controlled rectifier 35 to start an extended disconnect period which should include an elapsed time of approx- 0 fimately 15 days. At the expiration of said elapsed time iof disconnect the control unit 21 will again initiate the jfirst charging phase by connecting the direct current :output circuit to the first battery bank to repeat the en- .tire battery charging phase. The foregoing sequence of operations willgcontinue to repeat automatically until such time as the switch S1 is manually switched to OFF position. Upon opening of the normally closed momenfiz-tary reset button S2 the battery charging program can be stopped and the program reset to connect the first of the nine battery banks to the output circuit of its battery bank 17.

The battery bank series connection manual checkout system provides a manual means of verifying the correct series connection of six batteries in each separate battery bank 17, the check of separate battery banks being made, one bank at a time, by advancing the tap I switch S3 and noting the voltmeter reading for each position, a reading above or below the proper setting a conductor, a stand-by circuit connected across the charging circuit, a visible indicator means and a second switch interposed in series in the stand-by circuit, and a continuously operable sequence control means adapted to progressively actuate and disconnect each first switch to boost charge successive banks of batteries, then actuate the second switch to monitor a noncharging period of the system and finally initiate the boost charging circuit following the non-charging period.

2. In a programmed battery charging system as set forth in claim 1 wherein all the first switches and the second switch are controlled rectifiers.

3. In a programmed battery charging system as set forth in claim 1 wherein a power unit operates the sequence control means, and a center tapped memory battery assembly is connected to the power unit.

Claims (3)

1. In a programmed battery charging system the combination of a fully regulated, constant current boost charging circuit, a plurality of banks, each bank having a number of series connected batteries therein, a conductor connecting each bank of batteries to the charging circuit, a series of first switches each interposed in a conductor, a stand-by circuit connected across the charging circuit, a visible indicator means and a second switch interposed in series in the stand-by circuit, and a continuously operable sequence control means adapted to progressively actuate and disconnect each first switch to boost charge successive banks of batteries, then actuate the second switch to monitor a non-charging period of the system and finally initiate the boost charging circuit following the non-charging period.
2. In a programmed battery charging system as set forth in claim 1 wherein all the first switches and the second switch are controlled rectifiers.
3. In a programmed battery charging system as set forth in claim 1 wherein a power unit operates the sequence control means, and a center tapped memory battery assembly is connected to the power unit.
US3921050A 1974-10-02 1974-10-02 Programmed battery charging system Expired - Lifetime US3921050A (en)

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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4016474A (en) * 1975-04-25 1977-04-05 Ecc Corporation Circuit for controlling the charging current supplied to a plurality of battery loads in accordance with a predetermined program
FR2552592A1 (en) * 1983-09-23 1985-03-29 Dupont Raymond Device for automatic management of battery charging
US4689531A (en) * 1985-07-01 1987-08-25 Ewers, And Willis Electric regeneration apparatus and method for driving a load
EP0519052A1 (en) * 1990-10-16 1992-12-23 GALI, Carl E. Lead acid battery rejuvenator and charger
EP0609564A2 (en) * 1993-01-05 1994-08-10 Renate Böcker Method and device for charging an accumulator unit
US5497067A (en) * 1994-02-18 1996-03-05 Shaw; Donald E. Battery charger with timer-controlled charging, shut-off and reset operations
US5525892A (en) * 1993-08-24 1996-06-11 Pulse Charge Systems, Inc. Pulsed battery rejuvenator having variable trailing edge shaped pulses
US5883493A (en) * 1982-06-07 1999-03-16 Intermec Technologies Corporation Battery pack having memory
US5986435A (en) * 1982-06-07 1999-11-16 Intermec Ip Corp. Method of utilizing a battery powered system having two processors
US6075340A (en) * 1985-11-12 2000-06-13 Intermec Ip Corp. Battery pack having memory
US6097174A (en) * 1998-09-18 2000-08-01 Yang; Tai-Her Individually adjustable type automatic charging circuit for multiple batteries
US6271643B1 (en) 1986-12-18 2001-08-07 Intermec Ip Corp. Battery pack having memory
US6307349B1 (en) 2000-02-24 2001-10-23 Intermec Ip Corp. Battery pack having memory
US20090096399A1 (en) * 2007-10-16 2009-04-16 Yung Chen Intelligent motorized appliances with multiple power sources
US20130043842A1 (en) * 2010-02-05 2013-02-21 Sylvain Mercier Charge equalization system for batteries
US8653789B2 (en) 2009-10-28 2014-02-18 Superior Communications, Inc. Method and apparatus for recharging batteries in a more efficient manner

