US3731787A - Modular distributor system for bulk material - Google Patents

Modular distributor system for bulk material Download PDF

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US3731787A
US3731787A US3731787DA US3731787A US 3731787 A US3731787 A US 3731787A US 3731787D A US3731787D A US 3731787DA US 3731787 A US3731787 A US 3731787A
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material
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V Gregor
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING, SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G47/00Article or material-handling devices associated with conveyors; Methods employing such devices
    • B65G47/74Feeding, transfer, or discharging devices of particular kinds or types
    • B65G47/78Troughs having discharge openings and closures
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING, SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G37/00Combinations of mechanical conveyors of the same kind, or of different kinds, of interest apart from their application in particular machines or use in particular manufacturing processes

Abstract

A vibratory distributor system for supplying bulk material, such as potato chips, cereal or the like, to a number of use points on demand. The system comprises a plurality of successive modules arranged to nest with one another to provide a flow path from one module to the next. Each module includes a material-carrying tray and a gate, associated with each use point, each gate having a selectively operable closure member which controls gravity feed of the material to the use point. A sensor for each module monitors the material level at the location of each gate and, when the level drops to a threshold level, activates the vibrating means of the adjacent upstream module to cause material to flow. The upstream modules are thus progressively vibrated in accordance with the demand to convey material from a source of supply downstream to the various use points.

Description

United States Patent 1 [111 3,731,787 Gregor 5] May 8, 1973 [54] MODULAR DISTRIBUTOR SYSTEM Primary ExaminerRichard E. Aegerter FOR BULK MATERIAL Inventor: Vaughn Gregor, 1830 West Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, Calif. 90006 Filed: Nov. 16, 1970 Appl. No.: 89,941

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 12/1969 Finland ..214/16 Assistant Examiner-Douglas D. Watts Attorney-Fulwider, Patton, Rieber, Lee & Utecht ABSTRACT A vibratory distributor system for supplying bulk material, such as potato chips-cereal or the like, to a number of use points on demand. The system comprises a plurality of successive modules arranged to nest with one another to provide a flow path from one module to the next. Each module includes a materialcarrying tray and a gate, associated with each use point, each gate having a selectively operable closure member which controls gravity feed of the material to the use point. A sensor for each module monitors the material level at the location of each gate and, when the level drops to a threshold level, activates the vibrating means of the adjacent upstream module to cause material to flow. The upstream modules are thus progressively vibrated in accordance with the demand to convey material from a source of supply downstream to the various use points.

19 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures r43 31 v/aum 44 NAM/Mi MIC/10V! la 460% MAMA E Patented May 8, 1973 4 Sheets-Sheet l Patented May 8, 1973 7 3,731,787

4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. VAUGHN 5,2550? Patented May 8, 1973 3,731,787 I 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVEN TOR, [Qua /y 56 6M A BYMWW BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a distributor system, and more particularly, to a system for conveying nonfreeflowing bulk material from a material source to a plurality of use points in a manner which meets the demand for material at each such point.

Distributor systems for non-freeflowing bulk materials, such as potato chips, cookies, noodles and similar products of relatively low mass and irregular shape, have been subject to a number of problems. Typically, such products are directed by the distributor system to a large number of processing or use points at which the product is, for example, packaged, wrapped or otherwise suitably treated. Many distribution systems are unable to meet the varying demands at the plurality of processing points, particularly where modern, high speed processing machinery is employed. A high demand for product at one or more points overloads the system, and the remaining processing points are unable to obtain sufficient quantity of material to meetthe demand and thus become starved. This can lead to ma]- function of the processing machinery as by causing it to shut down or to supply underweight packages at the starved points. In any event, an operation prone to such problems is unreliable and, at the very least, inefficient;

One expedient employed to overcome the potential problem of starving certain of the use points has been to supply a normally excessive quantity of product at each use point. Storage reservoirs may be providedfor this purpose. This expedient has a number of inherent problems that stem from the nature of the material being handled. Non-freeflowing food products of the noted types are often quite fragile and also tend to degrade if left exposed to the air for any appreciable time. Thus, should the demand cease at any given use point, as may well be the. case for any number of reasons, the product stored there will degrade and may have to be discarded. Not only does this result in a loss of material, but also necessitates a time consuming operation to purge the system.

