US3844297A - Coin selector and sorter - Google Patents

Coin selector and sorter Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3844297A
US3844297A US33354773A US3844297A US 3844297 A US3844297 A US 3844297A US 33354773 A US33354773 A US 33354773A US 3844297 A US3844297 A US 3844297A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
coin
chute
coins
tube
mouth
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
A Lautzenhiser
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
LITTLE Inc A
Original Assignee
LITTLE Inc A
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F1/00Coin inlet arrangements; Coins specially adapted to operate coin-freed mechanisms
    • G07F1/04Coin chutes
    • G07F1/048Coin chutes with means for damping coin motion
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07DHANDLING OF COINS OR OF PAPER CURRENCY OR SIMILAR VALUABLE PAPERS, e.g. TESTING, SORTING BY DENOMINATIONS, COUNTING, DISPENSING, CHANGING OR DEPOSITING
    • G07D3/00Sorting a mixed bulk of coins into denominations
    • G07D3/02Sorting coins by means of graded apertures
    • G07D3/04Sorting coins by means of graded apertures arranged on an inclined rail
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07DHANDLING OF COINS OR OF PAPER CURRENCY OR SIMILAR VALUABLE PAPERS, e.g. TESTING, SORTING BY DENOMINATIONS, COUNTING, DISPENSING, CHANGING OR DEPOSITING
    • G07D5/00Testing specially adapted to determine the identity or genuineness of coins, e.g. for segregating coins which are unacceptable or alien to a currency
    • G07D5/08Testing the magnetic or electric properties

Abstract

In apparatus for use in a coin operated device, apparatus for separating coins, loading a coin dispenser with the separated coins, and directing coins in excess of the capacity of the dispenser to a coin storage box.

Description

[ Oct. 29, 1974 Unite States atent 11 1 Lautzenhiser COIN SELECTOR AND SORTER [75] Inventor: Argyle Glenn Lautzenhiser,

Magnolia, Mass.

[73] Assignee: Arthur D. Little, lnc., Chambridge,

Mass.

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1/1941 Denmark [22] 1 Filed: Feb. 20, 1973 AssistantExaminer-Thomas E. Kocovsky Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Davis, Hoxic, Faithful! & Hapgood [30] Foreign Application Priority Data Feb. 23, 1972 Great Britain..................

ABSTRACT In apparatus for use in a coin operated device, appara- 45 M1 m y 3H3 1 1 m 1 3 m 3 u 1" mm "6 M .3 ""8 as L h 0 d SLIM. U.mF m m 555 [1:11

tus for separating coins, loading a coin dispenser with [56] References Cited the separated coins, and directing coins in excess of UNITED AT A ENT the capacity of the dispenser to a coin storage box.

1,632,344 6/1927 133/1 A 8 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures COIN SELECTOR AND SORTER The present invention is concerned with coin and token handling apparatus suitable for incorporation in a coin operated vending machine. Such apparatus receives coins of various denominations, determines the denomination and authenticity of the coins, rejects slugs and coins of unacceptable denomination, determines and sums the denominations of acceptable coins, produces a vend signal when acceptable coins equaling or exceeding in value the price of the item to be vended have been inserted, and produces change in an amount equal to the excess of the inserted coinage over the price of the item selected. The apparatus is usually housed within a case whose external dimensions and coin box passages for input, reject and change-giving conform to standards which have evolved in the vending machine industry.

A coin inserted into a vending machine having apparatus of the present invention enters the apparatus and moves by gravity along a series of coin track segments which establish a sinuous coin path. Sensors arranged along the coin path measure one or more physical properties of the coin such as electrical conductivity, diameter, acceleration, velocity, or functions which depend on combinations of these properties. Circuitry associated with the sensors determines whether the coin is an authentic coin of an acceptable denomination. If not, the coin is rejected. An accepted coin travels along a further gravity track past one or more acceptance windows arranged in increasing order of coin diameters in the direction of coin travel. The acceptance windows each lead to a coin tube appropriate for coins of a particular denomination. The coin tubes store a supply of coins segregated by denomination for change-giving purposes. The coin tubes are dimensioned to hold only enough coins for anticipated change-giving purposes. Once a coin tube is full, further coins of that denomination will bypass the coin tube for that denomination and enter a chute which leads to the locked coin box in which accepted coins of all denominations are stored for periodic removal. Coins larger than any of the acceptance windows continue on the further gravity track to the chute to the coin box. When coinage exceeding the price of the desired item is inserted, the difference from the price is determined by the circuitry and change dispenser mechanisms at the foot of the coin tubes are actuated to dispense the proper change.

