US3906674A - Valve cleaner - Google Patents

Valve cleaner Download PDF

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US3906674A
US3906674A US53191774A US3906674A US 3906674 A US3906674 A US 3906674A US 53191774 A US53191774 A US 53191774A US 3906674 A US3906674 A US 3906674A
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enclosure
article
mounted
nozzles
cleaning apparatus
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Lowell D Stone
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Lowell D Stone
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B24GRINDING; POLISHING
    • B24CABRASIVE OR RELATED BLASTING WITH PARTICULATE MATERIAL
    • B24C3/00Abrasive blasting machines or devices; Plants
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B24GRINDING; POLISHING
    • B24CABRASIVE OR RELATED BLASTING WITH PARTICULATE MATERIAL
    • B24C9/00Appurtenances of abrasive blasting machines or devices, e.g. working chambers, arrangements for handling used abrasive material

Abstract

A cleaning apparatus has an enclosure, a mount inside to mount an article in a cleaning zone therein, and a plurality of dispensing nozzles. Valves control the air flow through the nozzles. The apparatus in use cleans an article, for example, an internal combustion engine cylinder valve, with the portion of the article to be cleaned being positioned in the cleaning zone, wherein abrasive particulate material is blown against it by the nozzles.

Description

United States Patent Stone Sept. 23, 1975 [54] VALVE CLEANER 2,846,820 8/1958 Persak 51/12 x 3.047986 8/1962 McKullam. 51/8 R [76] Inventor: Lowell D. Stone, 319 N. High, Pratt, 1191677 7/1965 johnsonmn 51/14 X Kaflsv 67124 3,385,005 5/1968 Nielsen 51/8 SP 3,516,205 6/1970 Thomson 51/8 R [22] 1974 3.553.895 11/1967 Power 51/8 [21] Appl. No.: 531,917 3,599,375 8/1971 Nunemaker 51/8 R Related U.S. Application Data Primary ExaminerDona1d G. Kelly Attorney, Agent, or FirmJohn H. Widdowson [57] ABSTRACT A cleaning apparatus has an enclosure, a mount inside to mount an article in a cleaning zone therein, and a plurality of dispensing nozzles. Valves control the air flow through the nozzles. The apparatus in use cleans an article, for example, an internal combustion engine cylinder valve. with the portion of the article to be cleaned being positioned in the cleaning zone, wherein abrasive particulate material is blown against it by the nozzles.

9 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures US Patent Sept. 23,1975 Sheet 1 of2 3,906,674

VALVE CLEANER CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This application is a continuation-in-part application for patent based on my pending application for patent entitled VALVE CLEANER, filed Dec. I3, 1973, having Ser. No. 424,435 and now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention is related to abrading machines and particularly those abrading machines wherein abrasive particulate material is carried in a gaseous fluid stream and directed onto an article to be cleaned. Further, this invention is related to abrading machines wherein the article to be cleaned, the particulate abrading material, and the material dispersing apparatus are contained in an enclosure.

Numerous particulate material abrading machines are known in the prior art as operable to clean or treat the surface of an article. However, the prior art devices are not constructed so they can safely be used for cleaning an article which is coated with a layer of material which when dislodged will produce a finely divided dust. Also, the prior art abrading machines are not constructed so that particulate abrasive material can be recycled within the machine in a single enclosure. Additionally, no prior art device is known which is portable and will provide a machine for the abrasive cleaning of small articles such as valves for internal combustion engines.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In a preferred specific embodiment the valve cleaner of this invention provides an abrasive particulate material cleaning apparatus which is comprised of an openable hollow enclosure which has a mount for an article having a stem. The article is positioned in a cleaning zone in the enclosure and a plurality of compressed air powered particulate material dispensing nozzles in the enclosure directed particulate toward the article toward the cleaning zone. A valve assembly is communicably connectable to a source of compressed air to in use control the air flow through the nozzles which in turn controls the dispersion of abrasive particulate material into the cleaning zone. The enclosure has a vent for air to escape. A hopper-like bottom portion of the enclosure collects and stores particulate material to supply the nozzles. The mount for the article is constructed to mount an article having a stem or to mount an article which can be supported on a stem. The plurality of nozzles receive particulate material from the hopper-like bottom portion of the enclosure. When the compressed air is passed through the nozzles they pick up the particulate material and direct it toward the cleaning zone. The cleaning apparatus is constructed and adapted to in use clean an article such as an internal combustion engine cylinder valve or any relatively small article which can be mounted on a stem or positioned in the cleaning zone.