In order to avoid the need for large storage reservoirs, while at the same time overcoming the potential problem of starving individual use points, systems have been employed in which material is continuously cycled past the use points. If product is not withdrawn as it passes a given use point, it is conveyed on to the next point and ultimately recycled, assuming that it is not withdrawn at one or more of such subsequent points. This approach clearly is unsatisfactory for handling perishable food products. A given quantity of the material may be recycled a number of times with the result that it becomes stale by the time it isultimately packaged. Moreover, this approach results in unnecessary working of the product and poses a likelihood that it well also be physically degraded.

Therefore, a system for successfully distributing bulk material, especially fragile food products, must be capable of distributing the product to a plurality of use points and meeting varying demands for product at each of these'points, and be capable of doing so quickly and smoothly, without physically or otherwise impairing its quality. Moreover, it should also ensure that the product is delivered in substantially the same sequence as it is received or, in other words, in first in first out sequence of operation, and movement of the product should be minimized.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In its broad aspect, the distributor system of the invention includes a plurality of successive and independently operable conveyor sections with gates associated therewith at locations corresponding to the use points. A continuous flow path for the material is provided through the system to the various use points. Sensor means associated with each gate monitor the quantity of material in the system at predetermined locations and control the operation of the adjacent upstream conveyor section. With this arrangement, successive upstream conveyor sections are operated progressively, as needed, to meet the demand at a given use point.

Significantly, only conveyor sections upstream of the use point where a demand exists are operated. Accordingly, movement and, hence, working of the material, is minimized, yet an ample supply of material is maintained at each of the gates to satisfy the demand at the corresponding use points. The system is also advantageous in that the material is delivered to the use points in substantially the same sequence that it is received by the system, and the problems inherent in systems incorporating large storage reservoirs or employing recycling modes of operation are obviated.

In the preferred embodiment of the system of the invention, the conveyor sections, which are illustrated as the vibratory type and include material-carrying trays, and the associated gate means are arranged in modules that nest in operative relationship with one another. Each gate means is connected to its associated conveyor section at'the upstream end of the latter, and each such module is resiliently supported for vibration independently of all other modules. The gate means include closure members selectively movable into and out of closing relationship with the gatesto control flow through them. Advantageously, these closure members, when in their closed positions, form a portion of the material carrying surfaces of their respective modules. Nesting of adjacent modules is accomplished in such a manner as to define temporary storage wells at locations above the gates, thereby assuring that an ample charge of material is available to be supplied to the use points upon opening of the closure members.

The gates in the preferred embodiment extend transversely across substantially the full materialcarrying surface of the modules. The closure members are slidably mounted and have their upper material-carrying surfaces disposed in close working relationship with the gate defining portions of the modules and in substantially the same plane as the trays. In addition, cooperating means are provided on the leading edge of the closure members and the mating edges of the trays at the junctures between the two, and the closure members are in close working relationship with the gates so as to minimize impediment to flow. By virtue of this mounting arrangement for the closure members and the cooperating means provided, the system is easily maintained in a sanitary condition and there is no danger of blocking flow and thereby trapping material in the system. In this same respect, physical damage to the material is avoided as might otherwise occur if flow were impeded.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The above and other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic representation of the material distributor system of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a partially cut-away perspective view of several conveyor modules of the invention arranged in operative, nested relationship;

FIG. 3 is a side view partly in side elevation and partly in section, showing the nesting of a module with adjacent modules to provide a sectional view of two nested trays;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view on an enlarged scale of the left hand end portion of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 4 showing the gate means in a closed condition and the manner in which material is conveyed through successive modules;

FIG. 5a is a fragmentary sectional view of the area encircled by the line 5a in FIG. 5;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 4 illustrating the terminal module in the system;

FIG. 7 is a top plan view of a portion of the distributor system showing the nesting of a module with adjacent modules;

FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially along line 88 in FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a partial side elevational view taken in the direction of and in the area indicated by line 9-9 in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary sectional view on an enlarged scale of the area encircled by line 10 in FIG. 8;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along line 11-11 in FIG. 10; and

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary perspective view of certain portions of the gate means constructed in accordance with the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring to the drawings and, in particular, to FIGS. 1 and 2 thereof, the apparatus of the invention is shown embodied in a distributor system for conveying bulk material from a source to a plurality of independent use or processing points on demand. By way of example, one of many possible processing operations is packaging, and the system of the invention is shown as adapted for use in conjunction with such an operation, with each of the use points, identified by reference numerals 20, 21, 22 and 23, comprising packaging machines. Thus, the invention is illustrated as especially adapted for use as a distributor system for conveying bulk material, such as potato chips, cereal or the like, from a source comprising a storage unit 24 to a plurality of use points for packaging. The storage unit, which may be of the type disclosed in my copending application Ser. No. 774,418, now 11.8. Pat. No. 3,550,752 entitled Automatic Storage System For Non-Free Flowing Products, discharges material, on demand, into the distributor system, and the system, in turn, conveys the material to each use point in such quantity as is required to meet the demand.