Throughout this specification the term coin is in tended to mean genuine coins, tokens, counterfeit coins, slugs, washers, and any other item which may be used in an attempt to use coin-operated devices; and for simplicity, coin movement on the coin edge is described as rotational motion; however, except where otherwise indicated, translational motion also is contemplated.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the apparatus of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial elevational view;

FIG. 3 is a partial sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a partial elevational view similar to FIG. 2 but showing an alternative embodiment of the apparatus of this invention;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the apparatus of FIG. 4 taken along the line 5-5; and

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of the apparatus of FIG. 4 taken along the line 6-6.

Referring now to the drawings, the apparatus of the present invention will be described with reference to a device regulated to accept three coins of different denomination and increasing diameters such as the U.S. l0-cent, S-cent and 25-cent coins. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 through 3, the apparatus is enclosed within a case 6 whose exterior dimensions conform to standards which have evolved in the vending machine industry for the space within vending machines which is allocated for coin handling purposes. The apparatus comprises as major components: a flight deck assembly 1 and 2 including sensor zones 31 and 32, an accept- /reject gate 24, a separator assembly 4 and 5 including acceptance windows 28 and 29, separator chutes 34 and 35, coin tubes 36 and37 and a change dispenser assembly 50. The apparatus also includes a reject chute 46 and a chute 42 leading to the coin box. Sensor data processing and logic circuitry are incorporated in the available space within the confines of the outer case 6.

The flight deck is composed of a pair of parallel plates 1 and 2 separated by a distance slightly greater than the thickest coin being handled, for example two sheets of fiberglass reinforced epoxy spaced 0.090 inch apart in a coin selector for 5, l0, and 25 cent U.S. coins. Front plate 1 may be hingedly associated with rear plate 2 to permit temporary separation of the plates for cleaning or to free a jam which may be occasioned by a bent coin. Spanning the space between the front plate 1 and the rear plate 2 is a series of baffles 10, 12 and 14, made either as a part of one of the plates 1 and 2 or as separate parts. Polycarbonate resin is a suitable material for the baffles. The upper surfaces ll, 13 and 16, respectively, of the baffles constitute track surface segments along which the coins roll. The baffles are arranged such that the coin tracks ll, 13 and 16 determine a sinuous path for coins which roll on edge under the influence of gravity. As is best seen in FIG. 3, the flight deck is inclined from the vertical by a small angle on the order of 9. This inclination insures that all coins bear facially against the front plate I to facilitate physical property sensing.

A coin, such as a l0-cent coin, is inserted into the coin receipt slot of the vending machine and is directed to the hopper 3, located at the upper edge of the plates of the flight deck, which orients the coin for edge-first travel into the coin path space between the front and rear plates 1 and 2 of the flight deck assembly. The coin falls through the hopper 3 and space between the plates until it is intercepted by track 11 on the upper surface of the first baffle 10. The coin rolls downward along track 11, issues from the end of the track 11, and travels in a trajectory until it is intercepted by track 13 on the upper surface of the second baffle 12. The portion 15 of track 13 first encountered by the coin is a beveled surface which provides a wedge shape between plate 1 and the beveled surface to frictionally absorb some of the kinetic energy of the coin to reduce coin bouncing. The coin then rolls down track 13 past the first sensor zone 31 which may include one or more coin property sensors to inspect certain physical properties of the coin, which properties may include chordal dimension, electrical conductivity, velocity, eddy current retardation, acceleration or other properties appropriate for identification of denomination and verification of authenticity. Although inductance sensors are preferred, optical or other known sensors can be employed. The sensors can be located in either or both the front and rear flight deck plates 1 and 2. The electrical signals from the sensors of the first sensor zone 31 enter the data processing and logic circuitry, the details of which are not a part of this invention. Inductance sensors as well as data processing and logic circuity suitable for use in the apparatus of this specification are disclosed in United Kingdom provisional specifications No. 16538/71 filed May 21, 1971 and 8385/72 filed Feb. 23, 1972 and the complete specification filed May 24, 1972 all assigned to the assignee of the present invention.

The coin issues from the end of track 13 in a trajectory and thecoin is intercepted by track 16 on the upper surface of baffle 14. Track 16 also includes a beveled surface portion 17 for frictional retardation of coin bounce. The terminal ends of the baffles 10, 12 and 14 constitute acute angles and may include notches 18 in their tips for the purpose of snagging a string affixed to a coin in an attempt to defraud the apparatus or a sharp edge for cutting such a string. The notches 18 prevent a coin from being pulled by a string backwardly through the flight deck in an attempt to falsify the sum or to retrieve the coin after accomplishing a vend signal.

