US3832705A - Alarm device - Google Patents

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US3832705A
US3832705A US36987173A US3832705A US 3832705 A US3832705 A US 3832705A US 36987173 A US36987173 A US 36987173A US 3832705 A US3832705 A US 3832705A
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housing
alarm
actuating unit
means
alarm device
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R King
B King
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B King
R King
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08BSIGNALLING OR CALLING SYSTEMS; ORDER TELEGRAPHS; ALARM SYSTEMS
    • G08B15/00Identifying, scaring or incapacitating burglars, thieves or intruders, e.g. by explosives
    • G08B15/004Identifying, scaring or incapacitating burglars, thieves or intruders, e.g. by explosives using portable personal devices

Abstract

A personal security device that is readily carried by hand and that includes an alarm activating unit that can be preset and restrained by a finger so that when released the activating unit automatically separates from the alarm device setting off a signal generator to produce continuous alarm signals.

Description

United States Patent [191 King et al.

ALARM DEVICE Inventors: Barry B. King, 28 Gannett Rd.,

Victor, NY. 14564; Ralph E. King, 68 F. Clintwood Court, Rochester, N.Y. 14620 Filed: June 14, 1973 Appl. No.: 369,871

US. Cl. 340/280, 340/321, 340/384 E Int. Cl. G08b 15/00 Field of Search 340/280, 321, 384 E References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1942 Sage 340/321 [111 3,832,705 Aug. 27, 1974 2,893,344 7/1959 Meyers 340/321 2,927,311 3/1960 Donaldson..... 340/280 3,631,271 12/1971 Shimada 340/280 3,701,140 10/1972 Dixon v. 340/280 Primary Examiner-Thomas B. Habecker ABSTRACT 18 Clains, 22 Drawing Figures 1 I1 III/Ml l/ \l/ Ill/l I] IIIIIIIIIIIYI! JI/IIIIIIII\III PAramwmcz m 3.832.105

sum s of 5 '1 ALARM DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION that can be readily set off to generate alarm signals in I the event of an attack.

Muggings, a type of robbery wherein a victim is physically assaulted or restrained while being robbed, have been increasing in occurrence over the years and may now account to well over one half the robberies in the United States. The victims are those that are burdened with packages that impede their defense, individuals traveling alone, particularly at night, and the elderly who are too feeble to defend themselves. The muggings occur outdoors in the streets and also indoors in common walkways, or hallways. The chances of being mugged are substantially increased in, or near, high crime areas, such as, older city residential areas, slums, and poorly lighted streets.

Often an attack on a victim is made by two muggers, one who surprises the victim from behind by locking an arm chokingly around the victims neck, while the otherempties the victims pockets. The attack often occurs as a surprise even though the victim may be guarding against such a possibility. In most cases, the victim can do little, if anything, to fend off the attack. It would be highly desirable if some sort of simple and inexpensive device could be provided for persons that are succeptable to muggings that can be set off in the event of an attempted attack and thereby act as a deterent to such muggings. The alarm device should be inexpensive, small, light weight, and portable, so that it can be readily carried in the palm of the hand or fit within a purse. Furthermore, the alarm device must be capable of being set off even in the event of a complete surprise attack.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a new and improved alarm device that is relatively inexpensive, small, light weight and readily portable by hand.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a new and improved alarm device that is capable of being set off even in the event of a complete surprise attack and in cases therein the victim is virtually incapacitated.

It is also an object to this invention to provide a new and improved alarm device that is capable of being immediately set off in the event of an attack to provide a continuous alarm signal which can not be stopped without destroying the alarm device.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a new and improved alarm device that can be preset so that the mere release thereof will set off the unit.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a new and improved alarm device that is physically small so that it can be carried wihtin the palm of the hand, that will be set off by merely releasing the alarm device, and that has a shape that allows the alarm device to roll away from the victim and out of the reach of the attacker in the event the alarm is dropped.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES FIG. 1 is a side view of a first embodiment of the alarm device of the invention including a spherical housing.

FIG. 2 is atop viewof FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an illustration of the alarm device of FIG. 1 carried within the palm of a hand and restrained from activation by a finger.

FIG. 4 is an exploded side view of the alarm device of FIG. 1 with the two hemispheres forming the spherical housing separated.

FIG. 5 is an exploded view of the alarm device of FIG. I with the two hemispheres forming the spherical housing separated and rotated to show an inside view of the alarm device.

FIG. 6 is a cut away view of one of the hemispheres showing the alarm device release mechanism.

FIG. 7 is a side view of a pushbutton assembly forming a part of the alarm device release mechanism.

FIG. 8 is a top view of the alarm device of FIG. 1 with the pushbutton removed.