The distributor system of the invention includes a plurality of conveyor modules 25, 26, 27 and 28 associated with respective use points 20, 21, 22 and 23, and arranged in nested operative relationship to provide a continuous flow path. The modules comprise conveyor sections, which here are of the vibratory type, and, therefore, include material-carrying trays 29, 30 and 31, and associated gate means or assemblies 32, 33 and 34. In addition, for reasons that will become apparent, the terminal end module 28 with gate assembly 35 is provided to supply the end use point 23. Each gate assembly, as shown in FIG. 2, illustrating modules 26, 27 and 28, includes a transversely extending gate or passage 36 leading to the corresponding packaging machine and an associated closure member 37 selectively movable into and out of closing relationship with the gate to control gravity feed of material to the use point. When a given closure member 37 is in its closed position, as in the case of module 27 in FIG. 2, its upper surface comprises a portion of the material-carrying conveyor surface of the respective module.

Each of the conveyor modules is arranged for vibration independently of all others. Suitable poweroperated vibrators 38, 39 and 40 associated with modules 25, 26 and 27, respectively, are provided for this purpose. No vibrator is needed for the terminal module 28 for the apparent reason that it need not convey material.

Actuation of each of the vibrators 38, 39 and 40 to vibrate the respective modules 25, 26 and 27 causes downstream flow therealong (left to right in FIGS. 1 and 2) when a demand exists in the adjacent downstream module. To this end, the level of material in each module at a location corresponding to that of its gate assembly is monitored by appropriate sensor means illustrated, by way of example, as photocell units 41, 42, 43 and 44. The units 42, 43 and 44 are connected through suitable controls 45, 46 and 47 to vibrators 38, 39 and 40 for modules 25, 26 and 27, respectively. It will be understood in this connection that each such unit is connected to the control and vibrator for the adjacent upstream module and, hence, controls the operation thereof. Similarly, the photocell unit 41 for the first module 25 is coupled through a control 48 to the storage unit 24, and activates such unit to cause material to be fed into the system when a demand exists in module 25.

Accordingly, the system of the invention has a progressive mode of operation. When a demand for material in a given module is sensed, as will occur when its gate assembly is actuated to deliver by gravity feed a charge of material to the associated packaging machine or material is conveyed to the next downstream module, the modules upstream thereof will be actuated in succession to the extent necessary to replenish the supply. Depending upon the extent of usage at the various packaging machines, selected ones or all of the vibrators 3840 may be operated at a given point in time to convey material to the successive downstream modules.

Thus, for example, referring again to FIGS. 1 and 2, and assuming that the system initially has a full complement of material and further assuming that the gate assembly 34 of module 27 is actuated to supply a charge of material to its packaging machine, the depletion at that location will be sensed by the photocell unit 43.

This results in actuation of vibrator 39 of the adjacent upstream module 26 to cause material to be conveyed by the vibratory action downstream to module 27. The supply of material in module 26 is depleted accordingly until photocell 42 actuates the first module 25. Assuming the charge originally delivered to gate assembly 34 was appreciable, the progressive actuation will continue, causing photocell unit 41 to actuate the storage unit 24 to deliver more material into the system, and operation of these modules will continue until the supplies of material in all of them is back to full capacity.

By virtue of the manner in which adjacent modules nest in operative relationship with one another, temporary storage wells 49 (see FIG. 4) are provided on the modules at locations over the gate assemblies. Thus, ample material is available to be delivered to the packaging machines when the gate assemblies are open. While this is true, an important feature of the invention is that the material in such wells 49 is not bypassed when the corresponding modules are vibrated. Rather, it is conveyed downstream, together with other material in the modules, since the closure members 37 of the respective gate assemblies, as previously explained, form portions of the material-carrying surfaces of the modules. Thus, material is distributed by the system in substantially the same sequence that it is received and the problems inherent in systems incorporating large storage reservoirs at the locations of the processing points or incorporating the recycling principle of operation are avoided.