The coin rolls down track 16 past the second sensor group 32, which may also include one or more of sensors to further inspect physical properties of the coin. Information derived from the sensor groups 31 and 32 is processed by the circuitry and a determination made of the denomination of the coin and of its authenticity. The denominational value of the coin in this instance is cents, or more correctly two units of 5 cents. The two value units are recorded in an accumulator in the circuitry. Since the coin first inserted in this example is an authentic coin of an acceptable denomination, the logic circuit provides an accept signal which results in energization of solenoid 25 to retract the accept/reject gate 24 to bring the tab 27 of the reject gate into position beneath the relief region 8. The coin issues from the end of track 16 and leaves the flight deck by way of exit relief 8 excavated in flight deck rear plate 2. The relief 8 accommodates the coin as it turns from the angular attitude dictated by the inclination of the selector plate 4. The selector plate 4 is inclined from the vertical at an angle in the order to 20 in the opposite direction from the inclination of the flight deck.

After traversing the coin path of the flight deck, the coin leaves the flight deck in the region of relief 8 and falls to the accept/reject gate 24 mounted on separator plate 4. The accept/reject gate includes a slot 26 at least as large as any coin capable of being inserted into the apparatus. If the sensors located in sensor zones 31 and 32 and the associated circuitry determine that the coin is of an unacceptable denomination or not authentic, the coin will fall through the slot 26 and continue to fall down the reject chute 46 to the coin return window of the vending machine. If a determination is made by the sensor zones 31 and 32 in combination with the circuitry that the coin is authentic and of an acceptable denomination, a solenoid 25 is activated to partially retract the accept/reject gate 24 toward plate 2, withdrawing the slot 26 from the path of the coin. The coin is intercepted between the tab 27 of the retracted accept/reject gate 24 and the surface of the separator plate 4. Coin bounce is frictionally retarded and the coin rolls down the slope of the accept/reject gate to the track 21 of the coin separator entrance guide 5.

After the coin rolls down the sloping bottom of the accept/reject gate 24 it is introduced to the sloping track 21 of the coin separator entrance guide 5. The coin rolls along track 21 toward separator windows 28 and 29 each of whose upper margines is spaced from the track 21 by a distance slightly exceeding the diameter of the coin associated with the particular window. Separator windows 28 and 29 communicate with separator chutes 34 and 35 respectively. FIG. 3 is a section which passes through separator chute 34. Window 28 and separator chute 34 communicate with coin tube 36 which facially stacks and stores a supply of acceptable lO-cent coins, similarly chute 35 communicates with coin tube 37 which facially stacks and stores a supply of acceptable S-cent coins.

Upon entering the coin separator, a ten-cent coin rolls along accept/reject tab 24 in facial contact with the inclined surface of the separator plate 4. As the coin rolls from the accept/reject tab 24 to the sloping track 21 of the coin separator entrance guide 5, the coin rolls past separator window 28. Since the coin is of a diameter smaller than the elevation of the upper margin of window 28 above the track 21, the coin is no longer supported by the surface of the separator 4. The upper edge of the IO-cent coin will begin to fall through separator window 28. The lower margin of the aperture 28 is elevated above the coin track 21 and is rounded to form a curb 30 about which the falling coin pivots and topples into coin chute 34. The coin separator entrance guide 5 is provided with a relief groove 48 to provide clearance for the edge of the coin as the coin topples over the curb 30 and falls into the separator chute 34. Separator chute 34 is of a transverse width equal to the diameter of the coin plus a small clearance. The rear wall 47 of the separator chute is generally arcuate. The separator chute narrows in depth to confine the falling coin and direct the coin into sliding contact with the arcuate rear wall 47 of the separator chute. A block 45 forms a narrowing throat in the separator chute for this purpose of converting the toppling motion of the coin into a sliding contact with the separator chute rear wall 47. 1f the small coin tube 36 is not full, the coin will slide along the arcuate rear wall 47 of the separator chute and then fall in a generally horizontal attitude into the vertical small coin tube 36. 1f the small coin tube 36 is full, the entrance to the coin tube will be blocked by the stack of coins. in that case, the coin sliding down the rear wall 47 of the separator chute has a sufficient velocity, as a result of the fall from the track 21 and the shape of the separator chute, to move across the top surface of the top-most coin in the coin tube and exit through the overflow chute 38. The exiting coin then falls to the overflow track 41, to which it is confined by the front wall (not shown) of the apparatus, and rolls along the overflow track 41 into the coin box chute 42 which directs coins to a coin box (not shown). The relation of the overflow track 41 to the coin box chute is best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2. A coin of intermediate diameter, the S-cent coin will be supported at the top of window 28 by the upper margin and will roll to separator window 29. The 5-cent coin will fall through separator window 29 and through separator chute 35 into coin tube 37 in a manner similar to that described for the l0-cent coin. Any coin larger than those accommodated by either separator window 28 or 29, e.g.: a cent coin, will continue to roll down track 21 and fall from the end thereof into coin box chute 42. In this manner, coins of small and intermediate diameter are extracted from the incoming coinage and segregated to replenish the supply of these coins stored in the coin tubes for change-giving purposes. A suitable coin dispenser or change-giver is disclosed in U.K. provisional specification No. 8386/72 filed Feb. 23, 1972 and its complete specification filed Feb. 14, 1973, both assigned to the assignee of the present invention.

