US3794119A - Horse shoe - Google Patents

Horse shoe Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3794119A
US3794119A US3794119DA US3794119A US 3794119 A US3794119 A US 3794119A US 3794119D A US3794119D A US 3794119DA US 3794119 A US3794119 A US 3794119A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
covering
elements
horse
section
hoof
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
A Paiso
J Battle
Original Assignee
A Paiso
J Battle
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01LSHOEING OF ANIMALS
    • A01L3/00Horseshoes fastened by means other than nails, with or without additional fastening by nailing

Abstract

A horse shoe is constructed from a flexible covering contoured to fit substantially entirely over a horse''s hoof. Fixed to the sides and upper rear part of the covering are three holding elements. A securement sling or band carrying at least three attachment elements is wrapped around the hoof back portion and opposing sides. The band is oriented to generally overlie the covering in a manner to permit the holding elements and attachment elements to become interlocked in order to firmly secure the covering onto the horse''s hoof.

Description

United States Patent 1191 Paiso et a1.

1451 Feb. 26, 1974 1 HORSE SHOE [76] Inventors: Al Paiso, 5044 Firestone Pl.,

Southgate, Calif. 90280; Jno R. Battle, 337 Mt. Holyoke Ave., Pacific Palisades, Calif. 90272 [22] Filed: Oct. 6, 1972 [21] Appl. N0.: 291,841

52 11.8. CI .j 168/18, 36/25 P 51 1m. 01 A0113/00 58 Field 01 56611611.... 168/18; 36/25 R, 7.1 R, 7.2,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,106,790 10/1963 Zimmon Z/DIG. 6 3,099,884 8/1963 Kixmiller et a1. Z/DlG. 6

797,895 8/1905 Johnson 168/18 1,328,708 l/192O Blondeau 168/18 2,651,853 9/1953 Lewis 36/25 P 3,487,830 1/1970 Pruett 36/72 3,104,479 A 9/1963 D'Amico 2/DIG. 6

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 8,819 5/1900 Great Britain 36/25 P Primary Examiner-Louis G. Mancene Assistant Examiner-.1. Q. Lever Attorney, Agent, or Firm--Past0riza & Kelly 5 7 ABSTRACT A horse shoe is constructed from a flexible Covering contoured to fit substantially entirely over a horses hoof. Fixed to the sides'and upper rear part of the covering are three holding elements. A securement sling or band carrying at least three attachment elements is wrapped around the hoof back portion and opposing sides. The band is oriented to generally over lie the covering in a manner to permit the holding elements and attachment elements to become inter locked in order to firmly secure the covering onto the horses hoof.

2 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures HORSE SHOE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to animal shoes and especially to shoes for horses and the like that enshroud the entire hoof of the animal and remain in place without nails or other fasteners penetrating into the horses hoof or flesh.

The most common type of horse shoes are U-shaped iron or other metal bars that must be heated, shaped to fit, and then nailed directly into a horses hoof by a Farrier or the like. Use of these U-shaped horse shoes often endanger the horses health by injuring hishoof and leg in general. For example, when a wrong type or size of U-shaped horse shoe is chosen it can cause adverse effects on the horse. I11 fitting horse shoes can force the horse to work improperly and sometimes disable the horse completely. Incorrect U-shaped horse shoes can eventually cause lameness, loss of speed, defective gaits and other types of hoof maladies. Moreover, if U-shaped horse shoes are notremoved and modified or replaced periodically, then problems of the type mentioned above can be created or aggravated.

In order to overcome some of the above-mentioned handicaps, flexible boots, coverings, shoes, etc., for horses hoofs have been proposed as disclosed, for example, in: US. Pat. No. 70,035 to Sloat (1867); US. Pat. No. 661,424 to Pflueger (1900); US. Pat. No. 797,895 to Johnson (1905 US. Pat. No. 1,039,002 to Winston (1912); US. Pat. No. 1,274,483 to Wiesenberg (1918); US. Pat. No. 1,294,896 to Grant (1919); and US. Pat. No. 1,298,364 to McCoy (1919).

The horse shoe of this invention is different in important respects from those of the general type described in the above-mentioned patents.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The horse shoe constructed in accordance with this invention may be secured to and worn by most ungulates, i.e., hoofed animals such as foals, full-grown horses, mules, donkeys, zebras, etc.