Another important feature of the system of the invention is its modularconstruction. The modules 25, 26 and 27 are substantially identical, and it is a simple matter to add or remove modules as needed to satisfy the requirements of a particular application. Thus, while three substantially identical modules 25, 26 and 27, together with the terminal end module 28, have been illustrated in the drawings, it will be understood that this was only by way of illustration and that modules may be added or removed without departing from the invention. To simplify the description, the same numerals have been used where appropriate to identify common parts and elements of the several modules.

The modules 25, 26 and 27 are supported for vibration on a mainframe in the manner illustrated in FIGS. 2, 7 and 8. The frame may be seen to include two elongated beams 50 disposed along the sides of the modules. Preferably, for purpose of stabilizing the frame, which remains stationary during operation, the

beams 50 are filled with sand 51 or the like (FIG. 8) to increase their mass. A plurality of suspension bars 52 extend transversely across the modules at spaced locations and have their ends secured to the upper surfaces of the beams. Depending upon the particular application, the main frame is supported up off the ground surface in any number of ways as, for example, by suspending it from above or by means of a suitable supporting base.

Mounting of individual modules on the main frame is accomplished by means of a number of resilient, flexible arms 54 formed, for example, of fibrous glass material. Three such arms are provided on each side of each module in the illustrative case. At their upper ends, the arms are secured to the suspension bars 52 and, at their lower ends, to outwardly projecting flanges 55 on a module frame 56, as shown in FIG. 8. In order to obtain the desired vibratory action of the modules, the arms angle down and forwardly in the direction of material flow through the system from their upper toward their lower ends.

While it is not necessary, the terminal end module 28, as illustrated in FIG. 2, is likewise suspended from flexible arms 54, two such arms being provided in this instance. Experience indicates that, when suspended in this manner, this module 28 which is of relatively low mass picks up sufficient vibration from the adjacent upstream module 27 to insure the desired uniform distribution ofmaterial in the module 28.

Each of the modules, as noted, is provided with a frame 56 which serves to mount the associated one of trays 29, 30 and 31 and gate assemblies 32, 33 and 34, as well as making possible a secure connection between the respective support arms 54 and their module. Referring to FIGS. 8 and 10, the module frame 56 may be seen to include a pair of longitudinally extending side channels 57 each with upper and lower legs 58 and 59, respectively, and a lateral connecting web 60, and transversely extending connecting members 61. Each of the trays 29, 30 and 31 is secured to the upper legs of the channels 57 as at 62 in FIG. 10..

The vibrators 38, 39 and 40 are coupled to their respective modules 25, 26 and 27 in the manner shown in FIGS. 3, 8 and 9 which illustrate module 26 and its associated vibrator 39. It will be understood in this connection that each module has its own independently operated vibrator, but the mounting arrangement will be understood to be the same in each instance, although only that of vibrator 39 relative to its module 26 is described. As shown in the last mentioned figures, the vibrator 39 is disposed below its module and enclosed within a suitable housing 63 secured to the main frame. The vibrators may be of any suitable construction and, in the illustrative case of vibrator 39, is shown to include an electric motor 64 and an eccentric mechanism 65 Vibratory motion is imparted to the module 26 by its vibrator 39 through a resilient flexible arm 66 centrally disposed relative to the module. The arm 66 is connected to the eccentric mechanism 65 at its lower end and to the module 26 at its upper end. For purposes of achieving the latter connection, a mounting block 67 is secured to the cross member 61 of the module frame 56. Accordingly, when the vibrator 39 is actuated, the entire module 26 is subjected to a vibratory motion in such manner as to cause material thereon to move downstream therealong and eventually to be discharged into the adjacent downstream module 27.

The manner in which the modules are arranged in nested, operative relationship is shown in detail in FIGS. 3, 7 and 8. The trays 29, 30 and 31 of the individual modules are generally rectangular in overall shape and present substantially planar material-carrying surfaces 68. With particular reference to FIG. 3, it may be seen that the modules are supported with the surface 68 angled upwardly from their upstream toward their downstream ends. The downstream end of each module is necked down in lateral dimension, as shown at 69 in FIGS. 2 and 7, and telescopes into the endof the adjacent module. A transverse bulkhead 70 at the upstream end of each module accommodates the difference in elevation of the modules at their juncture and, to avoid any loss of material, is arranged with its upper edge in close working relationship with the underside of the tray 29 of the adjacent upstream module, as best illustrated in FIG. 4.