In the alternative embodiment of FIGS. 4 through 6, a coin enters the apparatus through hopper 103 in a manner entirely similar to entry of a coin into the apparatus described above. The coins drops onto track 111 and rolls down along the track between front and rear plates 101, 102. At the end of track 111 the coin drops onto energy absorbing pad 115. Energy absorbing pad 115, which may be similar to energy absorbing pad 125 described in detail below, absorbs a substantial portion of the kinetic energy of the coin to reduce coin bouncing. The coin rolls down along the upper surface of energy absorbing pad 115 and onto track 113. As the coin rolls down along track 113, it is identified by one or more of sensors 130, 131, and 132 (similar to sensors 31 and 32 in the apparatus of FIGS. 1 through 3). By the time the coin reaches the end of track 113, it has been identified as either acceptable or unacceptable, and if acceptable, it has been further identified as to denomination.

At the end of track 113, the momentum of the coin carries it across to a second substantially vertical energy absorbing pad 117. Pad 117, similar to pads 115 and 125, absorbs most of the kinetic energy of the coin, allowing it to drop almost vertically toward accept- /reject gate 124. If the coin has been identified as acceptable, accept/reject gate 124 is retracted into rear plate 102, allowing the coin to fall past gate 124 toward energy absorbing pad 125. If the coin has been identified as unacceptable, accept/reject gate 124 intercepts the coin, diverting it onto track 116. The coin rolls down along track 116, entering reject chute 146 at 108. Reject chute 146 delivers the rejected coin to the coin return window of the vending machine.

As mentioned above, a coin identified as acceptable drops past retracted accept/reject gate 124 onto energy absorbing pad 125 behind separator plate 104 as viewed in FIG. 4. Like pads 115 and 117, energy absorbing pad 125 absorbs a substantial portion of the kinetic energy of the coin to reduce coin bouncing. As shown in FIG. 6, pad 125 of relatively hard rubber such as delrin, is mounted on a pad 151 of relatively soft rubber such as neoprene. Pad 151 in turn is mounted on an L-shaped bracket 152 of delrin or the like. Bracket 152 is coupled to the outer surface of separator plate 104 by means of a second relatively soft rubber pad 153 of neoprene or the like. Pads 125 and 151 and the associated leg of bracket 152 pass through separator plate 104 at an enlarged aperture 154 so that the upper portion of energy absorbing device is not restrained by plate 104. In addition, guide plate 105 has a notch 155 opposite aperture 154 to permit pad 125 to span the gap between plates 104 and 105 without being restrained by any contact with plate 105. Pad 125 may be glass filled to improve its wearing properties. Elements 125, 151, 152, and 153 may be held together by any suitable adhesives.

After dropping onto energy absorbing pad 125, the accepted coin rolls down onto track 121 between separator plate 104 and guide plate 105. As in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 through 3, track 121 passes separator windows 128 and 129. Plates 104 and 105 are tilted toward windows 128 and 129 to insure that coins passing the windows will fall through the appropriate window into the associated separator chute 134 or 135. In comparing FIGS. 2 and 4 it will be noted that separator chutes 34 and 35 are behind separator plate 4 as viewed in FIG. 2, while chutes 134 and 135 are in front of plate 104 as viewed in FIG. 4.

