US3826499A - Invisible ink markings in defined areas of a game device responsive to color changing chemical marker - Google Patents

Invisible ink markings in defined areas of a game device responsive to color changing chemical marker Download PDF

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US3826499A
US3826499A US29482172A US3826499A US 3826499 A US3826499 A US 3826499A US 29482172 A US29482172 A US 29482172A US 3826499 A US3826499 A US 3826499A
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marking
areas
markings
grid
invisible
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/06Lottos or bingo games; Systems, apparatus or devices for checking such games
    • A63F3/062Bingo games, e.g. Bingo card games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00895Accessories for board games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/18Question-and-answer games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00075War games
    • A63F2003/00078Naval war
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00094Ticktacktoe
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/06Lottos or bingo games; Systems, apparatus or devices for checking such games
    • A63F3/065Tickets or accessories for use therewith
    • A63F3/0685Tickets or accessories for use therewith having a message becoming legible after a chemical reaction or physical action has taken place, e.g. applying pressure, heat treatment, spraying with a substance, breaking microcapsules

Abstract

A game device including defined areas having differing invisible ink markings whereby the marking of one of said areas by a player with a color changing chemical marking means provides a differing game scoreable response from the marking of the other area.

Description

United States Patent 1 1 Lenkoff 111] 3,826,499 July 30, 1974 1 INVISIBLE INK MARKINGS IN DEFINED AREAS OF A GAME DEVICE RESPONSIVE TO COLOR CHANGING CHEMICAL MARKER [76] Inventor: Leon G. Lenkoff, 3203 Alden Dell,

Louisville, Ky. 40207 [22] Filed: Oct. 4, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 294,821

[52] US. Cl. 273/130 B, 35/9 G, 273/93 R, 273/130 E, 273/130 D, 273/135 B, 273/135 [51] Int. Cl. A631 3/00, G09b 3/02 [58] Field of Search... 273/139, 138, 130 R, 130 B, 273/130 C, 130 D, 130 E, 130 F, 130 G, 130

H; 35/9 G, 9 A, 48 R; 283/6 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER PUBLlCATlONS Fishin Fun, Copyright 1970, Spot-OGo1d Corp., Philadelphia, Pa. Eraso, Copyright Philadelphia, Pa.

1971, Spot-O-Gold C0rp.,

Primary Examiner-Ant0n O. Oechsle- Assistant ExaminerArno1d W. Kramer 5 7 ABSTRACT A game device including defined areashaving differing invisible ink markings whereby the marking of one 1,884,197 10/1932 Peterson et a1. 35/48 A of said areas by a player with a color changing chemil,900,(l05 3/1933 YZISUdZl 273/138 R a] marking means provides a game corea- 2,203,183 6/1940 Schuman et a1. 273/139 ble response from the marking of the other area 2,610,855 9/1952 Spiller 273/139 X 2,684,853 7/1954 Withers 273/139 X 5 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures TI C -TAC'TOE PATENTEUJULBOIHH 3.826.499

SHEEI 1 [IF 6 TlC-TAC-TOE BINGO Fig.1 5 1 Each Fleei consists of. Bafflnhip -8BBBB Cruiser -CCC C Destroyer D 00 Submarine-35 I b" '@ooo 32 Shot Record Fill in one of be above each lime you shoot of the Fleet a! he left.

Fig. 3 3

Pncusn am. 04021 I 4 mrs an: wALKs You wnv 3101's a mus-4w 115 L555 1mm 3 ms 02 moms Vou L055 snrme anus sm/Ke's 01/15 12;;

BATTER 1 BATTER 2 BATTR 3 BATTER 4 TOTAL Write in wiih your Yes & Mww Pen- 5 PATENTEUJULBowM SHEET 3 0F 6 GAME TIME! Pool Baskefball Horseshoes Table Tennis Marbles Shuffleboord Bowling he school spa/l cen (er. )iur qulbmcnf the y need. Find werlhg..............

Faafball Badminlo Baseball Volleyball Soccer I Ice Hockey Kw are he manager a! friends have asked you shu file or similar Piece of e out what hey want by one ANSWERS CLUES is he piece that is needed sphere-shaped 3 f is it ever made of Ieaiher 3 Does ii ever have air inside 2 Do you kick it as part of the game Do you strike it with somelhmg wooden Does if go over a net Does it ever go over 50 yards Is it used on ice Fig. 6

' PATENTEDJULSOIHH SHEEI b 0F 6 Color in circle at ENTER. FBI/aw arrow: you have laken he wmng path. Back up MAZE to E XI I Each limeyou find an N to your last oplian and fry 09am.

PATENIEDJummm SHEET 5 or 6 IKDI IN! III].

I ll

F-ll I JI I {ll PAIENTEDJULSOISH HANGMAN (Km can prinf' will? )isalfinvw Pen above (/7658 numbers na ofher' pen or pencil required.)

INVISIBLE INK MARKINGS IN DEFINED AREAS OF A GAME DEVICE RESPONSIVE TO COLOR CHANGING CHEMICAL MARKER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a game device and more particularly to a game device which utilizes invisible printing ink to provide differing game scoring responses.