Because the modules are supported with their material-carrying surfaces 68 inclined and the walldefining bulkheads 70 are provided, storage wells 49 are afforded at the locations of the gate assemblies. This is advantageous in that it enables material 71 to accumulate at the location of the gate assemblies, as may be seen in FIG. 5, and insures that ample material is available to supply the use point upon actuation of the corresponding closure member 37. It is to be emphasized that such storage wells 49 do not act as reservoirs in the sense that material is held there and by-passed during vibration of the modules. Rather, the level of material at that location is simply greater than elsewhere in the modules (see FIG. but it continues to move progressively through the system during vibration of the modules.

The nesting relationship between the module 27 and the terminal end module 28 is the same as in the case of other modules. Similarly, a storage well 49 is afforded by such end module over its associated gate assembly 35. The module 28 differs from the others in that it has no vibratory tray, but instead a transverse end wall 72 is provided at the downstream end of the gate 36, as shown in FIG. 6.

From the foregoing description, it will be appreciated that the most critical area insofar as the quantity of material available in each of the modules 25, 26, 27 and 28 is concerned is in the temporary storage wells 49 over the respective gates 36. Accordingly, the photocell units 41, 42, 43 and 44 are arranged to monitor material level at those locations.

The photocell units are of conventional construction and include a light source 73 and a light-responsive device 74, one of which is secured to a beam 50 on one side of the module and the other of which is secured to a beam 50 on the opposite side, as illustrated in FIG. 7. Light is projected and sensed through screened openings 75, illustrated in FIG. 4, in both side walls of the trays 29, 30 and 31 of the respective modules and the side walls of the module 28. When the material level in the well 49 rises above the threshold level, as is the case in the tray 30 in FIG. 5, the light beam is interrupted and the vibrator 38 of the adjacent upstream tray 29 is rendered inactive. On the other hand, when the level drops below the threshold level, the photocell unit 42 triggers operation of that vibrator 38 to initiate flow. By appropriate adjustment of the vertical positions of the components of the photocell units, the threshold level can be adjusted as desired, at least within the limits imposed by the size of the screened openings 75 in the modules.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 7, each gate or passage 36 extends transversely across substantially the entire width of its respective tray. Moreover, the associated closure member 37 is disposed on the underside of the tray and slides longitudinally into and out of closing relationship with its gate. The open and closed positions of the closure member 37 are shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, respectively. Longitudinal movement of each closure member is accomplished by a hydraulic cylinder 76, as in FIG. 3, secured to the underside of each tray. An actuator rod 77 extends out of the cylinder and, as was clearly shown in the enlarged view of FIG. 4, is connected to the closure member through a connecting link 78. The actuator rod is pin connected to the link 78 and the link, in turn, is threaded into a block 79 secured to the underside of the closure member in the illustrative case to accomplish the connection. As a result, actuation of the cylinder 76 drives its closure member longitudinally to close or open the gate.

To insure smooth, uniform flow through the system, the material-carrying surface 68 of each module should be free of obstruction at least to downstream flow. It will be recalled that the upper surface of each closure member 37 forms a part of such material-carrying surface 68 when in its closed condition. Thus, it is desirable that, in this condition, upper surface of the leading end portion of the member 37 and the adjacent downstream surface portion 68 of the tray be substan tially coplanar. Cooperating means are provided on the leading edge of the closure member 37 and the mating edge of the tray which defines the downstream boundary of the gate to accomplish this and obtain the desired continuity in the surface. As best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, such cooperating means here comprise a beveled edge 80 on the closure member and a downturned lip 81 on the mating edge of the tray.

When the closure member 37 is moved to its closed position, as in FIGS. 5 and 5a, the beveled edge 80 of the member and the lip 81 engage to guide the movement of the closure member relative to the tray to bring its upper surface into the desired substantially coplanar relationship. The inherent flexibility of the parts facilitates this action. Moreover, the possibility of flow being impeded is further reduced by virtue of the lip 81 having a curved configuration, as at 82, at its juncture with the tray.