As in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 through 3, windows 128 and 129 are graded in height from smaller to larger. Thus the height of window 128 (measured perpendicular to track 121) may be equal to the diameter of a lO-cent coin plus a small clearance, while the corresponding dimension of window 129 equals the diameter of a S-cent coin plus a small clearance. Accordingly, a lO-cent coin rolling along track 121 will fall through window 128. A larger 5-cent coin will roll past window 128 and fall through window 129. An acceptable coin larger than the S-cent coin (e.g., a 125-cent coin) will roll down track 121 without falling through either window. At the end of track 121 such a coin enters large coin chute 144 (approximately parallel to and behind reject chute 146 as viewed in FIG. 4) and drops to coin track 140. The large coin then rolls down along track 140 (behind separator plate 104 as viewed in FIG. 4), at the end of which it drops into chute 142 leading to the coin box of the machine.

As compared to windows 28 and 29 in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 through 3, windows 128 and 129 are slightly modified to further insure that all coins of appropriate diameter fall through the windows. As is best seen in FIG. 5, curb 130 in window 128 is made somewhat lower and without any appreciable surface perpendicular to coin track 121 at the bottom of the window. Curb 130 tapers upward to a single edge or fulcrum 149 about which coins pivot into coin chute 134. In addition, separator plate 104 includes lay-back slot 157 which increases by increment a the angle from the vertical of all coins small enough to pass through one of windows 128 and 129. Accordingly, the top of lay-back slot 157 is the same distance from track 121 as the top of larger window 129. Coins too large to enter either separator window roll down track 121 without entering lay-back slot 157.

As in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 through 3, a coin which falls through either of windows 128, 129 is guided down the associated coin chute 134, (each defined by cover 147 and one of blocks 145, 145) and across the mouth of the associated coin tube 136, 137. If the coin tube is full, the coin continues across the mouth of the coin tube and drops onto coin track which delivers the coin to chute 142 as in the case of acceptable coins too large to pass through either of windows 128, 129. If the coin tube is not full, the coin drops into the coin tube where it is stacked and stored for later use in dispensing change.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 4 through 6, the separator chutes 134, 135 below windows 128, 129 are made somewhat shorter than the corresponding chutes in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 through 3. This permits coin tubes 136, 137 to be made longer and of greater capacity within an apparatus of predetermined dimensions. The trajectory of coins as they reach the coin tubes is somewhat more horizontal in this embodiment. Particularly with smaller, lighter coins such as the US. cent coin, it has been found that in this embodiment a smaller clearance is desirable in the chute 134 for such coins to reduce coin vibration and direct coins more accurately at lip 158 in mouth 159 of coin tube 136. This reduces the probability that a coin will overshoot coin tube 136 when the coin tube is not full. Lip 158 is preferably straight and horizontal across the entire width of chute 134. A transition to circular coin tube 136 is effected below lip 158. The surface 161 of block 145 above mouth 159 is substantially parallel to the trajectory of coins in that portion of the apparatus to insure that any coin striking lip 158 will drop down into coin tube 136.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for facially stacking coins comprising a coin tube of predetermined capacity, and a chute for receiving coins of predetermined diameter which topple into the chute in an initial direction and for causing the received coins to facially slide along and exit from the lower portion of the chute edge first in a final direction across the top of the coin tube,

the chute comprising a coin passage having an entrance at the top and an exit at the bottom, the coin passage being between a front wall, a generally arcuate rear wall. and side walls,

the rear wall having a lower portion shaped to guide the coins from the initial direction to the final direction as they approach the top of the coin tube,

the front wall being defined by the surfaces of a block which faces the rear wall, the end portion of the lower surface of the block being substantially parallel to the downward sloping trajectory of coins sliding edge first from the lower portion of the coin tube;

the coin tube having an open mouth at the top for receiving coins from the chute, the mouth having a lip opposite the lower end of the chute the inner surface of which is exposed when the coin tube is filled to less than its capacity and is obscured by the topmost coin in the tube when the tube is filled to capacity; and

the end portion of the lower surface of the block being spaced above the mouth of the coin tube sufficiently to deflect coins striking the inner surface of the lip into the mouth of the tube.

2. The apparatus defined in claim 1 further comprising means for separating coins of the predetermined diameter from coins ofa different diameter and introducing coins of the predetermined diameter into the coin chute.

3. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein the front and rear walls coverge toward the lower portion of the chute to convert the toppling motion of a coin entering the chute to sliding motion along the chute.

