US3768724A - Cushioned shipping bag - Google Patents

Cushioned shipping bag Download PDF

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Publication number
US3768724A
US3768724A US3768724DA US3768724A US 3768724 A US3768724 A US 3768724A US 3768724D A US3768724D A US 3768724DA US 3768724 A US3768724 A US 3768724A
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US
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Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
bag
shipping
walls
cushioning
sealed
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Inventor
W Hill
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W Hill
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
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Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/06Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin as the main or only constituent of a layer, which is next to another layer of the same or of a different material
    • B32B27/10Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin as the main or only constituent of a layer, which is next to another layer of the same or of a different material of paper or cardboard
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31DMAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN SUBCLASSES B31B OR B31C
    • B31D5/00Multiple-step processes for making three-dimensional articles ; Making three-dimensional articles
    • B31D5/0039Multiple-step processes for making three-dimensional articles ; Making three-dimensional articles for making dunnage or cushion pads
    • B31D5/0073Multiple-step processes for making three-dimensional articles ; Making three-dimensional articles for making dunnage or cushion pads including pillow forming
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/06Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin as the main or only constituent of a layer, which is next to another layer of the same or of a different material
    • B32B27/08Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin as the main or only constituent of a layer, which is next to another layer of the same or of a different material of synthetic resin
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D75/00Packages comprising articles or materials partially or wholly enclosed in strips, sheets, blanks, tubes, or webs of flexible sheet material, e.g. in folded wrappers
    • B65D75/26Articles or materials wholly enclosed in laminated sheets or wrapper blanks
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D81/00Containers, packaging elements, or packages, for contents presenting particular transport or storage problems, or adapted to be used for non-packaging purposes after removal of contents
    • B65D81/02Containers, packaging elements, or packages, for contents presenting particular transport or storage problems, or adapted to be used for non-packaging purposes after removal of contents specially adapted to protect contents from mechanical damage
    • B65D81/03Wrappers or envelopes with shock-absorbing properties, e.g. bubble films
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29LINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASS B29C, RELATING TO PARTICULAR ARTICLES
    • B29L2031/00Other particular articles
    • B29L2031/712Containers; Packaging elements or accessories, Packages
    • B29L2031/7138Shock absorbing
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31DMAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN SUBCLASSES B31B OR B31C
    • B31D2205/00Multiple-step processes for making three-dimensional articles
    • B31D2205/0005Multiple-step processes for making three-dimensional articles for making dunnage or cushion pads
    • B31D2205/0011Multiple-step processes for making three-dimensional articles for making dunnage or cushion pads including particular additional operations
    • B31D2205/0058Cutting; Individualising the final products
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2553/00Packaging equipment or accessories not otherwise provided for
    • B32B2553/02Shock absorbing

Abstract

A shipping bag has two outer bag walls and at least two layers of a cushioning material which provide means for sealing the outer bag walls together at the peripheral edges thereof. A method for making the bag is also disclosed.

Description

United States Patent 11 1 Hill Oct. 30, 1973 [54] CUSHIONED SHIPPING BAG 3,468,468 9/1969 Foote 229/14 BL 4 1 1 70 t [76] Inventor: Walter Jennings Hill, PO. Box 29 2/ 9 S cm 229,53

5648, High Point, NC. 27262 [22] Filed: 20 1971 Primary ExaminerHerbert F. Ross Assistant Examiner-Stephen P. Garbe PP N05 209,747 Attorney-Herbert L. Allen [52] US. Cl 229/53, 206/46 FC, 206/46 FR,

229/3.5 R, 229/14 BL, 229/14 C, 229/48 T [57] ABSTRACT [51] Int. Cl 865d 31/02 [58] Field of Search 229/53, 55, 14 C, A Shipping bag has two outer bag u and at least 229/ 14 BL, 48 T, 3.5 R; 206/46 FC, 46 FR; two layers of a cushioning material which provide 93/35 R means for sealing the outer bag walls together at the peripheral edges thereof. A method for making the [56] References Cited bag is also disclosed.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,962,158 11/1960 Struthers 206/46 FR 1 Claim, 7 Drawing Figures PAIENIEDncI 30 1913 3,768,724

SHEEI 2 OF 3 FIG. 3

W/IZTE/P J. H/AL CUSHIONED SHIPPING BAG BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a cushioned shipping bag construction.