Since the system is designed and intended to handle food products, it is important that the gate assemblies, as well as other elements of the system, be maintained in a sanitary condition. The closure members 37 are mounted and operate in such a way as to readily lend the gate assemblies to be maintained in the desired high degree of sanitation. The mounting arrangement for closure members 37 is illustrated in FIGS. 10-12. As shown, each closure member is fixed at its outer edges to guide blocks 82 having upwardly projecting outer edge portions that present bearing surfaces 83 slidably engageable with the webs 60 on the channels 57 of the module frame 56. Preferably, the blocks are formed of plastic, or other suitable material, having a low coefficient of friction, and are arranged so that the bearing surfaces 83 project just slightly above the upper surface of the closure member 37, thereby insuring a smooth sliding action with the web.

The closure members 37 are maintained in slidable assembly with their modules by means of generally U- shaped guide rods or brackets 84 having longitudinally extending guide portions 85 of circular cross section that engage in a correspondingly shaped recess in the underside of the block 82. Upstanding legs 86 on the brackets project up through bores 87 in the webs 60 of the longitudinally extending channels 57 and are retained in place by nuts 88 threadily engaged on the ends of the legs. Preferably, the guide blocks 82 are spring biased into engagement with the webs and, for this purpose, compression springs 89 are disposed on the legs 86. The springs 89 bear at their opposite ends against bushings 90 disposed on the legs 86 adjacent the webs 60 and against the underside of the nuts 88.

The guide rods 84 incooperation with the blocks 82 serve the dual purpose of guiding movement of the closure members 37 and retaining them in assembly with their respective modules. Since the closure member moves in close working relationship to the adjacent structure of its associated module, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the members are scraped clean by the gatedefining edge 91 as they retract to their open positions. In this same regard, the blocks slide in engagement with the channels 57 and the rod 84 and serve to wipe these surfaces clean during each stroke.

While the operation of this system is believed apparent from the foregoing description, the following is intended as a brief summary. With the system initially devoid of material but conditioned for automatic operation, modules 29, and 31 will all be vibrated and the storage unit 24 actuated to deliver material into the system. Such material will then be conveyed downstream by the vibratory action of the modules through successive ones toward the end module 28. This operation will continue until the quantity of material in the end module 28, as monitored by the photocell unit 44, exceeds the threshold level. When this occurs, the vibrator for the adjacent upstream module 27 is rendered inactive. Similarly, vibrator 39 for module 26 is deactivated when the photocell unit 43 signals that a full supply of material is available in the storage well over the gate assembly of module 27. Thus, the modules shut down in succession, and, ultimately, supply of material from the storage unit to the first module is discontinued.

In this fully supplied condition, material is available in the storage wells 49 of all modules for delivery to the respective use points. Thereafter, upon the occurrence of either one or both of two events, and depending upon when the event or events occur, some or all modules will resume operation to convey material. These events are the withdrawal of a charge of material from the adjacent downstream module for delivery to its use point or the normal operation of such adjacent downstream module of conveying material to a subsequent module to replenish the supply therein. Thus, when a charge of material is withdrawn for a given use point, the modules upstream thereof will be actuated progressively, as needed, to replenish the depleted supply.

Flow through the system occurs smoothly and uniformly and material is conveyed only as necessary to meet the demand at a particular use point. It will be understood in this connection that if a charge of material is supplied, for example, at use point 21 only the upstream module 25 and the storage unit 24 will be actuated to replenish the supply. Onthe other hand, all material in a given module, other than that withdrawn through the associated gate assembly, moves progressively through it upon actuation thereof, resulting in material being delivered to the various use points in substantially the same sequence that it is received in the system.

While one embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described in detail, it will be understood that this was only by way of example, and that changes in the details of the constructions and the arrangements of the various elements may be made without department from the spirit and scope of the invention.

1 claim:

1. A vibratory conveyor module having upstream and downstream ends and a tray with a material-carrying surface for conveying material from the upstream toward the downstream end thereof and including gate means for delivering material from said tray to a corresponding use point, said gate means including:

means defining a passage in said material-carrying surface for delivery of material, said passage having a downstream peripheral edge;

a closure member selectively movable into and out of closing relationship with said passage for blocking the delivery of material through said passage, said closure member having a leading edge engageable with said downstream peripheral edge of said passage and an upper material-carrying surface when in said closing relationship; and

cooperative means on said leading edge of said closure member and on said downstream peripheral edge of said passage for guiding said closure member relative to the tray during such engagement of said leading edge with said peripheral edge to achieve an obstruction free flow path between the adjacent portions of the material-carrying surfaces of said tray and said closure member.