FIG. 9 is a block diagram of the electrical alarm signal generating means included in the first embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 10 is an electrical schematic diagram of a dual oscillator circuit for use in the alarm signal generator of FIG. 9 for generating a modulated alarm signal.

FIG. 11 is a side view of second embodiment of the alarm device of the invention including a cylindrical housing.

FIG. 12 is a cut away side view of the alarm device of FIG. 11 disclosing the alarm device release mechanism and the pneumatic alarm signal generating means.

FIG. 13 is a partial side view of the alarm device of FIG. 11 with the pushbutton removed.

FIG. 14 is an exploded view of a portion of the alarm release mechanism of FIG. 11.

FIG. 15 is a cut away view of the alarm device of FIG. 11 taken along lines AA.

FIG. 16 is a cut away view of the alarm device of FIG. 1] taken along lines B-B.

FIG. 17 is an end view of the alarm device of FIG. ll.

FIG. 18 is an exploded view of the pneumatic signal generating means including a reservoir and an acoustical transducer.

F 1G. 19 is a bottom view of the acoustical transducer of FIG. 18. I

FIG. 20 is a side view of the acoustical transducer of FIG. 18 with a plug and a diaphram removed.

FIG. 21 is a cut away view of the acoustical transducer of FIG. 18 along lines CC with the plug removed.

FIG. 22 is a plane view of a purse including the alarm device of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION A personal security alarm device that can be enclosed within a housing of a size for conveniently carrying within a hand, or can be included within a hand carried purse, or like item. The alarm device includes an alarm signal generating means that is set off by an restrained from activation while in the release position by pressure from a finger. In the event of an attack, the finger is released or the alarm unit is merely dropped and the actuating unit automatically separates from the alarm device setting off the alarm. In the event that no attacks occur, the actuating unit is returned to the locked condition. Hence, as can be seen, the alarm device of the invention can be preset, and in the event of the attack, even a complete surprise attack, the preset alarm can be set off by the mere movement of a finger or by dropping the device, which can be a result of automatic reflex or involuntary action.

If the alarm device is to be carried in the palm of the hand, the housing of the alarm device can have at lease one dimension having a generally circular configuration, such as for example a spherical or sylindrical shape, so that when the alarm device is dropped, or thrown, it can roll away from the person being attacked putting the alarm device away from the convenient reach of the attacker. The attacker is therefor faced with ignoring the alarm, or releasing the victim to silence the alarm. In any event, an alarm signal will be generated even if the victim can not cry out for help.

In a first embodiment of the invention, the alarm signal generating means comprises an oscillator circuit, a battery and a speaker. The alarm actuation means includes a switch including a first position for disabling the alarm signal generating means and resilient means for switching the switch to a second position for operating the signal generating means. The actuating unit, when in the lock position, maintains the switch in the first position and when in the release position enables the switch under the force of the resilient means toswitch to the second position.

In a second embodiment of the invention, the signal generating means comprises a reservoir of pressurized gas having a valve for the release of pressurized gas therefrom, and a transducer that is responsive to pressurized gas flow therethrough to produce an alarm signal. The alarm actuation means, under the control of the actuation unit, operates the valve so that the transducer produces the alarm signal. The valve can be of the type that engages the transducer and is responsive to a force therefrom to open the valve. In such an arrangement the alarm actuation means, .when actuated by the actuating unit, forces the transducer against the valve to actuate the alarm signal generating means.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION In accordance with a first embodiment of theinvention illustrated in FIGS. 1-10, the personal security or alarm device includes a spherical hollow shaped housing 10. The housing is of a size that can conveniently be carried within the palm of a hand (as illustrated in FIG. 3), having a diameter in the order of three inches.

form the sphere by any convenient means such as for example a ring 18 (FIGS. 4 and 5) that fits within the hemispheres l4 and 16 that is secured thereto by a plurality of fastening devices such as the screws 20. Extending from within the hemisphere 14 is an activation unit or pushbutton 22 that forms a portion of the alarm release mechanism.

As illustrated by the exploded views of FIG. 4 and 5, the first embodiment of the alarm device includes an electrical sound generating means having a battery 24 and a normally closed spring actuated switch 26 within the hemisphere 14, and an oscillator and a speaker combination 30 within the hemisphere 16. The battery and the oscillator and the speaker can be conveniently mounted within the hemispheres 14 and 16, respectively, by putty or cement or a bracket (not shown). Preferably, the battery and oscillator-speaker combination 30 should be mounted in a foam rubber type of material to absorb shock. The switch 26 is mounted in place by a bracket 28 secured to the hemisphere 14. The oscillator-speaker combination 30 is connected to the switch 26 and the battery 24 via the wires 32 and 34 in a manner as illustrated by the schematic diagram of FIG. 9. The oscillator 50 and speaker 52 can be a commercially available unit for producing a single frequency alarm signal, or can have the double oscillator configuration of FIG. 10 to produce a modulated alarm signal.

As illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7, the alarm activation unit or pushbutton 22 includes a circular cap 36 and a elongated rod 38 extending therefrom and that has a substantially smaller diagram than the cap 36. A pin 40 extends through and beyond the rod 38 near the end opposite the cap 36. Resilient means, such a coil spring 42, is attached to one end of the rdd 38. The pushbutton '22 is positioned in the hemisphere 14 by inserting the spring 42 and the rod 38 through an opening 44 with the ends of the pin 40 aligned with the keyways 46. After the pushbutton 22 is so inserted, it is rotated approximately ninety degrees so that the ends of the pin 40 engage the inner surface of the hemisphere 14 and prevent the pushbutton 22 from releasing, defining a first or locked position of the pushbutton. If desired, a groove can be formed within the hemisphere 14 to further capture the ends of the pin 40. When the pushbutton 22 is inserted into the hemisphere 14 as illustrated in FIG. 6, the spring 42 engages the plunger 48 of the switch 26 to operate the switch 26 and disconnect the oscillator 50 from the battery 24.

As long as the pushbutton 22 is in the off or locked condition (the pin 40 is not aligned with the keyways 46), the switch 26 remains open and the alarm device is deactivated. Prior to entering a potentially dangerous area, or to going out at night, the user will rotate the pushbutton 22 so that the pin 40 is aligned with the keyway 46 with a finger as illustrated in FIG. 3 while simultaneously maintaining the pushbutton 22 depressed (defined as a second or release position of the pushbutton). In this release position the pushbutton 22 is preset for actuating the alarm device. The alarm device is now carried in the palm of the hand with one finger continuously depressing the pushbutton 22. Should the person be attacked, he need merely release the pushbutton 22 by dropping the alarm device. The pushbutton 22 under the force of the spring 42 will automatically spring out of the housing 10 allowing the switch 26 to close to set ofi the alarm device. The attacker is now faced with the decision to continue the attack, or to silence the alarm device. The spring 42 should be of sufficient strength to propel the pushbutton 22 (when released) a sufficient distance so that it can not be conveniently picked up and used to shut off the alarm device. Although the pushbutton 22 is illustrated as being coupled with the switch 26 via the spring 42, it should be understood that if the spring mechanism within the switch 26 is sufficiently strong, the switch spring can be used to propel the pushbutton 22 and the spring 42 eliminated. Further, the spherical shape of the housing allows the alarm to roll away when so thrown by the carrier thereby putting the alarm device out of the easy reach of the attacker. The alarm device, when released, immediately produces a continuous distress alarm signal. Others in the vicinity can respond to the alarm signals by quickly summoning the police. Furthermore, the alarm signal may be a sufficient distraction to the attacker to allow the victim to defend himself, escape, or even cause an abandonment of the attack.

It is desireable that the alarm device generates a distinct sound that can be associated with a distress condition. Such a distress signal can be generated by the use of a dual oscillator circuit such as that illustrated in FIG. 10. The first oscillator circuit includes the transistors 54 and 56, an acoustical transducer 58, resistors 60, 62, and 64, and a capacitor 66. The first oscillator circuit also shares a resistor 68 and a capacitor 70 with the second oscillator circuit, which includes the transistors 72 and 74, resistors 76, 78, 80 and 81 and a capacitor 82. The resistive and the capacitive components in the first and second oscillator circuits are selected so that the first oscillator circuit generates a high frequency audio carrier signal and the second oscillator circuit generates a lower frequency switching signal. The second signal modulates the first signal because the two oscillator circuits share the common emitter resistor 68. The capacitor 70 provides a low impedance path for the first (higher frequency) signal. The transistor 56 drives the acoustical transducer 58, which can be, for example, a small loudspeaker of the type used in small portable transistor radios. A loud modulated sound is generated by the oscillator circuits that has a characteristic intermittent nature designed to attract attention.