4. The apparatus defined in claim 3 wherein the chute inverts a coin between the entrance of the chute and the mouth of the coin tube.

5. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein the top corner of the lip is horizontal and straight in a direction substantially perpendicular to the trajectory of coins crossing the mouth of the coin tube.

6. The apparatus defined in claim 5 further comprising means for separating coins of the predetermined diameter from coins of different diameter and introducing coins of the predetermined diameter into the coin chute.

7. The apparatus defined in claim 5 wherein the front and rear walls converge toward the lower portion of the chute to convert the toppling motion of a coin entering the chute to sliding motion along the chute.

8. The apparatus defined in claim 7 wherein the chute inverts a coin between the entrance of the chute and the mouth of the coin tube.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT NO. 3,844 ,297 DATED October 29 1974 ]N\/ENTOR(S) ARGYLE G. LAUTZENHISER it is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

[73] Assignee: "Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, Mass."

should be MARS, INC., McLean, Virginia".

Col. 4, line 8, "margines" should be --margin. 0

Col. 8, Claim 3, line 18, "coverge" should be converge-.

. Signed and Scaled this sixth D y of January 1976 [SEAL] Attest:

RUTH c. MASON c. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer Commissioner ufParenrs and Trademarks UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT N0. 5 qq,297 DATED October 29 1974 INVENTOR(S) I Argyle Glenn Lautzenhiser It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Col. 4, line 8, "margines" should be "margin".

Col. 8, Claim 3, line 18, "coverge" should be --converge-.

Signed and sealed this 10th day of June 1975.

(SEAL) Attest:

C. MARSHALL DANN RUTH C. MASON Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer and Trademarks

Claims (8)

1. Apparatus for facially stacking coins comprising a coin tube of predetermined capacity, and a chute for receiving coins of predetermined diameter which topple into the chute in an initial direction and for causing the received coins to facially slide along and exit from the lower portion of the chute edge first in a final direction across the top of the coin tube, the chute comprising a coin passage having an entrance at the top and an exit at the bottom, the coin passage being between a front wall, a generally arcuate rear wall, and side walls, the rear wall having a lower portion shaped to guide the coins from the initial direction to the final direction as they approach the top of the coin tube, the front wall being defined by the surfaces of a block which faces the rear wall, the end portion of the lower surface of the block being substantially paralleL to the downward sloping trajectory of coins sliding edge first from the lower portion of the coin tube; the coin tube having an open mouth at the top for receiving coins from the chute, the mouth having a lip opposite the lower end of the chute the inner surface of which is exposed when the coin tube is filled to less than its capacity and is obscured by the topmost coin in the tube when the tube is filled to capacity; and the end portion of the lower surface of the block being spaced above the mouth of the coin tube sufficiently to deflect coins striking the inner surface of the lip into the mouth of the tube.
2. The apparatus defined in claim 1 further comprising means for separating coins of the predetermined diameter from coins of a different diameter and introducing coins of the predetermined diameter into the coin chute.
3. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein the front and rear walls coverge toward the lower portion of the chute to convert the toppling motion of a coin entering the chute to sliding motion along the chute.
4. The apparatus defined in claim 3 wherein the chute inverts a coin between the entrance of the chute and the mouth of the coin tube.
5. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein the top corner of the lip is horizontal and straight in a direction substantially perpendicular to the trajectory of coins crossing the mouth of the coin tube.
6. The apparatus defined in claim 5 further comprising means for separating coins of the predetermined diameter from coins of different diameter and introducing coins of the predetermined diameter into the coin chute.
7. The apparatus defined in claim 5 wherein the front and rear walls converge toward the lower portion of the chute to convert the toppling motion of a coin entering the chute to sliding motion along the chute.
8. The apparatus defined in claim 7 wherein the chute inverts a coin between the entrance of the chute and the mouth of the coin tube.
US3844297A 1972-02-23 1973-02-20 Coin selector and sorter Expired - Lifetime US3844297A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB838772A GB1417581A (en) 1972-02-23 1972-02-23 Coin selector and sorter

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3844297A true US3844297A (en) 1974-10-29

Family

ID=9851557

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3844297A Expired - Lifetime US3844297A (en) 1972-02-23 1973-02-20 Coin selector and sorter

Country Status (10)

Country Link
US (1) US3844297A (en)
JP (1) JPS4895896A (en)
BE (1) BE795650A (en)
CA (1) CA985111A (en)
DE (1) DE2308776C2 (en)
DK (1) DK143149C (en)
FR (1) FR2173155B1 (en)
GB (1) GB1417581A (en)
LU (1) LU67079A1 (en)
NL (1) NL7302060A (en)

