US3827386A - Means for lowering the mast on sailboats - Google Patents

Means for lowering the mast on sailboats Download PDF

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US3827386A
US3827386A US37755073A US3827386A US 3827386 A US3827386 A US 3827386A US 37755073 A US37755073 A US 37755073A US 3827386 A US3827386 A US 3827386A
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mast
vertical
sailboat
means
lower end
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C Faden
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C Faden
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B15/00Superstructures, deckhouses, wheelhouses or the like; Arrangements or adaptations of masts or spars, e.g. bowsprits
    • B63B15/02Staying of masts or of other superstructures

Abstract

This invention provides means for lowering the mast on a sailboat without requiring any adjustment or release of the shrouds, stays or sails. The invention comprises vertical support means pivotally secured at one end to the hull of the sailboat, the second end being pivotally secured to an intermediate position on a mast, the lower end of the mast being pivotally and slidably secured to the hull of the sailboat.

Description

MEANS FOR LOWERING THE MAST ON SAILBOATS Aug. 6, 1974 l,375,40()' 4/192] Ljungstrom Il4/9I Primary Examiner-Trygve M. Blix IH H I [76] lnvmorz E x Bay Memck Attorney, Agent, or FirmLilling & Siege] PP 377,550 This invention provides means for lowering the must on a sailboat without requiring any adjustment or re- [52] US. Cl. 114/91 lease of the Shrouds stays of sails- The [51] Int. Cl B63b 15/00 prises vertical Support means Pivotally secured at one [58] Field of Search 114/39 90 91 end to the hull of the Sailboat, the Second being pivotally secured to an intermediate position on a 56 R f d mast, the lower end of the mast belng pivotally and UNITE]; g g 2:3 QZ slidably secured to the hull of the sailboat 477,477 6/1892 Uhlig 114 91 9 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures a Q23 Ant-30 o 46 1 I j i l| 3 MEANS FOR LOWERING THE MAST ON SAILBOATS A problem which has for many years faced the sailing enthusiast has been the relatively great height of the sail mast on even the smallest sailboats and the often relatively low vertical clearance which is available when passing under the ubiquitous bridges crossing the many inland waterways where recreational sailors prefer to sail. Such inland waterways include rivers, harbors, bays and sounds, as well as the many lakes available to both commerical and sport sailors.

Even the smallest of the sailing boats, the oneor two-man recreational boats, have masts which are at least about 12 feet high. Many of the highway bridges that criss-cross the inland waterways of the nations of the world often provide clearances of less than that and, therefore, require the sailor, in order to pass under the bridge, to demount his mast and sail under the bridge using power other than the wind.

This can be an onerous task, involving dropping the sail, releasing the guy wires and stays which support the mast, laterally and longitudinally, and then resetting the sails, guys and stays after having passed under the bridge. The removal of these stays and guy wires can be extremely hazardous both to limb and property, as in even the slightest swell it is quite possible for the mast to be knocked overboard and thus lost.

Many persons have attempted to devise quick release mechanisms to permit easy demounting of the mast from its hull support and then subsequent easy remounting back onto the hull support. In one early such device, the mast is pivoted about an intermediate point along its length, being pivotally connected to a vertical support member. The lower end of the mast is attached to a winch line which can be locked, and which permits lowering the mast to any desired level, providing the sails are dropped and stays are released. (See US. Pat. No. 477,471 to Uhlig; also see US. Pat. No. 457,323).

Another tack suggested, involves the use of a lateentype rig, i.e., of the Arab type, which omits the use of a mast, utilizing a sailyard only. This permits, according to the inventor, lowering of the complete rigging. The sailyard is pivoted, utilizing an elbowed joint connected to the forward, or bow, portion of the sailing boat. Such a device is of limited effect in that a mast cannot be used. (See De Monfreid, US. Pat. No. 3,272,167.)

The present invention provides means for lowering the mast of a sailing vessel to any position so as to reduce the total vertical height of the sailing vessel without requiring any adjustment to either the stays or the shrouds supporting the mast. This invention further permits a lowering of the mast to an angle below the vertical without requiring any adjustment to the sails attached to the mast, e.g., the main and jib sails on a sloop.