In accordance with a second embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 11-21, the alarm signal generating means includes an aerosol container 70 and a pneumatic acoustical transducer 72. The container 70 and the transducer 72 are commercially available devices. The container 70 includes a valve 74 that extends out from the container that when depressed, releases pressurized gas from the container through the valve 74. The transducer 72 fits over the end of the container 70 so that the valve 74 fits into a groove 80 (FIGS. 19-21). When the transducer 72 and container 70 are forced together, the top end of the groove 80 engages the valve 74 and depresses the valve thereby causing high velocity gas from the container 70 to flow into the two ring cavities 82 and 84 in the transducer. The cavities 82 and 84 are covered by a thin sheet of metal, or diaphram 86, which is held in place by a plug 7 The container and the transducer 72 are illustrated in FIGS. ll-l7 as contained within a cylindrical housing 92. As in the case of the spherical housing of FIGS. l-10, the size of the cylindrical housing 92 is such that it can be conveniently carried within the palm of the hand, such as for example being approximately 2 inches in diameter. The housing 92 should also be of sufficient strength to resist destruction by stomping by foot. The housing 92 includes a plurality of openings 94 throughout its circumference, or if greater strength is desired, only in the location of the transducer 72. The housing 92 can be conveniently sealed after assembly at opposite ends by the end plates 96 and 98 fastened to the housing 92 by the screws 100.

An alarm activation unit, such as a pushbutton 102, extends out from the housing and forms a part of the alarm release mechanism. The pushbutton 102 includes a circular cap 104 and a first elongated rod 106 extending therefrom having a substantially smaller diameter than the cap 104. A second elongated rod 108 having a substantially smaller diameter than the first rod 106 extends from the first rod and includes a detent finger 110 at the end thereof. A pin 112 extends through the first rod 106 near the end opposite the cap 104. Resilient means, such as a coil spring 114, fits over the detent finger 110 and the second rod 108 and engages the end of the first rod 106. The pushbutton 102 and the spring 114 are inserted into the housing 92 through an opening 116 (FIG. 13) with the ends of the pin 112 aligned with the keyway 118. The spring 114 is compressed between the end of the rod 113 and a plunger rod 122. After the pushbutton 102 is so inserted, it is rotated to a lock position wherein the ends of the pin 112 engage the inner surface of the housing 92 and prevents the pushbutton 102 from being released under the force of the spring 114.

When the pushbutton 102 is inserted into the housing 92, the detent finger engages a cavity 120 in the rod 122 of the plunger 122. The plunger rod 122 is mounted to fit loosely in a hole 126 extending through a circular wall 128. The wall is secured to the inner cylindrical surface of the housing 92, generally normal to the cylindrical axis and adjacent the hole 116. A portion of the wall 128 is cut away to allow clearance for the pin 112 (as illustrated in FlG. 14) so that the pushbutton 102 can be rotated. A circular piston 130 is attached to the other end of the rod 122 and includes a rim 132 for capuring the free end of the transducer 72. A coil spring 134 is placed between the piston 130 and the wall 128.

When initially assmebling the alarm device of FIGS. 11-21 the spring 134 is placed around the rod 122. The end of the rod 122 is inserted through the opening 126 in the wall 128 and the spring 134 is depressed. The pushbutton 102 and spring 114 are inserted through the keyway 116 so that the detent finger 110 engages the cavity 120 in the rod 122 and the pushbutton 102 is then rotated 90. The detent finger 110 engages the wall 128 and prevents the plunger 124 from moving under the force of the compressed spring 134. The transducer 72 is placed over the container 70 and inserted into the housing 92 so that the end of the transducer 72 fits wihtin the rim 132. The housing 92 is now sealed at opposite ends.

As in the case of the first embodiment of FIGS. l-10, the pushbutton 102 of the second embodiment of FIGS. 11-21 is preset for actuation by rotating the pushbutton 102 until the pin 112 is aligned with the keyways 118 (release position), however maintaining the pushbutton 102 depressed so that the detent finger 110 continues to engage the cavity 120. The alarm device is carried in the palm of the hand with a finger continuously depressing the pushbutton 102. Should an attack occur, the pushbutton 102 need merely be released and the detend finger 110 will automatically spring away from the rod 122 causing the plunger 124, under the resilient force of'the spring 134, to force the transducer 72 against the container 70 and set off the alarm device to produce a shrill shreek. The alarm device will continue to provide the alarm signal until either the container 70 is emptied or the alarm device is destroyed. As in the case of the spherical alarm device, the cylindrical shaped alarm is also capable of rolling away when released or thrown.