Many articles, such as books, electronic components and the like, require a shipping bag that provides a good degree of protection when the article is being shipped through the mails or by various transportation means. Because of the high volume involved with such articles, these shipping bags must also be easily and cheaply mass produced.

One of the cushioned shipping bags presently available for these purposes employs a side-wall construction having two kraft sheets joined together at their peripheral edges, with a loose cushioning material sealed therebetween. Two of these side walls are then folded together and joined to form the shipping bag. An example of this type of bag is disclosed in U. S. Pat. No. 3,055,575 to Gerard. The cushioning material first used in these bags were various forms of batting; more recently, macerated newsprint has been used in order to reduce the cost of the bag.

However, shipping bags constructed in this manner are relatively heavy and unduly add to postal and shipping costs. The macerated newsprint tends to bunch" in one location and reduce the overall protection afforded the article enclosed. Frequently, one of the outer kraft sheets is breached in transit or upon receipt, and the macerated newsprint is inadvertantly spilled. In addition, the seams of prior art shipping bags are often poorly sealed, thus exposing the article enclosed to moisture damage under the adverse humidity conditions frequently encountered during shipping. Further, the method for making prior art shipping bags is relatively complicated, requiring several separate cutting, folding, and glueing operations.

THE DRAWING FIG. 1 illustrates a cross-section of a shipping bag in accordance with the present invention.

FIGS. 2a and 2b are top plan views of two embodiments of the bag shown in FIG. 1, in which the magnified cross-section of FIG. 1 is taken along the lines 1-1'.

FIG. 3 illustrates a cross-section of an alternate embodiment of a shipping bag in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 4 is a cross-section of another embodiment of a shipping bag according to this invention.

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of manufacturing apparatus, shown by block diagrams, and materials used in a method for making the shipping bag of FIGS. 1 and 2a.

FIG. 6 is a side view of the apparatus and materials shown in FIG. 5.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The shipping bag of the present invention will be described with reference to FIGS. 1, 2a, and 2b.

Noting FIG. 1, the shipping bag, referred to generally as 10, includes two opposing outer bag walls 12 and 14 which are substantially parallel to each other. The walls 12, 14 may be a variety of materials. Preferably, the walls 12, 14 are a material which is readily heat sealed, such as paper with at least the inner side coated with a very thin layer of a poly-resin, such as a low-density polyethelene resin, for example. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, such inner poly-resin layers 13 and 15 are associated with the walls 12 and 14, respectively,

The bag 10 also includes two scalable cushioning layers l6 and 18 between the two walls 12 and 14, each of which extends along the innermost side of the adjacent bag wall to the peripheral edge thereof, and are each substantially the same width and length as the adjacent bag wall. Suitable materials for the cushioning layers 16,18 include a variety of heat-scalable resinous cushioning materials, such as any of the commercially available porous polyethelene, polyurethane, polystyrene, or polypropelene resins; particularly suitable, however, is a porous polypropelene resin known as Microfoam Sheeting, which is manufactured by E. I. duPont Inc., of Wilmington, Del. A densified sealed joint 22 of the cushioning layers 16 and 18 joins the peripheral edge 20 of the two bag walls 12 and 14 together. When the thin poly-resin layers 13 and 15 are employed, the peripheral portions of these layers are integral with the sealed joint 22. The two bag walls 12,14 and the cushioning layers 16,18 thus define a protected enclosure 24 which is especially suitable for shipping relatively fragile articles. As can be appreciated by those skilled in the art, the porous cushioning layers 16,18 provide the desired shock absorbency behind the bag walls 12,14 and simultaneously provides a moisture-resistant seal at the joint 22.