The present invention provides an improved, combined triple pivot means and mounting support for the mast of sailboats of a type which permits the lowering of the mast either during storage, or docking, or to reduce clearance while under way. This improved means is characterized by a unique triple pivoting action which permits the lowering of the mast without removing or loosening the stays and shrouds or even removing the sails when lowering is accomplished to as much as a 45 angle below the vertical. Generally, this improved means comprises a vertical support designed and adapted .to be pivotally secured to the sailboat at one end and pivotally secured to the mast at a second end; the. mast is pivotally secured to the vertical support at an intermediate location along the mast, generally below the mid-point of the mast and preferably not greater than about one-third of the way up the mast. The lower end of the mast includes means designed and adapted to be slidably and pivotally secured to the sailboat.

There is also preferably provided means attached to the sailboat for supporting the full weight of the mast when the mast is in the vertical operating position; preferably the vertical support member is so connected to the mast as to be in the vertical position when the mast is in the vertical position, thus serving to provide further lateral support for the mast at its lower end. Drive means are preferably provided to pivot the mast between its vertical and its non-vertical, or inclined, positions. Preferably such drive means act upon the lower portion of the mast so as to pull the mast from an inclined position into a vertical position. Locking means arealso preferably provided for locking the mast into the vertical position.

This invention is applicable to both open cockpit sailboats, i.e. where the mast is connected directly into the hull portion of the sailboat, and to enclosed cockpit, or cabintype, sailboats, wherein the mast is directly attached to the top of the cabin.

In the most preferred embodiment of this invention, a mast step means is provided for preventing movement of the mast to beyond the vertical position in one longitudinal direction and said mast stop means comprises an upper surface, preferably inclined; the bottom of the mast comprises a surface tapered in a complementary fashion, such that the bottom of the mast moves up onto the upper surface of the mast step means and is thus supported by the mast step when it is in the vertical position. Also, preferably, the mast is rigidly supported by the vertical support member from lateral and longitudinal stresses, from its lower end up to and including the intermediate portion, which is pivotally connected to the vertical support means.

Generally, the mainmast of most sailboats now being used, e.g. the Marconi-rigged sloop, places the mast towards the forward end of the vessel; therefore, it is preferred when the mast is lowered, that the lower end of the mast be permitted to move in a forwardly direction, i.e. towards the bow of the vessel, and the top of the mast thus pivots rearwardly, or towards the stern of the vessel.

The lower end of the mast is preferably slidably secured onto guide or track means connected to the hull of the vessel, either directly to the floor, or the inner surface of the hull or, in the case of a cabin sailboat, to the top surface of the cabin roof. The track means and the slide means connected to the lower end of the mast should be so interengaged as to permit the lower portion of the mast to slide longitudinally in a fore-and-aft direction, along the longitudinal axis of the sailboat, but to prevent lateral or vertical movement and thus retain the lower end of the mast in direct engagement with the hull. Such track means can be horizontal or inclined, depending upon the surface of the hull or the cabin top to which it is connected.

The slide means connected to the lower end of the mast can include roller means or simple flat slide surfaces which are designed and adapted to interactwith the track means connected to the hull of the boat so as to permit the lower portion of the mast to slide longitudinally forwardly as the mast moves from the vertical position and longitudinally aft as the mast moves towards the vertical position but to maintain the contact of the slide means with the track means against the torque exerted by the masts weight, tending to move the lower end of the mast upwardly, away from the boat and similarly also to prevent any substantial lateral movement of the lower end of the mast.

In an alternative embodiment of the present invention, which is especially useful for smaller vessels where the mast and sail are of relatively low weight, the mast stop need not support the full weight of the mast when it is in the vertical position, the weight of the mast can be supported by the pivot means.

Further advantages and aspects of this invention will be more readily ascertainable by a close examination of the specific embodiments of this invention shown in the drawings enclosed herewith.