Although the alarm device of the invention has been described in the contex of a spherical or cylindrical unit that can be carried within the palm of the hand, the alarm device of the invention can also be used in a variety of other ways, such as for example being built within a purse 170 as illustrated in FIG. 22. The transducer of the alarm device can be mounted within the purse adjacent the holes 172. In the case of an alarm device including the electrical signal generating means of FIGS. 1-10, two pushbuttons 174 and 176, or a single pushbutton can be used. One pushbutton 176 is located in the purse handle 178, and the other pushbutton 174 is located in the body of the purse 170. In the case of the alarm device including the pneumatic signal generating means, a single pushbutton 174 is used. The pushbutton 174 and 176 can be preset to the release position as previously described above and held in place by a finger as the purse 170 is carried. In the event of a purse snatch, the preset pushbutton will be released and the alarm will automatically go off. The robber, as a result, will run off with a screaming purse, which will force the robber to immediately stop and empty the purse, empty the purse in flight, or simply get rid of the purse. In any event, the noise of the alarm will produce an embarrassing situation for the purse snatcher, perhaps to the point of foiling the robbery attempt. Quite often a purse snatcher will cut through the purse strap in an attempt to snatch a purse. In such a case two sets of wires can be provided from the switch 176 (a complete circuit through each half of the strap) so that shen one half of the strap is cut, the alarm circuit can be completed through the other half of the strap.

Hence, in accordance to the invention, when a person leaves work at night or enters a dangerous area, the person need merely preset the pushbutton in the alarm device to the release position. The alarm device is set off by merely releasing the pushbutton. If the person reached a safe location, the pushbutton is returned to the deactivated of lock position and the alarm device can be stored until needed at a later date. In the event of an attack, the alarm device is easily set off. The alarm device will continue to produce distress signals until destroyed, or the aerosol container emptied, or the battery discharged. In any event, the distress signals will distract the attacker even to the point of attempting to destroy the device. The distraction may allow the victim the opportunity to escape or to protect himself. The attacker is forced with the decision to continue the mugging during the distress signals or to abandon the attack. The distress signals will attract attention of others so that help can be much more quickly summoned, and even perhaps resulting in the capture of the mugger. In the case of the purse snatcher, the alarm signal will draw attention to the robber as he attempts to flee with the purse. Rather than facing the possibility of capture, the purse snatcher may abandon the robbery. In any event, the alarm device of the invention provides an arrangement for summoning help even in the case of a complete surprise attack.

What is claimed is: 1. An alarm device comprising: a housing; alarm signal generating means mounted within the said housing, and alarm actuation means contained within the said housing coupled to said signal generating means to control the operation thereof, said alarm actuation means includes a detachable actuating unit extending from said housing for the manual operation thereof and includes means for receiving said actuating unit providing a lock position for capturing said actuation unit and preventing the operation of said signal generating means and providing a release position wherein said actuating unit, if unrestricted by manual force, is adapted to spring away to separate from said housing causing said actuation means to operate the signal generating means.

2. An alarm device in claim 1 wherein:

at least one dimension of said housing is of a generally circular configuration so the housing can be rolled, said housing is formed with a plurality apertures extending through the housing for the transmission of the alarm signal, and the size of the housing being such that it can be carried within the palm of the hand.

3. An alarm device as defined in claim 2 wherein:

said housing has a generally spherical shape.

4. An alarm device as defined in claim 2 wherein:

said housing has a generally cylindrical shape.

5.'An alarm device as defined in claim 1 wherein:

said signal generating means includes a oscillator circuit, a speaker and a battery, and

said alarm actuation means includes a spring operated switch coupled for operation by said actuating unit, when released, for enabling said signal generating means.

6. An alarm device as defined in claim 5 wherein:

said receiving means includes a portion of the housing formed with an aperture including a keyway, and

at least a portion of the actuating unit has the general shape of the keyway so that the actuating unit can be inserted through the keyway into the release positionand then roated beyond the keyway to the lock position.

' 7. An alarm device as defined in claim 6 including:

resilient means in said alarm actuation means for resiliently urging said actuating unit out from said housing.

8. An alarm device as defined in claim 1 wherein:

said signal generating means includes a reservoir of compressed gas, a valve for releasing pressurized gas from the reservoir, and a transducer positioned to receive gas flow from said valve and is responsive to the flow of gas therethrough to produce an alarm signal, and

said alarm actuation means operates the valve to release pressurized gas fiow through the transducer.

9. An alarm device as defined in claim 8 wherein:

said valve is opened by depressing the valve into the reservoir;

said transducer positioned adjacent said valve, and

said alarm actuation means, when operated, forces the transducer against the valve so that the valve is opened to produce pressurized gas flow through said transducer.

10. An alarm device as defined in claim 9 wherein:

said alarm actuation means includes resilient means for forcing the transducer against the valve; and

said actuating unit, when released, causes said resilient means to force the transducer against the valve.

11. An alarm device as defined in claim 10 wherein:

said receiving means includes a portion of the housing formed with an aperature including a keyway, and

at least a portion of the actuating unit has the general shape of the keyway so that the actuating unit can be inserted through the keyway into the release position and then rotated beyond the keyway to the lock position.