It has been long known in the printing art to scribe invisible ink upon a writing surface in a desired manner and to then utilize a suitable color activating means to react with the ink so that the invisible ink scribing becomes visible. This basic principle has been utilized in the printing art effectively to provide various forms of teaching and testing arrangementsA student is given a marking pen and, based upon knowledge of certain information, selects an outlined area for marking corresponding to an answer which the student believes is correct to a question relating to such certain information which has been posed either in writing or orally.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention recognizes that the basic principle of scribing invisible ink upon a writing surface and marking the same can be utilized in a novel manner to provide a straight-forward, economical, readily understandable and utilizable means of obtaining differing game scoring responses. The present invention further recognizes and employs this principle to provide a new, useful andnovel way to play by oneself with an invisible opponent or with another player popular games such as Tic-Tac-Toe, Bingo, Maze, Hangman, Baseball, and Fleet, as well as many other challenging games. In accordance with the present invention these games can be assembled on several sheets to provide a compact, readily transportable book which when assembled with a suitable marking device will provide a player with a package affording many hours of entertainment.

More particularly, the present invention provides a game comprising at least one marking sheet; color changing chemical marking means for marking the sheet visibly; at least one section on the marking sheet including at least two defined areas selectable for marking by the marking means; one of the defined areas being printed with an invisible ink marking in a manner to distinguish it from the defined area remaining when the means for marking the sheet contacts one of the defined areas to determine the presence of the invisible ink marking which will visibly develop a preselected image to chemical reaction with the invisible ink marking if the ink is contacted by the marking means, thus providing a differing game scoreable response from the marking of the other area.

It is to be understood that various modifications can be made in the arrangement, form and character of the game device disclosed herein without departing from FIG. 2 is a plan view of a marking sheet incorporating visible grids and appropriate visible and invisible markings for a game similar to Bingo;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a marking sheet incorporating visible grids and appropriate visible and invisible markings for a game similar to Fleet;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a marking sheet incorporating visible grids and appropriate markings and invisible markings for a game similar to Baseball;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a marking sheet incorporating two sections which are interrelated by a written legend and including appropriate invisible markings to provide a clue and identification game entitled Mission Underwater;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a marking sheet incorporating two sections which are interrelated by a written legend and including appropriate invisible markings to provide a clue and identification game entitled Game Time;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a marking sheet incorporating a multiple of adjacent defined areas including appropriate invisible markings in the form ofdirection signals and visible ink markings defining entrance and exit points to provide a game of Maze;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of a marking sheet incorporating a visibly defined figure and a further defined area with appropriate invisible markings to provide a game of Twenty-One;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of a marking sheet incorporating a first section including appropriate visible and invisible markings and second and third recording sections to enter the results of the marking of said first section to provide a game called Hangman; and,

FIG. 10 is a color changing chemical marking means in the form of a pen and a cap for the tip thereof.

Referring to FIGS. 1 through 4 of the drawings, four different games incorporating the novel invention are disclosed, one on each marking sheet 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively, each game including a visible grid section formed by a first set of spaced, parallel vertical lines crossed by a second set of spaced parallel horizontal lines to provide a multiplicity of defined areas which are printed with suitable invisible ink markings so that the defined areas in each grid provide a variety of distinguishing visible figures when a player selectively fills in the defined area with an appropriate marking pen, such as that disclosed in FIG. 10. Pen 10 can be provided with a suitable cap 20.

It is to be understood that any of several chemical formulations for invisible printing inks known in the printing art can be employed in the present invention. For example, the marking sheets can be treated with a suitable acid or base material which remains substantially invisible and the writing instrument 10 can be provided with appropriate color changing chemical materials. The acid or base is conveniently applied in any one of several aqueous solutions. The particular invisible ink formulation used on the marking sheets and writing instrument does not comprise an essential part of the present invention and the present invention is not to be considered as limited to any specific formulation. It is only essential that the figures in the defined areas remain suitably invisible until marked by a player with an appropriate marking instrument and formulations such as those described in the long-expired U.S. Pat. No. 1,884,197 to H. J. Peterson et al. and the more recently expired U.S. Pat. No. 2,618,866 to C. S.

Adams should suffice, as well as more recently developed formulations like those set forth in'U.S. Pat-No. 3,363,336 to B. F. Skinner.

Referring specifically to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the novel invention is disclosed as incorporated into two forms of the well known game, Tic-Tac-Toe. In one form, the upper portion of the marking sheet 1 includes several visible grids 5, each having nine defined areas. The grids 5 are marked in the defined areas with suitable invisible figure markings of Xs and Os with one winning row of at least one letter or a winning row of both letters. The player decides whether he will be an X or an O." The letter remaining is that of an imaginary opponent. With an appropriate marking instrument the player then selectively and alternatively marks the described areas for himself and his opponent (horizontally, vertically or diagonally) in'an attempt to win over his imaginary opponent by obtaining a row of his selected letter before that of his imaginary opponent.

As a variation of the game of Tic-Tac-Toe, the lower portion of marking sheet 1 is also provided with several visible grids 5, each having nine'defined areas. The grids 5, as above, are marked in the defined areas with invisible figure markings of Xs and Os, with at least one winning row of Xs. The player, who is always an X attempts to achieve a winning arrangement of his designated letter with a minimum of tries with his marking instrument.

