US3733810A - Timepiece with electronically designed digital read-out - Google Patents

Timepiece with electronically designed digital read-out Download PDF

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US3733810A
US3733810A US3733810DA US3733810A US 3733810 A US3733810 A US 3733810A US 3733810D A US3733810D A US 3733810DA US 3733810 A US3733810 A US 3733810A
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Prior art keywords
preselector
driving mechanism
position
advance
digital read
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P Girard
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Montres Rolex SA
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Montres Rolex SA
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04GELECTRONIC TIME-PIECES
    • G04G5/00Setting, i.e. correcting or changing, the time-indication
    • G04G5/04Setting, i.e. correcting or changing, the time-indication by setting each of the displayed values, e.g. date, hour, independently
    • G04G5/043Setting, i.e. correcting or changing, the time-indication by setting each of the displayed values, e.g. date, hour, independently using commutating devices for selecting the value, e.g. hours, minutes, seconds, to be corrected
    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04CELECTROMECHANICAL CLOCKS OR WATCHES
    • G04C3/00Electromechanical clocks or watches independent of other time-pieces and in which the movement is maintained by electric means
    • G04C3/001Electromechanical switches for setting or display
    • G04C3/005Multiple switches
    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04GELECTRONIC TIME-PIECES
    • G04G9/00Visual time or date indication means
    • G04G9/08Visual time or date indication means by building-up characters using a combination of indicating elements, e.g. by using multiplexing techniques
    • G04G9/10Visual time or date indication means by building-up characters using a combination of indicating elements, e.g. by using multiplexing techniques by controlling light sources, e.g. electroluminescent diodes
    • G04G9/105Visual time or date indication means by building-up characters using a combination of indicating elements, e.g. by using multiplexing techniques by controlling light sources, e.g. electroluminescent diodes provided with date indication

Abstract

In a timepiece having an electronically designed read out, an improved means which makes it possible to manually operate and set at least part of the digital readout elements. The setting means comprise a preselector capable of being set in different positions and a driving mechanism. Both the preselector and driving mechanism are arranged in such a manner that the position occupied by the preselector at the time that the driving mechanism is manipulated determines the element or elements of the digital read-out to be affected by the manipulation as well as the function accorded by the manipulation.

Description

United States Patent 1191 Girard 11 3,733,810 51 May 22, 1973 [54] TIMEPIECE WITH ELECTRONICALLY DESIGNED DIGITAL READ-OUT [75] Inventor: Pierre Girard, Bienne, Switzerland [73] Assignee: Manufacture des Montres Rolex S.A. Bienue, Bienne, Canton of Berne,

Switzerland 221 Filed: Mans, 1971 [21] Appl.No.: 121,251

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data I Mar. 6, 1970 Switzerland ..3337/70 [52] US. Cl ..58/4 A, 58/23 R, 58/50 R,

58/85.5 [51] Int. Cl. ...G04b 19/24, G04b 19/30, G04b 27/00 [58] Field of Search ..58/4 A, 23 R, 42.5, 58/43, 50 R, 85.5, 152 R; 307/222; 328/44 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,613,352 10/1971 Giersieden .r58/50X July 3,576,099 4 1971 Walton ..ss/23 R x 3,186,158 6/1965 Miller ..ss/42.5 3,300,771 1/1967 Wagner ..S8/39.5 x

Primary Examiner-Stephen J. Tomsky Assistant Examiner-Edith C. Simmons Jackson Attorney-Stevens, Davis, Miller & Mosher 57] ABSTRACT In a timepiece having an electronically designed read out, an improved means which makes it possible to manually operate and set at least part of the digital readout elements. The setting means comprise a preselector capable of being set in different positions and a driving mechanism. Both the preselector and driving mechanism are arranged in such a manner that the position occupied by the preselector at the time that the driving mechanism is manipulated determines the element or elements of the digital read-out to be affected by the manipulation as well as the function accorded by the manipulation.

37 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures Cal/N TIE DIV/DER 0550x811 7A 555 23 c h 0 g P5600515 S TAGIS PATamgmaYazms SHEET 1 UF 4 7 Monl7dulvw a 7 IE EB H5. /2

PAT T rm 2197s 5,733,810

SHEET 2 OF 4 PATENTEU M2 3.733310 SHEET 3 OF 4 PATENTED MAY 2 21975 SHEET U UF 4 TIMEPIECE WITH ELECTRONICALLY DESIGNED DIGITAL READ-OUT The present invention has to do with a timepiece with electronically designed digital read-out, equipped with means making it possible to manually operate at least part of the digital read-out elements.

The manual operation of the elements of digital readout in such a timepiece can be brought about in several ways. In some timepieces with digital read-out for each element of digital read-out or for each group of readout elements, or possibly only for each one of some of these groups there is an individual means of manual control which, when set into operation, affects the corresponding read-out element or group of read-out elements.

This form of manual control or operation presents several disadvantages. One of these disadvantages consists in that it requires as many external control elements as there are elements of digital read-out or groups of elements of digital read-out to be operated manually. Another one of these disadvantages lies in the fact that the timepiece may accidentally get out of order as a result of an involuntary action on one of these control means.

It would also be possible, at least theoretically, to manually control the digital read-out of a timepiece in the same manner as one operates the hands of a conventional timepiece. Such a solution, however, would be irksomeand would also present the disadvantage of not taking advantage of the facilities of separate control of different groups of read-out which is offered by the principle of digital read-out.

The purpose of the present invention is to provide a timepiece with digital read-out of the type previously mentioned but not having the disadvantages stated.

In accordance with the invention, the timepiece with electronically designed digital read-out, equipped with means making it possible to manually operate at least part of the digital read-out elements, is characterized in that said means comprise a preselector which is capable of being placed in different positions and adriving mechanism both of which are arranged in such a manner that the position occupied by the preselector at the time when the driving mechanism is manipulated determines the element or elements of digital read-out affected by the manipulation of the driving mechanism, as well as the function according to which this element or these elements of digital read-out are affected by this manipulation.

The means for accomplishing the foregoing objects and other advantages, which will be apparent to those skilled in the art are set forth in the following specification and claims and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings dealing with a basic embodiment of the present invention. Reference is made now to the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 represents, in top plan view, a wrist watch with a rectangular shaped digital read-out;

FIG. 2 shows the watch of FIG. 1 in bottom plan view;

FIG. 3 schematically shows an annular preselector piece included in this watch;

FIG. 4 shows, schematically and in partial section, the driving mechanism having the form of a winding rod working together with the preselector piece shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a section taken along line V-V of FIG. 2 through the back of the watch carrying electric contact switching elements;

FIG. 6 is a partial plan view schematically showing the electric contact switching elements which are visible in section in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is an electrical block level schematic showing certain electronic circuits of the watch and illustrating the working together of the driving mechanism, preselector and electronic elements;

FIG. 8 is an electrical schematic similar to FIG. 7 and illustrates a particular operating case; and

FIG. 9.is a block diagram representing the essentials of the group of electronic circuits in the watch.

In FIG. I, which represents the wrist watch in top plan view, the watch case 1 has two rectangular windows in which there appear, respectively, a group of digits 2 having the information necessary to give the time (for example 12 hours 26 minutes and 48 seconds) and a group of digits 3 having the information which is necessary to give the day and the date (for example Monday 17 July). FIG. 1 also shows a driving mechanism 4 which has an external shape and a side positioning similar to those of a winding crown mounted on a winding rod of an ordinary mechanical timepiece. It should be noted that in other types of design the watch could also be of an angular shape, or a round shape, and a design of identical type could also have to do with a watch in the form of a small clock, for example of the kind whose front area does not exceed approximately 25 square centimeters.

FIG. 2 shows the watch of FIG. 1 as seen from beneath. Besides the driving mechanism 4, which is also visible in FIG. 2, there is, located against the bottom of the watch, a crown 5 carrying indications A, B, C etc., the center of this crown being occupied by a cap 6 which, at the same time it serves to hold the crown 5, constitutes the unscrewable cover of a housing for a miniature electric battery which provides the electric power for the operation of the watch. The bottom of this watch also carries a marking or index 7 which constitutes the indicator opposite which the various indication A, B, C etc. carried by the crown 5 are placed according to the angular position imparted to the crown 5. As will be seen further on in conjunction with FIG. 5, the crown 5 can be manipulated in the manner of a rotating button.

FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate the mechanical operation of the crown 5, which constitutes a preselector 8, and of the driving mechanism 4. FIG. 5 shows a preselector annular element 8 which is mounted underneath the crown 5 so that it can move solidly in rotation therewith. This preselector element 8 has a number of notches equal to the number of indications (A, B, C etc.) carried by the crown 5. One of the twelve notches shown in element 8 is deeper than the other notches. FIG. 3 also shows that a flexible spring blade 17 causes the preselector element 8 to stop in well determined positions.

