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US3908658A - Seal and appliance for ostomy patients - Google Patents

Seal and appliance for ostomy patients Download PDF

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US3908658A
US3908658A US38849173A US3908658A US 3908658 A US3908658 A US 3908658A US 38849173 A US38849173 A US 38849173A US 3908658 A US3908658 A US 3908658A
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stoma
container
water
sealing
sensitive
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Arthur E Marsan
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Arthur E Marsan
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • A61F5/44Devices worn by the patient for reception of urine, faeces, catamenial or other discharge; Portable urination aids; Colostomy devices
    • A61F5/443Devices worn by the patient for reception of urine, faeces, catamenial or other discharge; Portable urination aids; Colostomy devices having adhesive seals for securing to the body, e.g. of hydrocolloid type, e.g. gels, starches, karaya gums
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L24/00Surgical adhesives or cements; Adhesives for colostomy devices
    • A61L24/04Surgical adhesives or cements; Adhesives for colostomy devices containing macromolecular materials
    • A61L24/043Mixtures of macromolecular materials
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L2400/00Materials characterised by their function or physical properties
    • A61L2400/14Adhesives for ostomy devices

Abstract

An appliance and sealing system for application to patients who have had surgery for colostomy, ileostomy or the like, for sealing a pouch or bag to the patient''s skin around the stoma so the pouch is in position to receive discharge from the stoma. The sealing system is a mass or ring of water insoluble pressure sensitive gel-like material which adheres to both the pouch and the patient''s skin. The adhesive can contain some water soluble ingredients if desired. The pressure sensitive adhesive may be made by preparing a melt mix of mineral oil, an aromatic-aliphatic polymer such as a copolymer styrene and isobutylene and a vinyl polymer such as an ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The melt mix is poured into suitable molds and permitted to gel to form the seal. Both the external surface and the internal mass of the seal have properties of pressure sensitive tack, elasticity, flexibility, compressibility and kneadability. The adhesive mass can be marketed in combination with the pouch or as an individual item in the form of a ring-shaped seal having release liner on both surfaces.

Description

United States Patent 1 Marsan 1 1 Sept-30, 1975 1 1 SEAL AND APPLIANCE FOR ()STOMY PATIENTS [76] Inventor: Arthur E. Marsan, PO. Box 3743,

Brownsville, Tex. 78520 [22] Filed: Aug. 15, 1973 211 Appl. No.: 388,491

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 255.543, May 22, 1972, Pat. No. 3,799,166, which is a continuationin-part of Ser. No. 884,842. Dec. 15, 1969, Pat. No. 3.667.469.

[52] U.S. C1. 128/283 [51] Int. Cl. A6lf 5/44 [58] Field of Search 128/283, 294, 295

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3.302.647 2/1967 Marsan 128/283 3.612.053 10/1971 Pratt 128/283 3.667.469 6/1972 Marsan 128/283 3.712.304 1/1973 Marsan 128/283 3.799.166 3/1974 Marsan 128/283 Primary E.\aminerDalton L. Truluck [57] ABSTRACT An appliance and sealing system for application to patients who have had surgery for colostomy, ileostomy or the like, for sealing a pouch or bag to the patients skin around the stoma so the pouch is in position to receive discharge from the stoma. The sealing system is a mass or ring of water insoluble pressure sensitive gel-like material which adheres to both the pouch and the patients skin. The adhesive can contain some water soluble ingredients if desired.

The pressure sensitive adhesive may -be made by preparing a melt mix of mineral oil, an aromatic-aliphatic polymer such as a copolymer styrene and isobutylene and a vinyl polymer such as "an ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The melt mix is poured into suitable molds and permitted to gel to form the seal. Both the external surface and the internal mass of the seal have properties of pressure sensitive tack, elasticity, flexibility, compressibility and kneadability. The adhesive mass can be marketed in combination with the pouch or as an individual item in the form of a ring shaped seal having release liner on both surfaces.

7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 3,908,658

FIG.|

FIG.4

SEAL AND APPLIANCE FOR OSTOMY PATIENTS CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a continuation-in-part and improvement of my application Ser. No. 255,543 filed May 22, 1972 now Pat. No. 3,799,166 issued Mar. 26, 1974, entitled Starch-Type Gel Seals for Ostomy Patients which in turn is a continuation-in-part and improvement of my application Ser. No. 884,842 filed Dec. 15, 1969, now US. Pat. No. 3,667,469, issued Jan. 6, 1972.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to an improved sealing system for use with a surgical drainage pouch to receive waste discharged from a patient who has undergone such abdominal surgery as a colostomy, ileostomy, ureter stomy or the like, resulting in an opening in the abdominal wall which permits drainage from the interior of the abdominal cavity. The sealing system seals the pouch opening around the abdominal opening or stoma of the patient so that the pouch receives the discharge from the stoma.

