US387174A - Sylvania - Google Patents

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US387174A
US387174A US387174DA US387174A US 387174 A US387174 A US 387174A US 387174D A US387174D A US 387174DA US 387174 A US387174 A US 387174A
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mold
molds
ingots
ingot
frames
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B22CASTING; POWDER METALLURGY
    • B22CFOUNDRY MOULDING
    • B22C9/00Moulds or cores; Moulding processes
    • B22C9/06Permanent moulds for shaped castings
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C45/00Injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C45/17Component parts, details or accessories; Auxiliary operations
    • B29C45/26Moulds

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  • This invention has relation to the manufacture of steel; and it has for its object to provide an ingot-mold in which steel can be cast sufficiently solid and with a surface smooth enough to permit of direct rolling into bars without the intermediate operation of blooming or hammering.
  • the mold now in general use for casting steel ingots is made of cast-iron in one piece, having the appearance of a truncated pyramid, the taper being very slight and just sufficient to allow clearance in drawing.
  • This shape of mold has proven itself unsuited to the purpose, as there is such a difficulty in drawing the ingots that a large supply of extra molds must be kept on hand to meet the requirement of the converters successive heats, and many of the molds are soon rendered useless by the rough treatment received by them in the effort to draw. All this entails heavy expense upon the manufacturer of steel, which is overcome by our improved mold.
  • the ingot produced in this old form of mold is honeycombed and extremely heterogcneo us, and requires considerable reworking to compact it and render it of the requisite homo geneity for the uses to which it is to be applied.
  • This defect in the ingot makes it practically impossible to secure a constant and invariable quality of finished material, no matter with how greatprecision and chemical accuracy the conversion is accomplished, because no two ingots will be honeycombed in the same man ner or degree, and as there can be no positive determination of their interior, so there can be no accurate standard of comparison between one ingot and another as to the exact amount of hammering and rolling required to bring 5 them to the same quality of product.
  • Furnot present the ingots require reheating and blooming before they are in condition for rolling.
  • Another item of cost in the ordinary method is that where two or more molds are cast at the one time on a single casting-table there is a gate-piece to each ingot and a runner common to the several ingots which must be broken off, and is then valued only as waste.
  • the object of our invention is the provision of an ingot-mold in which all the de' sirable features of an open mold are :retained and all the objections to a closed mold are overcome.
  • Our invention therefore consists in an ingotmold having its sides and bottom and one end solid and its top and the other end removable,
  • the top being formed of a single piece of the same metal as the mold and the removable end formed of fire-brick having an orifice through its center for the passage of the molten steel.
  • Our invention still further consists in the combinatiomwith two molds having a common IOO run, of a removable bar placed between the two molds and under the run,whereby the ingots can be readily drawn at the one time.
  • Figure 1 is a perspective view of our improved mold, one of the wells having the removable cover removed.
  • Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a cast of ingots as they appear when taken from the mold.
  • Fig. 3 is a perspective view of one of the removable end pieces, and
  • Fig. 4 a view of the cover of one of the wells.
  • the mold-frame A which is made of cast iron, is rectangular in form,and comprises two or more molds, A A, 850., in which the ingots are cast. As shown, the tops of these molds are open and are supplied with covers B,which are formed with flanges b b, so as to fit tightly upon the mold.
  • a brick, C having an orifice, f, for the passage of the molten metal, forms one end of the mold.
  • the two frames A are each slightly tapered at one end, D, so that when two frames are placed together there will be formed by their contiguous sides a sprue or runner for both molds.
  • the bricks, O which form the ends of the several molds, are shaped with two sloping sides, one of which coincides with the end of the mold-frame and the other making a sloping or inclined end to the mold.
  • a bar or lifter, E having eyes 6 e at its ends, is placed between the two frames, their sides abutting against it, and fire-bricks F F, placed upon the top of the bar near the ends thereof, form the ends of the runner.
  • a brick, G having an orifice, g, passing through it from side to side, and an orifice, g, from the top of the brick to the orifice g, is placed midway in the run and forms a support for the conduit for the molten metal.
  • the lids B B being placed in po sition over the several molds, the molten metal is poured through the orifice g in brick G, and from thence, through the orifice y, it follows the run, and, entering the several gates in the molds, forms the ingots, which, as before stated, are snfficiently free from all surface roughness, and the honeycombing is reduced to the minimum, the lids B B effectually preventing the ebullition of the steel and causing the same to form a finished and smooth surface.
  • the lids B B are removed, and the ingots are removed from the molds by attaching hooks or draw-chains to the eye-holes e e in the end of the bar E and the whole number of ingots drawn from the molds, the several bricks being raised with them.
  • the bricks are removed by breaking them, and the ingots are detached from the runner.