One object of this invention is to provide an abrading machine in the form of a particulate material type cleaning apparatus overcoming the aforementioned disadvantages of the prior art devices.

Still, one other object of this invention is to provide an abrasive particulate material cleaning apparatus that includes a hollow enclosure having a mount for supporting an article in the enclosure and a plurality of compressed air powered particulate material dispensing nozzles inside the enclosure to thrust particulate material toward an article.

Still, another object of this invention is to provide an abrasive particulate material cleaning apparatus which has a hollow enclosure with a plurality of compressed air powered particulate material dispensing nozzles mounted therein with a valve assembly to control the flow of compressed air to the nozzles. Further wherein the nozzles are connected so they can recycle particulate material contained in the enclosure for cleaning an article by directing the abrasive material toward the article.

Yet, another object of this invention is to provide a particulate material type abrasive cleaning apparatus which is portable and can be powered by a commonly available source of compressed air and which can be used to clean small articles such as the cylinder valves of an internal combustion engine or other small articles that can be mounted on a stem and positioned in the enclosure.

Various other objects, advantages, and features of the invention will become apparent from those skilled in the art from the following discussion, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevation view of the cleaning apparatus of this invention with portions cut away exposing the interior of the enclosure and the control valve assembly;

FIG. 2 is a front elevation view of the cleaning apparatus with portions of the housing cut away for clarity exposing the nozzles and a portion of the control valve assembly;

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of the cleaning apparatus taken horizontally through an upper portion of the enclosure showing the article mount and the vent in section and the nozzles in full view;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view of an air valve with the valve in the open position with the plunger shown in full view; and

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view of the mount for an article to be cleaned.

The following is a discussion and description of preferred specific embodiments of the valve cleaner structure of this invention, such being made with reference to the drawings, whereupon the same reference numerals are used to indicate the same or similar parts and/or structure. It is to be understood that such discussion and description is not to unduly limit the scope of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to the drawings in detail and in particular to FIGS. 1 and 2 where the valve cleaner apparatus of this invention, indicated generally at 10, is shown with a common engine valve mounted therein for cleaning. The cleaning apparatus 10 of this invention includes a hollow and openable enclosure 12 which contains a mount assembly, indicated generally at 14, to support an article to be cleaned. A plurality of compressed air powered particulate material dispensing nozzles, indicated generally at 16, are mounted in the enclosure I2 and directed toward a cleaning zone where the article to be cleaned is placed. A control valve assembly, indicated generally at 18, is mounted with the enclosure to in use Control the flow of compressed air to the nozzles 16. The cleaning apparatus is powerable from a source of compressed air or other gas. The cleaning apparatus 10 is constructed and adapted to clean small articles by mounting them inside the enclosure 12 and abrading them with particulate abrasive material carried in an airstream by the nozzles 16.

Enclosure 12 is preferably a cross-seetionally rectangular structure having four sidewalls indicated at 20, 22, 24 and 26. An openable lid 28 is mounted by hinges 30 on the top of the enclosure. A fastener 32 is mounted with the lid 28 and the enclosure sidewall in an opposed relation with the hinges for securing the lid. A gasket, not shown, is preferably fitted around the pcrimeter of the lid 28 to seal the enclosure when the lid is closed. The enclosure 12 has a hopper-like bottom portion 34 in a lower portion thereof. Sides of the hopper-like bottom portion 34 converge into the center portion of the structure as shown. The upper portion of the enclosure 12 forms a cavity 36 which contains the nozzles 16 and the mount assembly 14. A mesh member 38, preferably a screen or the like, is mounted transversely across the cavity 36 at the upper portion of the hopper-like bottom portion 34. The mesh mem ber 38 forms a structurally perforate separation of the cavity 36 which will allow particulate material to fall into the hopper-like bottom portion 34 and to prevent large particles from entering the bottom portion 34.