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2977525A (en) * 1957-09-18 1961-03-28 Fox Prod Co Battery charge maintaining apparatus
US3796940A (en) * 1971-12-27 1974-03-12 Bogue J Battery power supply,maintenance free

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2977525A (en) * 1957-09-18 1961-03-28 Fox Prod Co Battery charge maintaining apparatus
US3796940A (en) * 1971-12-27 1974-03-12 Bogue J Battery power supply,maintenance free

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4016474A (en) * 1975-04-25 1977-04-05 Ecc Corporation Circuit for controlling the charging current supplied to a plurality of battery loads in accordance with a predetermined program
US5883493A (en) * 1982-06-07 1999-03-16 Intermec Technologies Corporation Battery pack having memory
US5986435A (en) * 1982-06-07 1999-11-16 Intermec Ip Corp. Method of utilizing a battery powered system having two processors
FR2552592A1 (en) * 1983-09-23 1985-03-29 Dupont Raymond Device for automatic management of battery charging
US6252380B1 (en) 1984-05-21 2001-06-26 Intermec Ip Corp. Battery pack having memory
US4689531A (en) * 1985-07-01 1987-08-25 Ewers, And Willis Electric regeneration apparatus and method for driving a load
US6075340A (en) * 1985-11-12 2000-06-13 Intermec Ip Corp. Battery pack having memory
US6271643B1 (en) 1986-12-18 2001-08-07 Intermec Ip Corp. Battery pack having memory
EP0519052A4 (en) * 1990-10-16 1993-09-29 Carl E. Gali Lead acid battery rejuvenator and charger
EP0519052A1 (en) * 1990-10-16 1992-12-23 GALI, Carl E. Lead acid battery rejuvenator and charger
EP0609564A2 (en) * 1993-01-05 1994-08-10 Renate Böcker Method and device for charging an accumulator unit
US5525892A (en) * 1993-08-24 1996-06-11 Pulse Charge Systems, Inc. Pulsed battery rejuvenator having variable trailing edge shaped pulses
US5497067A (en) * 1994-02-18 1996-03-05 Shaw; Donald E. Battery charger with timer-controlled charging, shut-off and reset operations
US6097174A (en) * 1998-09-18 2000-08-01 Yang; Tai-Her Individually adjustable type automatic charging circuit for multiple batteries
US6307349B1 (en) 2000-02-24 2001-10-23 Intermec Ip Corp. Battery pack having memory
US20090096399A1 (en) * 2007-10-16 2009-04-16 Yung Chen Intelligent motorized appliances with multiple power sources
US7825615B2 (en) 2007-10-16 2010-11-02 Glj, Llc Intelligent motorized appliances with multiple power sources
US8653789B2 (en) 2009-10-28 2014-02-18 Superior Communications, Inc. Method and apparatus for recharging batteries in a more efficient manner
US8836282B2 (en) 2009-10-28 2014-09-16 Superior Communications, Inc. Method and apparatus for recharging batteries in a more efficient manner
US20130043842A1 (en) * 2010-02-05 2013-02-21 Sylvain Mercier Charge equalization system for batteries
US9490639B2 (en) * 2010-02-05 2016-11-08 Commissariat A L'energie Atomique Et Aux Energies Alternatives Charge equalization system for batteries

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