The densified sealed joint 22 may completely join the peripheral edge 20 on all four sides of the bag 10. Such an arrangement is illustrated in FIG. 2a; suitably, one of the sides would be sealed by the shipper after the article is placed inside the enclosure 24. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 2b, one of the bag walls 14 may be somewhat longer than the other bag wall 14, to provide a flap 26 which can be folded over and stapled or glued to the other wall 12 after the article to be shipped is inserted in the enclosure 24.

An alternate embodiment of the shipping bag 10 of FIG. 1 is shown in FIG. 3, and referred to generally as 30. In this embodiment, two outer bag walls 32 and 34 are formed from a single sheet of material, as the paper described above, which is folded at an intermediate point 36. Cushioning material having the same characteristics as that of the cushioning layers 16,18 of FIG. 1 is likewise folded to provide two cushioning layers 38,40 each next adjacent one of the bag walls 32,34 and which define a protected enclosure 42. The bag walls 32,34 are then joined together at the peripheral edges 44 by a sealed joint 46 of the cushioning layers 38,40.

Another embodiment of the shipping bag is shown in FIG. 4, and is referred to generally as 31. The shipping bag 31 is similar to the bag 10 of FIG. 1, except that two additional bag walls, as walls 33 and 35, are disposed on the inside of the cushioning layers 16,18. Each inner wall 33,35 has dimensions somewhat less than the cushioning layers 16,18 and the outer walls 12,14, and are also sealed within the sealed joint 22.

A method for mass producing a large number of the shipping bags will now be described with reference to FIGS. 5 and 6. The manufacturing apparatus employed in this method is well-known in the bag manufacturing industry, and is therefore identified in FIGS. 5 and 6 by block diagrams and descriptive legends only.

As clearly shown in FIG. 6, four machine rolls 5154 are mounted in successive elevated relationship, as on a bag machine backstand (not shown). The lower and upper rolls 51 and 54 each comprise a single rolled sheet 56 of a material suitable for use as the bag walls 12,14 in the bag shown in FIG. 1. The two inner rolls 52 and 53 each comprise a rolled sheet 58 of a heat scalable cushioning material, such as any of the materials described above.

The four sheets 56,58 are extended in substantially one direction d, so that the two cushioning sheets 58 are sandwiched between the two wall sheets 56. The four sheets 56,58 are then pulled through any one of a variety of standard longitudinal pressing and heating apparatus 60, either the jaw or roller type, to press te four sheets 56,58 together along their peripheral edges 62 and along preselected lines intermediate to the two edges and substantially parallel to the one direction d. Simultaneously, the cushioning sheets 58 are heated and melted at the edges 62 and along these intermediate lines. When the sheets 56,58 pass out the apparatus 60, the melted cushioning material is cooled and densified, forming peripheral sealed joints 64 along the peripheral edges 62 and intermediate sealed joints 65 along the intermediate lines (note FIG. 5). In order to facilitate the cutting operation described below, the intermediate sealed joints 65 are somewhat wider than the peripheral joints 64.

At this point, the sealed sheets 56,58 can be passed directly to a cutting apparatus 68, which cuts along each intermediate joint 65 to separate the sealed sheets into a number of peripherally sealed, uncut tubes, which are then rolled onto a spool. These tubes can then be delivered as is, allowing the user to cut shipping bags to any desired length, after which both ends of the bag are sealed.

Alternatively, prior to the cutting operation, the sealed sheets 56,58 can be passed from the longitudinal pressing and heating apparatus 60 to transverse pressing and heating apparatus 72, preferably of the stamping type which will form, in a single operation, a sealed joint across the sheets 56,58 without requiring the interruption of the movement of the sheets. Thus, the transverse heating apparatus 72 seals the sheets together along a series of joint lines 74 which are substantially transverse to the one direction d. The sheets 56,58 are then passed through a perforator 76 to cut a series of perforations 78 intermediate to adjacent transverse sealed joints 74 and also to cut perforations 80 along each transverse joint. The resulting perforated and sealed sheets 56,58 are then passed through the cutting apparatus 68 to cut along the intermediate longitudinal joints 65 and form a number of strips 82 containing a quantity of individual shipping bags similar to the bag 10 of FIGS. 1 and 20, but with side unsealed. Each strip 82 is then rolled onto a spool (not shown).