FIG. 4 shows the driving mechanism 4 which has an outer end in the form of a winding crown and a rod composed of various elements intended for establishing an electrical switching contact which operates when the driving mechanism 4 is pulled and pushed. These various elements of the driving mechanism which are intended for an electrical function will be examined later. The rod of the driving mechanism has, at its extremity, a support element which works together with a lever 13, pivoted at 14, and which acts resiliently so as to tend to bias the driving mechanism 4 towards the exterior. The rod of the driving mechanism also has a gouge by means of which the longitudinal movements of the driving mechanism are imparted to a square element 16 one of the wings of which (visible in FIG. 4) is slit in such a way as to take on the form of a fork the two branches of which lock into the gouge which the rod of the driving mechanism presents right behind the support element 10. This square element 16 is arranged by means, not shown, to slide longitudinally, and its other wing, the extremity of which is cut symmetrically v in oblique fashion, penetrates into one of the slits of the when the deep notch of the element 8 is situated against the square element 16 which is connected longitudinally to the driving mechanism 4 than when one of the other notches of the element 8 is opposite this square element 16. It can also be seen in FIG. 4 that the crown of the driving mechanism has a screw spacing which is identical to that which is known for the crowns of windows of certain waterproof watches. When the large notch of the preselector element 8 is opposite the square element 16, the driving mechanism can make its maximum entry inside of the watch and the screw thread channel 15 can be screwed into a corresponding screw thread channel presented by the watch case (not shown). In this position it will naturally be impossible to rotate the preselector element 8 and the crown 5 to which it is connected. If the crown is unscrewed from the driving mechanism, then the driving mechanism returns towards the exterior under the action of the resilient lever 13. It will then be possible to turn the crown 5 and the preselector element 8 which is connected to it in such a way as to bring opposite the square piece 16 one of the eleven other notches of the preselector element 8. Since the other eleven notches are not as deep, it will then be possible to push the driving mechanism only to a partial degree towards the inside of the watch. As will be seen further on, however, this partial movement will be sufficient to bring about the electrical switching which will carry out one of numerous possible functions chosen (in a manner which will be examined further on) with the aid of the crown 5 constituting a preselector element.

FIG. 5 represents a sectional view through the bottom of the watch taken along the line VV of FIG. 2. The watch case 1 includes a primary bottom plate It: below which are found various elements which make up the watch, and in particular the electronic read-out elements which are not shown in FIG. 5. The watch case 1 passes beyond the bottom plate la towards the rear and the preselector crown 5 is mounted in such a way as to make up the visible bottom of the watch. At the center of the element, attached to the bottom plate 1a, there is a cylindrical element 6a forming the case for the battery already mentioned in connection with FIG. 1. The cover 6 is screwed onto the cylindrical element 6a and has an annular flange holding the preselector crown 5 in place. The preselector crown 5 engages at its periphery into an annular groove in the watch case 1. Even though the watch is rectangular, it must be understood that the space represented in FIG. 5 above the bottom plate la is round.

It is thus clearly evident that when the preselector crown 5 is mounted as shown in FIG. 5, it can be manipulated by the fingers of an operator grasping it sideways so that it is moved in rotation in a plane which is perpendicular to the plane of the figure. This rotation, however, cannot be imparted unless the square element 16 (FIG. 4) has freed the preselector element 8.

FIG. 5 shows that the preselector crown 5 includes an inside bearing surface 5a around which various elements are arranged. These elements are first of all the preselector element 8, which can also be seen in FIG. 5 and which is forced around the bearing element 5a. Since the section of FIG. 5 is in the vertical direction with respect to FIG. 2, the entire group of the driving mechanism 4 with its various additional elements, and in particular the square element 16, is not shown in FIG. 5.

Immediately below the preselector element 8, the bearing surface 5a carries an assembly 22 comprising first and second annular elements 22a and 22b of insulating material which are forced onto the preselector crown 5. A resilient element 220 separates the two annular elements of insulating material so that the crown assembly 22 can move very slightly in the axial direction but is connected to the preselector crown 5 in rotation. This crown assembly 22 carries, at only one place on its surface, a rubbing contact element 21 which establishes an electric contact between a contact ring 23 and one of a group of contact studs 18. The contact ring 23 and the group of contact studs 18 are supported by a crown of insulating material 19 which is attached to the battery case 6a.

FIG. 6 presents a schematic plan view of this crown 19 together with the contact ring 23 and the group of studs 18. In this figure the contact ring 23 is contacting one of the studs 18. This contact is intended for facilitating the electrical connection which is supposed to assure a connection with the contact ring 23. A rotation of the crown assembly 22 causes the contact element 21 to subsequently establish an electrical contact between the contact ring 23 and each one of the studs 18. In the position where this contact element 21 is above the stud 18a already connected to the ring 23 no individual contact is established thus forming a zero position of the switch. The respective angular position of the large notch of the preselector element 8, of the contact element 21, and of the stud 18a will be such that the contact element 21 ends up on the stud 18 which is connected to the ring 23 when the large notch of the preselector element 8 is opposite the square piece 16 (FIG. 4).

It is now appropriate to come back to FIG. 4 to examine how the manipulation of the driving mechanism causes the opening or closing of electrical contacts. FIG. 4 shows that the rod of the driving mechanism is composed of a central rod 9 around which there are threaded two sockets 11 and 11a made of insulating material. The socket 11, at its extremity which is close to the socket 11a, has a bearing surface of small diameter around which a socket 12 made of conducting material slides. Three contact elements 15a, b, c are shown schematically and are actually formed of elastic conducting laminas which rest against the external diameter of the rod. In the position shown in FIG. 4, the square element 16 penetrates into the large notch of the preselector element 8 and the rod is driven to the maximum towards the inside of the watch. When the driving mechanism is released by unscrewing the crown from it, the rod returns completely towards the outside of the watch (that is to say towards the left in FIG. 4) and the conducting socket 12 opens an electrical contact between the contact elements 15a and 15b. At this time, with the driving mechanism towards the exterior, it is possible, if so desired,'to turn the preselector crown 5 in order to bring opposite the square element 16 another one of the notches of this preselector element. When the latter has assumed the desired position, the driving mechanism is depressed to a partial extent which is determined by the smallest depth of the notch into which the square'element 16 will penetrate. This depth is such that at the time when the driving mechanism is pressed so as to make the square piece 16 penetrate into the bottom of the notch the conducting socket l2 ceases to establish an electrical contact between the contact elements 15a and 15b and then establishes an electrical contact between the contact elements 15b and 150. According to the function which is then performed (a function which is determined by the position of the preselector crown, a matter which will be examined further on) it may be necessary to manipulate the driving mechanism several times or just once. After having pressed it in such a way as to establish a contact between the contact elements 15b and 15c it is then released and, if necessary, it is operated one or more times again, and each time that the driving mechanism is shifted lengthwise an electrical switching is carried out affecting the three contact elements 15a, 15b and 15c in the manner of an ordinary switch whose contact element 15b would be the common connection point. Needless to say, it would also be possible to achieve the switching mentioned above by other means, in particular by means of flexible contact elements moved by a part of the rod of the driving mechanism playing the role of a cam. It would also be possible, according to the case, to make more than one contact of the switching type react to the movement of the driving mechanism.

Knowledge of the manner of functioning of the two electrical contact groups, i.e. the group of contacts 15a, 15b and 150 and the group of contacts formed by the ring 23 and the various studs 18 makes it possible to understand the electronic functioning of the means making it possible to control the read-out elements of the electronic watch. It is necessary first of all, however, to examine what are the various types of action which the positioning of the preselector should make it possible to achieve.

First of all, the manner in which the electronic readout is furnished by the watch will be examined. Without delving into the technical means which are put into play to achieve this read-out, it can be pointed out briefly that the elements of read-out are formed preferably of luminous numbers which themselves are formed of elements of composition of a minimum number of seven, but preferably of a greater number. It is evident that the read-out elements could also be formed in a different way, for example by means of elements operating on the basis ofa principle similar to that ofNixie tubes but under a voltage and with a power compatible with the low source of energy available. If a timepiece which is similar to the watch described but of a larger size were used, for example a small-sized clock or even a large-sized clock, the read-out could naturally be done through the intermediary of conventional optical electronic means or at least means which are known.

The watch which is shown in FIG. 1 is a watch which supplies the time broken down into 24 hours, that is to say that this watch in the middle of the afternoon, for example, shows 15:30 and not 3:30. Obviously it would also be possible to design this watch in a way that it would indicate the hours of the morning and the hours of the afternoon by never going past the indication of 12 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds (as happens in the telling of time in the United States) or also by never going beyond 11 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds (as is current practice in time telling in certain European countries).

The technique of digital read-out has reached such a point that it would also be possible to read the fractions of an hour situated between 30 and 59 minutes not by addition but by subtraction, that is to say to indicate for example 8 hours less 15 minutes (15 minutes to 8) instead of 7:45. It would be possible to even go further than this by expressing by plus or minus of fractions of an hour (half an hour, quarter of an hour, possibly even 10 minutes and 5 minutes) so as to give a corresponding indication at all points under the usual manner of expression of the users.

In the case of the watch which is shown in FIG. 1 the indication of the date is given by a first indication concerning the days of the week, a second indication concerning the day of the month, and a third indication concerning the particular month. In some cases it would be appropriate to reverse the order of indication of the month and of the day of the month, as is current practice in the Anglo-Saxon countries. Let us also point out that the digital indication of the day of the week and of the month can be done for the day of the week by indicating a maximum of two letters and for the months by indicating up to four letters, even though an indication of two letters adequately coded could also be sufficient if necessary.'The letters necessary to form the names of the days of the week and the names of the months would theoretically require a number of elements of composition much greater than the numbers, but this number is reduced by the fact that at a given place there is no need to be able to indicate all of the letters of the alphabet but only a certain number of them. The composing of numbers or letters with the aid of elements of composition is a relatively well known technique into which it is not necessary to delve at this time.

The watch with digital electronic read-out in question is driven by a quartz oscillator and the variation in its daily operation is therefore extremely small. Despite the very small possibility of the watch running behind or ahead it would be advantageous to have the possibility of gaining or losing just a few seconds. It is this possibility which will probably be used the most often. in certain cases it might also be necessary to make a correction of more than one minute and it would then naturally be advantageous to be able to act in effect on the minute indicator and not to have to make a correction which is 60 times longer than a correction involving the second indicator. Furthermore, in cases when, in particular, the watch has stopped running, owing to a dead battery or the absence of a battery, it would also be advantageous to be able to act on the digital information of the hours, but it is clear that this particular possibility will be used the most rarely.