The enclosure 12 is provided with a vent assembly 40 to allow air to exit the enclosure. The vent assembly 40 serves as an air outlet and a filter for removing dust and finally dispersed particulate material from the air as it leaves the enclosure 12. The vent assembly 40 has a plate member 42 rigidly secured to housing sidewall 26 with a screen 44 rcmovably mounted therewith and a filter bag 46 which is also removably mountable. The plate member 42 has an aperture therethrough which aligns with an aperture 45 in the sidewall 26. A sleeve 47 is mounted at the aperture of the plate 42 and the screen 44 is mounted inside the sleeve 47. The bag 46 is secured to the exterior of the sleeve 47 by a clamp 48. The bag 46 and screen 44 are removably mounted for cleaning purposes. The screen 44 prevents large particles from leaving the enclosure 12 and the bag 46 traps and collects small particles and dust.

The mount assembly 14 includes a resilient plug member, indicated generally at 50, which in use mounts through an aperture 52 in sidewall 20. The plug 50 is shown in detail in FIG. 5. lt is shown in its mounted position in the sidewall in FIGS. 1 and 3. The plug 50 is a resilient member constructed to support a stem or the like in a substantially fixed position when the plug is mounted with the enclosure. ln FIGS. 1 and 3 an internal combustion engine valve 52 is shown mounted with the plug 50. The stem 53 of the valve 52 is mounted through the plug 50 with the head of the valve being in the enclosure cavity 36. The plug 50 is comprised of an outer portion 54 and an insert 56. The outer portion 54 is preferably generally frusta-conically shaped and constructed with a notch 58 around the perimeter of its larger end. An aperture 60 extends through the center of the outer portion 54 as shown. The outer portion 54 has a recessed portion 62 in the larger end thereof. The insert 56 is preferably generally frusta-conically shaped with an aperture 64 through the center thereof as shown. The aperture 64 is generally centrally disposed relative to aperture 60. The insert 56 is constructed of a resilient material with the aperture 64 being sized such that it will firmly grasp and hold the exterior ofa stern like member when it is inserted in the apertures and 64. Obviously, the specific sizes of the apertures 60 and 64 can be varied depending upon the size of stems which will be mounted in the plug 50. It is to be noted that the plug 50 can be constructed so the insert 56 can be removably mounted with the outer portion 54 to provide for replacement and to accommodate different sizes of stems. The plug 54 is preferably constructed with the outer portion 54 being of a substantially flexible resilient material so that it can be easily removably mounted with the sidewall 20.

The nozzle assembly 16 preferably includes four nozzles indicated at 66, 68, 70, and 72. The nozzles are directed toward a cleaning zone in a center portion of the enclosure cavity 36. The nozzles are preferably commonly available nozzle structures designed for dispersing or spraying particulate material in an air stream. Each of the nozzles 66, 68, 70, and 72 have an air inlet connected to conduits 74, 76, 78, and respectively. The conduits 74, 76, 78, and 80 are connected to the control valve assembly 18 which will be described in detail hereinafter. The nozzles 66, 68, 70 and 72 also each have an inlet for the particulate material with the inlets being connected to conduits 82, 84, 86, and 88. The particulate material carrying conduits 82, 84, 86, and 88 extend into the hopper-like bottom portion 34 of the enclosure with the inlets of these conduits being in the lower portion of the hopper. Each of the nozzles are individually mounted on top of uprights or standards extending upward from the bottom portion 34 of the enclosure. The nozzles 66, 68, and 72 are mounted on top of standards 90, 92, and 94, respectively. The standard supporting nozzle 70 is not visible in the drawings. A stop member 96 in the form of a standard is mounted with the bottom portion 34 and extends into the cleaning zone. The stop member 96 functions as a stop to contact an article to be cleaned so it is positioned in the cleaning zone for effective cleaning. The cleaning zone is preferably a space located between the small end portion of the plug 50 and the nozzles. Preferably, the nozzles are mounted with the standards such that they can be adjusted in vertical and horizontal position. Dashed lines extending from the outlet end portions of the individual nozzles are provided to illustrate the approximate path of some material as it is discharged from the nozzles toward the cleaning zone. Obviously, the nozzles can be moved to adjust the size of the cleaning zone and points of intensity within the cleaning zone at the discretion of the user.