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3906965A (en) * 1973-11-22 1975-09-23 Mars Inc Coin separator and stacker
US4095607A (en) * 1975-06-02 1978-06-20 Mars, Incorporated Coin handling apparatus
US4286703A (en) * 1979-05-11 1981-09-01 Umc Industries, Inc. Coin testing and sorting apparatus
US4687089A (en) * 1984-08-29 1987-08-18 Autelca Ag. Coin storage box and automatic teller
US5427220A (en) * 1992-03-13 1995-06-27 Kabushiki Kaisha Nippon Conlux Coin processing apparatus
EP0710935A1 (en) * 1994-10-28 1996-05-08 Landis & Gyr Technology Innovation AG Device for testing coins, tokens or other flat objects
US5566807A (en) * 1995-03-03 1996-10-22 Mars Incorporated Coin acceptance method and apparatus
US5597061A (en) * 1991-09-17 1997-01-28 Kabushiki Kaisha Nippon Conlux Coin processing apparatus
US6099401A (en) * 1997-02-12 2000-08-08 Mag-Nif Incorporated Coin sorting apparatus
EP1045351A2 (en) 1999-04-16 2000-10-18 Mars Incorporated Money handling mechanism with peripheral port
EP1071047A1 (en) 1994-09-16 2001-01-24 Mars Incorporated Multiple currency automatic transaction system and method
US6443829B1 (en) 1997-02-12 2002-09-03 Jerzy Perkitny Coin sorting apparatus
EP1367545A2 (en) * 2002-05-20 2003-12-03 Vincenzo Bauchiero Cashdrawer with automatic device for sorting and storing coins of different values, which are manually introduced as bulk material
US20040206601A1 (en) * 2000-11-27 2004-10-21 Raymond Heidel Note acceptor-dispenser validator
EP1865469A1 (en) * 2006-05-18 2007-12-12 Jofemar, S.A. Coin selector

Families Citing this family (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB1482417A (en) * 1973-11-22 1977-08-10 Mars Inc Coin handling mechanism including an energy dissipating device
US4106610A (en) * 1976-06-07 1978-08-15 Mars, Incorporated Coin apparatus having multiple coin-diverting gates
US4221227A (en) * 1978-08-09 1980-09-09 Mars, Incorporated Separable coin storage tube assembly
US4410077A (en) * 1981-06-01 1983-10-18 Umc Industries, Inc. Coin handling apparatus with coin retardation feature
GB2135096B (en) * 1983-02-08 1986-03-05 Mars Inc Coin storage assembly
DE3718710C2 (en) * 1987-06-04 1989-09-21 National Rejectors Inc. Gmbh, 2150 Buxtehude, De
GB0307880D0 (en) * 2003-04-04 2003-05-14 Money Controls Ltd Improved acceptor
ES2338682T3 (en) * 2004-11-25 2010-05-11 Basell Poliolefine Italia S.R.L. Method for recovering titanium tetrachloride of a residual liquid.

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1632344A (en) * 1926-03-09 1927-06-14 Frank E Modlin Jr Wrapping machine
DK58374C (en) * 1939-03-24 1941-01-27 Johannes Petersen Coin distributor to the vending machines.
US2561880A (en) * 1946-12-23 1951-07-24 Raymond T Moloney Coin and check separator
US2567900A (en) * 1946-10-11 1951-09-11 Clarance B Winkler Coin-changer mechanism
US2780336A (en) * 1950-04-03 1957-02-05 Creel W Hatcher Coin changing apparatus
US3204648A (en) * 1963-10-03 1965-09-07 Reed Electromech Corp Coin devices
US3703903A (en) * 1971-09-07 1972-11-28 Ncr Co Rotary drum coin stacking and dispensing device

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2528690A (en) * 1947-04-26 1950-11-07 Nat Slug Rejectors Inc Paramagnetic coin separator

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1632344A (en) * 1926-03-09 1927-06-14 Frank E Modlin Jr Wrapping machine
DK58374C (en) * 1939-03-24 1941-01-27 Johannes Petersen Coin distributor to the vending machines.
US2567900A (en) * 1946-10-11 1951-09-11 Clarance B Winkler Coin-changer mechanism
US2561880A (en) * 1946-12-23 1951-07-24 Raymond T Moloney Coin and check separator
US2780336A (en) * 1950-04-03 1957-02-05 Creel W Hatcher Coin changing apparatus
US3204648A (en) * 1963-10-03 1965-09-07 Reed Electromech Corp Coin devices
US3703903A (en) * 1971-09-07 1972-11-28 Ncr Co Rotary drum coin stacking and dispensing device

