US3737942A - Power operated cleaning device - Google Patents

Power operated cleaning device Download PDF

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US3737942A
US3737942A US3737942DA US3737942A US 3737942 A US3737942 A US 3737942A US 3737942D A US3737942D A US 3737942DA US 3737942 A US3737942 A US 3737942A
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means
housing
cleaning device
shoe
brush
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C Casey
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C Casey
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L23/00Cleaning footwear
    • A47L23/02Shoe-cleaning machines, with or without applicators for shoe polish

Abstract

A power operated cleaning device comprising a housing enclosing power operated brush means and vacuum means for cleaning dirt and the like from articles such as shoes and other articles.

Description

United States Patent 91 ['11] 3,737,942 Casey [4 June12, 1973 [54] POWER OPERATED CLEANING DEVICE 3,649,994 3/1972 Harris 15/311 Inventor: Charles H. a y, Rt- Box 9 3,115,653 12/1963 Fresh et a1. 15/311 X Winchester, Va. 22601 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 210,097 7/1960 Austria 15/310 1 1971 693,795 9/1930 France [21] Appl. N0.: 169,769

1 Primary Examiner-John Petrakes Assistant Examiner-C. K. Moore 15/339 Attorney-Luke A. Mattare, James W. Dent and [58] Field of Search 15/310, 311, 30, John b 15/31, 34, 36 [57] ABSTRACT [56] References Cited A power operated cleaning device comprising a hous- UNITED STATES PATENTS ing enclosing power operated brush means and vacuum 3 044 099 7/1962 Scott et al 15/311 means for Cleaning dirt and the like from articles suc 3/1926 as shoes and other articles.

Manger 15/311 28 Claims, 19 Drawing Figures PIHENIED 3, 737, 942

SHEET 1 0F 9 1s 72 T CHARLES H. CASEY 5 BY g /Z-4A/J ATTORNEYS PATENTED 3, 7 37, 942

SHEET 2 BF 9 INVENTOR CHARLES H. CASEY PATENTEDJUN I 2|973 3 737, 942

SHEET 3 BF 9 2| INVENTQ CHAR LES H. CASEY TTORNEYS PATENTE JUN 1 2 I975 snmsorg F/6.ll.

INVENTOR CHARLES H. CASEY ATTORNEYS PATENTEU m1 2 ms SHEET 8 OF 9 FIGJZ.

CHARLES H. CASEY z flmfi l ATTORNEYS PAIENI JUN! 21% sum 8 or 9 NVENTOR CHARLES H. CASEY Mk1 Mm ATTORNEYS PATENTED JUN1 21973 3, 737, 942

SHEET 9 BF 9 FIG. [9.

INVENTOR CHARLES H. CASEY ATTORNEYS POWER OPERATEDCLEAN'ING DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates'to a device for cleaning articles, and more particularly, relates to such a device for cleaning shoes and the like. The cleaning device includes power driven brush means and vacuum means therein for loosening and removing dirt such as mud, sand, snow, grass and the like from shoes'or boots and the like. For example, the device can be placed on the inside of a room adjacent the doorway that is most frequently used; and as a person enters the room through the doorway, he would place his foot into an opening provided in the top of the cleaning device. The brush mean would brush the sides and bottoms of the shoe or boot or the like worn by the person to loosen dirt therefrom, and the vacuum means would draw the material into a collecting bag. Accordingly, all or most of the dirt would be removed from the shoes, thus keeping the building cleaner by preventing dirt and the like from being carried into the building on the shoes of people entering the building. The device is especially useful in sandy areas such as beaches or the like or for small children who have been playing in sand. The cleaner also removes snow from shoes and boots, cleans grass cuttings from shoes such as, for example, after a person walks across a freshly mowed lawn or the like and also effectively removes other types of dirt such as dust and mud and the like from the shoes of persons entering a building. The device also includes means whereby the vacuum means may be utilized to clean pant legs and cuffs and the like and also to clean and brush clothes to remove lint and the like therefrom. Such means can also be used as a conventional vacuum cleaner, if desired. According to one aspect of the invention, a housing means is provided for connection with the cleaning device and has rack means or the like therein for receiving boots and shoes and the like for drying the boots and shoes and the like. Other garments, such as coats and the like, and items such as umbrellas and the like may also be placed in the rack means to be dried.

In another form of the invention, the device includes means for attachment to a central vacuum source wherein the vacuum for cleaning the shoes is derived from said central vacuum source rather than from a vacuum motor contained within the device.

Yet another feature of the invention includes a drive means for attachment thereto of a buffer or polisher for polishing shoes, silver and the like or for attachment of a drill, circular saw, circular sander or combing brush for pets and the like.

The device operates off of conventional house current, or it may be made to operate off of batteries or the like, if desired.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to'provide a device for cleaning shoes which itilizes power driven brush means and vacuum means for removing dirt from shoes and boots and the like.

Another object of this invention is to provide a device for cleaning shoes wherein brush means and vacuum means are enclosed within a housing for cleaning dirt from the shoes and wherein vacuum means operated from the device may be used to clean clothing or other objects, as desired.

- a devicefor cleaning shoes wherein brush means and vacuum means are enclosedwithin a housing for removingdirt from shoes and boots and the like and ".wherein separate means is driven by the devicefor buffing and polishing shoesor silver and the like or for operating a drill or other device.

An even further object of this invention-is to provide a device including brush means and vacuum means therein for cleaning dirt and the like from shoes and boots and the like and including means for holding shoes, boots, umbrellas and the like for drying the same.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. l is a top perspective view of a preferred form of the invention. I

FIG. 2 is an end view in elevation of the device shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a top perspective view of the device shown in FIG. 1 with the cover or housing shown in phanton lines to reveal the interior of the device and illustrating the manner in which a foot is inserted between the brush means of the device.