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a sailboat embodying the collapsible mast means of the present invention, showing the mast in the vertical position;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation view of a sailboat embodying the collapsible mast means of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged section taken along lines 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged section taken along lines 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged section taken along lines 55 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged section of one end of the tracking means;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary exploded view in perspective of the pivoted portion of the mast in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation view of another embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 9 is an enlarged section view taken-along lines 9-9 of FIG. 8; and

FIG. 10 is an enlarged section view taken along lines l0l0 of FIG. 9.

Referring to FIGS. 1 through 7, there is illustrated a sailboat 10, comprising a hull portion 12 and a cabin roof 14, upon which is supported a mast 16. In the vertical position shown by the solid lines in FIGS. 2 and 4, and in FIG. 5, the mast l6 rests upon the top surface of mast step which is secured to the cabin roof 14 by threaded screws 19 (see FIG. 5). The vertical support member 30, comprises two full-length side plates 30a and 30b and a third partial back plate 30c, and is pivotally secured at its lower end to the mast step 20 via pins 21, and pivotally secured at its upper end to an intermediate portion of the mast 16 via pin 23.

Check pieces are clamped against the curved sides of mast 16 between the vertical sides a and 30b of vertical support member 30 and held in place by threaded bolt 23. The interior faces 125 of the cheek pieces 25 are formed in a concave curve complementary to the convex curve of the side of mast 16. External surfaces 126 of the cheek pieces 25 are formed substantially flat so as to fit tightly against bearing material 27 forming the interior upper surface of the vertical support member 30. Bearing material 27 is wedged in place at the upper ends of the vertical support member 30, held between the turned in edges 30d of the vertical sides 30a and 30b and having flat surfaces in direct contact with the outer surfaces 126 of the cheek pieces 25. Thus the flat complementary surfaces 126 and 27 form a contact zone which permits pivoting the mast 16 about pin 23 with a minimum of friction but with a maximum of lateral support.

Bearing material 29 is also wedged into position at the lower ends of the vertical members 30a and 30b so as to reduce the friction and increase surface contact between the vertical support member 30 and the mast step member 20, thus further improving lateral support while reducing friction as the mast pivots.

The top surface of mast step 20 is inclined upwardly from the horizontal and includes triangular wedges 20a which form a generally crotch-shaped opening therebetween which substantially dovetails with the rear edge of mast 16, such that the mast 16 fits snugly between the inner edges of wedges 20a when the mast 16 is in the vertical position, thus serving as a stop to locate the mast in its vertical position. The lower surface 16a of the mast 16 is also formed at an angle which is not perpendicular to the vertical axis of the mast and which is complementary to the incline of the upper surface of the mast step 20, so as to permit the mast to ride up along mast step 20 and rest thereupon when in its vertical position. To accommodate this slight vertical rise of the mast, the hole for pin 23 in the vertical support 30 or in the mast 16 can be slightly elongated in a vertical direction. Winch 31 is secured to the rear side 300 of the vertical support member 30 and a winch line 31a, secured to the winch at one end, passes around the roller 32, rotatably secured to the lower portion of the vertical support member 30, and is connected at its second end to the rearward edge of the lower end of the mast 16, at eye 17. The threaded bolt 34 is connected via block 34a to the rearward edge of the mast l6 and is so placed so that when the mast is in the vertical position, the threaded end of bolt 34 extends through a complementary opening in rear face 300 of the vertical support 30, so that it can be locked into position by tightening wing nut 35.

Attached to the lower rearward edge of the mast 16 and extending there below, are rollers 40 attached to the mast via block 39 and pins 41. Track means 46 extends from and is engaged against the forward end of mast step 20 and extends from the mast step 20 approximately to the bow of the boat. The track means 46 is connected to the roof cabin top 14 by threaded screws 47 at the bow. Track means 46 comprises an enclosed channel of a size suitable to retain the rollers 40, the interior channel of the track 46 being aligned with substantially contiguous with a hollow chamber within mast step 20. The rollers 40 can pass from a position within mast step 20 longitudinally outwardly along the track 46. The inwardly extending upper portions 47 and 48 of the track 46 prevent the rollers 40 from pulling out from the track and thus serve to direct the rollers in the desired direction. The track means 46 preferably includes a forward stop means 50 at the forward, or bow, end of the track.