Referring to FIG. 2 of the drawings, the novel invention is disclosed as incorporated in the form of the well known game Bingo. The marking sheet 2 includes a visible grid 6. In the advantageous embodiment disclosed grid 6 is comprised of 76 defined areas marked in random order in the defined areas with invisible figures in the form of numerals running from 1 through 75, and an invisible letter B, representing the winning of an imaginary opponent. The four-defined areas at the point of grid 6 are blacked out. Adjacent grid 6, is a gridded scoreboard 7 made up in the form of a Bingo card. Each card 7 in the embodiment disclosed includes a grid of twenty-five defined areas in the form of five adjacent vertical columns of five de-. fined areas each with each defined area having invisible markings in the form of dots therein. The columns are numbered successively with the numeral heading ranges of 1-15, 16-30, 31-45, 46-60 and 61-75," respectively, and the five described areas in each columnare further each visibly marked with one single numeral of an amount which falls within the range in the numeral heading of the column. It is to be noted that, in the embodiment disclosed, the middle space of the column having the numeral heading range of 31-45 is indicated as a Free Space to give the player a by" for this described area. In playing the game of FIG. 2, when the player contacts a defined area on grid 6 with the marking instrument and, assumnary opponent appears. As a variation in the game, the player can continue after completing the first row in an attempt to complete a maximum'number of rows before the'invisible B becomes visible.

Referring to FIG. 3 of the drawings, the novel invention is disclosed as incorporated in the form of a novel game entitled Fleet. The marking sheet 3 includes visible grid 8. In the advantageous embodiment disclosed, grid 8 is comprised of 64 defined areas marked with invisible ink letters in the defined areas, with five B"s in five adjoined defined areas representing a battleship, four Cs in four adjoined defined areas representing a cruiser, three Ds in three adjoined defined areas representing a destroyer and two S"s in two adjoined defined areas representing a submarine and the remaining defined areas with Xs representing misses. The adjoining defined areas of the several ships can be vertical, horizontal or diagonal. Adjacent grid 8 is a scoreboard 9 representing shots. Scoreboard 9 includes 32 defined areas in the form of circles marked wtih invisible ink. Each time a player contacts a defined area on grid 8 with a marking instrument, he then completes a circle to keep a record of the shots taken. To destroy a ship the player must fill in every letter of that ship with the game object being to destroy the fleet with a minimum number of shots. As a variation of the game, two'players can play, each player taking shots at his opponents fleet comprised of a separate grid 8 (not shown). The first to destroy his opponents fleet wins.

Referring to'FIG. 4 of the drawings, the novel invention is disclosed as incorporated in the form of the popular game Baseball. The marking sheet 4 includes visible grid 11. In the advantageous embodiment disclosed, grid 1 l is comprised of 79 defined areas marked with invisible ink in random fashion in the defined areas with a preselected number of Ss representing Strikes a preselected number of Bs representing Balls, a preselected number of Hs representing Hits, and a preselected number of Os representing Outs. The two defined areas at the bottom corners of gridll are blacked out. Adjacent grid 11 is a scoreboard, 12. Scoreboard 12 includes 54 defined areas, each of which is marked with an invisible ink dot. The scoreboards are sectioned off for six Batters, each having a horizontal row of nine defined areas under columns marked Balls, Strikes," Outs, and Hits or Walks. For each batter under the column Balls there are four defined areas, for each batter under the column Strikes there are three defined areas, and for each batter under the columns Outs and Hits or Walks there is one defined area. Each time a player contacts a defined area on grid 11 with a marking instrument, which grid can be entitled Pitched Ball Chart, there becomes visible one of the figures or symbols which indicates a strike, ball, hit or out. The player then goes to scoreboard grid 12 and opposite the batter who is then at bat, makes an appropriate entry with the marking instrument in accordance with the symbol which has become visible in grid 11 so that one of the invisible dots becomes visible upon contact by the marking instrument with the selected defined area. Thus, a record is made of the results obtained in the Pitched Ball Chart. A suitable legend can be associated with grids 11 and 12 to indicate what is required for a player to either win, tie or lose. For example, four hits or walks can indicate a win, three hits or walks can indicate a tie, and less than three hits or walks can indicate a loss. In addition, a defined area can be located as disclosed in FIG. 4 below the Outs and the Hits or Walks so that totals can be entered.

Referring to FIGS. 5 and 6 of the drawings, the novel invention is disclosed as incorporated in the form of Clue games. FIG. 5, discloses the novel game of Mission Underwater and FIG. 6, discloses the novel game, Game Time. Each of these two games includes a written legend 17 which interrelates a written clue section 18 with a visible pictorial section 19. In the game of FIG. 5, entitled Mission Underwater, the legend 17, for example, describes that an old mine has been floated into the bay before an annual boat show. It is the players job to decide under which of the boats disclosed in pictorial section 19 that the mine is located so that the mine may be defused. To find the right boat, the player is instructed to select a clue in Clue Section 18 and then use the result to fill in a defined circle under one of the boats of pictorial section 19. The defined circle below each boat in pictorial section 19 is inscribed with an invisible marking either in the form of yes or no. The clues visibly written in section 18 refer to physical attributes of the boat. For example, whether a boat has a pennant, an outboard motor, an anchor, portholes, sails, paddles, cabins above deck, and people on the deck. Opposite each of the clues is a defined area with an invisible marking indicating either a yes or a no. The player selects one clue and marks the definedarea with an appropriate marking instrument so that the invisible answer becomes visible in either Yes or No form. If yes, the player makes an appropriate selection of one of the boats pictorialized in section 19 by marking the described area below the boat with the marking instrument so that the invisible image yes or no becomes visible. The number of tries indicates the success of a player. If the mine is located in one or two tries, the player proves to be a real life saver. If three or four tries are needed the player has still saved the day. If five or six tries are needed, the plaeyr should turn in his flipper". If seven or more tries are needed, the mine goes off and .the player is sunk.