FIG. 4 is a top view of the device shown in FIG. 1 illustrating the manner in which the bristles of the brush means engage and clean a shoe or boot or the like in the device.

FIG. 5 is a view in section taken along line 55 in FIG. 4 further illustrating the position of a shoe to be cleaned in the device.

FIG. 6 in a view in section taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a view in section taken along line 77 in FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 is a top view in section taken along line 8-8 in FIG. 5.

FIG. 9 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of the device shown in FIG. 5 and is taken along line 99 in FIG. 5.

FIG. 10 is a top plan view of the drive means shown in FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of an angle drive means for driving one of the brush means and is taken along line 1l11 in FIG. 8.

FIG. 12 is a top view similar to FIG. 4 of a second form of the invention.

FIG. 13 is a side view similar to FIG. 5 of the form of the invention shown in FIG. 12.

FIG. 14 is a top perspective view similar to FIG. 3 of a third form of the invention.

FIG. 15 is a top view of the device shown in FIG. 14 illustrating the manner in which the foot may be turned from side to side to effect cleaning of the top surface thereof.

FIG. 16 is an enlarged sectional view ofa drive means for driving an attachment and is taken along line 16-16 in FIG. 15.

FIG. 17 is a top perspective view of a fourth form of the invention.

FIG. 18 is a side view shown partly in section of the device shown in FIG. 17 and is taken along line 18-l8 in FIG. 17.

FIG. 19 is a top perspective view, partly broken away, of a fifth form of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout the several views, and referring particularly to FIGS. 1 through 11,

g a first form of cleaning device is indicated generally at l and comprises a housing or cover 2 including an upper cover portion 3 and a lower cover portion 4 removably joined together along adjacent edges in a conventional manner by suitable clamp means 5 so that the top and bottom cover sections may be removed for access to the interior thereof. A suitable opening 6 is in the top wall of the top cover portion 3 for receiving a shoe or boot S or the like therethrough to be cleaned.

A suitable frame means 7 is enclosed within and supports the cover 2 and other parts of the cleaning device and includes a generally rectangularly shaped horizontal portion including opposite, longitudinally extending, parallel side frame portions 8 and 9, and opposite end portions 10 and 11 connecting the opposite ends of the side frame portions.

A pair of substantially identically formed, vertically disposed, generally rectangularly shaped end boxframe members 12 and 13 are joined to the side frame members 8 and 9 adjacent the opposite ends thereof and extend a substantial distance above and below the side frame members. The end box-frame members 12 and 13 comprise vertically extending side frames 14 and 15 and 16 and 17, respectively. A horizontally disposed top traverse frame member 18 interconnects the upper ends of vertically extending side frame members 14 and 15 and a horizontally disposed bottom transverse frame member 19 interconnects the lower ends of side frame members 14 and 15. A'similar pair of transverse frame members 20 and 21 interconnect the upper and lower ends, respectively, of the side frame members 16 and 17 at the other end of the frame.

A pair of intermediate transverse end frame members 22 and 23 extend between the pairs of vertically extending frame members 14 and 15 and 16 and 17, respectively, at oppositeends of the frame assembly 7 spaced slightly above the points at which the side frame members 8 and 9 intersect the frame members l4, l5

, and'16, 17.

A suitable motor means M such as an electric motor or the like adapted to be energized from conventional house current is suitably mounted to the bottom transverse frame member 19 at one end of the frame 7 by suitable means such as bolts 24 or the like extended through a base 25 on the motor into the bottom transverse frame member 19. A drive pulley 26 is suitably mounted on a drive shaft or spindle 27 extending from the motor M. Suitable means, such as V-belt 28 or the like is operatively positioned around pulley 26 and over a first driven pulley 29 suitably rotatably mounted to the intermediate transverse frame member 22 adjacent one end thereof.

means'33 fitted within abore 34'i'n1the transverse frame member 22. The other end of flexible shaft 32 is drivingly connected with a shaft 35 rotatably supported at one end onvthe frame member 22 and rotatably supported at its other end in a suitable bearing means in the top transverse frame member 18.

A cylindrical pulley 36 is mounted on shaft 35 for rotation therewith and the lower end thereof is spaced upwardly from transverse frame member 22. A retain- 39 are mounted closer to the longitudinal center of the As seen best in FIG. 11, the driven pulley 29 is rotatframe 7 than are shaft 35 and pulley 36 so that the flexible brush belt 40 slopes inwardly toward the center of the frame from one end toward the other end thereof.

A second drive pulley 42 is rotatably mounted to transverse frame member 22 adjacent the other end thereof in a manner substantially identical to pulley 29 in that an angle drive such as angle drive 30 is mounted to the frame member 22 and is operatively connected with a shaft 43 rotatably journalled at its lower end in transverse frame member 22 and at its upper end in transverse frame member 18. A cylindrical pulley 44 similar to pulleys 36 and 39 is mounted on the shaft 43 for rotation therewith. A substantially identical shaft 45 and pulley 46 are similarly rotatably mounted to the frame at the opposite end between transverse frame members 23 and 20. A second flexible brush belt 47 is operatively disposed around pulleys 44 and 46 and includes elongated bristles 48 thereon. The shaft 45 and pulley 46 are mounted closer to the center of the frame than are shaft 43 and pulley44 so that the belt 47 slopes inwardly toward the center of the frame from one end to the other end thereof, with the belts 40 and 47 converging toward one another at said other end of the frame.

As indicated by the arrows in FIG. 4, the pulleys 29 and 42, through the angle drives 30, cause the shafts 35 and 43 and pulleys 36 and 44 to rotate thereby causing the belts 40 and 47 to rotate in opposite directions about the idler pulleys 39 and 46. The bristles 41 and 48 extend toward one another in the space between the brush belts 40 and 47 and are spaced apart a distance less than the width of a shoe'S or the like so that a shoe or boot or the like placed into the opening 6 between the belts 40 and 47 will be brushed by the bristles 41 and 48 with the bristles deforming and deflecting into crevices and the like and into the instep of the shoe to effect a thorough cleaning of the upper of the shoe.