2. Brief Description of the Prior Art A number of ostomy sealing devices have been proposed for sealing the openings of pouches around the stoma of the patient. One problem with such seals is that some leakage from the stoma occurs between the drainage pouch and the patients skin, causing irritation to the skin. For example, the constant flow of digestive juices on the skin can cause digestion of some of the skin, known as excoriation. Thus, it has been important to attempt to prevent the leakage between the pouch and the skin by providing a sealing system.

Probably the most important commercial sealing systern heretofore provided is exemplified in my U.S. Pat. No. 3,302,647. That patent describes sealing pads or rings formed of glycerol and karaya, using a sufficient amount of karaya to gel the glycerol when mixed. This seal was the first of its type and started a new trend in post-operative care for ostomy patients.

Karaya seals have been effective for prevention of skin irritation, skin excoriation and leakage on clothing and bedding for many patients and the seals have proved to be of great benefit.

However, some problems have been reported. For example, with some patients the use of the karayaglycerol seal has resulted in irritation, rash and itching. More important, both the karaya powder and glycerol are water soluble and the seals have exhibited a lack of durability due to seal breakdown and dissolution at a more rapid rate than desired. The dissolution results not only from aqueous liquid discharge from the body but also from water which may be present in the form of perspiration from the body. Moreover, the high cost of karaya and the relatively low durability of the seal creates an economical problem. The kayaya seals presently cost the patient from about 25 to about 50 cents each and some patients require the use of several seals every 24 hours, creating a significant financial burden to the patient.

Further, karaya gum powder is used as a substantial ingredient in such seals and since it is a natural product of exuded resin from a tree it acts as a food for bacterial growth that may become contaminated. Also, exposure to the atmosphere can contaminate the gum with impurities such as sand, dirt and bark. Additionally, as with most natural products, the properties of the karaya gum are not always uniform. Other disadvantages of karaya gum, especially when used as a major constituent of the seal, are set forth in my US. Pat. No. 3,712,304.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a new and useful sealing system for sealing a container to the skin of a patient having an ostomy condition. The seal is a pressure sensitive adhesive which is basically composed of water insoluble or hydrophobic materials to provide a water insoluble seal, although hydrophilic agents can be added to the seal composition in varying predetermined amounts so as to provide a predetermined controlled rate or degree of solubility of the hydrophilic components. This controlled solubility can be desirable, for example, for releasing medicinal materials or the like from the seal into the area of the stoma.

The total mass of the seal, including both the external surface and the internal mass, has excellent properties of pressure-sensitive tack, elasticity, flexibility, compressibility and kneadability.

In a specific preferred form, the pressure sensitive adhesive seal is prepared as a melt mixture of mineral oil, styrene-isobutylene copolymer, and ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The pressure-sensitive adhesive mass is usually provided in the form of a flat ringshaped seal for surrounding the stoma and the opening to the pouch or other container.

While this invention is susceptible of an embodiment in many different forms, there is shown in the drawings and will herein be described in detail a specific embodiment and modification thereof, with the understanding that the present disclosure is to be considered as an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the embodiment illustrated.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary view of the abdominal section of the human torso showing post-surgical drainage pouch in use; 1

FIG. 2 is an enlarged face view of the back panel of the drainage pouch of FIG. 1 showing a form of sealing ring of this invention for sealing the pouch to the patients body;

FIG. 3 is a section along line 33 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a sealing ring of this invention prior to assembly with the pouch.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, in FIG. 1 there is shown a post-surgical drainage pouch or bag 10 secured to the torso 12 of a patient by means of a belt 14. As seen in FIG. 2 the bag 10 has an opening 16 for receiving the stoma of the patient. A rigid plastic support ring 18 (FIGS. 2 and 3) surrounds opening 16 and is secured to the back panel of the bag 10. A sealing pad or gasket 20 is secured to ring 18 and to the back panel of bag 10 around opening 16 for sealing the bag to the patients skin.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the sealing gasket 20 can be prepared separately from the bag and distributed in the form of an assembly including the gasket 20 with its opposing faces covered by release liners 22 and 24 to protect the gasket 20 from adhesion to foreign substances during storage and distribution. One of the release liners 22 can be removed for securing the gasket 20 to the bag and the other release liner 24 can then be removed to secure the gasket 20 to the patients skin. Al ternatively, the gasket 20 can be molded directly on the ring I18 and back panel of bag 10 in the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 and one release liner 24 can be applied to the exposed surface of the gasket 20.

