US3786739A - Ventilating system - Google Patents

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US3786739A
US3786739A US3786739DA US3786739A US 3786739 A US3786739 A US 3786739A US 3786739D A US3786739D A US 3786739DA US 3786739 A US3786739 A US 3786739A
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chamber
air
housing
materials
exhaust port
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J Wright
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IND IND Inc
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IND IND Inc
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24CDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES ; DETAILS OF DOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F24C15/00Details
    • F24C15/20Removing cooking fumes
    • F24C15/2057Removing cooking fumes using a cleaning liquid
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24CDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES ; DETAILS OF DOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F24C15/00Details
    • F24C15/20Removing cooking fumes
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F3/00Air-conditioning systems in which conditioned primary air is supplied from one or more central stations to distributing units in the rooms or spaces where it may receive secondary treatment; Apparatus specially designed for such systems
    • F24F3/12Air-conditioning systems in which conditioned primary air is supplied from one or more central stations to distributing units in the rooms or spaces where it may receive secondary treatment; Apparatus specially designed for such systems characterised by the treatment of the air otherwise than by heating and cooling
    • F24F3/16Air-conditioning systems in which conditioned primary air is supplied from one or more central stations to distributing units in the rooms or spaces where it may receive secondary treatment; Apparatus specially designed for such systems characterised by the treatment of the air otherwise than by heating and cooling by purification, e.g. by filtering; by sterilisation; by ozonisation
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S55/00Gas separation
    • Y10S55/36Kitchen hoods

Abstract

A system for venting air laden with moisture, smoke, fumes, grease vapors and the like from environments such as kitchen areas. The system extracts nearly all grease vapors and a large proportion of other materials in the air and is adapted to periodically undergo a wash cycle to clean practically the entire system. The system includes a housing, a hood, a first chamber in the lower portion of the housing, a first series of nozzles for imparting an extraction spray to the first chamber, a second chamber in the upper portion of the housing communicating with the first chamber by means of a baffled conduit, a damper means for regulating exhaust, a suction fan and a second series of nozzles for imparting wash liquid to both chambers within the housing.

Description

a tent 91 right 1 Jan. 22, 1974 VENTIILATING SYSTEM Primary Examiner-Meyer Perlin Assistant Examiner- -Ronald C. Caposella [75] Inventor: John David Wright, Houston, Tex. Attorney, Agent, or Firm-James F. Weiler et al.
[73] Assignee: Industrial Industries, fine, Houston,
57 ABSTRACT [22] Filed: May 1972 A system for venting air laden with moisture, smoke, [21] Appl. No.: 257,423 fumes, grease vapors and the like from environments such as kitchen areas. The system extracts nearly all grease vapors and a large proportion of other materi- (Si. 98/1152 als in the air and is adapted to periodically undergo a [58] Field l 15 K wash cycle to clean practically the entire system. The
""""" system includes a housing, a hood, a first chamber in the lower portion of the housing, a first series of noz- [56] References Cited zles for imparting an extraction spray to the first v UNITED STATES PATENTS chamber, a second chamber in the upper portion of 3 616 744 11/197] Jensen 98/115 K the housing communicating with the first chamber by 3:060:833 10/1962 Pledger::::::.::.::... III: 98/115 K means of a baffled conduit, a damper means for 3324529 6/1967 Graswich et a]- 98/115 K lating exhaust, a suction fan and a second series of 3,425,334 2/1969 Brown et al. 98/86 X nozzles for imparting wash liquid to both chambers 3,564,989 2/1971 Williams 98/115 K Within the housing.
7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures sa J] VENTILATING SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Ventilating of cooking areas in kitchens particularly in restaurants and institutional prepared food establishments has long presented problems not only in the mechanics of removing sufficient quantities of air but also in exhausting grease and moisture-laden air both safely and in a sanitary manner. Fires in kitchen exhaust sys tems inflict phenomenal property losses due in large part to the continual condensation and build-up of grease and volatile materials on vent surfaces. These materials are constantly subjected to heat and even open flames in many instances resulting in ignition and consequent fire damage. Apart from fires, build-up of such materials also poses a sanitary problem in that the materials provide a substrate for growth of molds, bacteria and the like which are objectionable particularly in food-processing areas.