' A third brush belt 49 is horizontally mounted within the housing under the opening 6 and extends across the space between brush belts 40 and 47. The brush belt 49 is disposed about two horizontal, longitudinally extending rollers 50 and 51 rotatably mounted at their opposite ends in the intermediate transverse frame members 22 and 23 adjacent the opposite ends thereof and spaced inwardly along frame members 22 and 23 from shafts 35, 43, 38 and 45. Only the roller 50 is driven, the other roller 51 comprising an idler roller for the brush belt 49. The roller 50 is driven by means of a third driven pulley 53 rotatably mounted on the transverse intermediate frame member 22. Bristles 52 on brush belt 49 are of such length as to extend into the instep of a shoe S and to thoroughly clean and brush the sole, heel and instep of a shoe or boot or the like S placed through the opening 6 and between brush belts 40 and 47 and against brush belt 49. The brush belt 49 is of such length and width as to extend across substantially the entire space defined between the rollers 36, 39, 44, and 46. As indicated by the arrow in FIG. 7, the brush belt 49 is turned in a clockwise direction by the pulley 53.

, When a shoe or boot to be cleaned is placed through the opening 6, the toe of the shoe or boot is preferably first inserted between the brush belts 40 and 47 to urge them apart and to guide the shoe or boot therebetween. When the shoe or boot is positioned between the brush belts 40 and 47 and against the bristles of brush belt 49, all dirt, sand, grass and the like are loosened and removed from the shoe or boot.

A suitable on-off switch means L is mounted in the top cover 3 adjacent one side of the opening 6 for selectively turning the motor M on and off to energize the motor and operate the brushes 40, 47 and 49. A suitable means such as an electrical cord 54 or the like extends from the motor M outside the housing 4 for connection with an external source of power such as conventional house current or the like. Alternately, the motor M could be operated from batteries or the like, if desired.

A suitable manually operable clutching mechanism 55 is provided for selectively connecting the brushes to be driven by the motor M and includes a conventional over-center linkage mechanism 56 and a clutch pulley 57 which engages the belt 28 to tighten the belt on pulleys 26, 29, 42 and 53 to enable the pulley 26 to drive the belt 28 and brushes 40, 47 and 49 when a manually engageable operating lever 58 is moved into a first operative position as seen in FIGS. 3 and 6.

A suitable vacuum means 59 is inthe lower portion 4 of the housing for collecting dirt and the like dislodged from the shoes or boots and the like by the brushes and comprises a suitable vacuum pump or fan 60 operatively connected with the motor M to be driven thereby. A cylindrical housing 61 is connected at one end with the motor M and at the other end with the vacuum fan 60 and provides some support for the fan 60 and also encloses a shaft 62 extending from the motor to the fan for driving the fan. The vacuum fan 60 is supported at least in part on the bottom of the lower housing portion 4 as seen in FIGS. 5 and 7. The vacuum fan 60 includes a housing portion 63 extending up- I wardly therefrom and connected in supporting relationship with an elongate vacuum plenum chamber 64 extending over the space under the brushes 40, 47 and 49. The vacuum plenum chamber 64 is substantially trough shaped and has a generally flat upperside or wall 65 having a plurality of openings 66 therein spaced along the length thereof. An elongate, flat slide valve 67 having a plurality of openings 68 therein equal in number to openings 66 and adapted to come into registery therewith when the slide valve is in a first position as seen in FIG. 3, is slidably mounted on the plenum chamber 64. When the slide valve 67 is in the first position as seen in FIG. 3, the open openings 66 and 68 are in registery with one another to communicate the vacuum from the fan 60 and plenum chamber 64 to the area within the upper housing portion 3 occupied by the brushes 40, 47 and 49 to draw dirt and dust and the like'therefrom. The slide valve 67 has a second, inoperative position with the openings 68 therein out of alignment with the openings 66 as seen in FIG. 8. A tongue or handle portion 69 extends through one end of the housing and has an upturned portion 70 adapted to be grasped by the hand for sliding the slide valve 67 into and out of operative position over the openings 66 in the top wall 65 of vacuum plenum chamber 64.

Dust and dirt and the like drawn from the upper housing portion' by the vacuum fan 60 is collected in a suitable dust bag 71 connected to the vacuum fan 60 and confined within the lower portion 4 of the housing 2. Air is exhausted from the housing through a plurality of louvered openings 72 in one end of the lower housing 4 adjacent the dust bag 71. A suitable access opening 73 is provided in one side of lower housing portion 4 for providing access to the dust bag 71 to replace the dust bag as required. Suitable closure means, such as a hinged door 74 is provided for closing the access opening 73 and is held in closed position by suitable means such as clamps 75.

A conduit 76 is in communication with the vacuum plenum chamber 64 at one end thereof and extends through the end of the lower housing portion 4 for attachment to an external vacuum hose 77, shown in phantom line in FIG. 2, for removing dust and lint and the like from clothing or for vacuum cleaning the floor and the like in a conventional manner. A suitable slide closure 78 is provided for closing the conduit 76 when the vacuum hose 77 is removed therefrom or when it is desired to utilize all of the vacuum created by the vacuum fan 60 for withdrawing dirt and the like from the upper housing portion when it is dislodged from a shoe or the like S by the brushes.

Suitable casters or wheels or the like 79 may be provided on the housing 2 for making it easier to move the cleaning device from room to room when desired or the wheels may be omitted and the lower housing portion simply made to rest upon a supporting surface, if desired.