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3906965A (en) * 1973-11-22 1975-09-23 Mars Inc Coin separator and stacker
US4095607A (en) * 1975-06-02 1978-06-20 Mars, Incorporated Coin handling apparatus
US4286703A (en) * 1979-05-11 1981-09-01 Umc Industries, Inc. Coin testing and sorting apparatus
US4687089A (en) * 1984-08-29 1987-08-18 Autelca Ag. Coin storage box and automatic teller
US5597061A (en) * 1991-09-17 1997-01-28 Kabushiki Kaisha Nippon Conlux Coin processing apparatus
US5427220A (en) * 1992-03-13 1995-06-27 Kabushiki Kaisha Nippon Conlux Coin processing apparatus
EP1071047A1 (en) 1994-09-16 2001-01-24 Mars Incorporated Multiple currency automatic transaction system and method
EP0710935A1 (en) * 1994-10-28 1996-05-08 Landis & Gyr Technology Innovation AG Device for testing coins, tokens or other flat objects
US5566807A (en) * 1995-03-03 1996-10-22 Mars Incorporated Coin acceptance method and apparatus
US6443829B1 (en) 1997-02-12 2002-09-03 Jerzy Perkitny Coin sorting apparatus
US6099401A (en) * 1997-02-12 2000-08-08 Mag-Nif Incorporated Coin sorting apparatus
EP1045351A2 (en) 1999-04-16 2000-10-18 Mars Incorporated Money handling mechanism with peripheral port
US20040206601A1 (en) * 2000-11-27 2004-10-21 Raymond Heidel Note acceptor-dispenser validator
EP1367545A2 (en) * 2002-05-20 2003-12-03 Vincenzo Bauchiero Cashdrawer with automatic device for sorting and storing coins of different values, which are manually introduced as bulk material
EP1367545A3 (en) * 2002-05-20 2004-11-10 Vincenzo Bauchiero Cashdrawer with automatic device for sorting and storing coins of different values, which are manually introduced as bulk material
EP1865469A1 (en) * 2006-05-18 2007-12-12 Jofemar, S.A. Coin selector

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
JPS4895896A (en) 1973-12-08 application
DK143149C (en) 1981-11-09 grant
BE795650A1 (en) grant
CA985111A (en) 1976-03-09 grant
FR2173155B1 (en) 1978-05-26 grant
GB1417581A (en) 1975-12-10 application
DE2308776A1 (en) 1973-08-30 application
CA985111A1 (en) grant
FR2173155A1 (en) 1973-10-05 application
BE795650A (en) 1973-06-18 grant
LU67079A1 (en) 1973-05-15 application
DK143149B (en) 1981-06-29 grant
DE2308776C2 (en) 1986-03-27 grant
NL7302060A (en) 1973-08-27 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3048251A (en) Coin collector including clearance means
US5931732A (en) Apparatus for dispensing disks
US4098280A (en) Coin handling machine
US20030168309A1 (en) Disc-type coin processing device having improved coin discrimination system
US5404986A (en) Method and apparatus for discriminating and collecting coins
US4558712A (en) Automatic coin depositing and paying machine
US6193599B1 (en) Coin hopper device
US6957746B2 (en) Apparatuses and methods for dispensing magnetic cards, integrated circuit cards, and other similar items
US4694845A (en) Coin counter and wrapper and method of counting and wrapping coins
US5531640A (en) Coin dispenser
US5195626A (en) Device for checking coins
US4549561A (en) Coin handling machine
US4228812A (en) Coin sorter with striker means to propel non-standard size coins
US3921003A (en) Apparatus for identifying coins
US4531531A (en) Coin handling machine
US7244175B2 (en) Coin recycling machine and method
US5492212A (en) Device for sorting and storing objects inserted by way of payment in a dispenser
US4096933A (en) Coin-operated vending systems
WO2000065546A1 (en) Currency processing machine with multiple coin receptacles
US6502052B1 (en) Note bundle managing apparatus to store and count note bundles
EP0667973B1 (en) Coin sorters
US5007519A (en) Coin drop construction
US6966417B2 (en) Coin chute
US4475564A (en) Coin handling apparatus
US3653481A (en) Electrical/electronic coin or token indentification system