2. A module as in claim 1 wherein said cooperative means includes a beveled edge surface on said closure member and a correspondingly angled downturned lip at the downstream peripheral edge of said passage.

3. A module as in claim 2 wherein said lip has a curved configuration at the junction thereof with the material-carrying surface of said tray.

4. A module as in claim 1 further including:

a frame mounting the tray, said closure member and said cooperative means;

a pair of guide blocks secured to said closure member at its opposite sides and slidably engaged with said frame for supporting said closure member on the underside of the tray for longitudinal sliding movement into and out of said closing relationship; and

mounting means on said frame and engageable with said blocks for guiding movement of said closure member and retaining it in assembly with said frame.

5. A module as in claim 4 wherein said blocks are formed of material different than that forming said closure member and having a relatively low coefficient of friction, and wherein said closure member is supported in close working relationship with but at a working clearance from the surfaces of adjacent portions of said frame.

6. A module as in claim 4 including spring means associated with said mounting means for yieldably urging said blocks into engagement with said frame.

7. A module as in claim 4 wherein said mounting means include longitudinally extending rods of substantially uniform cross section engageable in correspondingly shaped recesses in said blocks.

8. A distributor system for conveying material from a source downstream to a number of successive use points comprising:

conveyor means having a plurality of successive and independently operable conveyor sections for conveying the material to each use point;

gate means including an opening between adjacent conveyor sections and a closure normally closing each opening, said gate means being associated, one each, with said conveyor section, for transmitting material to each use point;

wherein said conveyor section comprises an elongated tray connected at its upstream end to its associated gate means;

a main frame and mounting means for independently and resiliently mounting each of the assemblies of said trays and associated gates on said frame for vibration relative thereto;

power operated means including a plurality of actuators associated, one each, with said conveyor sections for independently operating each conveyor section to cause material to move downstream along such conveyor section; and

sensor means associated with each gate for monitoring the quantity of material at a location corresponding to the location of such gate for controlling the actuator associated with the adjacent upstream conveyor section to cause material to so move therealong toward such gate.

9. A distributor system for conveying material from a source downstream to a number of successive use points comprising: i

an elongated main frame having upstream and downstream ends;

a plurality of vibratory modules independently and movably mounted on said main frame in succession from the upstream toward the downstream end thereof; each of said modules including a tray, an associated opening providing a passage for delivery of material from such module to a corresponding use point, and a closure arranged in operative relationship with the opening to provide a continuous flow path for the distribution of material through successive modules, wherein each of said modules has its associated opening at the upstream end thereof;

further including means on each of said modules at the upstream ends thereof adjacent said opening cooperating with said tray to form a storage well over said openings; and

power-operated means for vibrating said modules independently of one another to feed material independently to each of the wells.

10. A distributor system for conveying material from a source downstream to a number of successive use points comprising:

an elongated main frame having upstream and downstream ends;

a plurality of vibratory modules independently and movably mounted on said main frame in succession from the upstream toward the downstream end thereof; each of said modules including a tray and an associated opening providing a passage for delivery of material from such module to a corresponding use point, and a closure arranged in operative relationship with the opening to provide a continuous flow path for the distribution of material through successive modules, with said modules having their downstream ends vertically spaced above the upstream ends of their respective adjacent modules; and

power-operated means for vibrating said modules independently of one another to feed material independently to each of the openings.

11. A distributor system for conveying material from a source to a plurality of use points spaced apart along a predetermined path, and comprising:

conveyor means having a plurality of independently operable conveyor sections arranged in generally end-to-end relation along said path to convey material downstream along said path from the source and successively from one conveyor section to the next along said conveyor means;

a plurality of gate means, one adjacent the downstream end of each of said conveyor sections, for transmitting material from said conveyor means to one of said use points, each of said gate means including an opening for delivering material from said conveyor means to the respective use point, and a closure member movable between open and closed relation with the opening, to block the passage of material to the use point when in said closed relation;

power-operated means for independently operating said conveyor sections to cause material to move downstream along each conveyor section while it is operating; and

sensor means adjacent each of said gate means for monitoring the quantity of material available for delivery through the opening and controlling the power-operated means to operate the adjacent upstream conveyor section to move material thereon toward the opening when said quantity is below a selected level.