Since the watch being described here is an electronic watch and since it therefore has the possibility, which is lacking in mechanical watches, of advancing at a speed which is 100 times, 1,000 times or even 10,000 times greater than its normal speed of advance, it has been provided to bring about the advance which is sup posed to involve only the hours by sending to the input of the electronic divider forming the time information a signal having a frequency of approximately one thousand Hz, that is to say that approximately 3.6 seconds are necessary to make the digital information advance by 1 hour. When one proceeds in this manner it is clear that one will observe nothing other than the digital information of the hours, since the movement of the signs indicating the minutes and the seconds are too fast to be able to be followed. It will thus be possible to first of all put the watch on the hour without worrying about the minutes, by means of this frequency of about 1,000 Hz. Then, for the adjustment to the minute it is provided that there be sent to the input of the divider a frequency of about 60 Hz, that is to say that the information of the minutes will advance by approximately one unit every second. In this way it is possible to set the watch on the minute. Then, to establish the exact setting down to the second a frequency of 2 Hz is fed to the input of the divider. This will gain back a second each second. Thus, by being sure, at the time of the first two rapid and approximate settings to the hour, of always remaining rather below and not above the indication which should be furnished, it is possible to obtain very quickly a setting to the hour of the digital read-out watch, the last touch being given to the setting to the hour by the action on the digital information of the seconds which, assuring an advance of two units per second, will occur at a rather slow speed to be able to be achieved with accuracy. It will also be necessary, however, to be able to slow down the watch by a few seconds in order not to have to advance the watch by l 1 hours 59 minutes and 57 seconds to slow the watch down by a few seconds, for example. A possibility of stopping the advance of the digital information should therefore, because of this fact, be also provided for, this possibility amounting in effect to losing a second each second (whereas the advance at twice the speed constituted a possibility of gaining one second each second).

The four different possibilities of setting the time mentioned above are brought about, each one of them, by manipulation of the driving mechanism 4 while the preselector has been placed in a different one of its twelve positions. Considering FIG. 2, the position E of the preselector crown 5 is situated opposite the indicating mark. Position E deals with normal operation, that is to say that the large notch of the preselector element 8 will be opposite the square piece 16 and that the crown of the driving mechanism can be screwed into the case. If the driving mechanism is released in this position, it will be possible to activate it any number of times without anything happening. On the other hand, if, the driving mechanism having been drawn into this position, one turns the preselector so as to introduce one of the four positions D, C, B or A, there are four possibilities of acting on the read-out of the watch. Bearing in mind the fact that the corrections of more than 1 second (that is to say double-time operation) and of less than 1 second (that is to say stop) will be used the most often, it has been provided to make these corrections correspond to the two positions C and D of is made by the intermediary of a frequency of approximately 1,000 cycles and which produces an advance of one unit of hour approximately every 3.6 seconds.

In order to make each one of the four corrections which have been mentioned above, the exact procedure to be followed starting with the position of normal operation in which the driving mechanism 4 is screwed in the watch, is the following:

First of all the crown of the driving mechanism is unscrewed and allowed to return as far as possible towards the exterior so as to release the rotating movement of the preselector crown 5; then the indicator 7 is brought to the desired marked position of the preselector crown S, that is to say, according to the particular case, the position D (stop), the position C (advance, second), the position B (advance minute), or the position A (advance, hour). Once the crown of preselector 5 has been placed in the appropriate position, the driving mechanism 4 is depressed and from that instant on and right up to the time that the driving mechanism is allowed to return towards the outside'the advance of the digital information takes place at the speed which is selected by the preselector (or does not take place at all if the stop position has been selected). As soon as the driving mechanism is released the watch will return to normal operation. When the adjustment to the hour which has to be done is large, one will proceed successively by a manipulation of the driving mechanism in the A position of the preselector, then in the B position of the preselector, then in the C position and then possibly also in the D position of the preselector. This is a gradation which is apt to facilitate the operation of time setting for a user with little experience.

It is needless to say that one could also, in certain design variations, only provide for part of the four possibilities of time setting mentioned above. According to the case, it is possible to do away with the advance at the speed of 1 hour every 3.6 seconds, or also, and this is evident, of the advance of 2 seconds per second in the case that one would not be posting the information of the seconds but only the information of the hours and of the minutes.

The positions of the preselector situated on the other side of the position of normal operation (E) are reserved for various operations which are different from the time setting operations mentioned previously. They differ by the fact that there no longer is, as previously, an operation which lasts as long as the driving mechanism is pressed and which ceases immediately after the driving mechanism has been released, but now there is a unique operation which takes place each time that the driving mechanism is pressed, an identical unique second operation not being able to take place except as the result of a prior releasing of the driving mechanism followed by another pressing on it. This necessity of assuring oneself first of all that the driving mechanism has actually been released prior to executing a second operation identical to a first operation already executed explains the necessity to arrange the contact 15a, b, c

in the manner of a switching contact and not simply in the manner of an interrupting contact. The exact functioning from the electronic point of view will be explained subsequently in conjunction with the figures representing the electrical diagram of the watch.

The different operations which a manipulation of the driving mechanism causes when the preselector has been placed in position F. G. H. etc., will now be successively described.

When, after having been freed by unscrewing and releasing of the driving mechanism, the preselector has been placed in the F position a manipulation of the driving mechanism will cause a return to a fixed hour. The procedure for this operation is the following: right from the time that the driving mechanism has been pressed (the preselector being in the F position) the digital read-out is brought to the indication hours 0 minutes 0 seconds (or possibly 12 hours 0 minutes 0 seconds in the case of US. type watches). Then, at the moment when the driving mechanism is released pulses are sent, by means of the action of an electronic logic with gates, at a frequency of approximately 4,000 Hz to the place of the counting device of the watch which constitutes the entrance of the minute counter (therefore the place where the output of the secondscounting device normally sends a pulse every minute) so that after a time which is determined by the fixed hour to which the read-out is to be returned, a time which will be of a maximum of about one third of a second, the read-out will have reached the preselected indication. An electronic decoding device detects the arrival of the read-out at the desired position and at that moment disconnects the frequency of about 4,000 Hz and the watch continues to operate starting with the preselected time. Since this return to a fixed time lasts less than one second the speed of the seconds is not disrupted. If we admit that a normal second pulse had entered right at the moment when the driving mechanism has been released, the following second pulse which will bring the read-out to indicate the selected fixed time plus one second will occur a fraction of a second after the moment when the read-out has reached said preselected indication. If we assume, for example, that this indication reading is 12 hours 45 seconds (12:45) (the time signal of a French-speaking Swiss radio station) the time required for the read-out to pass from 000 to 12:45 will correspond to 60 X 12 45 periods which, at the frequency of 4,000 Hz approximately, will require a time of approximately 0.19 second. One could also provide for a fixed time setting corresponding to an indication of a time in round figures, for example 2,000 hours, and in this case one would only need to act at the input of the hours counter, or possibly at the input of the counter of tens of hours (starting with the indication 00 h 00 min 00 see, it would only be necessary, for example, to change the first zero into a two in order to obtain the reading of h 00 min 00 sec). From the electronic point of view, as soon as the setting to a fixed time has been made the released positioning of the driving mechanism becomes of no effect. It is clear that this method of setting the time can be repeated as often as desired, but it does not make any sense except when the releasing of the driving mechanism takes place at the exact moment when, for example, by means of the radio, a time signal is heard which corresponds to the preselected indication. The decoding of this preselected time can be adjusted for example by means of a screw which is placed at one or another place so as to establish different possible connections inside of the watch. The watch dealer who sells the watch can then, according to the customers wishes, select the read-out of fixed-time setting which is appropriate.

In the positions G and H of the preselector the manipulation of the driving mechanism will cause, respectively, an advance or a delay of 1 hour exactly. This operation, by means of which the indication of the hours is made to advance or go back directly without affecting the minutes and of the seconds, is intended for permitting an adaptation at the time changes of time zones. If, for example, during an airplane flight, the owner of the watch penetrates in one direction or the other for example five time zone boundaries he will have to press and release the driving mechanism five times in order to set his watch at the time corresponding to the new time zone.

In the J and K positions of the preselector a manipulation of the driving mechanism will cause, respectively, an advance or a delay of one day in the indication of the day of the month. By means of this action a direct action is established on the electronic elements providing the read-out of the day of the month. The first one of these operations (in the J position of the preselector) which makes it possible to advance the day of the month will be used in particular at the end of each month comprising less than 31 days. The other operation (position K) is intended for rectifying possible errors such as the error which could be committed by thinking for example that the month of October only has 30 days and by causing the indicator of the day of the month to jump from October 30 to November 1 although the next day is actually the 31st of October.

In the L position of the preselector each manipulation of the driving mechanism causes a one step advance in the indication of the day of the week. This possibility would not need to be used in practice except as the result of an interruption in operation of more than a day in the watch and this is one of the reasons why the corresponding position is one of the last positions of the preselector. No position for bringing back by one day of the week has been provided for since a bringing back of one day can always be done by advancing by six days (six successive manipulations of the driving mechanism while the preselector is situated in the L position).

In the M position of the preselector a manipulation of the driving mechanism causes an advance of one step in the month indication. Normally this operation is not performed except in the case when the watch has not been working for a long period of time, that is to say that this would in all probability be the operation which is used the least often. This is the reason why it has the last position of the preselector. Similarly to what has been said for the days of the week, no possibility for a backing up of a month has been provided for, since a backing up of 1 month can always be done by advancing 11 months.

As shown in the drawing, the preselector composed of the crown 5 and of the elements which it supports can carry out a complete turn so that starting from the M position it would also be possible to return to the position of normal operation (E) by passing through the positions A, B, C, D instead of bypassing through the positions L, K, J, H, G, F.