12. An alarm device comprising:

a hollow housing having at least one dimension having a generally circular shape so that the housing can be rolled, the housing being formed with a plurality of aperatures and the size of the housing being such that it can be conveniently carried within a hand;

signal generating means mounted within said housing including an oscillator, a speaker and a battery;

a switch connected to said signal generating means having a first position for inhibiting the signal generating means from operating and resilient means for switching the switch to a second position for causing the signal generating means to produce an alarm signal, and

switch actuation means, including a detachable actuating unit extending through an aperature formed in the housing for the manual operation of the switch actuation means andengaging said switch overcoming said resilient means to switch said switch to the first position, and including means for providing a lock position for said actuating unit for preventing the operation of the signal generating means and a release position wherein the actuating unit, if unrestricted by manual force, springs away to separate from said housing thereby causing said actuation means to continuously operate said signal generating means.

13. An alarm device as defined in claim 12 wherein:

said aperature receiving te actuating unit includes a keyway, and

a portion of the actuating unit has the general shape of the keyway so that when the actuating unit is inserted into the keyway and is aligned with the keyway the actuating unit is in the release position and when the actuating unit is thereafter rotated beyond the keyway, the actuating unit is in the lock position.

14. An alarm device as defined in claim 13 including:

additional resilient means coupled to said actuating unit so that when the actuating unit is inserted into the aperature including the keyway, the addition resilient means provides a force for urging said actuating unit out from said housing.

15. An alarm device comprising:

a hollow housing having at least one dimension having a generally circular shape so that the housing can be rolled, the housing being formed with a plurality of aperatures, and the size of the housing being such that it can be conveniently carried within a hand;

signal generating means mounted within said housing including a reservoir or pressurized gas, a valve for releasing gas from the reservoir, and a transducer responsive to gas flow from said valve and through the transducer to produce an alarm signal, and

alarm actuating means contained within the housing for controlling the operation of said valve, including a detachable actuating unit extending from said housing for manual operation of the alarm ectuation means, resilient means, and receiving means for providing a lock position for said actuating unit for preventing the operation of said signal generating means and providing a release position wherein the actuating unit, if unrestricted by manual force, springs away under the force of said resilient means to separate from said housing causing said actuation means to continuously operate the signal generating means.

16. An alarm device as defined in claim 15 wherein:

said valve is opened by depressing the valve into the reservoir;

said transducer positioned adjacent said valve, and

said alarm actuation means, when operated, forces the transducer against the valve so that the valve is opened to force pressurized gas through the transducer.

17. An alarm device as defined in claim 16 wherein:

said alarm actuation means includes additional resilient means for forcing the transducer against the valve when the alarm actuation means is operated.

18. An alarm device as defined in claim 17 wherein:

said receiving means includes a portion of the housing formed with an aperature including a keyway, and

at least a portion of the actuating unit has the general shape of the keyway so that when the actuating unit is inserted through the keyway and aligned with the keyway the actuating unit is in the release position and when the actuating unit is thereafter rotated beyond the keyway the actuating unit is in the lock position.

Claims (18)