Removal of grease and moisture as well as smoke, fumes and the like from kitchen exhausts have been accomplished in the past by drawing exhaust air into a confined chamber where it is cooled and cleaned by a fine water spray after which it is ducted to a remote discharging outlet. For example, US. Pat. No. 3,221,635 granted Dec. 7, 1965 to Edward Hill, Jr. disclosed a ventilating system for directing captured air through a restricted velocity-increasing opening to impart a rotary swirl action in a collection chamber in which air is cooled and at least partially purified of grease particles and other foreign matter by a fine water spray. Particularly, the Hill device provides a water spray in a helical pattern to improve washing and cooling effectiveness.
While ventilating systems such as that disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,221,635 have been effective, nevertheless there has been a need for a ventilating system capable of removing virtually all grease compounds from hot exhaust air. In addition, it would be advantageous to provide positive fire-control means as well as means for periodically washing surfaces of the ventilating system. The present invention constitutes an improvement over conventional ventilating systems and offers the advantages mentioned.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a ventilating system for air containing moisture, smoke, fumes, grease vapors and the like. The system water-cools hot exhaust air to a point at which grease particles condense and are extracted by a water spray, the exhaust air moving in a centrifugal path in a first chamber within a housing in which the water spray contacts the exhaust air for extraction purposes. The air then moves through a baffled conduit in which residual grease particles are removed from the air whereupon the exhaust stream passes to a second chamber in the upper portion of the housing. Preferably, the second chamber is larger than the first so that the air expands and is slowed for removal of moisture to prevent water from being carried to duct systems. A damper device is provided in the second chamber to seal an exhaust port therewith should a rise in temperature to an elevated level be experienced due to fire and the like. A suction fan is provided downstream of the exhaust port to serve as the primary motive means for the exhaust air.
Preferably, nozzles are adapted throughout both chambers of the housing in the system to impart a wash liquid to all surfaces within the system that are contacted by the exhaust air. Periodically, wash liquid is sprayed through such nozzles to remove any materials that collect on the surfaces, such liquid falling to the lower portion of the first chamber for removal by drainage.
It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a ventilating system in which exhaust air is water-cooled to extractingly remove grease, smoke, fumes, moisture and the like from an atmosphere in enclosed areas such as kitchens and the like before the air is ducted to an exhaust outlet.
Another object of the present invention is the provision of an improved ventilating system wherein cyclonic motion is imparted to exhaust air, the air is contacted with water spray, cooled and entrained materials removed therefrom in order to reduce the likelihood of combustion in the ventilating system and to cleanse the air that is emitted from the system.
Still a further object of the present invention is the provision of a ventilating system having the advantages stated in addition to an integral self-cleaning means whereby a wash liquid is periodically applied to surfaces of the system to remove any build-up of grease, smoke residue and the like.
Yet a further object of the present invention is the provision of a ventilating system having the advantage of positive fire preclusion by means of constant water spray with instant cooling of hot, greasy vapors entering the system and consequent removal therefrom.
A still further object of the present invention is the provision of such a ventilating system having damper means forming a positive closure upon rise of temperature of air within the system in order to confine any possible combustion and eliminate same by means of a water spray.
Other and further objects, features and advantages will be apparent in the following description of a preferred embodiment of the invention, given for the purpose of disclosure and taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings forming a part of the disclosure herein, like character references designate like parts throughout the several views, wherein FIG. 1 is a partial elevational view in cross section showing the ventilating system of the present invention,
FIG. 2 is a partial plan view, partly in cross section, taken along the line 22 of FIG. 1,
FIG. 3 is a view similar to that of FIG. 1 illustrating functioning of washing means of the present invention, and
FIG. 4 is a view of a control panel and piping for operation of the ventilating system of the present invention.
DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Withreference to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the ventilating system of the present invention is designated generally by the reference numeral 10, having a vertically oriented, elongate housing 12. A hood member 14 is provided to collect exhaust air for passage through the housing 12. The hood 14 as shown may be constructed to extend as necessary to collect cooking vapors and the like from a kitchen area, and it will be understood that the hood 14, housing 12 and associated parts may be formed of suitable sheet metal.