In order to prevent the possible danger of the timepiece getting out of order through an improper manipulation of the driving mechanism at the time when one returns from the M position to the position of normal operation, it will be possible, by mechanical means which are easy to visualize and which are not represented, to prevent the preselector from making a complete turn by preventing any angular displacement which would cause it to pass from the M position to the A position or from the A position to the M position.

It is appropriate to once more state at this time that in certain design variations, it could very well be possible to have only a part of the positions of the preselector F, G, H, J, K, L and M. It could be possible, for example, to do away with the positions having to do with the advance or back-up of one hour in the case of the passing through a time zone, or of the position for resetting a fixed time. In the event that all of the positions described here are to be available then it turns out that the order mentioned above, in which these positions are presented starting from the position of normal operation (E), is the most rational one, since the positions which will be used the most often are the closest to the position of normal operation.

It is clear that a watch could also be equipped with either positions of the type A, B, C, D, or positions of the type F, G, L, M, in an independent manner. It could also provide only part of the positions described for each one of these two types.

Let us also point out that it would also be possible, as a variation in the form of design represented in FIGS. 1 and 2, to make a preselector crown of the type of the preselector crown 5 to protrude sideways so as to be able to turn the preselector without any need of removing the watch from the wrist.

It should also be noted that the kind of timepieces described above within the framework of a wristwatch could also be suitable for other types of watches, as well as for small clocks, even for large clocks (in this last case the preselector would be located preferably, however, somewhere else than the back of the clock).

Numerous means are known within the framework of electronic engineering which, by making use ofintegrated circuits in particular for designing units of very small dimensions, make it possible to establish circuits by means of which the functions previously described can be carried out. FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 illustrate the way in which these electronic circuits could be made up.

The lower part of FIG. 7 shows a schematic working together with the switch composed of the contacts 15a, 15b, and 150 and the socket 12. It can be seen that this scale is composed of two inverted OR gates connected so as to form a scale. In the state which is represented in FIG. 7 the driving mechanism 4 is released towards the outside and it can be seen that, by means of the contact 15a 15b a positive voltage is imparted onto the input of a gate. This gate is also connected by a resistance to the source so that it is negative when the contact 15 does not send a positive voltage there. A second input of each gate is connected to the output of each gate. In the situation involving the figure the gate which receives a positive voltage will have a negative output (since it is an inverted OR gate) so that the input of the other gate connected to its output will receive a negative voltage. Since the other input of the other gate also receives a negative voltage the output of the other gate will be positive, the potential of this positive output being fed to the input of the first gate which would thus be maintained in the state where its output is negative even if the contact 15b, 15a is broken. Thus, the point which is marked by a W in FIG. 7 receives a negative voltage in that position. At the moment that one presses on the driving mechanism 4 and the socket 12 breaks the contact 15a, 15b the point W retains its negative voltage. But at the moment when the socket l2 closes the contact 150, 15b one input of the second gate becomes positive, its output, as well as the second input of the other gate, becomes negative, and since the other input of the first gate has already been made negative by the breaking of the contact 15b, 15a this first gate assumes the condition that its output is positive. Similarly, the fact that the output of the first gate becomes positive imparts a positive voltage to the other input of the second gate which therefore retains its condition where its output is negative independently of the contact 150, 15b. This system of scale control, which functions exactly in the same manner but in the other direction at the moment that the driving mechanism 4 is released, provides at the point W an absolutely suitable switching independently of the possible bounces which the opening or closing of the contacts 15 could cause.

At the top of FIG. 7 there is a group of three AND gates each one of which has an input connected to the output W of the first inverted OR gate and each one of which has another input connected to one of the studs 18 mentioned in conjunction with FIGS. 5 and 6. In actuality there are not just the three AND gates R, S, T, but eleven similar gates. For purposes of ease of illustration, only three of these gates are shown in FIG. 7. Owing to the fact that a positive tension is fed to the ring contact 23 (FIGS. 5 and 6) only the AND gate having its second input connected to that of the studs 18 which is connected to the ring 23 by the contact element 21 will be capable of being thrown into gear or engaged, on the condition, however, that its other input, connected to the output W of the inverted OR gate, also has a positive voltage. Thus, in the released position of the driving mechanism 4 none of the AND gates R, S, T, can have a positive output since the output W of the inverted OR gate is negative. At the moment when the driving mechanism 4 is pressed only one of these AND gates will be thrown into gear, that is to say the one whose other input receives a positive voltage by means of the contact element 21.

It is therefore easy to understand that each one of the different logical functions described previously and each one of which corresponds to a particular position of the preselector will be carried out by the presence of a positive voltage at the output of one of the eleven AND gates of which the three gates shown (R, S, T) are a part.

The FIG. 8 shows, by way of example, how the frequency of approximately 1,000 Hz is fed to the input of the divider to achieve the rapid advance serving to bring the read-out of the time at the desired position. Let us note that the frequency which is used here is a frequency of 1,024 I-Iz. In effect, the frequency of 1 Hz which is necessary to normally control the watch is obtained by successive binary divisions so that 10 binary stages above the output 1 Hz have a frequency of 1,024 Hz which is very easy to use.

In FIG. 8, gate U is connected in a manner which is similar to the gates R, S, T, but which, instead of being a simple AND gate, is an inverted OR gate. This means that the output of the gate U will always be positive ex cept when the conditions are present which would make its output positive if it is a question of a noninverted AND gate. The output of this inverted AND gate U is connected to an input of an inverted OR gate the other input of which is connected to the frequency source of 1,024 Hz. Thus, the output of this inverted OR gate will always have a negative voltage when the potential is positive at the output of the gate U, that is to say in all of the cases when the conditions are not present which are needed to throw this gate U into gear, whereas, when these conditions have been fulfilled and the output of the gate U is negative, the output of the inverted OR gate will become alternately positive and negative at the pace of the 1,024 Hz frequency which is connected to its other input. A frequency of 1,024 Hz will therefore not be fed to the input of the divider (which will be examined further on) unless the stud 18 corresponding to the gate U has received a positive voltage from the ring 23, that is to say when the preselection crown (or the preselector) is in the A position and that simultaneously the driving mechanism 4 has been pressed so as to enable a positive voltage to pass through the point W. When this condition has not been fulfilled the frequency of 1,024 Hz will not reach the input of the divider, but, according to the case, it will be another frequency, for example 64 Hz or 2 Hz which will reach the input of the divider. The frequency which reaches the input of the divider under normal operation, that is to say the frequency of 1 Hz exactly will be connected permanently to the input of this divider except in the case where the driving mechanism is pressed into the stop position (B) of the preselector. In order to cut off the arrival of this frequency of 1 Hz an electronic device is used which is similar to the one shown in FIG. 8, but which has, instead of and in the place of the inverted AND gate U, a simple, therefore non-inverted, AND gate.

FIG. 9 shows, in the form of a block diagram, all of the circuits controlling the digital read-out of the watch. In that figure there is, schematically represented, the driving mechanism 4 with its contacts a, b, c and its scale with two inverted OR gates previously mentioned. Also, schematically shown is the selector with its 12 studs 18 one of which is connected to the ring 23. The main electronic logic, onto which there jointly act the preselector and the driving mechanism, is represented by an LP block which, in addition to the order which it receives from the driving mechanism and from the preselector, receives from a frequency divider four signals having a frequency of 1 Hz, 2 Hz, 64 Hz and 1,024 Hz, respectively. This logic block LP feeds the input of a divider and also feeds five connections h, m, p, q, and r which connect the logic to certain particular places of the counting and dividing circuits which establish the digital read-out of the watch.

The four frequencies of 1 Hz, 2 Hz, 64 Hz and 1.024 Hz are obtained from a quartz oscillator through a divider (Div) comprising a series of binary stages.

The frequency of the quartz oscillator will be 1,024 Hz or a multiple on the order 2' of 1,024 Hz. Two additional connections, shown by dotted lines, reach the main logic LP. One connection feeds a frequency of 4,096 Hz from the divider. These connections shown by dotted lines are optional and the need for them will depend, as will be seen, on the way in which the setting of fixed time is done. It is clear that if this frequency of 4,096 Hz has to be supplied by the divider then the frequency of the quartz oscillator will have to be 4,096 Hz or a multiple on the order of 2 of 4,096 Hz, unless the divider (Div) has one or two multiplier stages to supply this frequency of 4,096 Hz, in which case the oscillator could very well operate at 1,024 Hz or 2,048 Hz.

The ordinary output of the LP logic supplies, under normal operation, a frequency of 1 Hz which is applied to the input of a counter-divider-decoder stage 51 operating with a cycle of 10'and which is arranged first of all to count module 10, the pulses which it re ceives at the input, secondly to supply at its output a pulse each time that it receives 10 input pulses, that is to say to perform a division by ten, and thirdly to decode the states of the internal counters in such a way as to supply for each one of the 10 combined states possible the potentials which are desired to cause to appear the read-out of the corresponding Arabic numeral in accordance with the principle of composed read-out previously mentioned. In that case one is truly dealing with a "counter-divider-decoder" stage which presentday electronic engineering is capable of supplying in the form of integrated circuits which, under certain forms of design, could also encompass the field of optical posting itself(in general on the back ofa plate bearing the other electronic elements right-side-up). After this first counter-divider-decoder module 10 stage 51 there is a second counter-divider-decoder module 6 stage 53. These two counters together make it possible to carry out the posting of the seconds and they also supply each minute, that is to say every 60 seconds, a pulse to a subsequent group of counters 55, 57 which is similar to it but which this time involves the posting of the information concerning the minutes. The output of the counter-divider-decoder 57 supplying the readout of the tens of minutes provides a pulse every 60 minutes, that is to say every hour, to a group of counters-dividers-decoders 59, 61 arranged to establish a cycle having 12 or 24 positions, according to whether the watch is supposed to indicate 12 hours or 24 hours. It would be possible to achieve the stage of the hours by means of a single counter with 12 or with 24 positions. For reasons of convenience of electronic design, it is preferred here to use a counter-divider-decoder module 10 stage 59 followed by a counter-dividerdecoder module 3 stage 61, which, together, would provide therefore a cycle of 30 hours but interjecting means which reduce this cycle from 30 hours to 24 hours or, if need be, down to 12 hours. These means come from a technique which is well known in electronics and therefore they have not been specially shown in FIG. 9.