1. An alarm device comprising: a housing; alarm signal generating means mounted within the said housing, and alarm actuation means contained within the said housing coupled to said signal generating means to control the operation thereof, said alarm actuation means includes a detachable actuating unit extending from said housing for the manual operation thereof and includes means for receiving said actuating unit providing a lock position for capturing said actuation unit and preventing the operation of said signal generating means and providing a release position wherein said actuating unit, if unrestricted by manual force, is adapted to spring away to separate from said housing causing said actuation means to operate the signal generating means.
2. An alarm device in claim 1 wherein: at least one dimension of said housing is of a generally circular configuration so the housing can be rolled, said housing is formed with a plurality apertures extending through the housing for the transmission of the alarm signal, and the size of the housing being such that it can be carried within the palm of the hand.
3. An alarm device as defined in claim 2 wherein: said housing has a generally spherical shape.
4. An alarm device as defined in claim 2 wherein: said housing has a generally cylindrical shape.
5. An alarm device as defined in claim 1 wherein: said signal generating means includes a oscillator circuit, a speaker and a battery, and said alarm actuation means includes a spring operated switch coupled for operation by said actuating unit, when released, for enabling said signal generating means.
6. An alarm device as defined in claim 5 wherein: said receiving means includes a portion of the housing formed with an aperture including a keyway, and at least a portion of the actuating unit has the general shape of the keyway so that the actuating unit can be inserted through the keyway into the release position and then roated beyond the keyway to the lock position.
7. An alarm device as defined in claim 6 including: resilient means in said alarm actuation means for resiliently urging said actuating unit out from said housing.
8. An alarm device as defined in claim 1 wherein: said signal generating means includes a reservoir of compressed gas, a valve for releasing pressurized gas from the reservoir, and a transducer positioned to receive gas flow from said valve and is responsive to the flow of gas therethrough to produce an alarm signal, and said alarm actuation means operates the valve to release pressurized gas flow through the trAnsducer.
9. An alarm device as defined in claim 8 wherein: said valve is opened by depressing the valve into the reservoir; said transducer positioned adjacent said valve, and said alarm actuation means, when operated, forces the transducer against the valve so that the valve is opened to produce pressurized gas flow through said transducer.
10. An alarm device as defined in claim 9 wherein: said alarm actuation means includes resilient means for forcing the transducer against the valve; and said actuating unit, when released, causes said resilient means to force the transducer against the valve.
11. An alarm device as defined in claim 10 wherein: said receiving means includes a portion of the housing formed with an aperature including a keyway, and at least a portion of the actuating unit has the general shape of the keyway so that the actuating unit can be inserted through the keyway into the release position and then rotated beyond the keyway to the lock position.
12. An alarm device comprising: a hollow housing having at least one dimension having a generally circular shape so that the housing can be rolled, the housing being formed with a plurality of aperatures and the size of the housing being such that it can be conveniently carried within a hand; signal generating means mounted within said housing including an oscillator, a speaker and a battery; a switch connected to said signal generating means having a first position for inhibiting the signal generating means from operating and resilient means for switching the switch to a second position for causing the signal generating means to produce an alarm signal, and switch actuation means, including a detachable actuating unit extending through an aperature formed in the housing for the manual operation of the switch actuation means and engaging said switch overcoming said resilient means to switch said switch to the first position, and including means for providing a lock position for said actuating unit for preventing the operation of the signal generating means and a release position wherein the actuating unit, if unrestricted by manual force, springs away to separate from said housing thereby causing said actuation means to continuously operate said signal generating means.
13. An alarm device as defined in claim 12 wherein: said aperature receiving te actuating unit includes a keyway, and a portion of the actuating unit has the general shape of the keyway so that when the actuating unit is inserted into the keyway and is aligned with the keyway the actuating unit is in the release position and when the actuating unit is thereafter rotated beyond the keyway, the actuating unit is in the lock position.
14. An alarm device as defined in claim 13 including: additional resilient means coupled to said actuating unit so that when the actuating unit is inserted into the aperature including the keyway, the addition resilient means provides a force for urging said actuating unit out from said housing.
15. An alarm device comprising: a hollow housing having at least one dimension having a generally circular shape so that the housing can be rolled, the housing being formed with a plurality of aperatures, and the size of the housing being such that it can be conveniently carried within a hand; signal generating means mounted within said housing including a reservoir or pressurized gas, a valve for releasing gas from the reservoir, and a transducer responsive to gas flow from said valve and through the transducer to produce an alarm signal, and alarm actuating means contained within the housing for controlling the operation of said valve, including a detachable actuating unit extending from said housing for manual operation of the alarm ectuation means, resilient means, and receiving means for providing a lock position for said actuating unit for preventing the operation of said signal generating means and providing a releaSe position wherein the actuating unit, if unrestricted by manual force, springs away under the force of said resilient means to separate from said housing causing said actuation means to continuously operate the signal generating means.
16. An alarm device as defined in claim 15 wherein: said valve is opened by depressing the valve into the reservoir; said transducer positioned adjacent said valve, and said alarm actuation means, when operated, forces the transducer against the valve so that the valve is opened to force pressurized gas through the transducer.
17. An alarm device as defined in claim 16 wherein: said alarm actuation means includes additional resilient means for forcing the transducer against the valve when the alarm actuation means is operated.
18. An alarm device as defined in claim 17 wherein: said receiving means includes a portion of the housing formed with an aperature including a keyway, and at least a portion of the actuating unit has the general shape of the keyway so that when the actuating unit is inserted through the keyway and aligned with the keyway the actuating unit is in the release position and when the actuating unit is thereafter rotated beyond the keyway the actuating unit is in the lock position.
US3832705A 1973-06-14 1973-06-14 Alarm device Expired - Lifetime US3832705A (en)