A first chamber 16 is provided within the lower portion of the housing 12 for reception of exhaust air and materials contained therein. The first chamber 16 is generally formed by the provision of a suitable wall 18 that curves upwardly to form a conduit designated by the reference numeral 20, the wall 18 also curving around and downwardly to form a collection reservoir designated by the reference numeral 22. In liquid communication with the reservoir 22 is a drain pipe 24 for removal of extraction water containing grease and the like as well as for removal of wash liquid as will be explained hereafter.
Disposed within the first chamber 16 is a curved partition 26 to urge the exhaust air and materials contained therein into a cyclonic flow pattern. Thus, the partition 26 extends from the housing at a point adjacent to the hood 14 and curves downwardly and around as illustrated in FIG. 1. It will be understood that the partition 26 as well as the wall 18 extend substantially the length of the housing 12, the length being indicated in FIG. 2.
A first nozzle means is disposed within the first chamber 16 and comprises a plurality of nozzles 28, only one being shown in FIG. 1. It will be understood, however, that a plurality of nozzles 28 are spaced along substantially the width of the housing 12, each nozzle 28 communicating with a header pipe 30 which in turn is connected to a cold water supply pipe 32. The nozzles 28 impart a spray of water across the width of the first chamber 16 to extract material such as grease particles from exhaust air passing therethrough as will be explained.
A second chamber 34 is provided within the upper portion of the housing 12. An exhaust port 36 is located at the upper extremity of the second chamber 34 although physical location of the port 36 is not critical and it will be understood that it may be located elsewhere within the second chamber 34. As mentioned previously, the portion 20 of the wall 18 provides a conduit which likewise extends substantially the width of the housing 12 in order that exhaust air may flow from the first chamber 16 to the second chamber 34. A baffle 38 is formed in the wall 20 of the conduit and likewise extends substantially the width of the housing 12 to impart a direction change to the flow of exhaust air as it passes into the second chamber 34.
Preferably, the second chamber 34 is larger than the first chamber 16 so that movement of exhaust air with entrained residual material is slowed upon entering the is cooled so that entrained moisture with residualexhaust materials condenses and is separated from air,
about a pivot shaft 46. The damper plate 44 is adapted to engage a seat 48 formed of walls 50 secured to the housing 12 and forming an extension of the port 36.
The damper means further includes a retention line 52 for maintaining the damper plate 44 normally in the open position relative to the exhaust port 36 as shown in FIG. 1. The retention line 52 is better shown in FIG. 2 and comprises, preferably, a single strand of wire secured to the housing at opposed points 54 and 56 and looping through one and preferably two eyelets 58 likewise secured to the housing. The damper plate 44 is provided with holes 60 through which the retention line 52 passes or is anchored such as by means of a fusible link 62. At least one and preferably a plurality of fusible links 62 are placed in the retention line 52. The links are adapted to melt at elevated temperatures to release the retention line 52 whereby the damper plate 44 may close to seal the exhaust port 36. The fusible links 62 may be formed of a suitable metal alloy composition to melt at temperatures preferably 160 F. or higher, depending on the alloy composition as may be selected by those skilled in the art. For purposes of this specification, a temperature of 160 F. or higher is considered an elevated temperature and is preferred in order to use hot water wash liquid for purposes of cleaning the system without melting the fusible links.
As shown in FIG. 1, a weight 64 is attached to the damper plate 44 in order to gravitationally force the damper plate 44 into a closed position upon fusing severance of the fusible links 62. Of course, as will be appreciated, a suitable spring or spring arrangement may be employed in lieu of the weight 64 if desired.
As shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, a second series of nozzles are disposed within both the first and second chambers 16 and 34, respectively, for imparting a spray of wash liquid to said chambers. Thus, spray nozzles 66 and 68 are provided to impart a spray within the second chamber 34 while a plurality of nozzles 70 impart a spray of wash liquid into the first chamber 16. The nozzles 66 and 68 are secured to and are in liquid communication with a wash liquid header 72 which in turn is connected to a wash liquid pipe 74. The nozzles 70 are each secured to a series of secondary wash liquid header pipes 76 that project through the partition 26 to support and communicate with each nozzle 70. The spray pattern of wash liquid imparted by the nozzles 66, 68 and 70 is represented by dotted lines 78 in FIG. 3.