Thus, the six counter-divider-decoder stages 51, 53, 55, 57, 59 and 61 shown in the form of blocks in the top part of FIG. 9 permit the digital read-out to advance so that each second the read-out of the units of seconds advances by one step. Each time that the readout of the seconds advances from 9 to O the read-out of the tens of seconds advances by one step. Each time that the read-out of the tens of seconds passes from 5 (59) to 0 the read-out of the units of minutes goes ahead by one step. Each time that the read-out of the units of minutes passes from 9 to 0 the read-out of the tens of minutes advances by one step, and, each time that the read-out of the tens of minutes advances from (59) to 0 the read-out of the hours advances by one step.

The bottom part of FIG. 9 shows the sequence of the electronic group supplying the read-out of the information on the day of the month, the days of the week and the months.

Each cycle of 24 hours of the indication of the hours supplies a pulse to a connection n and it reaches, on the one hand, a counter-divider-decoder module 7 stage 63 which controls the posting of the days of the week and, on the other hand, a counter-divider-decoder stage 65 module 10 equipped to supply the posting of the units of the day of the month. This latter counter-dividerdecoder module 10 stage 65 is connected to another counter-divider-decoder module 4 stage 67 equipped so as to supply the indication of the tens of the days of the month, it being understood that means (looping), not shown, provides the reduction of the theoretical cycle of 40 to an actual cycle of 31 corresponding to the 31 days of the month.

Connected to the two counter-divider-decoders 65, 67 of the units and of the tens of the month there is a logic circuit 69. Its role is to detect the passage of the day of the month from 31 (or from 30 or from 29 or from 28) to 01 in order to then cause the indication of the months to advance by one step. Each time that this is necessary this logic supplies a pulse to a counterdivider-decoder module 12 stage 71 arranged to supply the digital read-out of the twelve months of the year. It should be noted that it could have been possible to do away with the logic serving as an intermediary between the counters of the days of the month and the counter of the months, and to control the counting of the months from the tens of days of the month without the intermediary of a logic in the same manner as one controls the counting of the days of the month from the divider-counter-decoder of the tens of hours. The presence of a logic circuit between the days of the month and the months will or will not be necessary depending upon the manner in which the counter-divider-decoder stages are composed.

In effect, it is possible to make up these stages either in a reversible manner, that is to say by giving them the possibility of counting forwards and backwards, or in a non-reversible manner, that is to say by only giving them the possibility of counting in one direction. Since they have to be able to move back 1 hour or 1 day, the counters-dividers-decoders of the hours 59, 61 and of the days of the month 65, 67 should theoretically be of the reversible type. It would, however, be possible to select them as of the non-reversible type by assuming that to make the counter ofthe hours go back by 1 hour it would be set ahead by 23 hours, or, if the case need be, by l 1 hours, whereas in order to make the counter of the days of the month go back by one day it would be set ahead by 30 days. This last possibility, however, would require the presence of an additional counter capable of counting for the hours 23 (or if necessary 11) pulses and for the days of the month 30 pulses. This requirement for an additional counter to count the pulses would make the last solution mentioned less advantageous than that which consists in selecting, at least for the counters-dividers-decoders 59, 61 of the hours and for the counters-dividers-decoders 65, 67 of the days of the month, counters of the reversible type. An excellent solution from the technical point of view, but not necessarily the best, would consist in using reversible counters-dividers-decoders stages also for the days of the week and for the months, despite the fact that these two counters never have to be made to go back directly. In effect, it is quite possible that use will be made, for example, of the delay of one hour intended for the passing across time zones so that the indication of the hours goes back from 3 oclock in the morning to for example 2300 hours (ll oclock in the evening). In this case the indication of the days and of the days of the month should also move back. This does not create any problems in the case when the subsequent counters, days of the month and days of the week are also reversible counters. On the other hand this would present some problem if, for example, the counter of the days of the week was not of the reversible type (it has been mentioned that the counter of the days of the month should be of the reversible type).

The same holds true for the control of the indication of the months from counters involving the day of the month. If one assumes that the most perfect solution consists in making the counters of the days of the week and the months also reversible, in addition to the counters of the hours and of the days of the month, it will be possible to carry out an automatic carrying forward in such a way that, for example, having thought that the month of October has 30 days and having manually made the indication pass from October 31 to No vember 1, one must make the inverse correction to come back to 31, the indication of the month passing back from November to October. If the counter of the months were not of the reversible type then the correction of this error would cause the watch to indicate 3] November instead of 31 October. It would then be necessary to once more advance the counter of the months by eleven steps in order to restore the correct date of the 31st of October.

Two of the most advantageous variants have been retained. The first one is the most perfect variant mentioned above in which all of the counters, except for the counters of the minutes and of the seconds, are reversible (can move backwards) and in which the carrying forward of the hours onto the days of the month and onto the days of the week and of the days of the month onto the months is also done in a reversible manner. The other solution retained as being advantageous is the following simplified solution: the principal logic circuit which conditions the manual control operations is arranged in such a way that at the time of a manual command all of the carrying forward operations are cut off so that, for example, if, by means of the advance of one hour for a time zone, one has made the indication pass from 2300 hours to 1 hour (1 oclock) the day of the week and the day of the month are not automatically affected and can be placed manually into the desired position. In this case the user knows that after each manual correction the subsequent indications do not follow, so that he will know that it is necessary to also correct them manually both when the deadline of midnight has been exceeded in the forward direction and when the deadline of midnight has been exceeded in the backward direction. A difficulty would occur with this solution, however, with regard to the months, since for five months out of the 12 the passage from 31 to 1 must be performed manually. It would therefore be possible to provide for a particular logic circuit which would also make the indication of the months advance when we jump the 29th, the 30th or the 31st of a month. This is the reason why FIG. 9 establishes the presence of a logic at the output of the counters of the days of the month to control the counter of the months. This logic will be arranged, for example, in such a way that it transmits a pulse at the time of the passing of the days of the month (the date of the month) to the position 01, on the condition, however, that since the last pulse transmitted for the advance of the months the counter of the days of the month has passed, for example, by the position 20, which could have not have occurred at the time of the correction of an error or during the passing of a time zone making the day of the month go back from 1 to 31, in which cases there is the risk of encountering disturbances owing to the fact that two successive pulses would be sent to the counter of the months.

It remains to see how the principal logic LP (FIG. 9) acts on the different counters-dividers-decoders stages to carry out the various operations of manual control. For the four operations in which the advance of the indication has to be made in an accelerated manner (2 Hz, advance of the seconds), in a rapid manner (64 Hz, advance of the minutes) or in a super-fast manner (1,024 Hz, advance of the hours), no additional explanation is necessary. The logic makes it possible to transmit higher frequencies to the input of the first counter-divider-decoder and also in a manner which does not require other additional explanations, the logic proceeds to completely stop the arrival of the frequency of 1 Hz when the driving mechanism is placed in the stop position of the preselector.

For the resetting to a fixed time there are two possibilitics. The first one, which corresponds to what has been said at the time of the functional explanation of the operation of resetting to a fixed time, consists in transmitting to the input of the counter-decoder of the minutes a frequency of 4,096 Hz and to decode the passage of the indication by the preselected position. This case would correspond in the figure to the connections drawn in by dashes, in assuming that the connection r which connects the principal logic LP to the countersdividers-decoders of the minutes, of the tens of minutes, of the hours and of the tens of hours constitutes the connection of decoding, the decoder itself being assumed as surrounded by the LP logic. In order to use this possibility, it is necessary to have a frequency of 4,096 Hz which, according to the case, could increase the encumbrance of the divider (Div) and complicate the design of the oscillator. in the resetting to fixed time, as described previously, provision was also made to bring all of the counters and minutes first of all to 0. A counter-divider-decoder generally has an additional input for putting back to O. The putting back to in question, therefore, if necessary, is done by the logic by using this particular input of setting back to O. The particular connection necessary for this putting back to 0 is not shown in the figure. It should be stated that in any event the putting back to 0 prior to the putting back to a fixed time is absolutely necessary only for the two counters-dividers-decoders of the seconds and of the tens of seconds. It is, on the other hand, completely possible to do away with this necessity in the case of the counters-dividers-decoders of the hours and of the minutes.

Another possibility which does not necessitate the utilization of a frequency of 4,096 Hz consists in sending a potential from the principal logic LP through the intermediary of the connection r. This potential forces each one of the four counters of the minutes, of the tens of minutes, of the hours and of the tens of hours to get into a well determined position which could also be selected by switching of wiring inside of the watch which could be done, for example, with the aid of detachable screws.

With this second solution the prior setting to 0 is also not absolutely necessary except for the seconds and for the tens of seconds. It does not have to be done, but can be if desired, for the minutes, tens of minutes, hours and tens of hours.