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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE3008530A1 (en) * 1980-03-06 1981-09-17 Sen Thomas Maerz Emergency electrically motor driven alarm siren - can be fastened to belt and when actuated cannot be turned off without special tools
WO1984000428A1 (en) * 1982-07-19 1984-02-02 Hubert Matthew Du Vallon Lohan Improvements in security warning devices
US4520351A (en) * 1982-03-08 1985-05-28 Sidney Altman Passive personal alarm device
US4633232A (en) * 1984-03-30 1986-12-30 Frederic P. Nelson Alarm device
WO1987006294A1 (en) * 1986-04-15 1987-10-22 Nelson Frederic P Alarm device
US4837559A (en) * 1987-12-10 1989-06-06 Green Sr James G Personal security device
GB2265236A (en) * 1992-03-20 1993-09-22 Janet Elizabeth Wragg Personal protection device
GB2279787A (en) * 1993-07-10 1995-01-11 Michael John Stock Personal alarm
WO1997006628A1 (en) * 1995-08-03 1997-02-20 Siemens Nederland N.V. Personal alarm system
US20040066299A1 (en) * 2002-10-02 2004-04-08 Hanabusa Russell Minoru Attack deterrent and attacker identification system
GB2404764A (en) * 2003-08-08 2005-02-09 John Alfred Worthington Spontaneously activated personal alarm/deterrent
US20110132929A1 (en) * 2009-12-07 2011-06-09 Ron Bennett Self Defense Device
US20150310710A1 (en) * 2014-04-23 2015-10-29 Markus Oliver HUMMEL Personal Safety and Security Light
DE202017000518U1 (en) * 2017-01-20 2018-04-24 Rudolf King Functioning or malfunctioning switch or a switch similar design to the siren of a mPERS, giving the impression, through pressure on the sound is switched off, the attacker vain prompting to press the switch, and thus information about the attacker leaving behind

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2277866A (en) * 1941-08-30 1942-03-31 Sage Aaron D Le Hand operated electric light signal device
US2893344A (en) * 1956-10-19 1959-07-07 Milton M Meyers Combination horn and flashlight
US2927311A (en) * 1957-12-10 1960-03-01 Security Products Mfg Company Portable containers provided with theft alarm devices
US3631271A (en) * 1969-11-27 1971-12-28 Tatsuji Shimada Burglar alarm switch
US3701140A (en) * 1971-03-05 1972-10-24 Richard W Dixon Purse theft alarm

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2277866A (en) * 1941-08-30 1942-03-31 Sage Aaron D Le Hand operated electric light signal device
US2893344A (en) * 1956-10-19 1959-07-07 Milton M Meyers Combination horn and flashlight
US2927311A (en) * 1957-12-10 1960-03-01 Security Products Mfg Company Portable containers provided with theft alarm devices
US3631271A (en) * 1969-11-27 1971-12-28 Tatsuji Shimada Burglar alarm switch
US3701140A (en) * 1971-03-05 1972-10-24 Richard W Dixon Purse theft alarm

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE3008530A1 (en) * 1980-03-06 1981-09-17 Sen Thomas Maerz Emergency electrically motor driven alarm siren - can be fastened to belt and when actuated cannot be turned off without special tools
US4520351A (en) * 1982-03-08 1985-05-28 Sidney Altman Passive personal alarm device
WO1984000428A1 (en) * 1982-07-19 1984-02-02 Hubert Matthew Du Vallon Lohan Improvements in security warning devices
US4633232A (en) * 1984-03-30 1986-12-30 Frederic P. Nelson Alarm device
WO1987006294A1 (en) * 1986-04-15 1987-10-22 Nelson Frederic P Alarm device
US4837559A (en) * 1987-12-10 1989-06-06 Green Sr James G Personal security device
GB2265236A (en) * 1992-03-20 1993-09-22 Janet Elizabeth Wragg Personal protection device
GB2279787A (en) * 1993-07-10 1995-01-11 Michael John Stock Personal alarm
WO1997006628A1 (en) * 1995-08-03 1997-02-20 Siemens Nederland N.V. Personal alarm system
US20040066299A1 (en) * 2002-10-02 2004-04-08 Hanabusa Russell Minoru Attack deterrent and attacker identification system
GB2404764A (en) * 2003-08-08 2005-02-09 John Alfred Worthington Spontaneously activated personal alarm/deterrent
US20110132929A1 (en) * 2009-12-07 2011-06-09 Ron Bennett Self Defense Device
US8499974B2 (en) * 2009-12-07 2013-08-06 Ron Bennett Automatic light switch on a self defense device
US20150310710A1 (en) * 2014-04-23 2015-10-29 Markus Oliver HUMMEL Personal Safety and Security Light
US9542817B2 (en) * 2014-04-23 2017-01-10 Markus Oliver HUMMEL Personal safety and security light
DE202017000518U1 (en) * 2017-01-20 2018-04-24 Rudolf King Functioning or malfunctioning switch or a switch similar design to the siren of a mPERS, giving the impression, through pressure on the sound is switched off, the attacker vain prompting to press the switch, and thus information about the attacker leaving behind

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