In operation, when the boat is under way, the mast, with or without sail, is in the upright operating position shown by the solid lines of FIGS. 1 and 2. When a low clearance or obstruction appears, eg a low-bridge, under which the boat cannot pass with the mast 16 in its operating position, retaining bolt 34 is released by removing wing nut 35 from bolt 34 and permitting the mast 16 to slide down the inclined upper surface 20a of the mast step 20; the rollers move along the interior of the mast step 20 until reaching the interior channel of the track 46. At this point, the weight of the mast which has already begun to pivot away from the vertical, provides the needed torque to pivot the lower portion of the mast in a forwardly direction, sothat rollers 40 slide within the track 46, as the mast gradually moves into the position shown by the phantom lines of FIG. 2; the vertical support member 30 simultaneously pivots about pins 21 in the mast step 20 while the mast l6 and vertical support member 30 pivot about each other about pin 23.

The forward movement of the lower portion of the mast 16 can be slowed by braking the winch 31, which is connected via line 31a to the bottom of mast 16. If the boat had been under sail, it is unnecessary to drop or loosen the sail; it does not become ever necessary to loosen or release either the shrouds or the strays which connect the top of the mast 16 to the hull of the sailboat, even when the mast is lowered to substantially a horizontal position. Thus at no time is the mast free to fall over the side, even in the event of a sudden gust of wind or roll of the'sea.

When the reduced clearance has been passed, the mast can be readily returned to its upright vertical position by turning winch 31, which pulls in the line 31a and in turn the lower portion of the mast rearwardly; the rollers 40 move within track 46 until the mast reaches the mast step 20; the winch line 31a can pull the mast up along the incline 20 until the rearward edge of the mast l6 fits into the crotch between the wedges 20a. Wing nut 35 is then tightened against locking support bolt 34 holding the mast in the substantially vertical operating position, as shown in FIG. 5. When the mast 16 is in the vertical position, the rollers 40 are within the channel in mast step 20. The tightening of wing nut 35 against bolt 34 draws the mast 16 into the full vertical position.

An alternative embodiment of the slide means and vertical support are shown in FIGS. 8, 9 and 10. Vertical support member 30 is pivotally connected to the mast step member 60, shown in FIG. 9, preferably connected by bushings 62. Mast 16 is pivotally connected to slide 66 via threaded pin 64 and wing nut 63, as shown in FIG. 10. As shown in FIG. 8, slide 66 moves along track 70 connected to the hull of the vessel via threaded screws 74.

Any spars, e.g. the yards or boom 80, are moved together with the mast 16, passing between the two vertical members 30a and 30b of vertical support member 30. As indicated by FIGS. 1-7, small boat rigging does not always include a boom, and the presence or absence of the bottom is not a part of the presentinvention. It is unnecessary to in any manner lash or hold the boom when lowering the mast, as the boom is automatically held in place between the side pieces 30a and 30b of vertical support member 30. The boom is generally pivotally connected to the mast, by a universal joint, one conventional example of which is shown in FIG. 8. Such a joint permits substantially unlimited movement along the X-and-Y-axes and permits folding the boom against the mast when the mast is inclined.

Furthermore, the slide member and track along which the slide moves, can be of any type, as long as the bottom edge of the mast is attached to the slide and the slide and the track (attached to the hull of the boat) are interlocked so as to permit movement only along the longitudinal, or fore-and-aft, direction and to prevent movement laterally or vertically.