Upon the command from the driving mechanism or from the preselector the LP logic carries out the advance or the bringing back ofa complete hour (the passage of time zones) by sending a pulse for advancing or bringing back, through the intermediary of the connection h, to the counter-divider-decoder of the units of hours which, as we have seen, should to all advantages be of the reversible-operation type. If this counterdivider-decoder were not of the reversible-operation type then the principal logic could act by sending it a series of 23 (or, if necessary,! 1) pulses, which would result in making the hours advance by 23 (or by l l) successive steps. In such a case the movements in the direction of the counters of the days of the month and of the days of the week should be blocked by an action on the part of the principal logic. One could also contemplate the case when, during an advance of the hours by 23 steps, the movements forward would not be blocked, but where one would then make all of the subsequent counters-dividers-decoders of acycle advance, less one unit, so as to cause them to effect the equivalent of one backward step of one unit. However, this solution requires the presence of an additional pulse counter and it turns out that this solution is not advantageous in comparison with the solution which consists in only using reversible counters.

The operation of going ahead by one day or going behind by one day is done in a manner which is similar to the operation of going ahead or going behind by 1 hour by sending an appropriate pulse from the LP logic, through the intermediary of the connection m, to the counter-divider-decoder of the units of the days of the month.

The operations, still controlled by the driving mechanism and the preselector, of advancing by one step of the days of the week or of the months are controlled in a similar manner by the principal logic LP, acting by means of the connections p and q, respectively, on the counters-dividers-decoders of the days of the week and of the months (for the months, if necessary, on the logic preceding the counter-divider-decoder).

It is important to point out that all of the electronic means herein described, and in particular all of the logical electronic means which the principal logic LP should contain, could be composed of certain electronic means which are known in this branch of technology, the elements which distinguish the watch which is the subject of the present description are primarily, but not exclusively, the technical measures which have to do with the manner in which the watch is controlled externally by means of the driving mechanism and the preselector to carry out the various functions which have been described, as well as the technical measures which have to do with the nature of these different functions and the manner in which they are carried out to form an ensemble permitting a manual control which is as easy as concerning the digital read-out of the watch.

In the case, for example, when the totality of the counters-dividers-decoders of the days of the month would be programmed in accordance with the yearly or perpetual calendar so that the days of the month which are missing at the end of the months of February, April, June, September and November are skipped automatically, it would be possible to do away with all or a part of the manual controls concerning the date.

l claim:

1. An electronically operated timepiece having a plurality of digital read-out elements, and comprising means to selectively manually operate at least some of the digital read-out elements, said means comprising a preselector capable of being placed in different rotational positions and a driving mechanism, said preselector comprising a rotatable element mounted on the side of the timepiece opposite the face and accessible externally to be rotated to different angular positions corresponding to various settings of the preselector, and said driving mechanism comprising a rod which penetrates into the time piece, said rod being arranged to be manipulated to change its depth of penetration into the timepiece, both said preselector and driving mechanism being arranged in such a manner that the position occupied by the preselector at the time that the driving mechanism is manipulated determines which digital read-out element is to be affected by the manipulation of the driving mechanism, as well as the function actuation imparted to this element, said timepiece further comprising an arrangement of said preselector such that said rotatable element works together'with said driving mechanism in such a way that in the various setting positions of the preselector the driving mechanism can be at least partially depressed into the timepiece, whereas when said preselector is located between two of said setting positions said driving mechanism can only occupy its most retracted position, said preselector being prevented from turning from one setting position to another unless said driving mechanism occupies this most retracted position.

2. A timepiece according to claim 1, wherein said rotatable element works together with said driving mechanism in sucha way that in a position .of normal operaouter periphery of said crown shaped rotatable element is not larger than the periphery of said timepiece housmg.

5. A timepiece accordingto claim 3, wherein the periphery of said crown shaped rotatable element is proportioned and mounted on the housing of the timepiece in such a way as to overlap at least one of the sides of the housing so as to be able to be turned even when said timepiece is placed on the wrist of its wearer.

6. An electronically operated timepiece having a plurality of digital read-out elements, and comprising means to selectively manually operate at least some of the digital read-out elements, said means comprising a preselector capable of being placed in different rotational positions and a driving mechanism, both said preselector and driving mechanism being arranged in such a manner that the position occupied by the preselector at the time that the driving mechanism is manipulated determines which digital read-out element is to be affected by the manipulation of the driving mechanism, as well as the function actuation imparted to this element, said preselector further having a position of normal operation wherein the manipulation of the driving mechanism has no effect on the positioning of said digital read-out elements.

7. A timepiece according to claim 6, wherein said preselector and said driving mechanism work together in such a way that when the preselector is in said position of normal operation said driving mechanism can be manipulated between two positions respectively locking and unlocking rotation of said preselector, with the locking position capable of being secured.

8. A timepiece according to claim 7, wherein said preselector has a position of accelerated advance in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed such that the hour indicated advances by one hour in less than five seconds.

9. A timepiece in accordance with claim 7, wherein said preselector has a position of accelerated advance in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance ata speed such that the minute indicated advances by one minute over a period between a half a second and five seconds.

10. A timepiece according to claim 7, wherein said preselector has a position of accelerated advance in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed which is twice the speed of normal operation.

11. A timepiece according to claim 7, wherein said preselector includes a stop position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism stops the advance of the digital read-out elements.

12. A timepiece according to claim 7, wherein said 7 preselector has sequentially following the normal position at least four adjacent operating positions which are a position in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism stops the advance of the digital read-out elements; a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed which is twice that of normal operation; a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed such that an advance of one minute is brought about during a period of between ahalf a second and 5 seconds; and aposition in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed such that an advance of 1 hour is brought about in less than 5 seconds.

13. A timepieceaccording to claim 7, wherein said preselector further includes a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism causes a resetting of the digital read-out elements to a predetermined time.

14. A timepiece according to claim 7, wherein said preselector further includes a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism causes an advance of the digital read-out elements which is exactly equal to 1 hour.

15. A timepiece according to claim 14, wherein said preselector also includes a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism causes a setting back of the digital read-out elements by exactly 1 hour.

16. A timepiece according to claim 7, further comprising digital read-out elements indicating the calendar date as well as the time, said preselector having a further position in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism causes an advance of said digital readout elements by one day of the month.

17. A timepiece according to claim 6, wherein said preselector also includes a position in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism causes a setting back of said digital read-out elements by one day of the month.

18. A timepiece according to claim 16, wherein said preselector includes a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism causes the digitalreadout elements to advance by one month.

19. A timepiece according to claim 16, wherein said digital read-out elements indicating the calendar date comprise digital read-out elements for the days of the week, said preselector including a further position in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism causes said digital read-out elements to advance by one day of the week.

20. A timepiece according to claim 19, wherein said positions of the preselector are broken down, starting with the position of normal operation according to an order such that there are successively presented: the positionof normal operation; a position of resetting to a predetermined fixed time; a position of advance by 1 hour; a position of setting back by 1 hour; a position of advance by one day of the month; a position of setting back by one day of the month; a position of advance by one month; and a position of advance by one day of the week.

21,. A timepiece according to claim 20, wherein said preselector includes, on one side of the position of normal operation, various positions of accelerated advance of the digital read-out elements and a position stopping advance of said digital read-out elements, and on the other side of the position of normal operation positions of resetting to fixed time, of advance and setting back of one hour, of advance and setting back of one day in the month, of advance of one month and of advance of one day of the week.

22. An electronically operated timepiece having a plurality of digital read-out elements, and comprising means to selectively manually operate at least some of the digital read-out elements, said means comprising a preselector capable of being placed in different rotational positions and a driving mechanism, both said preselector and driving mechanism being arranged in such a manner that the position occupied by the preselector at the time that the driving mechanism is manipulated determines which digital read-out element is to be affected by the manipulation of the driving mechanism, as well as the function actuation imparted to this element, further comprising electronic circuits operatively connected to control said digital read-out elements, said circuits comprising successive countersdividers-decoders stages having an input, means feeding a l Hz signal to said input at least in the absence of a manipulation ordering an accelerated advance or a stopping of the digital read-out'elements, the countersdividers-decoders stages being arranged to actuate successively during the course of their operation: first digital read-out elements numbered from 0 to 9 for the units of seconds; second digital read-out elements numbered from 0 to 5 for the tens of seconds; third digital read-out elements numbered from 0 to 9 for the units of minutes; fourth digital read-out elements numbered from 0 to 5 for the tens of minutes; and fifth and sixth digital read-out elements numbered for the hours.

23. A timepiece according to claim 22, further comprising digital read-out elements for the days of the month, the months and the days of the week, further counters-dividers-decoders stages fed at their input at a rate of one pulse per cycle of 24 hours of the preceding counters-dividers-decoders stages, and said further digital read-out elements being arranged to provide the numbered combinations of digital read-out of the days of the month, the combinations of alphabetic digital read-out of the months and the combinations of alphabetic digital read-outof the days of the week.

24. A timepiece according to claim 22, wherein said driving mechanism is provided with electrical contacts and said preselector further comprises means to establish, in its different positions, electrical contacts which, dependent upon said electrical contacts of said driving mechanism, feed a potential to said counters-dividersdecoders stages.

25. A timepiece according to claim 22, further comprising logic circuits arranged to carry out accelerated advance of said digital read-out elements by introducing into the first counter-divider-decoder a frequency which is higher than 1 Hz, this higher frequency being 2 Hz for double-speed operation, 64 Hz for the advance of 1 minute during a period between a half a second and 5 seconds, and 1,024 Hz for the advance of 1 hour in less than 5 seconds.

26. A timepiece according to claim 25, further comprising a frequency generating source of n-1,024 Hz, where n is an integer, said frequency generating source being connected to feed to the input of the first counter-divider-decoder, a divider with successive binary stages provided to reduce this frequency to the value of 1 Hz fed to said input duringnormal operation, and to supply frequencies of 2 Hz, 64 Hz, and 1,024 Hz, respectively, fed to the input for the various positions of accelerated advance.