The control valve assembly 18 is physically located on the lower portion of the apparatus and includes four separate control valves which are simultaneously controllable from a single operator lever. The control valve assembly 18 has an air tank or plenum chamber 98 with a single inlet 100. Preferably, the inlet 100 has a quickly removable pressure fitting to allow the plenum chamber 98 to be easily connected to and disconnected from a source of compressed air. The tank or plenum chamber 98 is mounted in a horizontal position across the lower portion of the enclosure below the hopperlike bottom portion 34. The control valves are preferably threadedly mountable with the upper portion of the plenum chamber 98 in a line and in a spaced relation. FIG. l shows a control valve 102 on one end of the plenum chamber or tank 98. FIG. 2 shows the control valve 104 on the opposite end of the plenum chamber or tank 98. Each of the four control valves are individually connected with the air carrying conduits 74, 76, 78, and 80 so that each nozzle has its individual control valve.

FIG. 4 shows a preferred construction of a control valve wherein the valve is generally indicated at 106. The control valve 106 has a body 108 with a threaded inlet 110 and a threaded outlet 112 and an aperture therethrough to receive a valve closure support member 114. The inlet 110 and the outlet 112 each have passageways 116 and 118 therethrough communicably connected with the aperture to mount the valve closure support member 114. The valve closure support memher 1 14 is a sleeve which is threadedly mountable in the valve body 108 and is provided with a bore 120 to receive and slidably mount a valve closure member 128. The valve closure member 128 has a shoulder portion 122 on one end thereof which fits in an enlarged end portion of the bore 120. The support member 114 has a pair of apertures 124 and 126 which are communicably connectable with the inlet aperture 116 and outlet aperture 118, respectively, when the support member 114 is mounted in the valve body 108. The valve c1osure member 128 has a passageway 130 transversely therethrough which aligns with the passageways 124 and 126 when the valve closure member 128 is in an open position. FIG. 4 shows the valve 106 with the valve closure member 128 in the open position wherein air can flow through passageways 116 and 124 into the closure member passageway 130, and from there on through passageways 126 and 118. When the valve 106 is in the open position shoulder portion 122 rests against the end of the enlarged portion of the bore 120 as shown. The valve closure 128 has an O-ring type gasket 132 around its exterior on end portion to seal same inside the bore 120. A valve closure member return as sembly is mounted in one end of the support member 114. The operator return assembly has a plunger 134 in contact with one end of the valve closure member, 122, a compression spring 136 mounted on the plunger 134, and a cap 138 threadedly mountable in the support member 114. The spring 136 urges the plunger 134 and the valve closure member 128 toward a nor mally closed position. With the valve 106 positioned as shown in FIG. 4 the spring 136 is compressed. The valve closure member 128 has a contact member 140 extending from the end thereof opposite to the return assembly tp provide a convenient member for contact ing the valve closure member 128 for movement of same. The valve closure member 128 and contact member 140 are displaced to the left from the position shown in FIG. 4 when the valve 106 is in its normally closed position. When the valve closure member 128 is displaced to the left from the position shown in FIG. 4 the passageway 130 does not align with passageways 124 and 126 thereby preventing fluid flow through control valve 106.