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  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Mechanical Engineering (AREA)
  • Manufacturing & Machinery (AREA)
  • Continuous Casting (AREA)

Description

(No Model.)
G. F. MQCLEANEK: W. M. PABER, Jr.
INGOT MOLD.
Patnted July 31, 1888.
. %NVEN 1113?.
ATENT rrrcn,
GEORGE F. MOGLEANE'AND WILLIAM M. FABER, JR, OF PITTSBURG, PENN- SYLVANIA.
INGOT MOLD.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 387,174, dated July 31, 1888.
Application filed May 24, 1888. Serial No. 274,903. (No model.)
To all whom it may concern.-
Beit known that we, GEORGE F. MoCLEANE and WILLIAM M. FABER, J12, citizens of the United States, residing at Pittsburg, in the county of Allegheny and State of Pennsylvania, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Ingot-Molds; and we do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, which form part of this specification.
This invention has relation to the manufacture of steel; and it has for its object to provide an ingot-mold in which steel can be cast sufficiently solid and with a surface smooth enough to permit of direct rolling into bars without the intermediate operation of blooming or hammering.
The mold now in general use for casting steel ingots is made of cast-iron in one piece, having the appearance of a truncated pyramid, the taper being very slight and just sufficient to allow clearance in drawing. This shape of mold has proven itself unsuited to the purpose, as there is such a difficulty in drawing the ingots that a large supply of extra molds must be kept on hand to meet the requirement of the converters successive heats, and many of the molds are soon rendered useless by the rough treatment received by them in the effort to draw. All this entails heavy expense upon the manufacturer of steel, which is overcome by our improved mold. Again, the ingot produced in this old form of mold, as is well known, is honeycombed and extremely heterogcneo us, and requires considerable reworking to compact it and render it of the requisite homo geneity for the uses to which it is to be applied. This defect in the ingot makes it practically impossible to secure a constant and invariable quality of finished material, no matter with how greatprecision and chemical accuracy the conversion is accomplished, because no two ingots will be honeycombed in the same man ner or degree, and as there can be no positive determination of their interior, so there can be no accurate standard of comparison between one ingot and another as to the exact amount of hammering and rolling required to bring 5 them to the same quality of product. Furnot present the ingots require reheating and blooming before they are in condition for rolling.
\Ve have demonstrated by actual experience, upon a very large scale, that ingots cast in our improved mold are sufficiently free from the many defects above mentioned, and that the metal as taken from the molds is in a perfoot condition for rolling without the intermediate step of blooming, which, in addition to its cost, is positively injurious to steel of certain kinds, particularly low-grade steel, the reheating of the steel rendering it more brittle and less ductile than that produced by our mold and not subjected to the blooming.
Another item of cost in the ordinary method is that where two or more molds are cast at the one time on a single casting-table there is a gate-piece to each ingot and a runner common to the several ingots which must be broken off, and is then valued only as waste.
In our mold for casting we make but one runner where there are now two runners, thus reducing this single item exactly one-half, and on account of the peculiarshape and combination of our molds the ingots are much more readily removed therefrom, and there is such a small possibility of breaking the molds that the cost of molds and amount of labor required in the casting and drawing operations are greatly lessened, thereby lessening the cost of 8 the steel ingots.
The object of our invention, therefore, is the provision of an ingot-mold in which all the de' sirable features of an open mold are :retained and all the objections to a closed mold are overcome.
Our invention therefore consists in an ingotmold having its sides and bottom and one end solid and its top and the other end removable,
the top being formed of a single piece of the same metal as the mold and the removable end formed of fire-brick having an orifice through its center for the passage of the molten steel.
Our invention still further consists in the combinatiomwith two molds having a common IOO run, of a removable bar placed between the two molds and under the run,whereby the ingots can be readily drawn at the one time.
Our'invention still further consists in the construction, combination, and arrangement of parts, more fully described hereinafter, and specifically pointed out in the claims.
Referring to the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of our improved mold, one of the wells having the removable cover removed. Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a cast of ingots as they appear when taken from the mold. Fig. 3 is a perspective view of one of the removable end pieces, and Fig. 4 a view of the cover of one of the wells.