The gasket 20 is advantageously a pressure-sensitive mass having a composition of mineral oil, a thermoplastic aromatic-aliphatic polymer such as styreneisobutylene copolymer and a thermoplastic vinyl polymer such as ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The composition can be prepared by blending the three in gredients at a temperature above the melt temperatures of the copolymers. The melt mixture can then be poured into suitable molds or molded directly on the back panel of bag 10 as indicated above. All three ingredients are water insoluble, as in the molded gasket. Thus, the basic composition is hydrophobic, although it is intended that hydrophilic agents can be included in the composition so as to provide that a predetermined controlled rate of solubility of the hydrophilic components where desired. For example, where it is desired for the composition to slowly release a rnedicinal material a hydrophilic medicinal material may be included.

In an advantageous form, starch, such as pregelatinized starch, which is hydrophilic, is included in the composition for a number of reasons. The starch can function as an extender, thereby replacing some of the more expensive polymers used in the composition. The starch can also function as a filler to give the composition, additional strength where desired. The preferred basic material made from the mineral oil and two'copolymers is fairly clear in its appearance, i.e., transparent to translucent and the starch, which is white and has a high degree of absorbency when present in the composition, permits ready visual detection of dis charge leakage between the seal and the patients'skin. The starch also tends to absorb discharge fluids which may otherwise irritate the skin in the stoma area.

Both the vinyl copolymer and the aromatic-aliphatic copolymer are thermoplastic so that the composition can be easily manufactured by heating the mineral oil to a temperature above the melting temperatures of the polymers and then adding and blending the polymers. The polymers exhibit appreciable tack when dissolved in the oil. As the vinyl polymer, I have used ethylenevinyl acetate copolymer and I prefer those materials marketed by E. I. DuPont De Nemours & Co. under the trade name Elvax. As the aromatic-aliphatic polymer, I have used styreneisobutylene copolymer and I prefer those materials marketed by Velsicol Chemical Corporation under the trade name Klyrvel. Reference is made to Shenfeld et al in US. Pat. No. 3,644,252 issued Feb. 222, 1972.

The Klyrvel polymers are commonly referred to simply as aromatic-aliphatic polymers and usually have number average molecular weight between about 1000 and 6000, depending upon the method used for determination, i.e., 1000 to 3000 by the Vapor Phase Osmometry Method and 3000 to 6000 by the Gel Permeation Chromatograph Method (standardized against polystyrene). The weight average molecular weight by this latter method is usually within the range of about 6000 to 12000. The copolymers are random copolymers and have ball and ring softening points between about 125 and 225F. Further information can be obtained from suppliers of such materials.

The Elvax resins'vary in their vinyl acetate unit con tent between about 10 and 50% and have ring and ball softening points ranging as low as about 175F. up to about 400F.'

In my preferred compositions, I use from about 5 to about 25% of the vinyl polymer, from about 10 to about 40% mineralv oil, and from about 10 to about 50% of the aromatic-aliphatic copolymer. Also, up to 50% of water sensitive compounds can be used and up to about 0.1% FD and C coloring agents are usually included, each based on weight of the total composition. Especially preferred compositions can contain more than 20% and often at least 25% mineral oil based on total composition weight.

The following examples are offered as illustrations of the practice of the present invention and are not intended to limit the'invention in any manner.

EXAMPLE I 200 grams of Chevron No. 9 U.S.P. mineral oil were heated to'325F. and 100 grams of Elvax 250 (an ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer containing from about 27.2 to 28.8% vinyl acetate) were added while stirring until the Elvax dissolved. Then 300 grams of Klyrvel (a copolymer of styrene and isobutylene containing 90% styrene and 10% isobutylene units) were added and stirring was continued until the Klyrvel dissolved. The molten mixture was then poured into ring-shaped molds and permitted to solidify. Alternatively, the molten mixture can be cast into sheets and then die cut to desired shape. The ring-shaped seals were removed from the molds and immersed in water for seven days to test their durability against aqueous fluids. No change in their shape or weight was noted. The seals exhibited excellent flexibility, elastibility, compressibil ity and pressure sensitive adhesive qualities of tackiness both before and after the seven day immersion.

Hydrophilic agents can be added to the composition where desired. For example, by adding a water sensitive gelling agent such as pregelatinized starch to the mixture in variable amounts, seals were made having variable controlled degrees of solubility in water. In working with i such seals I have used two different starches and both have been acceptable. These starches are Snowflake'lnstant Stabilizer B919 Starch made by Corn Industrial Division of Corn Products Company, and experimental product F4-246 Starch, a cold water swelling tapioca starch made by A. D. Staley Manufacturing Company. The F4-246 starch had a moisture content of only 5% while the B191 starch had a higher moisture content of 9% so that the 1 4-246 starch produced less foaming action due to water vaporization in the high temperature blending process and as a result it was easier to work with.

EXAMPLE II grams of Elvax 250, 200 grams of heavy mineral oil and 300 grams of Klyrvel 90 were blended at about 300F. The temperature of the blend was then lowered to a temperature a little above 200C. and 200 grams of pregelatinized starch were added while stirring. The

hot mixture was then poured into ring-shaped'molds and permitted to gel to form ring-like sealsiWhen immersed in water over an extended period of time, these seals slowly release the pregelatinized starch although the seals retain their shape, flexibility, elasticity, compressibility and pressure sensitive adhesive qualities.