In its broader aspects, the horse shoe includes a flexible covering of general hollow ungulate shape to fit an animals hoof. The covering has a front section, a pair of side sections, a rear section, a bottom section and an open top section. Holding elements are fixed to the covering side sections and to the rear section. A sling has a central section and a pair of end sections and is oriented to overlie and wrap around parts of the covering side sections and rear section. Attachment elements are fixed to the sling and positioned to register and interlock with corresponding holding elements when the sling is wrapped around and arranged in its intended position.

The holding elements and attachment elements are adjustable to various positions in order to accommodate, to some degree, hoofs of various sizes and hoofs experiencing growth. Preferably the holding elements and attachment elements are constructed from patches of velcro hook and loop material or the like.

The covering bottom section is fully closed and formed with parallel gripping ridges for traction purposes.

The sling central section is formed with at least one pocket to fit over and protect a horses heel bulbs. An upwardly projecting tongue is formed by the covering rear section in order to further protect a horses heel bulb area and the tongue mounts a holding element.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The numerous benefits and unique aspects of the present invention will be fully understood when the following detailed description is studied in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective partly sectional view showing a horse shoe constructed in accordance with this invention firmly secured to a horses hoof;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing the wrap-around sling or band component of the horse shoe;

FIG. 3 is a bottom plan view of the flexible covering component of the horse shoe; and,

FIG. 4 is a rear perspective view showing the flexible covering in solid lines and the sling component in phantom lines.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now primarily to FIG. 1, a horse shoe 10 constructed in accordance with this invention is shown securely fitted onto the lower leg portion 11 of a horse. The lower leg portion 11 illustrated generally consists of the fetlock portion, the pastem portion and the hoof 12. The coronet section 13 is that portion of the horse s pastern which separates the hoof 12 from the haircovered flesh portion of lower leg 11.

The principal aim of the horse shoe 10 is to aid in protecting the horsess hoof and generally preserve and promote the horses health.

Horse shoe 10 generally includes a flexible covering 14 that may be constructed from various plastic or rubber material and has a hollow ungulate configuration in order to fit the hoof of a horse, mule, donkey, zebra or the like. Flexible covering 14 has a front section 15 that generally covers the toe part of hoof 12, a pair of side sections 1 6 and 17 that generally cover the quarter parts of the hoof 12, and a rear section 18 that generally covers the heel part of hoof 12. Covering 14 has an open top 19 through which the horses hoof may be slipped to become placed within the covering 14.

Firmly anchored to covering side sections 16 and 17 are holding elements 20 and 21 respectively. The holding elements 16 and 17 are identical and are preferably patches of well-known velcro material characterized by a multitude of gripping hooks.

Shown wrapped around the heel and quarter parts of hoof 12 is a sling 25 or band that includes forwardly extending end segments 26 and 27 which are attachment elements that are tightly and stably interlocked with corresponding holding elements 20 and 21. The holding elements and attachment elements are mating patches or strips of velcro material that can be securely interlocked and hooked together by pressing them together in a well-known manner.

Referring now primarily to FIG. 2, the sling 25 is shown opened or spread out for the purpose of illustrating certain details. It can be seen that the interior periphery 28 is covered continuously with velcro material to co-act with the holding elements. Between the end segments or attachment elements 26 and 27 is a centrally located and specially contoured pocket 31 or pouch shaped to fit over and conform to the heel bulb area of a horse. The interior face of pocket 31 constitutes a third attachment element that functions in the same manner as attachment elements 26 and 27. Sling 25 has an upper edge 29 and a lower edge 30.

Referring now to FIG. 3, it can be seen that the bottom section 32 of the flexible covering 14 is fully closed and is formed with a series of parallel ridges or ribs 33 for traction and non-skid purposes. The central portion of bottom section 32 is formed with a recess 34. By eliminating openings in bottom section 32 the sole and tender frog parts of the horsess underfoot are better sheltered and protected.

The covering side sections 16 and 17 terminate rearwardly in back walls 36 and 37. Approximately half way between the side section back walls 36 and 37, the covering rear section 18 is formed with a tongue 41 that projects upwardly. Cut-away sections 39 and 40 are formed between back walls 36 and 37 and the intermediate tongue 38. Rigidly anchored to the outer face of tongue 38 is a third holding element 41 of the same construction as holding elements 20 and 21. The attachment element constituted by sling pocket 31 is positioned to fit over and co-act with attachment element 41.