FIGS. 1 and 2 show the control valves mounted with the cleaning apparatus in the preferred position wherein the contact members of the control valves extend toward the sidewall 20. For convenience in identification and description the valve contact members on the control valves 102 and 104 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 are both indicated at 140. The control valve assembly 18 includes a bar member 142 rotatably mounted through apertures in the sidewalls 22 and 26 of the enclosure. The bar 140 has an extended portion 144 on one side thereof. A lever 146 is movably mounted on the extended portion of the bar at a mid portion thereof and extends through an aperture 148 in the housing sidewall 20. The lever 146 is mounted so that it can be moved from side to side in a plane parallel to the bar and such that vertical motion of the lever will rotate the bar. Vertical motion of the lever 146 rotates the bar in its mounting with the enclosure sides 22 and 26. The extended portion 144 is positioned so that it will contact the valve contact members 140. Vertical motion of the lever 146 rotates the bar 142 and moves the valve contact members in and out to open and close the valves. Preferably, the aperture 148 in the sidewall 20 is generally L-shaped with one portion being vertically disposed and the other portion being horizontally disposed. When the control valves are closed lever 146 is in the vertically disposed portion of aperture 148. Once lever 146 has been moved downward to open the valves it can be moved horizontally into the horizontally disposed portion of aperture 148 to hold the control valves in the open position without requiring the attention of the operator. The lever and aperture structure provide a lock for the valve assembly 18.

In use of the cleaning apparatus 10 of this invention an article such as an internal combustion engine cylind'er valve is mounted with the plug 50 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The lid 28 of the enclosure 12 is openable to provide access to the plug 50 so the stem 53 of the engine valve 52 can be inserted into the plug 50. It is to be noted that virtually any article which can be supported on a holder having a stem or the like can be supported by the plug 50. The article to be cleaned can be mounted with the plug by inserting the stern into the plug with the plug being mounted in the housing sidewall. Or in the alternative the plug 50 can be removed from the enclosure 12, the article mounted therewith and then the plug 50 reinserted into the aperture in the sidewall of the enclosure 12. When an article to be cleaned has been fitted into the mount assembly 14 the lid 28 is closed and secured by the fastener 32 then the lever 146 can be depressed to open the control valves and allow air to pass to the nozzles 16. When compressed air passes through the nozzles 16 they automatically pick up the particulate material of the lower por tion of the hopper-like bottom portion 34 of the enclosure 12 and disperse or spray it into the cleaning zone. Once the particulate material contacts the surface of the article to be cleaned is dislodges or knocks away the material covering of the article thereby cleaning same in a known and usual manner. The dust generated by the particulate abrasive cleaning is partially captured by the filter structure in the vent assembly 40. The screen 44 catches and retains inside the enclosure the large particles of material and the smaller dust like material is caught in the bag 46. In operating the cleaning apparatus the operating lever 146 can be locked as described to maintain the apparatus in use so the operator can attend to other matters such as handling the articles to be cleaned and previously cleaned articles while an article is being cleaned by the machine.

In the use and operation of the cleaning apparatus 10 of this invention it is anticipated that numerous classes of particulate material can be successfully used. For instance. small glass beads, sand pulvarized stone, and other numerous and common abrasive materials can be used. Preferably glass beads are used for cleaning inter nal combustion engine cylinder valves because they separate upon impact and have been found to function quite well in removing carbon from the metal valve structure. it is to be noted that the cleaning apparatus of this invention recycles the particulate abrasive material thereby permitting it to operate with a relatively small quantity of material. The filter structure in the vent assembly 40 will function to remove a considerable amount of the undesired materials which are dislodged from the article to be cleaned so the particulate material used for abrasive purposes filtered or cleaned somewhat during the operation of the cleaning apparatus. It is anticipated that periodically during use of the cleaning apparatus the particulate abrasive material will have to be changed, however, such is minimized by the filter structure of the vent assembly. The mesh member or screen 38 will catch large pieces or chunks of the foreign material being removed from the articles whereas the smaller pieces will drop through the screen into the hopper portion 34 along with the abrasive particulate material after it strikes an article. Additionally, it is to be noted that the cleaning apparatus 10 can be constructed in a relatively small size and a relatively light weight to make it portable so it can be easily moved from place to place for use or storage.