Referring now to FIG. 4, a control panel is shown for controlling operation of the ventilating system of the present invention. Thus provided is a cold water supply line 80 having a shut-off valve 82 and a strainer 84. A pressure reducing valve 86 is connected in the line 80 as is a cold water solenoid valve 88 which opens and closes flow of cold water in the line 80a to the pipe 32 of the ventilating system of FIG. 1-3.
Also as shown in FIG. 4, a hot water supply line 90 is provided with a shut-off valve 92 and a strainer 94. A hot water solenoid valve 96 opens and closes flow of hot water in the line 90a leading to the pipe 74 of the ventilating system. A wash liquid such as a suitable detergent is provided from a source to which is connected the pipe 98, the detergent being pumped by means of a pump 100 into the hot water supply line 90a leading to the ventilator system.
As further shown in FIG. 4, suitable electrical control means including a timer 102, starting switch 104 and stopping switch 106 are provided. Electrical current is provided by the line 108 to actuate the detergent pump 100, by the line 110 to actuate the hot water solenoid valve 96, and by the line 1 12 to actuate the cold water solenoid valve 88.
Not shown in any of the drawings is a suction fan mounted within duct work leading from the exhaust port 36. It will be understood by those skilled in the art that any suitable suction fan or blower may be utilized to provide a prime motive source to pull exhaust air through the ventilating system of the present invention.
In operation, the cold and hot water shut-off valves 82 and 92, respectively, should be in the open position as shown in FIG. 4. The starting switch 104 is actuated to supply power to the cold water solenoid 88 and to the exhaust or suction fan (not shown). As a result, cold water passes into the line 32 and out of the nozzles 28 resulting in a spray pattern indicated in FIG. 1 by the dotted lines designated with the reference numeral 1 14. Thus spray water impinges on the wall of the partition 26, flowing down the wall of the partition 26 and into the reservoir 22 formed by the lower portion of the wall 18. Exhaust to be vented from a stove, range, etc.
is pulled by means of the suction fan (not shown) in a pattern indicated by a series of arrows in FIG. 1. The exhaust air enters the first chamber 16 and assumes a cyclonic flow path by virtue of the partition 26. The exhaust air contacts the water spray 114 and is cooled. Water saturated air is forced to the bottom of the first chamber 16 as cooled grease particles separate from the air and are deposited on the walls of the first chamber 16 and/or drop into the reservoir 22 to be flushed out the drain 24.
Extraction of grease particles, smoke, fumes and the like also occurs as the exhaust air moves through the first chamber 16 in cyclonic motion, being pushed downward against the lower portion of the chamber 16 and into contact with water standing in the reservoir 22 as indicated by the dotted line 23. Preferably, the drain 24 is a standpipe type drain creating at least a three quarter inch water level within the reservoir 22.
The exhaust air is compressed as it is pushed upward into the conduit formed between the partition 26 and the wall 18. The surfaces of the partition 26 and the wall 18 forming the conduit 20 serve to collect residual grease particles in the exhaust air as a result of I sudden changes in velocity and direction provided by the conduit 20. The baffie 38 within the conduit likewise catches any residual grease that may still be in the exhaust air.
Cyclonic motion once again is created in the second chamber 34 where moisture is taken out of the exhaust air. As the exhaust air moves into the second chamber 34, it expands and is slowed having further cooling effect on the air and causing moisture to condense on the interior surfaces of the wall of the chamber 34. Finally, the exhaust air exits through the exhaust port 36 and is ducted through the suction fan or blower for final disposal.
Periodically, and as may be regulated such as by means of the timer 102 in the electrical system of the present invention, the cold water solenoid 88 may be closed to stop flow of cold water to the first chamber l6. Simultaneously, the hot water solenoid valve '96 may be opened and the detergent pump 100 activated whereby hot water and detergent pass into the pipe 90a which communicates with the header 72 as shown in FIG. 2. Wash liquid is thus imparted to the first chamber 16 as well as the second chamber 34 in flow patterns such as those of the dotted lines indicated by reference numeral 78 in FIG. 3. Consequently, the interior surfaces of all walls within both chambers are flushed with hot wash liquid to remove any grease that has collected on the walls. The wash liquid flows downward along the walls into the reservoir 22 and is removed through the drain 24. The period of time during which wash liquid is sprayed into the system may be regulated as desired and, once the wash cycle has been completed, the cold water spray 114 in the first chamber 16 may be started again for repetition of the operation.