Referring primarily to FIG. 4, the sling 25 is shown in phantom lines wrapped generally around the heel and quarter sections of hoof 12. The sling pocket 31 and tongue 38 both generally cover and protect the relatively tender and sensitive heel bulb area 45 of the horses lower leg portion 11. The sling upper edge 29 is generally aligned above the top of tongue 38 and the sling lower edge 30 is aligned beneath the cut-away sections 39 and 40 so that sand and debris cannot be picked up into the covering 14 where it might be able to irritate the horses sole or frog areas.

Referring again to FIG. 1, a plurality of dimples 23 spaced approximately one-quarter inch apart are formed on the frontal interior periphery of the flexible covering 14. The dimples 23 function to assist in preventing slippage between the flexible covering 14 and hoof 12. Preferably the dimples 23 are sized to be at least 0.020 inches in depth.

The horse shoe of this invention is intended to be comfortably placed on the animals hoof when the animal is ridden, worked or used in any manner whatsoever. After the horse shoe 10 has been used, it can be easily removed, just like any other gear or equipment, so that the animals foot can be free to rest and relax.

From a health and safety standpoint, the horse shoe 10 can greatly assist in correcting the shape of a colts foot, for example, while the bones and muscles are soft and pliable. A further advantage of using this type of no-nail horse shoe is that horses hooves ought to be developed uniformly in terms of shape and size, de pending upon the weight and height of the animals.

The horse shoe 10 is especially suitable for stage use and parades and where noise is a factor. The general softness and comfort of the horse shoe whill tend to virtually eliminate most all foot, leg and arthritic ailments of the type that often cripple horses and mules and similar animals wearing the conventional U-shaped metal shoes.

OPERATION After a horses hoof size is generally measured, an accommodating or correspondingly sized horse shoe 10 is selected and fit over the horses hoof 12 by using tongue 38 as a pulling lever somewhat akin to a shoe horn. Thereafter the sling 25 is aligned generally in place with pocket 31 arranged to cover and protect at least part of the horses heel bulb area 45.

With the three attachment elements in registering relationship with the three holding elements, the sling 25 is pressed inwardly so the velcro material will become tightly interlocked. Because the patches of velcro material are relatively large, corresponding holding elements and attachment elements may be adjusted to one another to correct loose or tight fit or accommodate the hoofs of other animals.

From the foregoing it will be evident that the present invention has provided a horse shoe in which all of the various advantages are fully realized.

What is claimed is:

l. A horse shoe comprising:

a. a flexible covering of a general hollow ungulate shape to fit an animals hoof, the covering having a front section, a pair of side sections, a rear section, a closed bottom section and an open top section;

b. an upwardly projecting tongue formed by the covering rear section to protect an animals heel bulb area;

c. gripping ridges formed on the covering bottom section for improving traction;

d. holding elements on the covering side sections and the tongue;

e. a sling having a central section and a pair of end sections and oriented to overlie and wrap around parts of the covering side sections and rear section;

f. a pocket formed by the sling central section to fit over and protect an animals heel bulb area; and,

g. attachment elements fixed to the sling and positioned to register and interlock with the corresponding holding elements on the covering side sections and the tongue.

2. The structure according to claim 1, wherein:

the holding elements and attachment elements are constructed from patches of mating velcro material.

Claims (2)

1. A horse shoe cOmprising: a. a flexible covering of a general hollow ungulate shape to fit an animal''s hoof, the covering having a front section, a pair of side sections, a rear section, a closed bottom section and an open top section; b. an upwardly projecting tongue formed by the covering rear section to protect an animal''s heel bulb area; c. gripping ridges formed on the covering bottom section for improving traction; d. holding elements on the covering side sections and the tongue; e. a sling having a central section and a pair of end sections and oriented to overlie and wrap around parts of the covering side sections and rear section; f. a pocket formed by the sling central section to fit over and protect an animal''s heel bulb area; and, g. attachment elements fixed to the sling and positioned to register and interlock with the corresponding holding elements on the covering side sections and the tongue.
2. The structure according to claim 1, wherein: the holding elements and attachment elements are constructed from patches of mating velcro material.
US3794119A 1972-10-06 1972-10-06 Horse shoe Expired - Lifetime US3794119A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US29184172 true 1972-10-06 1972-10-06

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3794119A true US3794119A (en) 1974-02-26

Family

ID=23122074

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3794119A Expired - Lifetime US3794119A (en) 1972-10-06 1972-10-06 Horse shoe

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3794119A (en)