in the manufacture of the valve cleaner and cleaning apparatus of this invention it is obvious that same provides a cleaning apparatus which can be easily constructed to achieve the end product. The enclosure is relatively simple in construction and can be easily fabricated from commonly available materials. The nozzles are commonly available items known to be used with particulate material abrading devices. The control valves can be easily constructed as described to operate for controlling the compressed air flow to the nozzles.

In the use and operation of the valve cleaner structure of this invention it is seen that same provides a relatively easily usable device for cleaning of internal combustion engine cylinder valves and other small articles which can be supported on a stem or the like. The cleaning apparatus provides a structure for the abrasive cleaning of articles which is safe for an operator to use because of the selfcontained and enclosed operating elements of the structure. The valve cleaner or particulate material cleaning apparatus of this invention with its compact nature can, in simple construction, be pro duced so that it can be used by an operator having only nominal skill. The device provides an efficient and rapid means of cleaning internal combustion engine cylinder valves and other small articles.

As will become apparent from the foregoing description of the Applicant's valve cleaner structure, relatively simple and inexpensive means have been provided for the abrasive cleaning of articles by using par ticulate material. The valve cleaner structure is economical to manufacture, extremely simple to use, and reasonably safe for an operator when taking normal precautions. The valve cleaner recycles the particulate abrasive material thus conserving the abrasive particulatc material and thereby lowering its operating cost.

While the invention has been described in conjunction with preferred specific embodiments thereof, it will be understood that this description is intended to illustrate and not to limit the scope of the invention, which is defined by the following claims.

I claim:

1. An abrasive particulate material cleaning apparatus, comprising:

a. a hollow enclosure having an openable portion, a sidewall, a vent. and a hopper-like bottom portion to in use collect and store particulate material,

b. means to mount an article having a stem member extending through said sidewall, said means to mount having means constructed and adapted to in use mount an article in a cleaning zone inside said enclosure,

c. a plurality of compressed air powered particulate material dispensing nozzles mounted in said enclosure in a spaced relation, said nozzles being directed toward said cleaning zone and each having an inlet to receive particulate material from said hopper-like portion, an inlet to receive compressed air and an outlet, and

d. valve means communicably connected to said plurality of nozzles and communicably connectable to a source of compressed air, said valve means being constructed and adapted to in use control air flow through said nozzles, said cleaning apparatus being constructed and adapted to in use clean an article such as an internal combustion engine cylinder valve or an article mountable on a stem and positioned in said cleaning zone by abrasive particulate material being thrusted against the article by said nozzles.

2. The cleaning apparatus of claim 1, wherein:

a. said valve means has a plenum chamber communicably connected to said source of compressed air, a plurality of valves communicably connected to said plenum chamber, and a valve operator means to in use open and close said valves, and

b. said means to mount an article has a resilient support member mountable in said sidewall said resil ient support member having an aperture therethrough to receive and hold said stem or the like with an end portion of said stem being external to said enclosure when mounted with said resilient support member.

3. The cleaning apparatus of claim 2, wherein:

a. said vent has a particulate material filter mounted with said sidewall to in use prevent said particulate material from escaping said enclosure,

b. said means to mount an article has a stop member mounted inside said enclosure to in use aid in positioning an article in said cleaning zone, and

c. said enclosure has a perforate member transversely mounted in the lower portion thereof above said hopper-like bottom portion.

4. The cleaning apparatus of claim 2, wherein:

a. said valves each have a valve closure member resiliently urged to a normally closed position,

b. said valve operator has a movably mounted member mounted with said enclosure, said movably mounted member being contactable with said valve closure members to open said valves, and

c. said valve operator has means to temporarily hold said movably mounted member in contact with said valve closure member to hold said valves in an open position.