27. A timepiece according to claim 26, wherein said frequency generating source is a quartz oscillator.

28. A timepiece according to claim 22, further comprising logic circuits arranged to feed, when the driving mechanism is placed in the position of the preselector corresponding to the resetting to fixed time, potentials of required positioning to the counters-dividersdecoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements of the units of minutes, tens of minutes, and of hours.

29. A timepiece according to claim 22, further comprising logic circuits arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of advance by one hour, a pulse to the input of the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for the hours.

30. A timepiece according to claim 22, wherein the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for hours are of reversible operation, said logic circuits being equipped to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism arising when the preselector is in the position of advance by 1 hour, an advance pulse to these counters-dividersdecoders stages and to provide them with a backward pulse at the time ofa manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of setting back by 1 hour.

31. A timepiece according to claim 23, further comprising logic circuits arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of advance by one day of the month, a pulse to the input of the counters-dividersdecoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for the days of the month.

32. A timepiece according to claim 31, wherein the counters-decoders-dividers stages supplying the readout of the days of the month are of reversible operation, said logic circuits being arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of advance by one day of the month, a pulse advance to said digital read-out elements for the days of the month, and to provide a setting back pulse at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of setting back by one day of the month.

33. A timepiece according to claim 23, further comprising logic circuits arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of advance by one month, a pulse to the input of the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for the months.

34. A timepiece according to claim 23, further comprising logic circuits arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of advance by one day of the week, a pulse to the input of the counters-dividersdecoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for the days of the week.

35. A timepiece according to claim 23, wherein the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for the hours, the days of the month, the days of the week and the months, are all of reversible operation, further comprising electrical connection means between the reversible counters-dividersdecoders stages of the hours and those of the days of the month, between the reversible counters-dividersdecoders stages of the hours and those of the days of the week, and between the reversible countersdividers-decoders stages of the days of the month and those of the months, said electrical connection means being established in such a way that a setting back manipulation of the driving mechanism and preselector which drives back a counters-dividers-decoders stage from the first position of a cycle to the last position of the preceding cycle causes the next counters-dividersdecoders stage to execute a backwards operation.

36. A timepiece according to claim 23, wherein the counters-dividers-decoders stages are non-reversible, a setting back input pulse causing an advance of the related digital read-out element of n-l, n being the number of steps in the counting cycle of the related counting stage.

37. A timepiece according to claim 23, further comprising logic circuits arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in a predetermined position, at least one pulse to the input of a counters-dividers-decoders stage selected as a function of the position of the preselector, said logic circuits being further arranged to cut off the carry pulse from one counters-dividers-decoders stage to the next one.

Claims (37)

1. An electronically operated timepiece having a plurality of digital read-out elements, and comprising means to selectively manually operate at least some of the digital read-out elements, said means comprising a preselector capable of being placed in different rotational positions and a driving mechanism, said preselector comprising a rotatable element mounted on the side of the timepiece opposite the face and accessible externally to be rotated to different angular positions corresponding to various settings of the preselector, and said driving mechanism comprising a rod which penetrates into the time piece, said rod being arranged to be manipulated to change its depth of penetration into the timepiece, both said preselector and driving mechanism being arranged in such a manner that the position ocCupied by the preselector at the time that the driving mechanism is manipulated determines which digital read-out element is to be affected by the manipulation of the driving mechanism, as well as the function actuation imparted to this element, said timepiece further comprising an arrangement of said preselector such that said rotatable element works together with said driving mechanism in such a way that in the various setting positions of the preselector the driving mechanism can be at least partially depressed into the timepiece, whereas when said preselector is located between two of said setting positions said driving mechanism can only occupy its most retracted position, said preselector being prevented from turning from one setting position to another unless said driving mechanism occupies this most retracted position.
2. A timepiece according to claim 1, wherein said rotatable element works together with said driving mechanism in such a way that in a position of normal operation of said preselector said driving mechanism can enter more deeply into the side of the timepiece than in the other positions of said preselector.
3. A timepiece according to claim 1, wherein said timepiece further comprises a housing having a face side and a cylindrical recess for storing an electrical battery in the side opposite the face, said preselector comprising a rotatable element in the shape of a crown situated around said cylindrical recess.
4. A timepiece according to claim 3, wherein the outer periphery of said crown shaped rotatable element is not larger than the periphery of said timepiece housing.
5. A timepiece according to claim 3, wherein the periphery of said crown shaped rotatable element is proportioned and mounted on the housing of the timepiece in such a way as to overlap at least one of the sides of the housing so as to be able to be turned even when said timepiece is placed on the wrist of its wearer.
6. An electronically operated timepiece having a plurality of digital read-out elements, and comprising means to selectively manually operate at least some of the digital read-out elements, said means comprising a preselector capable of being placed in different rotational positions and a driving mechanism, both said preselector and driving mechanism being arranged in such a manner that the position occupied by the preselector at the time that the driving mechanism is manipulated determines which digital read-out element is to be affected by the manipulation of the driving mechanism, as well as the function actuation imparted to this element, said preselector further having a position of normal operation wherein the manipulation of the driving mechanism has no effect on the positioning of said digital read-out elements.
7. A timepiece according to claim 6, wherein said preselector and said driving mechanism work together in such a way that when the preselector is in said position of normal operation said driving mechanism can be manipulated between two positions respectively locking and unlocking rotation of said preselector, with the locking position capable of being secured.
8. A timepiece according to claim 7, wherein said preselector has a position of accelerated advance in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed such that the hour indicated advances by one hour in less than five seconds.
9. A timepiece in accordance with claim 7, wherein said preselector has a position of accelerated advance in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed such that the minute indicated advances by one minute over a period between a half a second and five seconds.
10. A timepiece according to claim 7, wherein said preselector has a position of accelerated advance in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed which is twice the speed of normal operation.
11. A timepiece accorDing to claim 7, wherein said preselector includes a stop position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism stops the advance of the digital read-out elements.
12. A timepiece according to claim 7, wherein said preselector has sequentially following the normal position at least four adjacent operating positions which are a position in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism stops the advance of the digital read-out elements; a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed which is twice that of normal operation; a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed such that an advance of one minute is brought about during a period of between a half a second and 5 seconds; and a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism makes the digital read-out elements advance at a speed such that an advance of 1 hour is brought about in less than 5 seconds.
13. A timepiece according to claim 7, wherein said preselector further includes a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism causes a resetting of the digital read-out elements to a predetermined time.
14. A timepiece according to claim 7, wherein said preselector further includes a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism causes an advance of the digital read-out elements which is exactly equal to 1 hour.
15. A timepiece according to claim 14, wherein said preselector also includes a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism causes a setting back of the digital read-out elements by exactly 1 hour.
16. A timepiece according to claim 7, further comprising digital read-out elements indicating the calendar date as well as the time, said preselector having a further position in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism causes an advance of said digital read-out elements by one day of the month.
17. A timepiece according to claim 6, wherein said preselector also includes a position in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism causes a setting back of said digital read-out elements by one day of the month.
18. A timepiece according to claim 16, wherein said preselector includes a position in which the manipulation of the driving mechanism causes the digital read-out elements to advance by one month.
19. A timepiece according to claim 16, wherein said digital read-out elements indicating the calendar date comprise digital read-out elements for the days of the week, said preselector including a further position in which the manipulation of said driving mechanism causes said digital read-out elements to advance by one day of the week.
20. A timepiece according to claim 19, wherein said positions of the preselector are broken down, starting with the position of normal operation according to an order such that there are successively presented: the position of normal operation; a position of resetting to a predetermined fixed time; a position of advance by 1 hour; a position of setting back by 1 hour; a position of advance by one day of the month; a position of setting back by one day of the month; a position of advance by one month; and a position of advance by one day of the week.
21. A timepiece according to claim 20, wherein said preselector includes, on one side of the position of normal operation, various positions of accelerated advance of the digital read-out elements and a position stopping advance of said digital read-out elements, and on the other side of the position of normal operation positions of resetting to fixed time, of advance and setting back of one hour, of advance and setting back of one day in the month, of advance of one month and of advance of one day of the week.
22. An electronically operated timepiece having a plurality of digital read-out elements, and comprising means to selectively manually operate at Least some of the digital read-out elements, said means comprising a preselector capable of being placed in different rotational positions and a driving mechanism, both said preselector and driving mechanism being arranged in such a manner that the position occupied by the preselector at the time that the driving mechanism is manipulated determines which digital read-out element is to be affected by the manipulation of the driving mechanism, as well as the function actuation imparted to this element, further comprising electronic circuits operatively connected to control said digital read-out elements, said circuits comprising successive counters-dividers-decoders stages having an input, means feeding a 1 Hz signal to said input at least in the absence of a manipulation ordering an accelerated advance or a stopping of the digital read-out elements, the counters-dividers-decoders stages being arranged to actuate successively during the course of their operation: first digital read-out elements numbered from 0 to 9 for the units of seconds; second digital read-out elements numbered from 0 to 5 for the tens of seconds; third digital read-out elements numbered from 0 to 9 for the units of minutes; fourth digital read-out elements numbered from 0 to 5 for the tens of minutes; and fifth and sixth digital read-out elements numbered for the hours.
23. A timepiece according to claim 22, further comprising digital read-out elements for the days of the month, the months and the days of the week, further counters-dividers-decoders stages fed at their input at a rate of one pulse per cycle of 24 hours of the preceding counters-dividers-decoders stages, and said further digital read-out elements being arranged to provide the numbered combinations of digital read-out of the days of the month, the combinations of alphabetic digital read-out of the months and the combinations of alphabetic digital read-out of the days of the week.
24. A timepiece according to claim 22, wherein said driving mechanism is provided with electrical contacts and said preselector further comprises means to establish, in its different positions, electrical contacts which, dependent upon said electrical contacts of said driving mechanism, feed a potential to said counters-dividers-decoders stages.
25. A timepiece according to claim 22, further comprising logic circuits arranged to carry out accelerated advance of said digital read-out elements by introducing into the first counter-divider-decoder a frequency which is higher than 1 Hz, this higher frequency being 2 Hz for double-speed operation, 64 Hz for the advance of 1 minute during a period between a half a second and 5 seconds, and 1,024 Hz for the advance of 1 hour in less than 5 seconds.
26. A timepiece according to claim 25, further comprising a frequency generating source of n.1,024 Hz, where n is an integer, said frequency generating source being connected to feed to the input of the first counter-divider-decoder, a divider with successive binary stages provided to reduce this frequency to the value of 1 Hz fed to said input during normal operation, and to supply frequencies of 2 Hz, 64 Hz, and 1,024 Hz, respectively, fed to the input for the various positions of accelerated advance.
27. A timepiece according to claim 26, wherein said frequency generating source is a quartz oscillator.
28. A timepiece according to claim 22, further comprising logic circuits arranged to feed, when the driving mechanism is placed in the position of the preselector corresponding to the resetting to fixed time, potentials of required positioning to the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements of the units of minutes, tens of minutes, and of hours.
29. A timepiece according to claim 22, further comprising logic circuits arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulatIon of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of advance by one hour, a pulse to the input of the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for the hours.
30. A timepiece according to claim 22, wherein the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for hours are of reversible operation, said logic circuits being equipped to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism arising when the preselector is in the position of advance by 1 hour, an advance pulse to these counters-dividers-decoders stages and to provide them with a backward pulse at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of setting back by 1 hour.
31. A timepiece according to claim 23, further comprising logic circuits arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of advance by one day of the month, a pulse to the input of the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for the days of the month.
32. A timepiece according to claim 31, wherein the counters-decoders-dividers stages supplying the read-out of the days of the month are of reversible operation, said logic circuits being arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of advance by one day of the month, a pulse advance to said digital read-out elements for the days of the month, and to provide a setting back pulse at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of setting back by one day of the month.
33. A timepiece according to claim 23, further comprising logic circuits arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of advance by one month, a pulse to the input of the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for the months.
34. A timepiece according to claim 23, further comprising logic circuits arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in the position of advance by one day of the week, a pulse to the input of the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for the days of the week.
35. A timepiece according to claim 23, wherein the counters-dividers-decoders stages supplying the digital read-out elements for the hours, the days of the month, the days of the week and the months, are all of reversible operation, further comprising electrical connection means between the reversible counters-dividers-decoders stages of the hours and those of the days of the month, between the reversible counters-dividers-decoders stages of the hours and those of the days of the week, and between the reversible counters-dividers-decoders stages of the days of the month and those of the months, said electrical connection means being established in such a way that a setting back manipulation of the driving mechanism and preselector which drives back a counters-dividers-decoders stage from the first position of a cycle to the last position of the preceding cycle causes the next counters-dividers-decoders stage to execute a backwards operation.
36. A timepiece according to claim 23, wherein the counters-dividers-decoders stages are non-reversible, a setting back input pulse causing an advance of the related digital read-out element of n-1, n being the number of steps in the counting cycle of the related counting stage.
37. A timepiece according to claim 23, further comprising logic circuits arranged to supply, at the time of a manipulation of the driving mechanism when the preselector is in a predetermined position, at least one pulse to the input of a counters-dividers-decoders stage selected as a function of the position of the preselector, said logic circuits being further arrangEd to cut off the carry pulse from one counters-dividers-decoders stage to the next one.
US3733810D 1970-03-06 1971-03-05 Timepiece with electronically designed digital read-out Expired - Lifetime US3733810A (en)