A generally U-shaped tray 80 is removably supported in the housing 2 immediately under the brushes for catching water and large particles of dirt and the like dislodged from shoes cleaned by the brushes to prevent the water and dirt and the like from falling into the lower portion 4 of the housing. The tray 80 includes opposite, elongate parallel side portions 81 and 82 extending substantially the entire length of the housing underlying the brushes 40 and 47 adjacent the outer sides thereof for catching dirt carried by and dislodged from the brushes. The inner edges of the side portions 81 and 82 are immediately adjacent and under the opposite sides of brush 49 for catching dirt and the like carried by and dislodged from the brush 49.

The tray 80 also includes an end portion 83 disposed across one endof the housing under the brushes 40 and 47 at one end thereof for catching dirt and the like thrown from the brushes as they rotate around the pulleys 39 and 46. As seen in FIGS. 5, 6 and 7, the end 83 is raised from the plane of the side portions 81 and 82 and is disposed above the slide closure 67. The tray is supported in the housing by means of a plurality of inwardly extending supporting fingers 84 carried by the opposite side frame members 8 and 9 and extending under the side tray portions 81 and 82.

the shaft 43 extends upwardly through transverse frame member 18 and has a flat sided socket 85 therein receptive of a square sided flexible drive cable 86 which is operatively connected with an external attachment 87 such as a buffing brush or the like for polishing shoes, silver and so forth. Alternately, the attachment 87 may comprise a drill, saw or other rotatable attachment as desired. I

In use of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 11, the cord 54 is plugged into a suitable electrical outlet and the switch 53 is turn'edto the on position, this energizes motor M which in turn drives the vacuum fan and pulley 26, which if the lever 58 is operated to engage clutch pulley 57 with belt 28, causes operation of the brushes 40, 47 and 49.

,-If it is desired that all of the vacuum produced by vacuum fan 60 be concentrated within the housing 2, to

draw and collect dirt dislodged from ashoe by the brushes, the slide closure 78 is positioned over the conduit 76 and slide closure 67 is operated to bring the openings 68. therein into alignment with the openings 66 in the top wall of vacuum plenum chamber 64.

.The shoe or the like S is then inserted between the brushes 40 and 47 by placing the toe between the brushes first to urge the brushes apart and guide the shoe between the brushes. The bottom of the shoe is brought into contact with the bristles 52 on brush 49 which brushes and cleans the sole, heel and instep of the shoe while the brushes 40 and 47 clean the upper of the shoe. The dirt dislodged by the brushes is drawn into the vacuum plenum chamber 64 and hence through the vacuum fan 60 to the collecting bag 71. Water and large particles of dirt and the like dislodged by the brushes are collected in the tray 80. If use of the brushes is not desired, the lever 58 is operated to disengage the clutch pulley 57 from belt 28 and thereby disengage the pulleys 29, 42 and 53 from being driven by the pulley 26 and belt 28.

If it is desired to use the vacuum, hose attachment 77 for vacuuming dust and lint and the like from clothing, the slide closure 78 is moved to open position and the hose 77 is attached to the end of conduit 76. The hose 77 may be used while a shoe is being cleaned in the upper portion of the housing, if desired. Also, if it is desired to use the buffing attachment 87, the flexible drive cable 86 is inserted into the socket of shaft 43; and the lever 58 is manipulated to engage the pulley wheels connected with the various pulleys 36, 39, 44 and 46. This attachment may also be used at the same time that a shoe is being cleaned in the upper portion of the housing, if desired.

If more vacuum is desired for using the attachment 77, the slide closure 67 may be closed by pulling it out to bring the openings 68 therein out of registery with the openings 66 in the top wall of-the vacuum plenum chamber 64, although it is not essential that this be done. When it is desired to empty the tray 80, the top portion 3 of the housing 2 is removed, and the tray is lifted up and slid out over the transverse end frame member 11.

Referring now to FIGS. 12 and 13, a modification of the invention shown in FIGS. 1 through 11 is illustrated, and is identical in every respect with the first form of the invention except that a single brush 88 is used for cleaning the upper of a shoe S or the like rather than the pair of brushes 40 and 47 as in the first form -'of the invention. Brush 88 includes a-flexible I backing 89 having a pair of inwardly directed ribs 90 and91 adjacent the upper and lower edge-s thereof, respectively, whichare received in two-pairs of-vertically spaced, grooved pulleys 92,.93 and 94, 95 at opposite ends'of the opening 6 and mounted on rotatable shafts 96 and 97 for rotation therewith. The shafts 96 and 9-7 are rotatably journalled in'transverse frame members 22 and 18 and 23 and 20, respectively. The shaft 96 is connected to be driven by a pulley 98 connected with the shaft 96 through an angle drive mechanism 30 identical to that previously described.

Radially inwardly directed bristles 99 are carried by the backing 89 in the space between the pulleys 92, 93 and 94, 95.

As seen in FIG. 12,'the space between the opposite sides of the brush belt 88 is such that the bristles engage and clean the crevices and instep and the like of a shoe when placed therebetween. A square sided socket 85 is provided in the end of shaft 96 for attachment of the rotary attachment 87 as in the previously described embodiment.

Referring now to FIGS. 14, 15 and '16, a third form of the invention is illustrated and is identical in every respect with the first form of the invention except that a pair of brush rolls 100 and 101 are provided at opposite sides of the opening 6 rather than the brush belts 40 and 47 illustrated and described with reference to FIGS. 1 through 11. Each of the brush rolls 100 and 101 is mounted for rotation at its opposite ends in a pair of laterally inwardly directed bosses 102, 103 formed on the inside of the verically extending frame members 15, 17 and 14, 16. A shaft 104 extends beyond theend of brush 100 through a suitable bearing means 105 in the boss 103 and through an opening in the side of top cover portion 3. A suitable flat sided recess 106 is formed in the end of shaft 104 for receiving the squared end of flexible shaft 86 for operating the attachment 87.