Other water sensitive agents can be used as a substia tute for the pregelatinized starch. Such water sensitive agents can be either organic or inorganic and can be either natural or synthetic. Examples includethe natural gum such as karaya, tragacanth, gelatin, arabic, pectin, guar, algin, and the various alginates as well as their alkali metal salts. Examples ofsynthetic materials are carboxymethylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, dextrin and other modified starches, hydroxy-ethylene oxide, polyvinyl methyl ether and the like. Inorganic water sensitive agents include clays such as kaolin and'bentonite. Due to irregularities of size and shape of the stoma, creases or folds in the abdominal wall, or scar tissue, is often desirable to use a sealing material that can be kneaded by squeezing with the fingers into a specific shape, like a putty for the purpose of filling voids. I have found that such a putty can be made by modifying the formula of Example II simply by substituting an ethylene-vinyl acetate co'polymer containing a lower percentage of vinyl acetate units. Accordingly, I have prepared the following example:

EXAMPLE III 100 grams of Elvax 120 (having from about 17.5 to about 18.5% vinyl acetate units), 200 grams of 'heavy mineral'oil and 300 grams of Klyrvel 90 were blended at about 300F. The temperature was then lowered as in Example II and 200 grams of pregelatinized starch were added. The mix was permitted to cool and it gelled to putty-like consistance and except for the putty-like consistancy its properties were approximately the same as those of the composition of Example II.

I have made other modifications in the basic formulations for the purpose of altering properties. For'example, by increasing the proportion of mineral oil in the composition, I have found that the seal'becomes softer and more tacky. Such a seal was made by the following example:

EXAMPLE IV 100 grams of Elvax 250, 250'grams ofhe avy mineral oil and 300 grams of Klyrvel 90 were mixed and blended in accordance with the procedure of Example II. After cooling to about 200F. 200 grams of pregelatinized starch and 0.4 grams of B 3014 FD and C yellow No. 5 Lakolene were added. The composition was poured into seal molds. The resulting seals were more tacky than those of Examples I through III and were preferred for use by some patients.

In other modifications of the seal I have prepared seals of varying colors using oil soluble dyes or mineral pigments which are approved for use in cosmetics. Such coloring ingredients include titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, ferric oxide, starch adn pregelatinized starch tinted with food coloring. Other acceptable coloring agents include FD and C yellow No. 5 Lakolene, PD and C red No. 3 Aluminum Lake, FD and C yellow No. 6 Lakolene, FD and C violet No. l Lakolene, FD and C blue No. l Lakolene and FD and C red No. 2 Lakolene. The different coloring agents are useful in identifying different formulations of seals. They are EXAMPLE v As an example of a colored seal I blended 300 grams of Elvax250, 750 grams of mineral oil and grams of Klyrvel 90 at about 300F. and then lowered the temperature' to about 200F. whereupon I added 600 grams of f4-246 Staley pregelatinized starch and 0.13 grams of 8-3012 PD and C red No. 3 aluminum lake. When moldedto ring shape the composition produced very pleasantly colored pink seals.

It is also contemplated that medicinal ingredients can be added to the compositions to aid in healing excoriated skin. Such medicinal ingredients are well known to the art, but exemplary are zinc oxide, aluminum hydro x'ide, hexachloraphene, nystatin, aluminum stearate,cortisone acetate, precipitated sulfur, zinc stearate, allantoin, stearic acid and sodium stearate. Emoli- .ents and other functional ingredients are also contemplated.

The seals of the present invention are a homogeneous mass of pressure sensitive adhesive material having uniformproperties throughout. In general, the seal composition will include from 50 to hydrophobic material and from 0 to 50% hydrophilic material. These materials can be proportioned so as to provide a predetermined controlled rate and degree of solubility of the hydrophilic components while still leaving a hydrophobic structure and not detracting from the adhesiveness or other properties of that structure, even after several days immersion in water.

Another important feature of the seals provided by the present invention is that body heat increases the ag gressiveness of the tacky surface and causes tighter adhesion. The same tackiness or pressure sensitive quality enables the seal to be easily attached to a plastic drainage pouch surrounding the stoma receiving opening. Thus, only one adhesive composition provides good adherence to'both' types of surfaces having markedly differentsurface properties. In the form of the invention wherein the seal is formed by pouring the hot mixture directly onto the drainage pouch around the drainage pouch opening, it has been'found that the resulting bond has greater strength than the polyethylene film which the pouch is made and pulling on the seal will tear the pouch before theseal breaks adhesion with the pouch.

All percentages given herein are percentages by weight unless otherwise indicated.