As shown in FIG. 2 (by phantom lines generally indicated by the letter B), the mast can be placed in completely horizontal position and the lower end of the mast 16a disconnected from the track means 46 by removing pin 50 which locks the rollers 40 within track 46. In the embodiment of FIG. 10, the mast 16 is separated from the slide 66 (which remains engaged on track 70) by removing bolt 64. The mast can then be placed upon blocks 140, also indicated by phantom lines in FIG. 2, when the boat is to be stored or docked or trailered. The mast can then serve as a support, for example, for a rain awning for protecting the entire boat from inclement weather.

The track 46 can also be made removable, if desired. As shown in FIG. 6, bracket 49 is permanently affixed to the boat by screws 47. The track 46 is held in position in bracket 49 by pin 51 at one end, and slip fitted into the complementary slot in step 20 at its other end. If pin 51 is threadedly secured at one end thereof, it can be removed and track 46 removed and stowed away when desired, to clear the deck when under full sail. The track can also be molded into the boats surface.

As a further variation, which permits lowering the mast to a more nearly horizontal position without disengaging the mast from the track, a vertical slot can be provided in the vertical support member in lieu of the circular hole provided for the pin 23. See the phantom lines in FIG. 8. This permits sliding movement of the pin 23, and thus of the mast l6, axially with respect to the vertical support 30.

The present invention is applicable to substantially any type of sailboat, of almost any size and class, from the smallest, single-masted, dagger board-type of pleasure boat to the larger keel boats. Twin-masted yawls or ketches can be provided with masts in accordance with this invention; both of the mainmast and the mizzenmast can be pivotally mounted in accordance with the present invention. This invention, however, has perhaps its greatest utility when used on sloop-rigged sailboat as shown in the attached drawings.

The advantages of this invention are obtainable in the manner explained above; however, the specific embodiments which are shown are intended to be exemplary and are not limiting of the scope or spirit of the invention, which are defined by the claims that follow.

The claimed embodiments of the present invention are as follows:

1. A sailboat comprising:

a hull;

vertical mast support means pivotally attached at one end to the hull;

a mast having a lower and an upper end, the mast being pivotally attached to a second end of the vertical mast support means at a location intermediate the ends of the mast, and the lower end of the mast being pivotally and slidably connected to the hull; and

guide means for directing the slidable lower end of the mast in a longitudinal direction; whereby, the mast can be moved between a vertical position and an inclined position by sliding the lower end of the mast longitudinally along the hull while pivoting the intermediate portion of the mast relative to the vertical support means and the lower end of the vertical support member relative to the hull.

2. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 wherein the guide means comprises a track, extending from the lower end of the vertical support means towards the bow of the boat and connected to the boat 3. A sailboat in accordance with claim 2 comprising sliding means attached to the lower end of the mast and wherein the sliding means and the track are so interlocked as to prevent lateral or vertical movement of the lower end of the mast relative to the track.

4. A sailboat in accordance with claim 3 wherein the sliding means are rollers.

5. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 wherein the vertical support means comprises spaced vertically extending side walls, the mast being connected between the side walls such that when the mast is in the vertical position, the mast is supported by the side walls from the intermediate pivot location on the mast to the lower end of the mast.

6. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 comprising in addition a boom pivotally secured to the mast.

7. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 comprising in addition mast step means, at the first end of the vertical support means, designed and adapted to support the mast when the mast is in the vertical position.

8. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 comprising in addition drive means for sliding the lower end of the mast and to thus move the mast between a vertical and an inclined position.

9. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 comprising, in addition, locking means for securing the mast to the vertical support means so as to lock the mast into a vertical position.

Claims (9)