Should temperature within the system rise due to fire, the links 62 as shown in FIGS. 1-3 fuse thereby severing and releasing the retention line 52 so that the damper plate 44 swings into engagement with the seat 48 forming a closure about the exhaust port 36. As previously indicated, the damper plate 44 assumes such a position by virtue of the weight 64 or suitable spring arrangement. Thus, any fire is confined to the interior of the housing 12 and may be doused immediately by virtue of the cold water spray 114 as shown in FIG. 1 and- /or a hot water spray in the pattern 78 shown in FIG. 3.
The present invention, therefore, is well adapted to carry out the objects and attain the ends and advantages mentioned as well as others inherent therein. While a presently preferred embodiment of the invention has been given for the purpose of disclosure, numerous changes in the detail of construction and the combination, shape, size and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as hereinafter claimed.
What is claimed is:
1. A ventilating system for air containing materials including moisture, smoke, fumes, grease vapors and the like, comprising,
a. a vertically oriented, elongate housing,
b. a hood member for collecting the air and materials for passage through the housing (a),
c. a first chamber within the lower portion of the housing (a) for reception of the air and materials from the hood member (b), said chamber having a curved partition extending substantially the width of the housing (a) to urge the air and materials into a cyclonic flow pattern,
d. first nozzle means within said first chamber (c) for imparting a spray of water across substantially the width of the first chamber (c) to extract materials from the air,
e. drain means in the first chamber (c) for removing water and materials that collect in the bottom of said chamber,
f. a second chamber within the upper portion of the housing (a) having an exhaust port therein,
g. a conduit extending substantially the width of the housing (a) for flow of air with residual materials from the first chamber (c) to the second chamber (f),
h. at least one baffle within the conduit (g) extending substantially the width of the housing for imparting a-directional change to the flow of exhaust air in the second chamber (f), and
i. damper means in the second chamber (f) for sealably closing the exhaust port upon rising of temperature therein.
2. The ventilating system of claim 1 including, additionally,
k. second nozzle means disposed within both the first and second chambers (c) and (f) respectively for imparting a spray of wash liquid to said chambers.
3. The ventilating system of claim 1 wherein the damper means (i) includes, more particularly,
a damper plate pivotally secured within the second chamber (f) adjacent the exhaust port of said chamber,
a retention line for maintaining the damper plate normally in the open position relative to the exhaust port, and
at least one fusible link in'the retention line, said link being adapted to melt at an elevated temperature to release the retention line whereby the damper plate may close to seal the exhaust port.
4. The system of claim 1 wherein the second chamber (f) is larger than the first chamber (c) so that movement of air with residual materials is slowed upon entering the second chamber (f).
5. The system of claim 4 including, additionally, baffle means within the second chamber (f) to urge the air with residual materials into a cyclonic flow pattern therewithin.
6. A ventilating system for air containing materials including moisture, smoke, fumes, grease vapors and the like comprising,
a. a vertically oriented, elongate housing,
b. a hood member for collecting the air and materials for passage through the housing (a),
c. a first chamber within the lower portion of the housing (a) for reception of the air and materials from the hood member (b), said chamber having a curved partition extending substantially the width of the housing (a) to urge the air and materials into a cyclonic flow pattern,
d. first nozzle means within said first chamber (c) for imparting a spray of water across substantially the width of the first chamber (0) to extract materials from the air,
e. drain means in the first chamber (0) for removing water and materials that collect in the bottom of said chamber,
f. a second chamber within the upper portion of the housing (a) having an exhaust port, the second chamber being larger in volume than the first chamber (c) so that movement of air with residual materials is slowed upon entering the second chamber,
g. a conduit extending substantially the width of the housing (a) for flow of air with residual materials from the first chamber (0) to the second chamber h. at least one baffle within the conduit (g) extending substantially the width of the housing for imparting a directional change to the flow of exhaust air into the second chamber (f),
second nozzle means disposed within both the first and second chambers (c) and (f) respectively for imparting a spray of wash liquid to said chambers, and j. damper means in the second chamber (f) for sea]- ably closing the exhaust port upon rise of temperature there.