Referring to FIG. 6, the written legend in the area 17 interrelates Clue section 18 with Pictorial section 19 by asking a player to select an appropriate athletic game pictorialized in section 19 by equipment associated with the game and identified in section 18 with written clues associated with the several games. The equipment of fifteen different games are pictorially disclosed in section 19, including baseball, football, basketball, golf, tennis, volleyball, soccer, horseshoes, table tennis, pool, ice hockey, badminton, marbles, shuffleboard and bowling. Below each of the games in a defined area there is set forth in invisible ink, selectively the legend Right or Wrong. In Clue section 18, eight written clues relating to the games are set forth. For example, the shape of the equipment, the material composition of the equipment, whether the equipment is inflated, whether it is kicked, whether it is hit with something wooden, whether it goes over a net, whether it is used on ice and whether it goes over 50 yards. Opposite each of the clues is a defined area bearing an invisible image indicating Yes or No." The player selects a clue by contacting the defined area opposite thereto with a suitable marking instrument. If the image proves to be a Yes the player then selects one of the games associated with that clue by marking the defined area below the game with the marking instrument. If the appropriate game is selected the invisible image when marked will indicate a Right, if not, it will indicate a Wrong. The player is scored in accordance with the number of clues he needs to find the right game. If one or two clues are utilized the player is a master sportsman. If three or four clues are utilized, the player is average. If five or six clues are utilized, the player is poor. And, if seven or eight clues are utilized, the player is out of the game.

Referring to FIG. 7 of the drawings, the marking sheet 21- is disclosed as incorporating the game of Maze. In the advantageous embodiment of the invention disclosed, the marking sheet includes 84 defined areas in the form of spaced, visible circles. Each of the circles is printed with an invisible ink marking comprised of direction signals, some of which include two arrows and others of which include one arrow to provide at least two differing paths, within said section of defined areas. Only one of the paths leads to a preselected target area, which in the advantageous embodiment disclosed is visibly designated at the lower periphery of the section as Exit. Diagonally opposite the defined areas of this section at the upper periphery thereof, in the advantageous embodiment disclosed, there is suitably marked Enter. Certain of the defined areas are marked with an N to indicate that a player has taken a wrong path. The player then has to back up to his last option and try again, until ultimately he reaches the Exit end. The least number of described areas marked indicates the success of the player in reaching his path.

Referring to FIG. 8 of the drawings, the marking sheet 28 is disclosed as incorporating the popular card game Twenty-One.

In the advantageous embodiment disclosed on marking sheet 28, provision is made for twelve separate games set forth in twelve separate horizontal rows. Each row includes pairs of defined areas, for example, 29-30; 32-33; 34-35; 36-37; and 38-39. Each of these defined areas is printed with a different invisible ink marking figure. The visibly defined figure Twenty-One written at the top of the page represents the achievement figure. A second visibly defined figure adjacent each row comprises an indicia figure. The invisible figures in the sections 29-30 and the successive sections 32-33, etc. are so selected that the marking of one of the defined areas provides a figure which when associated with the indicia figure equals a differing game scoreable response relative the marking of the achievement figure 21. The object of the game is to have two or more cards that total as closely as possible to the achievement figure 21. To win, the player must total more points than his imaginary opponent without going over 21. Points can be determined by card value. One can count aces indicated by A as l or 11; picture cards indicated by K, O, or J for King, Queen and Jack, respectively, are 10 and all other cards count at their face value. The player imagines he is playing an imaginary opponent who is already finished taking cards. The player does not know the imaginary opponents total. The right hand card of each pair is invisibly printed with the total at which the imaginary opponent quit and an invisible marking of either W or L to respectively indicate whether the player has Won" or Lost. The player fills in the left hand card in the first pair and adds it to the visible number adjacent the section. He then decides whether he wants to quit or proceed. If he decides to quit, he fills in the right hand card of the first pair which shows the opponents number, and would indicate a W or an L to show whether the player has won or lost. If, on the otherhand, he decides to go on to the next pair, he once again fills in the left hand number and adds that to his previous total. If he decides to quit at that point, he then fills in once again the right hand number which will show his imaginary opponents total and indicate whether the player has won or lost. If he decides to go on instead of having filled in the right hand number, he proceeds to the next pair and fills in the left hand side and so on, selecting the right hand side of a pair only at the point where he quits to show the total of the imaginary opponent and whether the player has won or lost. The player can get as many cards as he'wants by filling in the left card in each set, and he must choose them in the order left to right. He will only fill in the right hand card in each set whenhe is ready to quit. When he fills in the right hand card the game is'over. Player wins all ties and if he goes over 21, he has automatically lost. Thus, a simple, straight-forward, enjoyable method of playing an imaginary opponent is provided to give a player 12 card games of enjoyment.