I claim:

' 1. In' an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patients body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the container, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patients skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesion gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, said gel consisting essentially of a mixture of mineral oil, styrene-isobutylene copolymer and ethylenevinyl acetate copolymer.

2. In an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patients body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the container, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patients skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesion gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, said gel consisting essentially of a mixture of mineral oil, styrene-isobutylene copolymer and ethylenevinyl acetate copolymer, wherein said sealing means constitutes a gasket.

3. In an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patients body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the container, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patients skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesive gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, wherein said gel comprises a mixture of a water insoluble oleaginous liquid, a normally solid water insoluble thermo-plastic tackifying aromatic-aliphatic copolymer which is miscible and compatible with said oleaginous liquid and a normally solid water insoluble thermoplastic tackifying vinyl polymer which is miscible and compatible with said liquid, said copolymers being present in amounts sufficient to gel said liquid as a tacky pliable pressure sensitive adhesive mass.

4. In an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patients body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the contaianer, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patients skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesive gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, wherein said gel comprise a mixture of a water insoluble oleaginous liquid, a normally solid water insoluble thermo-plastic tackifying aromatic-aliphatic copolymer which is miscible and compatible with said oleaginous liquid and a normally solid water insoluble thermo-plastic tacifying vinyl polymer which is miscible and compatible with said liquid, said copolymers being present in amounts sufficient to gel said liquid as a tacky pliable pressure sensitive adhesive mass, and wherein said aromatic-aliphatic copolymer is a styreneisobutylene copolymer.

5. In an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patients body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the container, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patients skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesive gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, wherein said gel comprises a mixture of a water insoluble oleaginous liquid, a normally solid water insoluble thermo-plastic tackifying aromatic-aliphatic copolymer which is miscible and compatible with said oleaginous liquid and a normally solid water insoluble thermoplastic tackifying vinyl polymer which is miscible and compatible with said liquid, said copolymers being present in amounts sufficient to gel said liquid as,

a tacky pliable pressure sensitive adhesive mass, and wherein said gel contains normally solid particulate water soluble ingredients selected from the class consisting of starch and kayaya.

6. In an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patients body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the container, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patients skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesive gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, wherein said gel consists essentially of about 12.5% by weight ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, about 25% by weight No. 9 USP mineral oil, about 37.5 parts by weight styrene-isobutylene copolymer and about 25 parts by weight pregelatinized starch.

7. A structure for use in securing a pouch having an opening to an ostomy patient with the pouch opening surrounding the patients stoma, said structure consisting of a flat ring-shaped gelled mass of a mixture of from about 5 to about 25% ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, from about 10 to about 40% by weight mineral oil, from about 10 to about 50% by weight of styrene-isobutylene copolymer, from O to about 50% by weight of a water sensitive filler material, and from O to about 0.1% by weight of coloring material.

Claims (7)