As seen in FIG. 14, the brush rolls 100 and 101 are connected for rotation in opposite directions to brush the dirt removed from the shoes or the like down into the container to be collected by the vacuum 60. This is accomplished by running the belt 28 over roller 107 connected with brush 101 and under pulley 108 connected with brush 100 and then over an idler pulley 109 rotatably mounted to frame member 16.

Referring now to FIGS. 17 and 18, a fourth modification of the invention illustrated in FIGS. -1 through 11 is shown and is identical in every respect with the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 1 through 11 except that a drying rack 110 is attached to one end of housing 2 over the louvered openings 72 and is held to the housing 2 by suitable means such as clamps 5 or the like. Alternately, the drying rack 110 could be made integrally with housing 2, if desired.

The drying rack 110 is substantially rectangular in shape and includes a back 111, opposite sides 112 and 113, and a top 114 and bottom 115. A plurality of openings 116 are formed in the top wall 114 for receiving umbrellas 117 or the like therethrough. A plurality of upwardly inclined pegs 1 18 are mounted to the back wall 111 of the housing in spaced apart relationship for receiving shoes or boots S or the like thereover. Suitable means are provided adjacent the bottom of the drying rack 110 for generating heat and such means may comprise a heat lamp 119 or the like, if desired.

Suitable switch means 120 is provided for selectively energizing the lamp 119.

In use, the drying rack attachment 110 is connected to the housing 2 over the louvered opening 72 and shoes and boots S and umbrellas 117 or the like are placed in the rack and the lamp 119 turned on. The air exhausted from the lower portion 4 of the housing 2 flows through the louvered opening 72 and up through the drying lack 110 to dry the shoes and boots and umbrellas and the like contained therein.

Referring now to FIG. 19, a'fifth form of the invention is illustrated and is identical in every respect with the form of the invention illustrated and described with reference to FIGS. 1 through 11 except that the device is intended to be used with a central vacuum system rather than have its own vacuum fan or pump 60. To this end, a suitable connection such as a hose 121 or the like is provided extending through one side of the lower housing portion 4 into communication with the vacuum plenum chamber 64 (not shown in this figure).

Accordingly, when it is desired to use the form of the invention illustrated in FIG. 19, the hose 121 is con-- nected with a suitable vacuum source and the motor M switchedon by means of switch 53 and the lever 58 manipulated to engage clutch pulley 57 with belt 28 to actuate the brushes.

Each of the components of the various forms of the invention illustrated and described herein can be manufactured from any suitable materials, such as plastic,

, metal, fiberglass and the like. And various other attachments could be used with the device rather than those specifically described herein. Further, a different type of clutching mechanism could be used to disengage the brushes from the motor M rather than the clutch pulley 57 and lever 58 as described. The cleaning device could also be used for cleaning articles other than shoes or boots or the like, if desired, when the articles are placed in operative relationship with the brushes and vacuum.

As this invention may be embodied in several forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof, the present embodiment is therefore illustrative and not restrictive, since the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims rather than by the description preceding them, and all changes that fall within the metes and bounds of the claims or that form their functional as well as conjointly cooperative equivalents, are therefore intended to be embraced by those claims.

I claim:

1. A shoe cleaning device comprising a housing means, poweroperated brush means in said housing means for cleaning the upper and the bottom of a shoe, an opening in the top wall of said housing means for placing a shoe or the like therethrough into cooperative engagement with said brush means, vacuum means in said housing means to draw dirt dislodged from said shoe, or from a floor or the like, into a collecting bag, said vacuum means including a vacuum plenum chamber positioned adjacent said brush means, said plenum chamber having openings therein for communicating the vacuum with the portion of the housing means in which said brush means is located, and tray means in said housing beneath said brush means for catching dirt and water and the like dislodged and carried by said brush means.

2. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 1, wherein said brush means includes a first brush means for cleaning the upper of a shoe and a second brush means for cleaning the bottom of a shoe.

3. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 1, wherein valve means is operatively associated with said openings in said vacuum plenum chamber for selectively opening and closing said openings.

4. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 3, wherein motor means is in said housing, and said motor means is operatively connected through a drive means with the brush means and vacuum means for actuating the brush means and .vacuum means.

5. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 4, wherein a frame means is confined within said housing means in supporting relationship thereto, said motor means, brush means, vacuum means and drive means being supported by said frame means.

6. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 5, wherein said brush means dislodge dirt, water and the like from a shoe or the like placed into operative engagement therewith, and said vacuum means draws said dislodged dirt into a collecting bag in said housing, said collecting bag being operatively connected with said vacuum means, and said tray means positioned under said brush means in a manner to catch large particles of dirt and the like which are not caught by said vacuum means.

7. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 6, wherein said motor means, said vacuum means and said collecting bag are in a lower portion of said housing, and said brush means are in an upper portion of said housing.

8. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 7, wherein said upper and lower housing portions are removable from said frame means to expose said framemeans and said brush means, motor means, vacuum means and collecting bag. 7

9. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 8, wherein said drive means operatively connected with said brush means and said motor means comprises drive pulley means and idler pulley means rotatably mounted on said frame means and operatively connected with driven pulley means over which said brush means are operatively positioned, and drive belt means operatively positioned over said drive pulley means for driving said driven pulley means when said motor means is energized.

10. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 9, wherein means is operatively associated with said drive belt means for selectively tightening and loosening said drive belt means on said drive pulley means for selectively causing said brush means to be driven by said motor means.

11. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 10, wherein an access opening and closure means therefor is in said lower housing portion for providing access to said collecting bag to replace said collecting bag.

12. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 11, wherein said vacuum plenum chamber is elongate and is generally trough shaped with a flat top wall, and said valve means comprises an elongate slide closure having openings therein adapted to register with the openings in said vacuum plenum chamber for selectively opening and closing said openings, said slide closure having operating means extending externally of said housing means for operating said slide closure.

13. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 12, wherein externally accessible drive means are on said housing ment.

14. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 13, wherein said externally accessible drive means is driven with said brush means.

15. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 14, wherein a conduit means is in communication with said vacuum plenum chamber and extends to an opening in said housing means, and closure means for selectively opening and closing said opening means.

16. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 15, wherein said brush means includes brush means at opposite sides of said housing spaced apart a distance such as to clean the opposite sides ofa shoe placed therebetween.

17. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 16, wherein said brush means at opposite sides of said housing comprise endless belts disposed about pulleys at opposite ends of said housing, said belts having bristles thereon.

18. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 17, wherein said belt brush means at opposite sides of said housing extend longitudinally and are operatively positioned about first and second pairs of spaced apart vertically disposed pulleys at opposite ends of the housing said first and second pairs of spaced pulleys being also spaced apart laterally from one another, and a third,

' horizontally disposed belt having bristles thereon disposed about a pair of spaced apart substantially parallel longitudinally extending pulleys mounted in said housing means for rotation beneath said first and second belts.

19. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 18, wherein said belts at opposite sides of the housing converge toward one another at one end thereof.

20. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 19, wherein said vacuum plenum chamber extends beneath said horizontally disposed belt, and said tray is generally U- shaped'with a pair of substantially parallel legs and an end'portion interconnecting one end of said legs, said parallel leg portions extending under said first and second belts.

' 21. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 20, wherein said tray means'is supported on said frame means.

22. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 15, wherein said brush means comprises a first endless belt having bristles thereon operatively positioned around two spaced apart, vertically disposed pulleys rotatably mounted in said housing at opposite ends of said opening, said bristles facing radially inwardly of said belt means for brushing a shoe inserted therebetween, and

for-attachment thereto of an external, driven" attacka second endless belt means having bristles thereon operatively positioned about a pair of spaced apart, horizontally. disposed pulleys extending longitudinally of said housing means and rotatably mounted to said frame means, said horizontally disposed belt means having a length and width at least as great as the length and width of said opening and positioned below said first belt means.

23. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 22, wherein said first belt means has radially inwardly facingribs adjacent the upper and lower edges thereof, said ribs received in grooved pulleys mounted in vertically spaced relationship on a pair of shafts rotatably mounted in said frame means.

24. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 15, wherein said brush means comprises a pair of laterally spaced, substantially parallel, longitudinally extending roller brushes rotatably mounted in said housing at opposite sides of said opening, said roller brushes being spaced apart a distance less than the width of a shoe to be placed therebetween so that bristles on said roller brushes engage and clean dirt from said shoe or the like, and an endless belt means having bristles thereon operatively positioned about a pair of spaced parallel elongate pulleys rotatably mounted to said frame means and positioned beneath said roller brush means, said endless belt means having a length and width at least as great as the length and width of said opening,

25. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 1, wherein a drying rack means is at one side of said housing means, said drying rack means being in communication with the interior of said housing means for circulation of air from said housing means through said rack means, and heating means in said rack means for heating the air circulated therethrough, said rack means having means therein for supporting shoes and boots and the like for drying said shoes and boots and the like.

26. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 25, wherein said rack means has means therein for supporting umbrellas and the like for drying said umbrellas and the like.

27. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 26, wherein I said housing means has louvered openings in said one side for establishing communication between the interior of said housing means and said lack means.

28. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 1, wherein said vacuum means is operated from an external vacuum source.

Claims (28)