Referring to FIG. 9 of the drawings, the novel invention is disclosed as incorporated on a marking sheet 40 to provide the well known game of Hangman. This game includes a first section 41, comprised of a plurality of defined areas which are printed with differing invisible ink markings. In the instant embodiment of the invention 26 defined areas are provided and above each is visibly printed one of the letters of the alphabet. The defined areas are printed with differing invisible ink markings, which in the embodiment disclosed, comprise either the word No or a numeral. A second section 42 and a third section 43 are also provided. The second section 42 includes several defined areas with visible numerals associated with each-of the defined areas. In the instant embodiment, the second section is comprised of eight such defined areas with the numerals running from 1 through 8. The third section 43 in the instant embodiment is a pictorial representation of a man referred to as the Hangman. This man is divided into 16 separate parts. The defined areas in the first section 41 which have the visible letters representing the letters in a chosen word to be filled in in the second section are filled in with invisible numbers which correspond to the visible numbers in the second section, in accordance with the position of the letter in the word to be completed in the second section. For example, if the word Humorist is to be completed in the second section, the H would be filled in with the invisible number I, the U with the invisible number 2, the M with the invisible number 3, the O with the invisible number 4, the R with the invisible number 5, the I with the invisible number 6, the S with the invisible number 7, and the T with the invisible number 8. The remaining defined areas are filled in with the invisible marking no to indicate that the letter associated therewith is not applicable in the second section 42. The player guesses any letter in the first section 41 with his marking instrument. If the letter he guesses is part of the secret word a number or numbers will appear in the box. With his marking instrument he then goes to section v4'2 and prints the letter in the blank space above the number indicated in section 41. After several letters have been found, the word will begin to take shape. If the letter guessed is not in the word, a No will appear. For each No the player must fill in one of the 16 parts of the Hangman with his marking instrument. If all 16 parts of the Hangman are filled in before the player completes the word, he loses. If he completes the word I claim:

1. A simulated-tac-toe game comprising a marking sheet; a color changing chemical marking means for marking said sheet visibly; at least one tic-tac-toe grid visibly marked on said sheet to define areas associated therewith in which two differing indicia are normally placed in the progress of a conventional tic-tac-toe game; said defined areas each being printed with an invisible inkmarking designating one indicia or the other, said markings including at least one winning linear array of one indicia and/or the other whereby a player may arbitrarily assign to himself one of the two indicia marking designations with the other designation being first, he wins.

assigned to an opponent who may be imaginary whereby the player on selectively marking said areas with the color changing chemical marking means develops said invisible ink markings in an attempt to complete a winning linear array of the markings assigned to himself before completion of a winning linear array of the other marking. a

2. A simulated naval engagement game comprising marking sheet means; color changing chemical marking means for marking said sheet means visibly; a first grid for one player visibly marked on said sheet means to define areas associated therewith; said grid defined areas each being printed with a respective one of invisible ink markings which invisible ink markings are developed on being marked with said color changing chemical marking means; said invisible ink markings including groups of invisible markings with the markings within each group being identical and the markings of each group being different than the markings of each other group; the identical invisible ink markings of each group being aligned in linear array on adjoining defined areas of said grid with each invisible linear array simulating an unseen naval vessel; and a second gridfor a second player marked on said sheet means in a manner similar to said first grid and printed in competitively arranged fashion with similar invisible linear array groups whereby one player can play against the other by each alternatively selectively marking its marking grid with color changing chemical marking means in an attempt to win by first developing all of the invisible groups of markings simulating all of the naval vessels on its grid before the other.

3. A simulated naval engagement game comprising marking sheet means; color changing chemical marking means for marking said sheet means visibly; a grid visibly marked on said sheet means to define areas associated therewith; said grid defined areas each being printed with a respective one of invisible ink markings which invisible ink markings are developed on being marked with said color changing chemical marking means; said invisible ink markings including groups of invisible markings with the markings within each group being identical and the markings of each group being different than the markings of each other group; the identical invisible ink markings of each group being aligned in linear array on adjoining defined areas of said grid with each invisible linear array simulating an unseen naval vessel; and a scoreboard marked on said sheet means defining a number of score marking areas;

the number of score marking areas being less than the number of grid areas and greater than the total number of linear arrayed areas simulating said naval vessels whereby a player alternating between selectively marking an invisibly marked grid area and a different scoremarking area with said color changing chemical marking means attempts to win by developing all of the groups of markings simulating all the naval vessels before marking all the scoremarking areas.

4. A simulated maze game comprising a marking sheet; a color changing chemical marking means for marking said sheet visibly; at least one section on said marking sheet including a plurality of visibly marked adjacent areas selectable for marking by said marking means; a visibly designated entrance at a first position of said section of adjacent areas designating one of said areas and a visibly designated exit at a second position designating another of said areas; all of said areas each being printed with one of invisible ink markings; said invisible ink markings comprising single directional arrows, double directional arrows and nondirectional indicia with said single directional arrows each being variably positioned and indicating the next adjacent area designated thereby, the double directional arrows variably positioned and indicating the next adjacent areas designated thereby, and the nondirectional indicia failing to indicate any adjacent areas; and a continuous tortuous pathway made up of said directional arrows extending from said entrance to said exit whereby on marking said areas starting at said entrance with said marking means and following the invisible ink markings developed thereby an attempt is made to complete the continuous tortuous pathway to said exit by marking the fewest possible numbers of said areas with said marking means.