5. The cleaning apparatus of claim 2, wherein:

a. said cleaning apparatus has four of said nozzles with said nozzles being mounted in a spaced relation and each directed toward a central portion of said cleaning zone. and

b. said cleaning apparatus has four of said valves with said valves individually connected to said nozzles.

6. The cleaning apparatus of claim 5, wherein:

a. said nozzles being individually mounted on stan dards which are rigidly secured inside said enclosure. and

b. said means to mount an article has a stop member mounted inside said enclosure to in use contact said article for positioning said article in said cleaning zone.

7. The cleaning apparatus of claim 6, wherein:

a. said means to mount an article has a resilient member mountable in an aperture in said enclosure,

bv said resilient member having an aperture therethrough to receive and hold said stem or the like.

said filter downstream of said screen element.

Claims (9)

1. An abrasive particulate material cleaning apparatus, comprising: a. a hollow enclosure having an openable portion, a sidewall, a vent, and a hopper-like bottom portion to in use collect and store particulate material, b. means to mount an article having a stem member extending through said sidewall, said means to mount having means constructed and adapted to in use mount an article in a cleaning zone inside said enclosure, c. a plurality of compressed air powered particulate material dispensing nozzles mounted in said enclosure in a spaced relation, said nozzles being directed toward said cleaning zone and each having an inlet to receive particulate material from said hopper-like portion, an inlet to receive compressed air and an outlet, and d. valve means communicably connected to said plurality of nozzles and communicably connectable to a source of compressed air, said valve means being constructed and adapted to in use control air flow through said nozzles, said cleaning apparatus being constructed and adapted to in use clean an article such as an internal combustion engine cylinder valve or an article mountable on a stem and positioned in said cleaning zone by abrasive particulate material being thrusted against the article by said nozzles.
2. The cleaning apparatus of claim 1, wherein: a. said valve means has a plenum chamber communicably connected to said source of compressed air, a plurality of valves communicably connected to said plenum chamber, and a valve operator means to in use open and close said valves, and b. said means to mount an article has a resilient support member mountable in said sidewall said resilient support member having an aperture therethrough to receive and hold said stem or the like with an end portion of said stem being external to said enclosure when mounted with said resilient support member.
3. The cleaning apparatus of claim 2, wherein: a. said vent has a particulate material filter mounted with said sidewall to in use prevent said particulate material from escaping said enclosure, b. said means to mount an article has a stop member mounted inside said enclosure to in use aid in positioning an article in said cleaning zone, and c. said enclosure has a perforate member transversely mounted in the lower portion thereof above said hopper-like bottom portion.
4. The cleaning apparatus of claim 2, wherein: a. said valves each have a valve closure member resiliently urged to a normally closed position, b. said valve operator has a movably mounted member mounted with said enclosure, said movably mounted member being contactable with said valve closure members to open said valves, and c. said valve operator has means to temporarily hold said movably mounted member in contact with said valve closure member to hold said valves in an open position.
5. The cleaning apparatus of claim 2, wherein: a. said cleaning apparatus has four of said nozzles with said nozzles being mounted in a spaced relation and each directed toward a central portion of said cleaning zone, and b. said cleaning apparatus has four of said valves with said valves individually connected to said nozzles.
6. The cleaning apparatus of claim 5, wherein: a. said nozzles being individually mounted on standards which are rigidly secured inside said enclosure, and b. said means to mount an article has a stop member mounted inside said enclosure to in use contact said article for positioning said article in said cleaning zone.