1. A sailboat comprising: a hull; vertical mast support means pivotally attached at one end to the hull; a mast having a lower and an upper end, the mast being pivotally attached to a second end of the vertical mast support means at a location intermediate the ends of the mast, and the lower end of the mast being pivotally and slidably connected to the hull; and guide means for directing the slidable lower end of the mast in a longitudinal direction; whereby, the mast can be moved between a vertical position and an inclined position by sliding the lower end of the mast longitudinally along the hull while pivoting the intermediate portion of the mast relative to the vertical support means and the lower end of the vertical support member relative to the hull.
2. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 wherein the guide means comprises a track, extending from the lower end of the vertical support means towards the bow of the boat and connected to the boat.
3. A sailboat in accordance with claim 2 comprising sliding means attached to the lower end of the mast and wherein the sliding means and the track are so interlocked as to prevent lateral or vertical movement of the lower end of the mast relative to the track.
4. A sailboat in accordance with claim 3 wherein the sliding means are rollers.
5. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 wherein the vertical support means comprises spaced vertically extending side walls, the mast being connected between the side walls such that when the mast is in the vertical position, the mast is supported by the side walls from the intermediate pivot location on the mast to the lower end of the mast.
6. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 comprising in addition a boom pivotally secured to the mast.
7. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 comprising in addition mast step means, at the first end of the vertical support means, designed and adapted to support the mast when the mast is in the vertical position.
8. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 comprising in addition drive means for sliding the lower end of the mast and to thus move the mast between a vertical and an inclined position.
9. A sailboat in accordance with claim 1 comprising, in addition, locking means for securing the mast to the vertical support means so as to lock the mast into a vertical position.
US37755073 1973-07-09 1973-07-09 Means for lowering the mast on sailboats Expired - Lifetime US3827386A (en)

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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3898948A (en) * 1974-06-24 1975-08-12 Thomas R Huff Mast handling
US4005669A (en) * 1975-04-28 1977-02-01 Julius Roland Klemm Mast displacement mechanism
US4112861A (en) * 1977-09-30 1978-09-12 Lewis Barry R Mast stepping and unstepping structure
US4259917A (en) * 1978-11-28 1981-04-07 Frank Richard J Foldable mast assembly
US4273062A (en) * 1978-10-05 1981-06-16 Hannes Marker Device for connecting a sailmast to a sailboard
US4352337A (en) * 1980-05-01 1982-10-05 Wyoral Frank J Mast and boom carrier combination for sailing vessels
US4448143A (en) * 1980-02-07 1984-05-15 Welsh Richard J Sail cradle
US4528926A (en) * 1982-08-11 1985-07-16 Peter Brockhaus Gmbh & Co. Handels Kg Mast foot mounting system for a sailboard
US4624204A (en) * 1985-07-29 1986-11-25 Temple William A Mast raising and lowering device
WO1987002322A1 (en) * 1985-10-16 1987-04-23 Granstroem Anders Arrangement in sailing boat rigging with a hinge-like mast attachment
US5605480A (en) * 1995-11-08 1997-02-25 Wright; Clarence E. Easily maneuverable vessel propelled by eight jets and sails
US6116177A (en) * 1998-05-28 2000-09-12 Conant; Carson V. Mast with top boom
EP1180478A1 (en) 2000-08-09 2002-02-20 Carson V. Conant Mast with top boom
US6457430B1 (en) 2001-06-27 2002-10-01 David Drabkin Sailing assembly for small boats
US20040060859A1 (en) * 1998-04-10 2004-04-01 Osamu Seshimoto Continuous blood filtration apparatus
DE10205723B4 (en) * 2001-03-07 2005-09-15 Manfred Paul Mast-equipment
US6990916B1 (en) 2004-12-13 2006-01-31 Atwood Jr Rex E Sailboat mast stepping system
GB2437386A (en) * 2006-04-19 2007-10-24 Anthony James Smith System for lifting and lowering a sailboat mast
US20080156242A1 (en) * 2007-01-03 2008-07-03 Susquehanna Yacht Manufacturing, Inc. Foldable Mast Assembly for a Sailing Vessel
US20110100278A1 (en) * 2009-11-04 2011-05-05 Mcclintock Scott G Rapid Sailboat Mast Raising/Lowering Method
WO2012114057A1 (en) 2011-02-25 2012-08-30 Sail Line Fish Ltd Improvements relating to masts
US9694876B1 (en) 2015-07-30 2017-07-04 Donald E. Smith Pivoting mast device and method

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US477477A (en) * 1892-06-21 Franz uhlig
US1375400A (en) * 1920-03-03 1921-04-19 Ljungstrom Fredrik Sailboat-rigging