5. A simulated bingo-type game comprising a marking sheet means; color changing chemical marking means for marking said sheet means invisibly; a first grid visibly marked on said sheet means to define areas therewith with each defined area being printed with one of a random variation of visible ink markings to identify said defined areas; and a second grid visibly marked on said sheet means to define areas therewith with all but at least one of said defined areas including in random fashion an invisible ink marking corresponding with one of the distinct visible markings in one of the defined areas of said first grid and the at least one defined area excepted in said second grid including an invisible symbol representing a straw contestant against a player whereby a player on selectively marking said areas on said second grid develops said invisible ink markings to select defined areas in said first grid in accordance with the agreement between the developed markings and the visible ink markings on the defined areas of said first grid in an attempt to select a linear array of defined areas across said first grid before selecting on said second grid said invisible symbol representing said straw contestant.

Claims (5)

1. A simulated-tac-toe game comprising a marking sheet; a color changing chemical marking means for marking said sheet visibly; at least one tic-tac-toe grid visibly marked on said sheet to define areas associated therewith in wHich two differing indicia are normally placed in the progress of a conventional tic-tac-toe game; said defined areas each being printed with an invisible ink marking designating one indicia or the other, said markings including at least one winning linear array of one indicia and/or the other whereby a player may arbitrarily assign to himself one of the two indicia marking designations with the other designation being assigned to an opponent who may be imaginary whereby the player on selectively marking said areas with the color changing chemical marking means develops said invisible ink markings in an attempt to complete a winning linear array of the markings assigned to himself before completion of a winning linear array of the other marking.
2. A simulated naval engagement game comprising marking sheet means; color changing chemical marking means for marking said sheet means visibly; a first grid for one player visibly marked on said sheet means to define areas associated therewith; said grid defined areas each being printed with a respective one of invisible ink markings which invisible ink markings are developed on being marked with said color changing chemical marking means; said invisible ink markings including groups of invisible markings with the markings within each group being identical and the markings of each group being different than the markings of each other group; the identical invisible ink markings of each group being aligned in linear array on adjoining defined areas of said grid with each invisible linear array simulating an unseen naval vessel; and a second grid for a second player marked on said sheet means in a manner similar to said first grid and printed in competitively arranged fashion with similar invisible linear array groups whereby one player can play against the other by each alternatively selectively marking its marking grid with color changing chemical marking means in an attempt to win by first developing all of the invisible groups of markings simulating all of the naval vessels on its grid before the other.
3. A simulated naval engagement game comprising marking sheet means; color changing chemical marking means for marking said sheet means visibly; a grid visibly marked on said sheet means to define areas associated therewith; said grid defined areas each being printed with a respective one of invisible ink markings which invisible ink markings are developed on being marked with said color changing chemical marking means; said invisible ink markings including groups of invisible markings with the markings within each group being identical and the markings of each group being different than the markings of each other group; the identical invisible ink markings of each group being aligned in linear array on adjoining defined areas of said grid with each invisible linear array simulating an unseen naval vessel; and a scoreboard marked on said sheet means defining a number of score marking areas; the number of score marking areas being less than the number of grid areas and greater than the total number of linear arrayed areas simulating said naval vessels whereby a player alternating between selectively marking an invisibly marked grid area and a different scoremarking area with said color changing chemical marking means attempts to win by developing all of the groups of markings simulating all the naval vessels before marking all the scoremarking areas.
4. A simulated maze game comprising a marking sheet; a color changing chemical marking means for marking said sheet visibly; at least one section on said marking sheet including a plurality of visibly marked adjacent areas selectable for marking by said marking means; a visibly designated entrance at a first position of said section of adjacent areas designating one of said areas and a visibly designated exit at a second position designating another of said areas; all of said areas each being printed with one of invisible ink markings; said invisible ink markings comprising singLe directional arrows, double directional arrows and nondirectional indicia with said single directional arrows each being variably positioned and indicating the next adjacent area designated thereby, the double directional arrows variably positioned and indicating the next adjacent areas designated thereby, and the nondirectional indicia failing to indicate any adjacent areas; and a continuous tortuous pathway made up of said directional arrows extending from said entrance to said exit whereby on marking said areas starting at said entrance with said marking means and following the invisible ink markings developed thereby an attempt is made to complete the continuous tortuous pathway to said exit by marking the fewest possible numbers of said areas with said marking means.
5. A simulated bingo-type game comprising a marking sheet means; color changing chemical marking means for marking said sheet means invisibly; a first grid visibly marked on said sheet means to define areas therewith with each defined area being printed with one of a random variation of visible ink markings to identify said defined areas; and a second grid visibly marked on said sheet means to define areas therewith with all but at least one of said defined areas including in random fashion an invisible ink marking corresponding with one of the distinct visible markings in one of the defined areas of said first grid and the at least one defined area excepted in said second grid including an invisible symbol representing a straw contestant against a player whereby a player on selectively marking said areas on said second grid develops said invisible ink markings to select defined areas in said first grid in accordance with the agreement between the developed markings and the visible ink markings on the defined areas of said first grid in an attempt to select a linear array of defined areas across said first grid before selecting on said second grid said invisible symbol representing said straw contestant.
US29482172 1972-10-04 1972-10-04 Invisible ink markings in defined areas of a game device responsive to color changing chemical marker Expired - Lifetime US3826499A (en)