In use, the shipper tears the outermost shipping bag from the strip 82 at one of the perforations 78 or 80, inserts the article to be shipped, and closes the open end, as by heat sealing or stapling, for example.

The shipping bag described above is relatively light in weight and provides a high degree of shock absorbency over the entire bag. Further, the resinous cushioning material, in providing the desired shock absorbency, simultaneously provides a densified sealed joint at the periphery of the bag which has a very high degree of moisture resistance. The shipping bag of this invention also avoids the difficulties with the macerated newsprint and batting heretofore used in shipping bags. In addition, the shipping bag can be easily and cheaply mass-produced by the method described.

I claim:

1. A shipping bag construction, comprising:

two outer poly-coated paper bag walls;

two inner poly-coated paper bag walls,

a layer of resinous cushioning material interposed between and laminated to each inner and outer wall, each said cushioning layer having dimensions approximately equal to the dimensions of said outer walls; and

said cushioning layers being joined together along the periphery of the bag by a densitied sealed joint,

the periphery of each of said inner walls extending to but not included in said joint.

Claims (1)

1. A shipping bag construction, comprising: two outer poly-coated paper bag walls; two inner poly-coated paper bag walls, a layer of resinous cushioning material interposed between and laminated to each inner and outer wall, each said cushioning layer having dimensions approximately equal to the dimensions of said outer walls; and said cushioning layers being joined together along the periphery of the bag by a densified sealed joint, the periphery of each of said inner walls extending to but not included in said joint.
US3768724A 1971-12-20 1971-12-20 Cushioned shipping bag Expired - Lifetime US3768724A (en)

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Cited By (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3867874A (en) * 1974-01-28 1975-02-25 Us Envelope Co Method for making padded envelope
US3948436A (en) * 1974-11-04 1976-04-06 Packaging Industries, Inc. Multilayer bag
US4011798A (en) * 1973-11-29 1977-03-15 Packaging Industries, Inc. Method of making shipping bag
US4086384A (en) * 1976-07-13 1978-04-25 The Crowell Corporation Reforced paper-microfoam sheet packaging material
US4087002A (en) * 1973-11-29 1978-05-02 Packaging Industries, Inc. Shipping bag
US4136205A (en) * 1977-03-30 1979-01-23 W. R. Grace & Co. Container and method for packaging meat articles
US4253892A (en) * 1979-02-15 1981-03-03 Flexible Design Packaging Machine Company Method and apparatus for making cushioned shipping bags
FR2470728A1 (en) * 1979-12-03 1981-06-12 Arnaud Guy Combined packing and display case - has double shell attached to centrally hinged arms closed by latches
US4471872A (en) * 1982-09-30 1984-09-18 General Dynamics, Pomona Division Conductive resealable pouch
US4496406A (en) * 1982-09-30 1985-01-29 General Dynamics, Pomona Division Method of making a conductive resealable pouch
EP0175753A1 (en) * 1984-03-15 1986-04-02 Crowell Corp Protective cushioning.
US4700844A (en) * 1985-06-14 1987-10-20 Griffith William R Packaging wrap
GB2201394A (en) * 1986-06-30 1988-09-01 Nomix Mfg Co Ltd Flexible container for liquids
US4784269A (en) * 1985-06-14 1988-11-15 Griffith William R Packaging wrap
US4800708A (en) * 1987-11-16 1989-01-31 Sealed Air Corporation Apparatus and method for forming foam cushions for packaging purposes
US4823945A (en) * 1980-07-07 1989-04-25 The Crowell Corporation Protective cushioning
US4846348A (en) * 1988-01-06 1989-07-11 Smith Karin G L Two-way mailing envelope for an audio cassette
US4884684A (en) * 1988-05-06 1989-12-05 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Containment device for biological materials
US4942963A (en) * 1987-03-06 1990-07-24 Aies Gibellini S.P.A. Container for storage batteries
EP0512187A1 (en) * 1991-05-03 1992-11-11 Michel Chappuis Cushioning element for packaging articles and apparatus for the manufacturing of a cushioning element
WO1994001345A1 (en) * 1992-07-06 1994-01-20 Fassomat S.A. Protective package
US5676509A (en) * 1995-02-22 1997-10-14 S. P. Chemical Co., Ltd. Fastening pad
US5765688A (en) * 1996-11-25 1998-06-16 Sealed Air Corporation Embossed foam in bag cushions
WO1999033714A1 (en) * 1997-12-24 1999-07-08 Baxter International Inc. Perimeter seals and encapsulated seam for multilayer materials
US6024220A (en) * 1995-06-07 2000-02-15 Baxter International Inc. Encapsulated seam for multilayer materials
US6083584A (en) * 1998-01-30 2000-07-04 Baxter International Inc. Perimeter seals for multi-layer materials and method
US6391404B1 (en) 1995-06-07 2002-05-21 Baxter International Inc. Coextruded multilayer film materials and containers made therefrom
EP1369226A1 (en) * 2002-05-31 2003-12-10 Fagerdala World Foams Ab Laminated sheet
US6742655B2 (en) * 2000-04-14 2004-06-01 Yoshimasa Kasakura Cushioning material and container also serving for cushioning using the cushioning material as container
US20050181922A1 (en) * 2004-01-22 2005-08-18 Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. Inner bag for transport tank and producing method thereof
WO2006041395A1 (en) * 2004-10-14 2006-04-20 Logistic System Sweden Ab Handling of products
US20070125683A1 (en) * 2005-12-06 2007-06-07 International Business Machines Corporation End cap packaging material, packaging and method for protecting products against damage
US20120175283A1 (en) * 2009-09-16 2012-07-12 Vishwas Pethe Vessel incorporating film with enhanced anti-static properties and related methods
US8413808B1 (en) * 2011-10-07 2013-04-09 Joy Tong Receiving spacer layer for mobile electronic device and bag combined with the receiving spacer layer