1. IN AN APPLIANCE FOR OSTOMY CONDITIONS AND THE LIKE A CONTAINER FOR RECEIVING DISCHARGE MATERIAL A PATIENT''S BODY, THE CONTAINER HAVING A STONA RECEIVING OPENING THROUGH WHICH THE STOMA DISCHARGES INTO THE CONTAINER, AND SEALING MEANS ADHERED TO THE CONTAINER AROUND THE STOMA RECEIVING OPENING AND PROJECTING FROM THE CONTAINER FOR ADHERING TO THE PATIENT''S SKIN AROUND THE STOMA, SAID SEALING MEANS BEING WATER INSOLUBLE AND COMPOUND ESSENTIALLY OF A PRESSURE SENSITIVE ADHENSION GEL BODY HAVING UNIFORM SURFACE AND INTERNAL PROPERTIES OF TACK, COHENSIVE STRENGTH PROVIDING ELASTICITY FLEXIBILITY AND COMPRESSIBILITY AND MANUAL KNEADABILITY SAID
2. In an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patient''s body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the container, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patient''s skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesion gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, said gel consisting essentially of a mixture of mineral oil, styrene-isobutylene copolymer and ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, wherein said sealing means constitutes a gasket.
3. In an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patient''s body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the container, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patient''s skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesive gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, wherein said gel comprises a mixture of a water insoluble oleaginous liquid, a normally solid water insoluble thermo-plastic tackifying aromatic-aliphatic copolymer which is miscible and compatible with said oleaginous liquid and a normally solid water insoluble thermoplastic tackifying vinyl polymer which is miscible and coMpatible with said liquid, said copolymers being present in amounts sufficient to gel said liquid as a tacky pliable pressure sensitive adhesive mass.
4. In an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patient''s body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the contaianer, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patient''s skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesive gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, wherein said gel comprise a mixture of a water insoluble oleaginous liquid, a normally solid water insoluble thermo-plastic tackifying aromatic-aliphatic copolymer which is miscible and compatible with said oleaginous liquid and a normally solid water insoluble thermo-plastic tacifying vinyl polymer which is miscible and compatible with said liquid, said copolymers being present in amounts sufficient to gel said liquid as a tacky pliable pressure sensitive adhesive mass, and wherein said aromatic-aliphatic copolymer is a styrene-isobutylene copolymer.
5. In an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patient''s body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the container, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patient''s skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesive gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, wherein said gel comprises a mixture of a water insoluble oleaginous liquid, a normally solid water insoluble thermo-plastic tackifying aromatic-aliphatic copolymer which is miscible and compatible with said oleaginous liquid and a normally solid water insoluble thermoplastic tackifying vinyl polymer which is miscible and compatible with said liquid, said copolymers being present in amounts sufficient to gel said liquid as a tacky pliable pressure sensitive adhesive mass, and wherein said gel contains normally solid particulate water soluble ingredients selected from the class consisting of starch and kayaya.
6. In an appliance for ostomy conditions and the like, a container for receiving discharged material from a patient''s body, the container having a stoma receiving opening through which the stoma discharges into the container, and sealing means adhered to the container around the stoma receiving opening and projecting from the container for adhering to the patient''s skin around the stoma, said sealing means being water insoluble and composed essentially of a pressure sensitive adhesive gel body having uniform surface and internal properties of tack, cohesive strength providing elasticity, flexibility, and compressibility and manual kneadability, wherein said gel consists essentially of about 12.5% by weight ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, about 25% by weight No. 9 USP mineral oil, about 37.5 parts by weight styrene-isobutylene copolymer and about 25 parts by weight pregelatinized starch.