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US7213811B2 (en) 2004-12-08 2007-05-08 Scientific Games Royalty Corporation Extension to a lottery game for which winning indicia are set by selections made by winners of a base lottery game
US20070187888A1 (en) * 2005-11-29 2007-08-16 Paul Dures Lottery game card having a Sudoku-themed game
US20080248950A1 (en) * 2007-04-04 2008-10-09 Ibrahim Katampe Ink and Developer System
US20080265506A1 (en) * 2007-04-30 2008-10-30 Milner Benedict Closable-type electronic game grid box with digital display for strategic word pattern engagement
US20080277874A1 (en) * 2007-05-11 2008-11-13 Scoccia Adelmo A Tossed projectile game
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US7481431B2 (en) 2005-02-01 2009-01-27 Scientific Games International, Inc. Bingo-style lottery game ticket
US7485037B2 (en) 2004-10-11 2009-02-03 Scientific Games International, Inc. Fixed-odds sports lottery game
US7621814B2 (en) 2004-07-22 2009-11-24 Scientific Games International, Inc. Media enhanced gaming system
US7631871B2 (en) 2004-10-11 2009-12-15 Scientific Games International, Inc. Lottery game based on combining player selections with lottery draws to select objects from a third set of indicia
US7654529B2 (en) 2005-05-17 2010-02-02 Scientific Games International, Inc. Combination scratch ticket and on-line game ticket
US7662038B2 (en) 2005-01-07 2010-02-16 Scientific Games International, Inc. Multi-matrix lottery
US7699314B2 (en) 2005-01-07 2010-04-20 Scientific Games International, Inc. Lottery game utilizing nostalgic game themes
US7726652B2 (en) 2004-10-28 2010-06-01 Scientific Games International, Inc. Lottery game played on a geometric figure using indicia with variable point values
US7785184B2 (en) 2005-03-23 2010-08-31 Scientific Games International, Inc. Computer-implemented simulated card game
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US4103895A (en) * 1976-03-19 1978-08-01 Pressman Gerald L Concealed pattern detection game
US4084332A (en) * 1977-03-07 1978-04-18 Waloszyk John S System for visual communication
US4212393A (en) * 1978-12-29 1980-07-15 Lenkoff Leon G Magic pictures
US4468028A (en) * 1984-01-06 1984-08-28 Fleer Corp. Playing board simulating an action game
GB2152391A (en) * 1984-01-06 1985-08-07 Fleer Corp Playing board simulating an action game
US4514177A (en) * 1984-01-23 1985-04-30 Stry-Lenkoff Co. Invisible ink quiz game
US4540174A (en) * 1984-04-16 1985-09-10 Coppock C Wallace Game of chance particularly adapted for play in conjunction with a team sport contest
US4540175A (en) * 1984-08-27 1985-09-10 Coppock C Wallace Game of chance
US4643431A (en) * 1985-04-02 1987-02-17 David Hilinsky Blackjack board game
US4744113A (en) * 1986-04-21 1988-05-17 Kogut Judy J Toilet training aid and method
US4877253A (en) * 1987-02-06 1989-10-31 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Reusable bingo card
GB2212727A (en) * 1987-11-26 1989-08-02 Malcolm Andrew Norman Game apparatus
US4955614A (en) * 1989-01-26 1990-09-11 Pualette Buda Word forming by elimination game
US4964642A (en) * 1989-05-15 1990-10-23 Longview Corporation Variably scored skill game
US5083815A (en) * 1990-04-27 1992-01-28 Pollard Banknote Limited Heat actuated game
US5160266A (en) * 1991-02-11 1992-11-03 Stry-Lenkoff Company Mix and match invisible ink game
US5443629A (en) * 1991-11-27 1995-08-22 Alex Wilson Coldstream, Ltd. Latent image ink
US5217231A (en) * 1992-06-01 1993-06-08 Stry-Lenkoff Co. Power of observation invisible ink game
US5286061A (en) * 1992-10-09 1994-02-15 Scientific Games, Inc. Lottery ticket having validation data printed in developable invisible ink
US5389426A (en) * 1993-01-25 1995-02-14 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Article for use in forming a permanent image using a temporary marker
US5407199A (en) * 1993-05-28 1995-04-18 Vegas Pull Tabs, Inc. Interactive games and method of playing
US6435500B2 (en) 1993-05-28 2002-08-20 Media Drop-In Productions, Inc. Interactive games and method of playing
US6176487B1 (en) * 1996-03-04 2001-01-23 Ge- Spelutveckling Ab System and a method for generating game pieces and movement sequences
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US5957458A (en) * 1997-03-03 1999-09-28 Temtec, Inc. Substrate with hidden images and method of making such images appear
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US5931467A (en) * 1997-05-16 1999-08-03 Stuart J. Kamille Probability game
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WO1998051381A1 (en) * 1997-05-16 1998-11-19 Kamille Stuart J A probability game
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EP1293446A1 (en) * 1997-07-28 2003-03-19 Ralph B. Brick Article packaging assembly comprising an opening tape with a message
US20030193136A1 (en) * 1997-12-31 2003-10-16 Walker Jay S. Ticket for instant lottery game and method of playing same
US6669560B2 (en) 1998-08-17 2003-12-30 Igs Limited Device for manufacturing playing counters and drawing sequences in a lottery