7. The cleaning apparatus of claim 6, wherein: a. said means to mount an article has a resilient member mountable in an aperture in said enclosure, b. said resilient member having an aperture therethrough to receive and hold said stem or the like.
8. The cleaning apparatus of claim 7, wherein: a. said enclosure is essentially rectangular in transverse cross section with said openable portion being a lid, b. said resilient member is mountable through a sidewall of said enclosure, and c. said vent has a particulate material filter mounted in a sidewall of said enclosure.
9. The cleaning apparatus of claim 8, wherein: a. said filter has a removably mounted screen element, and b. said filter has a removably mounted perforate bag communicably connected in the fluid stream of said filter downstream of said screen element.
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US8764627B2 (en) 2000-02-14 2014-07-01 Obtech Medical Ag Penile prosthesis
US8874215B2 (en) 2008-10-10 2014-10-28 Peter Forsell System, an apparatus, and a method for treating a sexual dysfunctional female patient
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US4048918A (en) * 1975-08-13 1977-09-20 Identicar Corporation Of America Stenciling apparatus and identification system
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US5431593A (en) * 1991-07-11 1995-07-11 Kaltenbach & Voigt Gmbh & Co. Machining device for machining precision, in particular dental, workpieces in a machining chamber surrounded by a housing
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US8545384B2 (en) 1999-08-12 2013-10-01 Obtech Medical Ag Anal incontinence disease treatment with controlled wireless energy supply
US8556796B2 (en) 2000-02-10 2013-10-15 Obtech Medical Ag Controlled urinary incontinence treatment
US8602966B2 (en) 2000-02-10 2013-12-10 Obtech Medical, AG Mechanical impotence treatment apparatus
US8734318B2 (en) 2000-02-11 2014-05-27 Obtech Medical Ag Mechanical anal incontinence
US8678997B2 (en) 2000-02-14 2014-03-25 Obtech Medical Ag Male impotence prosthesis apparatus with wireless energy supply
US8764627B2 (en) 2000-02-14 2014-07-01 Obtech Medical Ag Penile prosthesis
US20040106366A1 (en) * 2002-08-26 2004-06-03 Robinson Robert A. Portable pipe restoration system
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US20060037293A1 (en) * 2004-08-17 2006-02-23 Storer Ron D Blast medium pot
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US9694165B2 (en) * 2008-01-28 2017-07-04 Peter Mats Forsell Implantable drainage device
US9789290B2 (en) * 2008-01-28 2017-10-17 Peter Forsell Drainage device comprising a filter cleaning device
US20150157836A1 (en) * 2008-01-28 2015-06-11 Peter Mats Forsell Implantable drainage device
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US9060771B2 (en) 2008-01-29 2015-06-23 Peter Forsell Method and instrument for treating obesity
US8636809B2 (en) 2008-01-29 2014-01-28 Milux Holding Sa Device for treating obesity
US8874215B2 (en) 2008-10-10 2014-10-28 Peter Forsell System, an apparatus, and a method for treating a sexual dysfunctional female patient
US8696745B2 (en) 2008-10-10 2014-04-15 Kirk Promotion Ltd. Heart help device, system, and method
US8600510B2 (en) 2008-10-10 2013-12-03 Milux Holding Sa Apparatus, system and operation method for the treatment of female sexual dysfunction
US9072907B2 (en) 2008-10-10 2015-07-07 Peter Forsell Heart help device, system, and method
US9370656B2 (en) 2008-10-10 2016-06-21 Peter Forsell System, an apparatus, and a method for treating a sexual dysfunctional female patient
US9526649B2 (en) 2008-10-10 2016-12-27 Peter Forsell Method and instrument for treating obesity
US8509894B2 (en) 2008-10-10 2013-08-13 Milux Holding Sa Heart help device, system, and method
US20100173569A1 (en) * 2009-01-07 2010-07-08 Enbio Limited Blasting device and containment
US9949812B2 (en) 2009-07-17 2018-04-24 Peter Forsell Vaginal operation method for the treatment of anal incontinence in women
US9623539B2 (en) * 2014-07-07 2017-04-18 Media Blast & Abrasive, Inc. Carving cabinet having protective carving barrier
US20160001420A1 (en) * 2014-07-07 2016-01-07 Media Blast & Abrasive, Inc. Carving cabinet having protective carving barrier

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