7. The invention of claim 6 wherein the damper means (j) includes, more particularly,
a damper plate pivotally secured within the second chamber (f) adjacent the exhaust port of said chamber,
a retention line for maintaining the damper plate normally in the open position relative to the exhaust port, and
at least one fusible link in the retention line, said link being adapted to melt at an elevated temperature to release the retention line whereby the damper plate may close to seal the exhaust port,

Claims (7)

1. A ventilating system for air containing materials including moisture, smoke, fumes, grease vapors and the like, comprising, a. a vertically oriented, elongate housing, b. a hood member for collecting the air and materials for passage through the housing (a), c. a first chamber within the lower portion of the housing (a) for reception of the air and materials from the hood member (b), said chamber having a curved partition extending substantially the width of the housing (a) to urge the air and materials into a cyclonic flow pattern, d. first nozzle means within said first chamber (c) for imparting a spray of water across substantially the width of the first chamber (c) to extract materials from the air, e. drain means in the first chamber (c) for removing water and materials that collect in the bottom of said chamber, f. a second chamber within the upper portion of the housing (a) having an exhaust port therein, g. a conduit extending substantially the width of the housing (a) for flow of air with residual materials from the first chamber (c) to the second chamber (f), h. at least one baffle within the conduit (g) extending substantially the width of the housing for imparting a directional change to the flow of exhaust air in the second chamber (f), and i. damper means in the second chamber (f) for sealably closing the exhaust port upon rising of temperature therein.
2. The ventilating system of claim 1 including, additionally, k. second nozzle means disposed within both the first and second chambers (c) and (f) respectively for imparting a spray of wash liquid to said chambers.
3. The ventilating system of claim 1 wherein the damper means (i) includes, more particularly, a damper plate pivotally secured within the second chamber (f) adjacent the exhaust port of said chamber, a retention line for maintaining the damper plate normally in the open position relative to the exhaust port, and at least one fusible link in the retention line, said link being adapted to melt at an elevated temperature to release the retention line whereby the damper plate may close to seal the exhaust port.
4. The system of claim 1 wherein the second chamber (f) is larger than the first chamber (c) so that movement of air with residual materials is slowed upon entering the second chamber (f).
5. The system of claim 4 including, additionally, baffle means within the second chamber (f) to urge the air with residual materials into a cyclonic flow pattern therewithin.
6. A ventilating system for air containing materials including moisture, smoke, fumes, grease vapors and the like comprising, a. a vertically oriented, elongate housing, b. a hood member for collecting the air and materials for passage through the housing (a), c. a first chamber within the lower portion of the housing (a) for reception of the air and materials from the hood member (b), said chamber having a curved partition extending substantially the width of the housing (a) to urge the air and materials into a cyclonic flow pattern, d. first nozzle means within said first chamber (c) for imparting a spray of water across substantially the width of the first chamber (c) to extract materials from the air, e. drain means in the first chamber (c) for removing water and materials that collect in the bottom of said chamber, f. a second chamber within the upper portion of the housing (a) having an exhaust port, the second chamber being larger in volume than the first chamber (c) so that movement of air with residual materials is slowed upon entering the second chamber, g. a conduit extending substantially the width of the housing (a) for flow of air with residual materials from the first chamber (c) to the second chamber (f), h. at least one baffle within the conduit (g) extending substantially the width of tHe housing for imparting a directional change to the flow of exhaust air into the second chamber (f), i. second nozzle means disposed within both the first and second chambers (c) and (f) respectively for imparting a spray of wash liquid to said chambers, and j. damper means in the second chamber (f) for sealably closing the exhaust port upon rise of temperature there.
7. The invention of claim 6 wherein the damper means (j) includes, more particularly, a damper plate pivotally secured within the second chamber (f) adjacent the exhaust port of said chamber, a retention line for maintaining the damper plate normally in the open position relative to the exhaust port, and at least one fusible link in the retention line, said link being adapted to melt at an elevated temperature to release the retention line whereby the damper plate may close to seal the exhaust port.