The mold-frame A, which is made of cast iron, is rectangular in form,and comprises two or more molds, A A, 850., in which the ingots are cast. As shown, the tops of these molds are open and are supplied with covers B,which are formed with flanges b b, so as to fit tightly upon the mold. A brick, C, having an orifice, f, for the passage of the molten metal, forms one end of the mold. The two frames A are each slightly tapered at one end, D, so that when two frames are placed together there will be formed by their contiguous sides a sprue or runner for both molds.
The bricks, O, which form the ends of the several molds, are shaped with two sloping sides, one of which coincides with the end of the mold-frame and the other making a sloping or inclined end to the mold.
A bar or lifter, E, having eyes 6 e at its ends, is placed between the two frames, their sides abutting against it, and fire-bricks F F, placed upon the top of the bar near the ends thereof, form the ends of the runner. A brick, G, having an orifice, g, passing through it from side to side, and an orifice, g, from the top of the brick to the orifice g, is placed midway in the run and forms a support for the conduit for the molten metal.
In casting the mold the two frames are brought together, as shown, with the bar G in proper position between them and the bricks F F in their respective position, molders sand being used to tamp the interstices between the several parts, and also covering the bar E and preventing the molten met-a1 from contacting therewith. The lids B B being placed in po sition over the several molds, the molten metal is poured through the orifice g in brick G, and from thence, through the orifice y, it follows the run, and, entering the several gates in the molds, forms the ingots, which, as before stated, are snfficiently free from all surface roughness, and the honeycombing is reduced to the minimum, the lids B B effectually preventing the ebullition of the steel and causing the same to form a finished and smooth surface. After the ingots have solidified the lids B B are removed, and the ingots are removed from the molds by attaching hooks or draw-chains to the eye-holes e e in the end of the bar E and the whole number of ingots drawn from the molds, the several bricks being raised with them. After the ingots are drawn from the molds the bricks are removed by breaking them, and the ingots are detached from the runner.
As before explained, there being but a single runner to each pair of molds, frames, or series of ingots, the amount of the waste metal is materially lessened, and by reason of the fa cility with which the ingots are drawn there is a great saving in labor and but small loss from destruction of molds.
Having described our invention,we elaim- 1. In aningot-mold having an open top and end, a removable end piece composed of firebrick and provided with a gate or passage for molten metal, substantially as described.
2. The combination,with an ingot-mold on nsisting of two separate frames, each frame containing two or more molds and having inclined faces, whereby said frames when placed together form a single sprue having inclined sides, of a removable bar and end bricks situated between the two frames, substantially as described.
3. The combination,with an ingot-mold consisting of independent frames having a single sprue between them, of a removable bottom and end pieces for said sprue, said bottom consisting of a rod or bar of iron, substantially as described.
4. An ingot-mold consisting of the frames A A, having inclined faces D, the removable bar E, and bricks F F, all constructed and combined substantially as described.
In testimony that We claim the foregoing we have hereunto set our hands this 15th day of May, 1888.
GEO. F. MCOLEANE. WM. M. FABER, JR.
Witnesses:
H. G. EVERT, LoUIs MoEsER.
It is hereby certified that Letters Patent No. 387,174, granted July 31, 1888, upon the application of George F. MeOleane and William M. Faber, Jr., of Pittsburg, Pennsylyania, for an improvement in Ingot-Molds, Was erroneously issued to the said George F. McGleane and William M. Faber, J r., as joint owners; that said Letters Patent should have been issued to said George F. McCleane as sole owner, by assignmen t, of the entire interest; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the ease in the Patent Office. 7
Signed, eonntersigned, and sealed this 7th day of August, A. D. 18388.
lsEAn] D. L. HAWKINS,
Assistant Secretary of the Interior.
BENTON J. HALL,
'\ Countersigned 1 Commissioner of Patents.
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2917798A (en) * 1957-12-02 1959-12-22 Ross Haldon Method and apparatus for casting and handling ferro-manganese
US2975493A (en) * 1957-02-05 1961-03-21 British Iron Steel Research Casting of metals
US4032104A (en) * 1975-02-26 1977-06-28 Societe Nouvelle Des Acieries De Pampey Ingot casting mould in particular for ferromanganese
US4237734A (en) * 1979-04-16 1980-12-09 Mcdevitt Robert F Device for obtaining a sample of liquid

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2975493A (en) * 1957-02-05 1961-03-21 British Iron Steel Research Casting of metals
US2917798A (en) * 1957-12-02 1959-12-22 Ross Haldon Method and apparatus for casting and handling ferro-manganese
US4032104A (en) * 1975-02-26 1977-06-28 Societe Nouvelle Des Acieries De Pampey Ingot casting mould in particular for ferromanganese
US4237734A (en) * 1979-04-16 1980-12-09 Mcdevitt Robert F Device for obtaining a sample of liquid

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