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US477477A (en) * 1892-06-21 Franz uhlig
US1375400A (en) * 1920-03-03 1921-04-19 Ljungstrom Fredrik Sailboat-rigging

Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3898948A (en) * 1974-06-24 1975-08-12 Thomas R Huff Mast handling
US4005669A (en) * 1975-04-28 1977-02-01 Julius Roland Klemm Mast displacement mechanism
US4112861A (en) * 1977-09-30 1978-09-12 Lewis Barry R Mast stepping and unstepping structure
US4273062A (en) * 1978-10-05 1981-06-16 Hannes Marker Device for connecting a sailmast to a sailboard
US4259917A (en) * 1978-11-28 1981-04-07 Frank Richard J Foldable mast assembly
US4448143A (en) * 1980-02-07 1984-05-15 Welsh Richard J Sail cradle
US4352337A (en) * 1980-05-01 1982-10-05 Wyoral Frank J Mast and boom carrier combination for sailing vessels
US4528926A (en) * 1982-08-11 1985-07-16 Peter Brockhaus Gmbh & Co. Handels Kg Mast foot mounting system for a sailboard
US4624204A (en) * 1985-07-29 1986-11-25 Temple William A Mast raising and lowering device
WO1987002322A1 (en) * 1985-10-16 1987-04-23 Granstroem Anders Arrangement in sailing boat rigging with a hinge-like mast attachment
US5605480A (en) * 1995-11-08 1997-02-25 Wright; Clarence E. Easily maneuverable vessel propelled by eight jets and sails
US7059480B2 (en) * 1998-04-10 2006-06-13 Fuji Photo Film Co., Inc. Continuous blood filtration apparatus
US20040060859A1 (en) * 1998-04-10 2004-04-01 Osamu Seshimoto Continuous blood filtration apparatus
US6116177A (en) * 1998-05-28 2000-09-12 Conant; Carson V. Mast with top boom
EP1180478A1 (en) 2000-08-09 2002-02-20 Carson V. Conant Mast with top boom
DE10205723B4 (en) * 2001-03-07 2005-09-15 Manfred Paul Mast-equipment
US6457430B1 (en) 2001-06-27 2002-10-01 David Drabkin Sailing assembly for small boats
US6990916B1 (en) 2004-12-13 2006-01-31 Atwood Jr Rex E Sailboat mast stepping system
GB2437386A (en) * 2006-04-19 2007-10-24 Anthony James Smith System for lifting and lowering a sailboat mast
US20080035042A1 (en) * 2006-04-19 2008-02-14 Smith Anthony J System for lifting and lowering a sailboat mast
US7341014B2 (en) 2006-04-19 2008-03-11 Smith Anthony J System for lifting and lowering a sailboat mast
GB2437386B (en) * 2006-04-19 2008-09-10 Anthony James Smith System for lifting and lowering a sailboat mast
US20080156242A1 (en) * 2007-01-03 2008-07-03 Susquehanna Yacht Manufacturing, Inc. Foldable Mast Assembly for a Sailing Vessel
US7614356B2 (en) 2007-01-03 2009-11-10 Susquehanna Yacht Manufacturing, Inc. Foldable mast assembly for a sailing vessel
US20110100278A1 (en) * 2009-11-04 2011-05-05 Mcclintock Scott G Rapid Sailboat Mast Raising/Lowering Method
WO2012114057A1 (en) 2011-02-25 2012-08-30 Sail Line Fish Ltd Improvements relating to masts
GB2502497A (en) * 2011-02-25 2013-11-27 Sail Line Fish Ltd Improvements relating to masts
US9139256B2 (en) 2011-02-25 2015-09-22 Sail Line Fish Ltd Improvements relating to masts
GB2502497B (en) * 2011-02-25 2016-12-14 Sail Line Fish Ltd A mast raised or lowered by means of drive member
US9694876B1 (en) 2015-07-30 2017-07-04 Donald E. Smith Pivoting mast device and method

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