1. A shoe cleaning device comprising a housing means, power operated brush means in said housing means for cleaning the upper and the bottom of a shoe, an opening in the top wall of said housing means for placing a shoe or the like therethrough into cooperative engagement with said brush means, vacuum means in said housing means to draw dirt dislodged from said shoe, or from a floor or the like, into a collecting bag, said vacuum means including a vacuum plenum chamber positioned adjacent said brush means, said plenum chamber having openings therein for communicating the vacuum with the portion of the housing means in which said brush means is located, and tray means in said housing beneath said brush means for catching dirt and water and the like dislodged and carried by said brush means.
2. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 1, wherein said brush means includes a first brush means for cleaning the upper of a shoe and a second brush means for cleaning the bottom of a shoe.
3. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 1, wherein valve means is operatively associated with said openings in said vacuum plenum chamber for selectively opening and closing said openings.
4. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 3, wherein motor means is in said housing, and said motor means is operatively connected through a drive means with the brush means and vacuum means for actuating the brush means and vacuum means.
5. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 4, wherein a frame means is confined within said housing means in supporting relationship thereto, said motor means, brush means, vacuum means and drive means being supported by said frame means.
6. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 5, wherein said brush means dislodge dirt, water and the like from a shoe or the lIke placed into operative engagement therewith, and said vacuum means draws said dislodged dirt into a collecting bag in said housing, said collecting bag being operatively connected with said vacuum means, and said tray means positioned under said brush means in a manner to catch large particles of dirt and the like which are not caught by said vacuum means.
7. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 6, wherein said motor means, said vacuum means and said collecting bag are in a lower portion of said housing, and said brush means are in an upper portion of said housing.
8. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 7, wherein said upper and lower housing portions are removable from said frame means to expose said frame means and said brush means, motor means, vacuum means and collecting bag.
9. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 8, wherein said drive means operatively connected with said brush means and said motor means comprises drive pulley means and idler pulley means rotatably mounted on said frame means and operatively connected with driven pulley means over which said brush means are operatively positioned, and drive belt means operatively positioned over said drive pulley means for driving said driven pulley means when said motor means is energized.
10. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 9, wherein means is operatively associated with said drive belt means for selectively tightening and loosening said drive belt means on said drive pulley means for selectively causing said brush means to be driven by said motor means.
11. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 10, wherein an access opening and closure means therefor is in said lower housing portion for providing access to said collecting bag to replace said collecting bag.
12. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 11, wherein said vacuum plenum chamber is elongate and is generally trough shaped with a flat top wall, and said valve means comprises an elongate slide closure having openings therein adapted to register with the openings in said vacuum plenum chamber for selectively opening and closing said openings, said slide closure having operating means extending externally of said housing means for operating said slide closure.
13. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 12, wherein externally accessible drive means are on said housing for attachment thereto of an external, driven attachment.
14. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 13, wherein said externally accessible drive means is driven with said brush means.
15. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 14, wherein a conduit means is in communication with said vacuum plenum chamber and extends to an opening in said housing means, and closure means for selectively opening and closing said opening means.
16. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 15, wherein said brush means includes brush means at opposite sides of said housing spaced apart a distance such as to clean the opposite sides of a shoe placed therebetween.
17. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 16, wherein said brush means at opposite sides of said housing comprise endless belts disposed about pulleys at opposite ends of said housing, said belts having bristles thereon.
18. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 17, wherein said belt brush means at opposite sides of said housing extend longitudinally and are operatively positioned about first and second pairs of spaced apart vertically disposed pulleys at opposite ends of the housing said first and second pairs of spaced pulleys being also spaced apart laterally from one another, and a third, horizontally disposed belt having bristles thereon disposed about a pair of spaced apart substantially parallel longitudinally extending pulleys mounted in said housing means for rotation beneath said first and second belts.
19. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 18, wherein said belts at opposite sides of the housing converge toward one another at one end thereof.
20. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 19, wherein said vacuum plenum chamber extenDs beneath said horizontally disposed belt, and said tray is generally U-shaped with a pair of substantially parallel legs and an end portion interconnecting one end of said legs, said parallel leg portions extending under said first and second belts.
21. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 20, wherein said tray means is supported on said frame means.
22. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 15, wherein said brush means comprises a first endless belt having bristles thereon operatively positioned around two spaced apart, vertically disposed pulleys rotatably mounted in said housing at opposite ends of said opening, said bristles facing radially inwardly of said belt means for brushing a shoe inserted therebetween, and a second endless belt means having bristles thereon operatively positioned about a pair of spaced apart, horizontally disposed pulleys extending longitudinally of said housing means and rotatably mounted to said frame means, said horizontally disposed belt means having a length and width at least as great as the length and width of said opening and positioned below said first belt means.
23. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 22, wherein said first belt means has radially inwardly facing ribs adjacent the upper and lower edges thereof, said ribs received in grooved pulleys mounted in vertically spaced relationship on a pair of shafts rotatably mounted in said frame means.
24. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 15, wherein said brush means comprises a pair of laterally spaced, substantially parallel, longitudinally extending roller brushes rotatably mounted in said housing at opposite sides of said opening, said roller brushes being spaced apart a distance less than the width of a shoe to be placed therebetween so that bristles on said roller brushes engage and clean dirt from said shoe or the like, and an endless belt means having bristles thereon operatively positioned about a pair of spaced parallel elongate pulleys rotatably mounted to said frame means and positioned beneath said roller brush means, said endless belt means having a length and width at least as great as the length and width of said opening.
25. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 1, wherein a drying rack means is at one side of said housing means, said drying rack means being in communication with the interior of said housing means for circulation of air from said housing means through said rack means, and heating means in said rack means for heating the air circulated therethrough, said rack means having means therein for supporting shoes and boots and the like for drying said shoes and boots and the like.
26. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 25, wherein said rack means has means therein for supporting umbrellas and the like for drying said umbrellas and the like.
27. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 26, wherein said housing means has louvered openings in said one side for establishing communication between the interior of said housing means and said lack means.
28. A shoe cleaning device as in claim 1, wherein said vacuum means is operated from an external vacuum source.
US3737942A 1971-08-06 1971-08-06 Power operated cleaning device Expired - Lifetime US3737942A (en)

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3849822A (en) * 1972-07-26 1974-11-26 G Ouellette Footwear wiping machine
US4118818A (en) * 1977-04-08 1978-10-10 Holleran Eileen M Apparatus for cleaning the lower portion of shoes
US4233707A (en) * 1979-07-09 1980-11-18 Gilles Leblanc Footwear cleaning apparatus
FR2535193A1 (en) * 1982-11-02 1984-05-04 Ledoujet Bernard Automatic boot washer.
FR2566260A1 (en) * 1984-06-26 1985-12-27 Bobet Materiel Boot cleaning machine
US5025528A (en) * 1986-11-24 1991-06-25 Burey Bernard P Multiple station machine for brushing or cleaning footwear
DE4408079C1 (en) * 1994-03-10 1995-06-08 Frank Prochiner Cleaning device for boots and shoes
US6067688A (en) * 1997-11-17 2000-05-30 West; William E. Shoe cleaning device
US6105201A (en) * 1999-05-27 2000-08-22 Min; Soung Kiy Shoe cleaning device
WO2001074227A2 (en) * 2000-03-31 2001-10-11 Luciano Ferrari Shoe-cleaning machine in particular for removing mud, snow and dirt from the soles
US6532618B2 (en) * 2001-06-01 2003-03-18 Robert Koch Floor mat with incorporated vacuum system
US20040088814A1 (en) * 2002-11-12 2004-05-13 Te-Hsin Hsieh De-dusting device for static swab
US6735807B2 (en) 2001-05-21 2004-05-18 Howard Brent Boot cleaning apparatus
US20040094431A1 (en) * 2000-06-12 2004-05-20 Howard A. Fromson Brush graining
US20090038096A1 (en) * 2007-08-06 2009-02-12 William Hollander Spike/shoe cleaner
US7676876B1 (en) * 2008-10-29 2010-03-16 Terry Ewert Footwear washer
US20100306935A1 (en) * 2007-09-19 2010-12-09 Zobele Holding S.P.A. Shoe-polishing machine
US20110197380A1 (en) * 2010-02-08 2011-08-18 Back Joung-Moon Apparatus for shining shoes
US20110272440A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2011-11-10 Robert Heller Shoe cover removal apparatus
US20110278332A1 (en) * 2009-03-26 2011-11-17 Protexer, Inc. Shoe cover removal apparatus
US20140116468A1 (en) * 2012-10-26 2014-05-01 Hormel Foods Corporation Sanitary foot sprayer for dry powder plants
US20140196235A1 (en) * 2013-01-11 2014-07-17 Liberty Products Ii Llc Mountable footwear cleaner
US9049978B1 (en) * 2013-01-08 2015-06-09 Baruch L. Shamberger Shoe cleaning apparatus
US9322124B1 (en) 2015-07-01 2016-04-26 Khaled J. H. Al-Hasan Portable drier for personal articles
US9907422B2 (en) 2015-08-20 2018-03-06 Protexer, Inc. Bootie level alert