7. A structure for use in securing a pouch having an opening to an ostomy patient with the pouch opening surrounding the patient''s stoma, said structure consisting of a flat ring-shaped gelled mass of a mixture of from about 5 to about 25% ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, from about 10 to about 40% by weight mineral oil, from about 10 to about 50% by weight of styrene-isobutylene copolymer, from 0 to about 50% by weight of a water sensitive filler material, and from 0 to about 0.1% by weight of coloring material.
US3908658A 1972-05-22 1973-08-15 Seal and appliance for ostomy patients Expired - Lifetime US3908658A (en)

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Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2822535A1 (en) * 1977-05-24 1978-12-07 Coloplast Int As Sealing material for ostomy devices
DE2825195A1 (en) * 1977-06-08 1978-12-14 Squibb & Sons Inc Adhesive composition for medical use
FR2393566A1 (en) * 1977-06-08 1979-01-05 Squibb & Sons Inc Composition for ostomy
FR2394628A1 (en) * 1977-06-15 1979-01-12 Wirkmaschinenbau Karl Marx Veb Warp knitting machine, especially KNITTING-sewing, comprising a device for laying material frame-shaped sheet
US4204540A (en) * 1977-06-08 1980-05-27 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Ostomy composition
EP0017401A1 (en) * 1979-03-21 1980-10-15 Advance Tapes (U.K) Limited Articles of manufacture having adhesive properties
EP0018093A1 (en) * 1979-03-21 1980-10-29 Advance Tapes (U.K) Limited Gelatinous articles and compositions
US4253460A (en) * 1979-07-27 1981-03-03 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Ostomy adhesive
FR2479002A1 (en) * 1980-04-01 1981-10-02 Biotrol Sa Lab Adhesive contg. pressure sensitive adhesive and a hydro-colloid - plus an aluminium silicate used medically, esp. in stoma
US4367732A (en) * 1980-12-05 1983-01-11 Coloplast A/S Skin barrier
EP0072607A2 (en) * 1981-04-20 1983-02-23 Pfizer Inc. Adhesive pad for ostomy use
US4393080A (en) * 1981-12-24 1983-07-12 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Adhesive compositions
US4477325A (en) * 1982-07-12 1984-10-16 Hollister Incorporated Skin barrier composition comprising an irradiated crosslinked ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer and polyisobutylene
US4538603A (en) * 1982-04-22 1985-09-03 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Dressings, granules, and their use in treating wounds
US4551490A (en) * 1983-06-27 1985-11-05 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Adhesive composition resistant to biological fluids
US4573984A (en) * 1982-12-11 1986-03-04 Benzies George Y Waste retaining receptacles for patients with colostomies and ileostomies
GB2181652A (en) * 1985-10-21 1987-04-29 John Victor Edwards Ostomy appliance
US4772279A (en) * 1986-01-17 1988-09-20 Smiths Industries Public Limited Company wc-Disposable bags
DE8810468U1 (en) * 1988-08-18 1988-10-13 Pfrimmer-Viggo Gmbh & Co Kg, 8520 Erlangen, De
WO1995034258A1 (en) * 1994-06-13 1995-12-21 Eurocare (Uk) Limited An ostomy coupling
EP0954342A1 (en) 1994-07-26 1999-11-10 E.R. SQUIBB & SONS, INC. Ostomy appliance and wound drainage device
US6213993B1 (en) 1994-10-28 2001-04-10 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Self-adhering absorbent article
EP0970673A3 (en) * 1998-07-08 2001-12-12 Resorba Chirurgisches Nahtmaterial Franz Hiltner GmbH & Co. Dressing for covering especially the edge areas of artificial body openings
US20030150050A1 (en) * 2002-02-14 2003-08-14 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable excreta management device
US6685683B1 (en) 1999-07-15 2004-02-03 Coloplast A/S Ostomy appliance showing adhesive, barrier and absorbing properties
US20040026821A1 (en) * 2001-06-16 2004-02-12 Joon-Suk Chae Method of manufacturing an abdominal belt and mould
US20050080155A1 (en) * 2003-10-14 2005-04-14 Fattman George F. Ostomy pouch attachment adhesives resistant to stomal effluent
US20070005033A1 (en) * 2003-03-27 2007-01-04 Danuta Ciok Ostomy appliance
US20070185464A1 (en) * 2006-02-03 2007-08-09 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Ostomy appliance with recovery resistant moldable adhesive
US20070239104A1 (en) * 2005-09-23 2007-10-11 Feerrar Angela C Anti acid G/tube pad
US20080097361A1 (en) * 2005-01-11 2008-04-24 Molnlycke Health Care Ab Component for Forming a Seal Around an Opening in the Skin
US20100114045A1 (en) * 2007-04-09 2010-05-06 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Ostomy pouch appliane
WO2010069334A1 (en) * 2008-12-19 2010-06-24 Coloplast A/S A soft shapeable adhesive paste
US20110054425A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 Welland Medical Limited Ostomy bag
US20120165767A1 (en) * 2010-12-27 2012-06-28 Abrams Gilbert L Ostomy barrier seal