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2962158A (en) * 1958-03-31 1960-11-29 Joseph J Klein Means and method of packaging articles
US3468468A (en) * 1967-08-14 1969-09-23 Diamond Int Corp Container
US3497129A (en) * 1965-10-18 1970-02-24 Oneida Paper Products Inc Method of producing patterned-surface sheet material and bags made therefrom

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2962158A (en) * 1958-03-31 1960-11-29 Joseph J Klein Means and method of packaging articles
US3497129A (en) * 1965-10-18 1970-02-24 Oneida Paper Products Inc Method of producing patterned-surface sheet material and bags made therefrom
US3468468A (en) * 1967-08-14 1969-09-23 Diamond Int Corp Container

Cited By (41)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4011798A (en) * 1973-11-29 1977-03-15 Packaging Industries, Inc. Method of making shipping bag
US4087002A (en) * 1973-11-29 1978-05-02 Packaging Industries, Inc. Shipping bag
US3867874A (en) * 1974-01-28 1975-02-25 Us Envelope Co Method for making padded envelope
US3948436A (en) * 1974-11-04 1976-04-06 Packaging Industries, Inc. Multilayer bag
US4086384A (en) * 1976-07-13 1978-04-25 The Crowell Corporation Reforced paper-microfoam sheet packaging material
US4136205A (en) * 1977-03-30 1979-01-23 W. R. Grace & Co. Container and method for packaging meat articles
US4253892A (en) * 1979-02-15 1981-03-03 Flexible Design Packaging Machine Company Method and apparatus for making cushioned shipping bags
FR2470728A1 (en) * 1979-12-03 1981-06-12 Arnaud Guy Combined packing and display case - has double shell attached to centrally hinged arms closed by latches
US4823945A (en) * 1980-07-07 1989-04-25 The Crowell Corporation Protective cushioning
US4471872A (en) * 1982-09-30 1984-09-18 General Dynamics, Pomona Division Conductive resealable pouch
US4496406A (en) * 1982-09-30 1985-01-29 General Dynamics, Pomona Division Method of making a conductive resealable pouch
EP0175753A4 (en) * 1984-03-15 1987-01-22 Crowell Corp Protective cushioning.
EP0175753A1 (en) * 1984-03-15 1986-04-02 Crowell Corp Protective cushioning.
US4784269A (en) * 1985-06-14 1988-11-15 Griffith William R Packaging wrap
US4700844A (en) * 1985-06-14 1987-10-20 Griffith William R Packaging wrap
GB2201394A (en) * 1986-06-30 1988-09-01 Nomix Mfg Co Ltd Flexible container for liquids
US4942963A (en) * 1987-03-06 1990-07-24 Aies Gibellini S.P.A. Container for storage batteries
US4800708A (en) * 1987-11-16 1989-01-31 Sealed Air Corporation Apparatus and method for forming foam cushions for packaging purposes
US4846348A (en) * 1988-01-06 1989-07-11 Smith Karin G L Two-way mailing envelope for an audio cassette
US4884684A (en) * 1988-05-06 1989-12-05 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Containment device for biological materials