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US20110048397A1 (en) * 2006-03-10 2011-03-03 Kellogg, Bruns & Smeija, LLC Range exhaust cleaning system and method
ES2394500A1 (en) * 2010-10-14 2013-02-01 Nashitel, S.L. Fume cupboard (Machine-translation by Google Translate, not legally binding)
CN103438490A (en) * 2013-09-17 2013-12-11 天津曌宇环保科技发展有限公司 Lampblack purifying machine for kitchen
US8746231B2 (en) 2006-03-10 2014-06-10 Kbs Automist, Llc Range exhaust cleaning system and method
CN108679677A (en) * 2018-07-26 2018-10-19 广东美的厨房电器制造有限公司 Range hood
WO2021154685A1 (en) * 2020-01-29 2021-08-05 Taylor Jeffrey Allen Kitchen exhaust systems and methods of removing grease from grease-laden vapors
US11156368B2 (en) * 2018-04-19 2021-10-26 Steivor, Inc. Range exhaust hood cleaning system

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US3984505A (en) * 1974-03-26 1976-10-05 Paul Gutermuth False kitchen ceiling with liquid spray system for cleaning
US4125148A (en) * 1976-01-07 1978-11-14 Stainless Equipment Company Method for utilization of waste energy
US4129179A (en) * 1976-01-07 1978-12-12 Stainless Equipment Company Apparatus for utilization of waste energy
US4085735A (en) * 1976-01-26 1978-04-25 National Food Service Equipment Fabricators, Inc. Air ventilation and washing system
US4071019A (en) * 1976-04-08 1978-01-31 Industrial Industries, Inc. Grease extractor
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US4103676A (en) * 1976-11-03 1978-08-01 Kastner Karl F Grease extraction cartridge for kitchen exhaust ventilator
FR2545739A1 (en) * 1983-05-10 1984-11-16 Cassan Michel Safety device for fume extractor
US4753218A (en) * 1987-02-09 1988-06-28 Cambridge Engineering, Inc. Continuous water wash hood type ventilating system
US4911233A (en) * 1988-08-22 1990-03-27 Chao James C Interface fluid heat transfer system
WO1991011670A1 (en) * 1990-01-30 1991-08-08 Chao James C Interface fluid heat transfer system
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US5613990A (en) * 1995-03-28 1997-03-25 Helical Dynamics, Inc. Air cleaning system for mechanical industrial processes
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US5860412A (en) * 1997-11-05 1999-01-19 Way; Joseph E. Kitchen ventilation duct degreasing system
EP1108959A1 (en) * 1999-12-16 2001-06-20 Sven Oetjen Kitchen exhaust hood
US7026945B2 (en) 2003-08-27 2006-04-11 Bobby Dwyane Hill Alarm device interface system
US20050046565A1 (en) * 2003-08-27 2005-03-03 Hill Bobby D. Alarm device interface system
US8316839B2 (en) * 2006-03-10 2012-11-27 Kbs Automist, Llc Range exhaust cleaning system and method
US20110048397A1 (en) * 2006-03-10 2011-03-03 Kellogg, Bruns & Smeija, LLC Range exhaust cleaning system and method
US8746231B2 (en) 2006-03-10 2014-06-10 Kbs Automist, Llc Range exhaust cleaning system and method
US20090264060A1 (en) * 2006-04-18 2009-10-22 Oy Halton Group Ltd. Recirculating exhaust system
US10473336B2 (en) * 2006-04-18 2019-11-12 Oy Halton Group Ltd. Recirculating exhaust system
US10634365B2 (en) 2006-04-18 2020-04-28 Oy Halton Group Ltd. Modular services supply arrangement
ES2394500A1 (en) * 2010-10-14 2013-02-01 Nashitel, S.L. Fume cupboard (Machine-translation by Google Translate, not legally binding)
CN103438490A (en) * 2013-09-17 2013-12-11 天津曌宇环保科技发展有限公司 Lampblack purifying machine for kitchen
US11156368B2 (en) * 2018-04-19 2021-10-26 Steivor, Inc. Range exhaust hood cleaning system
CN108679677B (en) * 2018-07-26 2019-09-06 广东美的厨房电器制造有限公司 Range hood
CN108679677A (en) * 2018-07-26 2018-10-19 广东美的厨房电器制造有限公司 Range hood
WO2021154685A1 (en) * 2020-01-29 2021-08-05 Taylor Jeffrey Allen Kitchen exhaust systems and methods of removing grease from grease-laden vapors

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