US6889978B2 (en) * 2000-07-03 2005-05-10 Oberthur Gaming Technologies, Inc. Lottery ticket with play action game
US6672590B1 (en) * 2002-10-17 2004-01-06 Jeffrey S. Olsen Board game for promoting hometown identity
US7134959B2 (en) 2003-06-25 2006-11-14 Scientific Games Royalty Corporation Methods and apparatus for providing a lottery game
US8177136B2 (en) 2003-12-19 2012-05-15 Scientific Games International, Inc. Embedded optical signatures in documents
US7837117B2 (en) 2003-12-19 2010-11-23 Scientific Games International, Inc. Embedded optical signatures in documents
US20050210384A1 (en) * 2004-03-19 2005-09-22 Klassen James B Memory system
US20050275214A1 (en) * 2004-06-14 2005-12-15 Joshua Pokempner Printed materials with color-change inks to create unique designs
US7621814B2 (en) 2004-07-22 2009-11-24 Scientific Games International, Inc. Media enhanced gaming system
US20060043669A1 (en) * 2004-08-27 2006-03-02 Gumina Anthony G Poker style scratch-ticket lottery games
US7410168B2 (en) 2004-08-27 2008-08-12 Scientific Games International, Inc. Poker style scratch-ticket lottery games
US20060043670A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2006-03-02 O'brien Jim Scratch-ticket lottery and promotional games
US7429044B2 (en) 2004-08-31 2008-09-30 Scientific Games International, Inc. Scratch-ticket lottery and promotional games
US7485037B2 (en) 2004-10-11 2009-02-03 Scientific Games International, Inc. Fixed-odds sports lottery game
US7631871B2 (en) 2004-10-11 2009-12-15 Scientific Games International, Inc. Lottery game based on combining player selections with lottery draws to select objects from a third set of indicia
US8109513B2 (en) 2004-10-28 2012-02-07 Scientific Games International, Inc. Lottery game played on a geometric figure using indicia with variable point values
US7726652B2 (en) 2004-10-28 2010-06-01 Scientific Games International, Inc. Lottery game played on a geometric figure using indicia with variable point values
US7213811B2 (en) 2004-12-08 2007-05-08 Scientific Games Royalty Corporation Extension to a lottery game for which winning indicia are set by selections made by winners of a base lottery game
US7662038B2 (en) 2005-01-07 2010-02-16 Scientific Games International, Inc. Multi-matrix lottery
US8056900B2 (en) 2005-01-07 2011-11-15 Scientific Games International, Inc. Grid-based lottery game and associated system
US7699314B2 (en) 2005-01-07 2010-04-20 Scientific Games International, Inc. Lottery game utilizing nostalgic game themes
US7824257B2 (en) 2005-01-11 2010-11-02 Scientific Games International, Inc. On-line lottery game in which supplemental lottery-selected indicia are available for purchase
US7601059B2 (en) 2005-01-21 2009-10-13 Scientific Games International, Inc. Word-based lottery game
US20060178192A1 (en) * 2005-01-21 2006-08-10 Bozeman Alan K Word-based lottery game
US7481431B2 (en) 2005-02-01 2009-01-27 Scientific Games International, Inc. Bingo-style lottery game ticket
US8262453B2 (en) 2005-02-09 2012-09-11 Scientific Games International, Inc. Combination lottery and raffle game
US7874902B2 (en) 2005-03-23 2011-01-25 Scientific Games International. Inc. Computer-implemented simulated card game
US7785184B2 (en) 2005-03-23 2010-08-31 Scientific Games International, Inc. Computer-implemented simulated card game
US8033905B2 (en) 2005-04-27 2011-10-11 Scientific Games International, Inc. Preprinted lottery tickets using a player activated electronic validation machine
US20100102546A1 (en) * 2005-05-17 2010-04-29 Scientific Games International, Inc. Combination scratch ticket and on-line game ticket
US8308162B2 (en) 2005-05-17 2012-11-13 Scientific Games International, Inc. Combination scratch ticket and on-line game ticket
US7654529B2 (en) 2005-05-17 2010-02-02 Scientific Games International, Inc. Combination scratch ticket and on-line game ticket
US7458580B2 (en) 2005-11-08 2008-12-02 Scientific Games International, Inc. Lottery game card having a Sudoku game
US20070187888A1 (en) * 2005-11-29 2007-08-16 Paul Dures Lottery game card having a Sudoku-themed game
US20080248950A1 (en) * 2007-04-04 2008-10-09 Ibrahim Katampe Ink and Developer System
US20080265506A1 (en) * 2007-04-30 2008-10-30 Milner Benedict Closable-type electronic game grid box with digital display for strategic word pattern engagement
US20080277874A1 (en) * 2007-05-11 2008-11-13 Scoccia Adelmo A Tossed projectile game
US7731196B2 (en) 2007-05-11 2010-06-08 Scoccia Adelmo A Tossed projectile game
US8460081B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2013-06-11 Scientific Games International, Inc. Grid-based multi-lottery game and associated method
US8808080B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2014-08-19 Scientific Games International, Inc. Grid-based lottery game and associated method
US20140265119A1 (en) * 2013-03-13 2014-09-18 Mattel, Inc. Drawing Game

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