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DE2731970C3 (en) * 1977-07-15 1987-04-16 Diehl Gmbh & Co, 8500 Nuernberg, De
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US4344161A (en) * 1979-02-09 1982-08-10 Kabushiki Kaisha Suwa Seikosha Electronic timepiece
DE2922621C2 (en) * 1979-06-02 1985-10-31 Braun Ag, 6000 Frankfurt, De
CH631318A (en) * 1980-02-18 1982-08-13

Cited By (37)

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US3871168A (en) * 1971-08-27 1975-03-18 Longines Montres Comp D Electronic circuit for correction of the time display on an electronic timepiece
US3889458A (en) * 1972-03-15 1975-06-17 Casio Computer Co Ltd Electronic clock devices
US3855780A (en) * 1972-03-15 1974-12-24 Casio Computer Co Ltd Electronic clock device
US3810356A (en) * 1972-04-17 1974-05-14 Suwa Seikosha Kk Time correcting apparatus for an electronic timepiece
USRE29720E (en) * 1972-04-17 1978-08-08 Kabushiki Kaisha Suwa Seikosha Time correcting apparatus for an electronic timepiece
US4182113A (en) * 1972-04-21 1980-01-08 Casio Computer Co., Ltd. Electronic time keeping device with time-shared timing indicator
US3925977A (en) * 1972-05-02 1975-12-16 Suwa Seikosha Kk Display system for showing the days of the week in an electrical timepiece
US3998046A (en) * 1972-06-12 1976-12-21 Kabushiki Kaisha Suwa Seikosha Electronic timepiece
US3889460A (en) * 1972-06-19 1975-06-17 Suwa Seikosha Kk Method and apparatus for correcting time in an electronic wristwatch
US3886726A (en) * 1972-06-19 1975-06-03 Texas Instruments Inc Electronic time keeping system
USRE29327E (en) * 1972-06-19 1977-08-02 Kabushiki Kaisha Suwa Seikosha Method and apparatus for correcting time in an electronic wristwatch
US3841081A (en) * 1972-07-10 1974-10-15 Seiko Instr & Electronics Electronic watch with a time display correcting device
US3925978A (en) * 1972-07-31 1975-12-16 Suwa Seikosha Kk Time correcting arrangement for electronic wrist watches
US3962861A (en) * 1973-01-02 1976-06-15 Societe Suisse Pour L'industrie Horlogere Management Services S.A. Apparatus for determining and lastingly showing the time at which an event occurs
US3866406A (en) * 1973-02-01 1975-02-18 Time Computer Solid state electronic wristwatch
US3945190A (en) * 1973-06-28 1976-03-23 Citizen Watch Co., Ltd. Switch mechanism for electronic timepiece
US3939641A (en) * 1973-07-31 1976-02-24 Kabushiki Kaisha Suwa Seikosha Electronic circuit for individually correcting each digit of time displayed
US3884033A (en) * 1973-10-17 1975-05-20 American Micro Syst Switch for electronic watch
US3934401A (en) * 1973-10-17 1976-01-27 American Microsystems, Inc. Switch for electronic watch
US3935700A (en) * 1973-11-06 1976-02-03 Bulova Watch Company, Inc. Switching mechanism for electronic watch electro-optic display
US4030283A (en) * 1974-03-25 1977-06-21 Societe Suisse Pour L'industrie Horlogere Management Services S.A. Electrically driven time piece with means for effecting a precise setting of time
US3994124A (en) * 1974-05-01 1976-11-30 Kabushiki Kaisha Suwa Seikosha Electronic timepiece
US4028879A (en) * 1974-07-26 1977-06-14 Eurosil G.M.B.H. Switching arrangement for setting time-measuring apparatus
US4232510A (en) * 1974-09-25 1980-11-11 Citizen Watch Co., Ltd. Timepiece
US4040248A (en) * 1974-10-11 1977-08-09 Ebauches S.A. Alarm electric watch
US4133170A (en) * 1975-04-30 1979-01-09 Casio Computer Co., Ltd. Global timepiece
US4001553A (en) * 1975-09-17 1977-01-04 Rockwell International Corporation Counter arrangement and associated test circuit for an electronic timing device
US4094136A (en) * 1975-12-24 1978-06-13 Kabushiki Kaisha Suwa Seikosha Electronic timepiece inspection circuit
US4348753A (en) * 1976-12-22 1982-09-07 Firma D I E H L Electro-mechanical pulse generator
US4211067A (en) * 1977-04-22 1980-07-08 Kabushiki Kaisha Seikosha Time adjusting device for electronic timepiece
US4145617A (en) * 1977-07-25 1979-03-20 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Control circuit for providing time selected application of A.C. power
US4444511A (en) * 1980-08-07 1984-04-24 Seiko Koki Kabushiki Kaisha Mode switching device in an electronic timepiece
FR2495349A1 (en) * 1980-12-02 1982-06-04 Dodane Precia Gete Montres Aircraft multi-function chronometer controller - includes two control pushbuttons and rotating display showing function in operation and development of function chosen
US4651147A (en) * 1982-11-30 1987-03-17 Ab Electrolux Device for setting a numeric display
EP0427566A2 (en) * 1989-11-10 1991-05-15 Seiko Instruments Inc. Multifunctional electronic timepiece
EP0427566A3 (en) * 1989-11-10 1991-12-18 Seiko Instruments Inc. Multifunctional electronic timepiece
US5377168A (en) * 1989-11-10 1994-12-27 Seiko Instruments Inc. Multifunctional electronic timepiece

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
FR2081742B3 (en) 1973-05-11
DE2107433B2 (en) 1977-09-08
CH333770A4 (en) 1973-01-31
FR2081742A7 (en) 1971-12-10
DE2107433A1 (en) 1971-09-16
DE2107433C3 (en) 1980-04-10
CH569320B5 (en) 1975-11-14
JPS4930474B1 (en) 1974-08-13

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