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US3302647A (en) * 1964-03-03 1967-02-07 Hollister Inc Sealing pad for a post-surgical drainage pouch
US3612053A (en) * 1969-06-23 1971-10-12 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Ostomy sealing washer
US3667469A (en) * 1969-12-15 1972-06-06 Arthur E Marsan Post-surgical drainage pouch
US3712304A (en) * 1970-11-17 1973-01-23 A Marsan Starch seal and appliance for ostomy
US3799166A (en) * 1972-05-22 1974-03-26 A Marsan Starch type gel seals for ostomy patients

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US3302647A (en) * 1964-03-03 1967-02-07 Hollister Inc Sealing pad for a post-surgical drainage pouch
US3612053A (en) * 1969-06-23 1971-10-12 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Ostomy sealing washer
US3667469A (en) * 1969-12-15 1972-06-06 Arthur E Marsan Post-surgical drainage pouch
US3712304A (en) * 1970-11-17 1973-01-23 A Marsan Starch seal and appliance for ostomy
US3799166A (en) * 1972-05-22 1974-03-26 A Marsan Starch type gel seals for ostomy patients

Cited By (53)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2822535A1 (en) * 1977-05-24 1978-12-07 Coloplast Int As Sealing material for ostomy devices
US4192785A (en) * 1977-06-08 1980-03-11 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Ostomy adhesive
DE2825195A1 (en) * 1977-06-08 1978-12-14 Squibb & Sons Inc Adhesive composition for medical use
FR2393566A1 (en) * 1977-06-08 1979-01-05 Squibb & Sons Inc Composition for ostomy
US4166051A (en) * 1977-06-08 1979-08-28 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Ostomy composition
US4204540A (en) * 1977-06-08 1980-05-27 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Ostomy composition
FR2394628A1 (en) * 1977-06-15 1979-01-12 Wirkmaschinenbau Karl Marx Veb Warp knitting machine, especially KNITTING-sewing, comprising a device for laying material frame-shaped sheet
EP0017401A1 (en) * 1979-03-21 1980-10-15 Advance Tapes (U.K) Limited Articles of manufacture having adhesive properties
EP0018093A1 (en) * 1979-03-21 1980-10-29 Advance Tapes (U.K) Limited Gelatinous articles and compositions
US4356819A (en) * 1979-03-21 1982-11-02 Advance Tapes (U.K) Limited Article of manufacture having adhesive properties
US4359047A (en) * 1979-03-21 1982-11-16 Advance Tapes (U.K.) Limited Gelatinous articles and compositions
US4253460A (en) * 1979-07-27 1981-03-03 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Ostomy adhesive
FR2479002A1 (en) * 1980-04-01 1981-10-02 Biotrol Sa Lab Adhesive contg. pressure sensitive adhesive and a hydro-colloid - plus an aluminium silicate used medically, esp. in stoma
US4367732A (en) * 1980-12-05 1983-01-11 Coloplast A/S Skin barrier
EP0072607A2 (en) * 1981-04-20 1983-02-23 Pfizer Inc. Adhesive pad for ostomy use
EP0072607A3 (en) * 1981-04-20 1983-07-20 Pfizer Inc. Adhesive pad for ostomy use
US4393080A (en) * 1981-12-24 1983-07-12 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Adhesive compositions
US4538603A (en) * 1982-04-22 1985-09-03 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Dressings, granules, and their use in treating wounds
US4477325A (en) * 1982-07-12 1984-10-16 Hollister Incorporated Skin barrier composition comprising an irradiated crosslinked ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer and polyisobutylene
US4573984A (en) * 1982-12-11 1986-03-04 Benzies George Y Waste retaining receptacles for patients with colostomies and ileostomies
US4551490A (en) * 1983-06-27 1985-11-05 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Adhesive composition resistant to biological fluids
DE3438811A1 (en) * 1983-11-08 1985-05-15 Hollister Inc Skin cover composition
GB2181652A (en) * 1985-10-21 1987-04-29 John Victor Edwards Ostomy appliance
US4772279A (en) * 1986-01-17 1988-09-20 Smiths Industries Public Limited Company wc-Disposable bags
DE8810468U1 (en) * 1988-08-18 1988-10-13 Pfrimmer-Viggo Gmbh & Co Kg, 8520 Erlangen, De
WO1995034258A1 (en) * 1994-06-13 1995-12-21 Eurocare (Uk) Limited An ostomy coupling
US5814033A (en) * 1994-06-13 1998-09-29 Salt & Son Limited Ostomy Coupling
EP0954342A1 (en) 1994-07-26 1999-11-10 E.R. SQUIBB & SONS, INC. Ostomy appliance and wound drainage device
EP0954342B2 (en) 1994-07-26 2012-06-13 ConvaTec Technologies Inc. Ostomy appliance and wound drainage device
US6213993B1 (en) 1994-10-28 2001-04-10 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Self-adhering absorbent article
EP0970673A3 (en) * 1998-07-08 2001-12-12 Resorba Chirurgisches Nahtmaterial Franz Hiltner GmbH & Co. Dressing for covering especially the edge areas of artificial body openings
EP1198261B2 (en) 1999-07-15 2007-08-08 Coloplast A/S An ostomy appliance
US6685683B1 (en) 1999-07-15 2004-02-03 Coloplast A/S Ostomy appliance showing adhesive, barrier and absorbing properties
US20040026821A1 (en) * 2001-06-16 2004-02-12 Joon-Suk Chae Method of manufacturing an abdominal belt and mould
US7101357B2 (en) * 2002-02-14 2006-09-05 Procter And Gamble Disposable excreta management device
US20030150050A1 (en) * 2002-02-14 2003-08-14 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable excreta management device
US8740867B2 (en) * 2003-03-27 2014-06-03 Coloplast A/S Ostomy appliance
US20070005033A1 (en) * 2003-03-27 2007-01-04 Danuta Ciok Ostomy appliance
US20050080155A1 (en) * 2003-10-14 2005-04-14 Fattman George F. Ostomy pouch attachment adhesives resistant to stomal effluent
US20080097361A1 (en) * 2005-01-11 2008-04-24 Molnlycke Health Care Ab Component for Forming a Seal Around an Opening in the Skin
US8545468B2 (en) 2005-01-11 2013-10-01 Mölnlycke Health Care Ab Component for forming a seal around an opening in the skin
US20070239104A1 (en) * 2005-09-23 2007-10-11 Feerrar Angela C Anti acid G/tube pad
US20070185464A1 (en) * 2006-02-03 2007-08-09 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Ostomy appliance with recovery resistant moldable adhesive
US8343121B2 (en) * 2007-04-09 2013-01-01 Convatec Technologies, Inc. Ostomy pouch appliance
US20100114045A1 (en) * 2007-04-09 2010-05-06 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Ostomy pouch appliane
US8809417B2 (en) 2008-12-19 2014-08-19 Coloplast A/S Soft shapeable adhesive paste
CN102224213B (en) * 2008-12-19 2015-08-19 科洛普拉斯特公司 A soft formable adhesive paste
WO2010069334A1 (en) * 2008-12-19 2010-06-24 Coloplast A/S A soft shapeable adhesive paste
US8343120B2 (en) 2009-08-28 2013-01-01 Welland Medical Limited Ostomy bag
US20110054425A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 Welland Medical Limited Ostomy bag
US8211072B2 (en) * 2009-08-28 2012-07-03 Welland Medical Limited Ostomy bag
US8449513B2 (en) * 2010-12-27 2013-05-28 Benson Turtleneck Barrier, Llc Ostomy barrier seal
US20120165767A1 (en) * 2010-12-27 2012-06-28 Abrams Gilbert L Ostomy barrier seal

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