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1596676A (en) * 1921-11-21 1926-08-17 Manger Philip Shoe-polishing machine
FR693795A (en) * 1930-04-12 1930-11-25 Apparatus for cleaning footwear
US3044099A (en) * 1960-01-21 1962-07-17 Progressive Engineering Co Shoe cleaner
US3115653A (en) * 1962-01-02 1963-12-31 Elwyn M Fresh Mechanical door mat
US3649994A (en) * 1970-11-09 1972-03-21 Ewell J Harris Pedestrian footwear cleaner

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1596676A (en) * 1921-11-21 1926-08-17 Manger Philip Shoe-polishing machine
FR693795A (en) * 1930-04-12 1930-11-25 Apparatus for cleaning footwear
US3044099A (en) * 1960-01-21 1962-07-17 Progressive Engineering Co Shoe cleaner
US3115653A (en) * 1962-01-02 1963-12-31 Elwyn M Fresh Mechanical door mat
US3649994A (en) * 1970-11-09 1972-03-21 Ewell J Harris Pedestrian footwear cleaner

Cited By (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3849822A (en) * 1972-07-26 1974-11-26 G Ouellette Footwear wiping machine
US4118818A (en) * 1977-04-08 1978-10-10 Holleran Eileen M Apparatus for cleaning the lower portion of shoes
US4233707A (en) * 1979-07-09 1980-11-18 Gilles Leblanc Footwear cleaning apparatus
FR2535193A1 (en) * 1982-11-02 1984-05-04 Ledoujet Bernard Automatic boot washer.
FR2566260A1 (en) * 1984-06-26 1985-12-27 Bobet Materiel Boot cleaning machine
US5025528A (en) * 1986-11-24 1991-06-25 Burey Bernard P Multiple station machine for brushing or cleaning footwear
DE4408079C1 (en) * 1994-03-10 1995-06-08 Frank Prochiner Cleaning device for boots and shoes
US6067688A (en) * 1997-11-17 2000-05-30 West; William E. Shoe cleaning device
US6105201A (en) * 1999-05-27 2000-08-22 Min; Soung Kiy Shoe cleaning device
US20030051300A1 (en) * 2000-03-31 2003-03-20 Luciano Ferrari Shoe-cleaning machine in particular for removing mud, snow and dirt from the soles
WO2001074227A2 (en) * 2000-03-31 2001-10-11 Luciano Ferrari Shoe-cleaning machine in particular for removing mud, snow and dirt from the soles
WO2001074227A3 (en) * 2000-03-31 2002-03-14 Luciano Ferrari Shoe-cleaning machine in particular for removing mud, snow and dirt from the soles
US6912752B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2005-07-05 Luciano Ferrari Shoe-cleaning machine in particular for removing mud, snow and dirt from the soles
US20040094431A1 (en) * 2000-06-12 2004-05-20 Howard A. Fromson Brush graining
US6735807B2 (en) 2001-05-21 2004-05-18 Howard Brent Boot cleaning apparatus
US6532618B2 (en) * 2001-06-01 2003-03-18 Robert Koch Floor mat with incorporated vacuum system
US20040088814A1 (en) * 2002-11-12 2004-05-13 Te-Hsin Hsieh De-dusting device for static swab
US7930789B2 (en) 2007-08-06 2011-04-26 William Hollander Spike/shoe cleaner
US20090038096A1 (en) * 2007-08-06 2009-02-12 William Hollander Spike/shoe cleaner
US20100306935A1 (en) * 2007-09-19 2010-12-09 Zobele Holding S.P.A. Shoe-polishing machine
US20110272440A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2011-11-10 Robert Heller Shoe cover removal apparatus
US7676876B1 (en) * 2008-10-29 2010-03-16 Terry Ewert Footwear washer
US20110278332A1 (en) * 2009-03-26 2011-11-17 Protexer, Inc. Shoe cover removal apparatus
US20110197380A1 (en) * 2010-02-08 2011-08-18 Back Joung-Moon Apparatus for shining shoes
US8495780B2 (en) * 2010-02-08 2013-07-30 Joung-Moon BACK Apparatus for shining shoes
US20140116468A1 (en) * 2012-10-26 2014-05-01 Hormel Foods Corporation Sanitary foot sprayer for dry powder plants
US9259139B2 (en) * 2012-10-26 2016-02-16 Hormel Foods Corporation Sanitary foot sprayer for dry powder plants
US9049978B1 (en) * 2013-01-08 2015-06-09 Baruch L. Shamberger Shoe cleaning apparatus
US20140196235A1 (en) * 2013-01-11 2014-07-17 Liberty Products Ii Llc Mountable footwear cleaner
US9380927B2 (en) * 2013-01-11 2016-07-05 Liberty Products Ii Llc Mountable footwear cleaner
US9322124B1 (en) 2015-07-01 2016-04-26 Khaled J. H. Al-Hasan Portable drier for personal articles
US9907422B2 (en) 2015-08-20 2018-03-06 Protexer, Inc. Bootie level alert

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