US5340632A (en) * 1991-05-03 1994-08-23 Michel Chappuis Padding element for the packing of objects and device for the manufacturing of the same
WO1992019436A1 (en) * 1991-05-03 1992-11-12 Michel Chappuis Padding element for packaging objects and device for manufacturing a padding element
EP0512187A1 (en) * 1991-05-03 1992-11-11 Michel Chappuis Cushioning element for packaging articles and apparatus for the manufacturing of a cushioning element
WO1994001345A1 (en) * 1992-07-06 1994-01-20 Fassomat S.A. Protective package
US5676509A (en) * 1995-02-22 1997-10-14 S. P. Chemical Co., Ltd. Fastening pad
US6024220A (en) * 1995-06-07 2000-02-15 Baxter International Inc. Encapsulated seam for multilayer materials
US6391404B1 (en) 1995-06-07 2002-05-21 Baxter International Inc. Coextruded multilayer film materials and containers made therefrom
US5765688A (en) * 1996-11-25 1998-06-16 Sealed Air Corporation Embossed foam in bag cushions
WO1999033714A1 (en) * 1997-12-24 1999-07-08 Baxter International Inc. Perimeter seals and encapsulated seam for multilayer materials
EP1238920A1 (en) * 1997-12-24 2002-09-11 Baxter International Inc. Perimeter seals and encapsulated seam for multilayer materials
US6083584A (en) * 1998-01-30 2000-07-04 Baxter International Inc. Perimeter seals for multi-layer materials and method
US6742655B2 (en) * 2000-04-14 2004-06-01 Yoshimasa Kasakura Cushioning material and container also serving for cushioning using the cushioning material as container
EP1369226A1 (en) * 2002-05-31 2003-12-10 Fagerdala World Foams Ab Laminated sheet
US20050181922A1 (en) * 2004-01-22 2005-08-18 Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. Inner bag for transport tank and producing method thereof
US7275869B2 (en) * 2004-01-22 2007-10-02 Fujifilm Corporation Inner bag for transport tank and producing method thereof
WO2006041395A1 (en) * 2004-10-14 2006-04-20 Logistic System Sweden Ab Handling of products
US8196747B2 (en) * 2005-12-06 2012-06-12 International Business Machines Corporation End cap packaging material, packaging and method for protecting products against damage
US20070125683A1 (en) * 2005-12-06 2007-06-07 International Business Machines Corporation End cap packaging material, packaging and method for protecting products against damage
US20120175283A1 (en) * 2009-09-16 2012-07-12 Vishwas Pethe Vessel incorporating film with enhanced anti-static properties and related methods
US20130089274A1 (en) * 2011-10-07 2013-04-11 Joy Tong Receiving spacer layer for mobile electronic device and bag combined with the receiving spacer layer
US8413808B1 (en) * 2011-10-07 2013-04-09 Joy Tong Receiving spacer layer for mobile electronic device and bag combined with the receiving spacer layer

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