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3967683A (en) * 1974-09-27 1976-07-06 Juan Saavedra Ensinozo Equine hoofwear
DE19630660A1 (en) * 1996-07-30 1998-02-05 Thomas Graesler Hoof protection for horses
DE19742274A1 (en) * 1997-09-25 1998-03-05 Stefan Dr Brosig Method for detachably fixing interchangeable hoof protectors to hooves
DE19732269A1 (en) * 1996-07-30 1999-02-11 Thomas Graesler Shoe for fitting onto horse's hoof
GB2338394A (en) * 1998-06-04 1999-12-22 Harry Iles Releasable horseshoe
US6305328B1 (en) * 1998-12-03 2001-10-23 Helmut Marquis Hoof shoe
US6439314B1 (en) 2000-08-24 2002-08-27 William G. Wiltz Aqua boot for horses
US6560951B1 (en) * 1999-04-22 2003-05-13 Gary Adrian Wood Boot for livestock
DE10228727C1 (en) * 2002-04-25 2003-10-16 Dallmer Gmbh & Co Kg Hoof shoe, for the treatment of acute and chronic hoof disablement in horses, has a base secured to the hoof without nails with a wedge-shaped sole and a ribbed walking surface with a convex curvature
US6651410B2 (en) 2001-09-15 2003-11-25 Tommy Lee Osha Comfort management system for equine
WO2004047526A1 (en) * 2002-11-27 2004-06-10 Manolo Maestrini Size-adjustable shoe for hoofed animals
US20050166556A1 (en) * 2004-01-13 2005-08-04 Ford Garrett N. Horse boot sleeve for pastern protection
US7032367B1 (en) 2004-06-16 2006-04-25 Yoho Bonnie R Hoof boot for hoofed animals and methods of making same
US20070068125A1 (en) * 2005-09-27 2007-03-29 Brian Davis Hoof treatment device having a dual-density pad and method
US20140007548A1 (en) * 2010-09-23 2014-01-09 Equine Fusion As Sole for a foot of an animal
WO2014138790A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 David Duncan Macdonald Improved equine hoof boot
USD767830S1 (en) 2015-03-06 2016-09-27 Advanced Equine Comfort, LLC Horseshoe
US9629336B1 (en) 2003-11-03 2017-04-25 Stephen E. Paxton Dog boot

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB190008819A (en) * 1900-05-12 1901-05-11 Joseph Webb Squier Improvements in the Manufacture of Horse Lawn Mowing Boots
US797895A (en) * 1905-04-27 1905-08-22 Randell Johnson Horseshoe.
US1328708A (en) * 1919-04-11 1920-01-20 Blondeau Eugene Henry Horseshoe
US2651853A (en) * 1951-11-29 1953-09-15 Lewis Fred Peter Animal boot with adhesive tape securing means
US3099884A (en) * 1961-11-16 1963-08-06 Frank C Kixmiller Shoes or sandals
US3104479A (en) * 1962-11-08 1963-09-24 D Amico Rosemary Heel protector
US3106790A (en) * 1962-10-29 1963-10-15 Zimmpon & Company Inc Slipper for geriatrics and other uses
US3487830A (en) * 1969-05-05 1970-01-06 Frank M Pruett Surgical cast and orthopedic toe protecting sock

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB190008819A (en) * 1900-05-12 1901-05-11 Joseph Webb Squier Improvements in the Manufacture of Horse Lawn Mowing Boots
US797895A (en) * 1905-04-27 1905-08-22 Randell Johnson Horseshoe.
US1328708A (en) * 1919-04-11 1920-01-20 Blondeau Eugene Henry Horseshoe
US2651853A (en) * 1951-11-29 1953-09-15 Lewis Fred Peter Animal boot with adhesive tape securing means
US3099884A (en) * 1961-11-16 1963-08-06 Frank C Kixmiller Shoes or sandals
US3106790A (en) * 1962-10-29 1963-10-15 Zimmpon & Company Inc Slipper for geriatrics and other uses
US3104479A (en) * 1962-11-08 1963-09-24 D Amico Rosemary Heel protector
US3487830A (en) * 1969-05-05 1970-01-06 Frank M Pruett Surgical cast and orthopedic toe protecting sock

Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3967683A (en) * 1974-09-27 1976-07-06 Juan Saavedra Ensinozo Equine hoofwear
DE19630660A1 (en) * 1996-07-30 1998-02-05 Thomas Graesler Hoof protection for horses
DE19732269A1 (en) * 1996-07-30 1999-02-11 Thomas Graesler Shoe for fitting onto horse's hoof
DE19732269C2 (en) * 1996-07-30 2003-09-18 Thomas Graesler Hoof protection for horses as well as method of mounting such a hoof
DE19630660C2 (en) * 1996-07-30 2000-08-03 Thomas Graesler Hoof protection for horses as well as method of mounting such a hoof
DE19742274A1 (en) * 1997-09-25 1998-03-05 Stefan Dr Brosig Method for detachably fixing interchangeable hoof protectors to hooves
GB2338394A (en) * 1998-06-04 1999-12-22 Harry Iles Releasable horseshoe
US6305328B1 (en) * 1998-12-03 2001-10-23 Helmut Marquis Hoof shoe
US6560951B1 (en) * 1999-04-22 2003-05-13 Gary Adrian Wood Boot for livestock
US6439314B1 (en) 2000-08-24 2002-08-27 William G. Wiltz Aqua boot for horses
US6651410B2 (en) 2001-09-15 2003-11-25 Tommy Lee Osha Comfort management system for equine
US6868656B2 (en) 2001-09-15 2005-03-22 Tommy Lee Osha Comfort management system for equine
US20040065063A1 (en) * 2001-09-15 2004-04-08 Osha Tommy Lee Comfort management system for equine
DE10228727C1 (en) * 2002-04-25 2003-10-16 Dallmer Gmbh & Co Kg Hoof shoe, for the treatment of acute and chronic hoof disablement in horses, has a base secured to the hoof without nails with a wedge-shaped sole and a ribbed walking surface with a convex curvature
DE10228728A1 (en) * 2002-04-25 2003-11-13 Dallmer Gmbh & Co Kg Horseshoe for treating acute and chronic laminitis comprises base plate with peripheral collar which fits over hoof and sole made up of grid of longitudinal and transverse ribs
US20060162296A1 (en) * 2002-11-27 2006-07-27 Manolo Maestrini Size-adjustable shoe for hoofed animals
WO2004047526A1 (en) * 2002-11-27 2004-06-10 Manolo Maestrini Size-adjustable shoe for hoofed animals
US7207163B2 (en) * 2002-11-27 2007-04-24 Manolo Maestrini Size-adjustable shoe for hoofed animals
US9629336B1 (en) 2003-11-03 2017-04-25 Stephen E. Paxton Dog boot
US7174858B2 (en) * 2004-01-13 2007-02-13 Ford Garrett N Horse boot sleeve for pastern protection
US20050166556A1 (en) * 2004-01-13 2005-08-04 Ford Garrett N. Horse boot sleeve for pastern protection
US7032367B1 (en) 2004-06-16 2006-04-25 Yoho Bonnie R Hoof boot for hoofed animals and methods of making same
US20070068125A1 (en) * 2005-09-27 2007-03-29 Brian Davis Hoof treatment device having a dual-density pad and method
US20140007548A1 (en) * 2010-09-23 2014-01-09 Equine Fusion As Sole for a foot of an animal
WO2014138790A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 David Duncan Macdonald Improved equine hoof boot
USD767830S1 (en) 2015-03-06 2016-09-27 Advanced Equine Comfort, LLC Horseshoe

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3285346A (en) Method of forming a hoof-covering
US3519079A (en) Horseshoe and method of making same
US4177583A (en) Orthopedic shoe with forefoot protective guard
US5822887A (en) Over-the-shoe athletic spat
US4497070A (en) Unitary leg and foot protective device
US6532689B1 (en) Slipper
US5143058A (en) Foot and leg splint
US4385592A (en) Canine cervical brace
US6394041B1 (en) Pooch pooh catcher
US4719876A (en) Restraint collar
US20120005995A1 (en) Hoof protection devices
US6167844B1 (en) Humane training and control collar
US4892150A (en) Polymer horseshoe providing enhanced support
US5408812A (en) Dog boot
US5676095A (en) Protective paw coverings for animals
US3603402A (en) Horseshoe and methods for shoeing a horse therewith
US4559906A (en) Small animal harness
US4981010A (en) Horse boot
US4513825A (en) Horseshoe full pad
US5199498A (en) Custom horseshoe pad and hoof repair
US20050188925A1 (en) Canine footwear
US4265033A (en) Shoe to be worn over cast
US4838206A (en) Combination collar and muzzle humane training aid
Hayes Veterinary notes for horse owners
US6508205B1 (en) Fly bite and botfly prevention legging for equine