12. A distributor system as defined in claim 11, wherein each conveyor section is assembled as a unitary, modular assembly having one of said gate means thereon, and the opposite ends of said modular assembly have nesting means thereon for interfitting with the adjacent ends of two substantially similar modular assemblies, said conveyor sections being nested together in series to form said conveyor means.

13. A distributor system as defined in claim 12, wherein the gate means of each of said modular assemblies is located at the upstream end of the assembly, to receive material from the next upstream conveyor section as the latter is operated, said sensor means for each of said gate means being operatively connected to the power operated means for the next upstream conveyor.

14. A distributor system as defined in claim 12 in which said nesting means comprise a downstream end portion on each of said modular assemblies that is necked down in lateral dimension, and an upstream end portion sized to telescope around the upstream end portion of the adjacent modular assembly.

15. A distributor system as defined in claim 11, wherein each of said conveyor sections has a materialsupporting surface which is inclined upwardly from the upstream end thereof toward the downstream end, the upstream end being disposed beneath an overhanging end portion of the adjacent upstream conveyor section, and a transverse bulkhead at the upstream end of the conveyor section beneath the overhanging end portion of the adjacent'upstream conveyor section, one of said gate means being located on each conveyor section adjacent said transverse bulkhead to receive material temporarily stored on said conveyor section adjacent said bulkhead.

16. A distributor system as defined in claim 11, in which said conveyor sections are inclined upwardly from the upstream ends thereof toward the downstream ends thereof, and the downstream ends are disposed at levels somewhat above the next adjacent upstream ends to overhang the latter and drop material thereon, and further including means preventing the escape of material from the upstream ends beneath the overhanging downstream ends, the openings of said gate means being formed in said inclined surfaces adjacent the lower upstream ends thereof, with the closure members normally closing the openings and forming continuations of the inclined surfaces of the conveyor sections.

17. A distributor system as defined in claim 11, wherein said conveyor sections comprise an elongated tray having an opening adjacent its upstream end constituting part of one of said gate means, and further including an elongated main frame extending along said path, and means mounting said trays on said frame in end-to-end overlapping relation and for vibratory movement relative to each other and relative to said frame, said power-operated means comprising independently operable vibrators connected to the respective trays.

18. A distributor system as defined in claim 17, wherein said closure members are disposed beneath the openings in said trays, against the undersides thereof, and are slidable longitudinally of said trays to said open positions.

19. A distributor system for conveying material from a source to a plurality of use points spaced apart along a predetermined path, and comprising: i

a frame;

a plurality of generally horizontal, end-to-end vibratory conveyor trays mounted on said frame for vibratory movement relative thereto and to each other, said trays having ends in overlapped relation with the adjacent trays and each being supported on said frame with the material-carrying surface of the tray inclined upwardly from the upstream end toward the downstream end thereof;

said downstream ends overhanging the upstream ends of adjacent downstream trays, and said upstream ends having transverse walls beneath the overhanging ends for retaining material on the trays and defining material-holding wells adjacent said upstream ends;

means for independently vibrating each tray and moving material thereon from the upstream end toward the downstream end for delivery to the well of the next tray downstream;

each tray having an opening in the material-carrying surface thereof in the area of said well, and extending across said surface adjacent the upstream end of the tray; closure means normally closing said openings and forming continuations of said material-carrying surfaces for carrying material from said wells along said trays as the latter are vibrated;

means operable, on demand, to move said closure members to open positions to admit material through the openings, said use points receiving material from beneath said openings; and

sensor means at each well for monitoring the level of material in the well and, when the level is below a preselected level, controlling the vibrating means of the next upstream conveyor to convey material thereon to the well.

Claims (19)

1. A vibratory conveyor module having upstream and downstream ends and a tray with a material-carrying surface for conveying material from the upstream toward the downstream end thereof and including gate means for delivering material from said tray to a corresponding use point, said gate means including: means defining a passage in said material-carrying surface for delivery of material, said passage having a downstream peripheral edge; a closure member selectively movable into and out of closing relationship with said passage for blocking the delivery of material through said passage, said closure member having a leading edge engageable with said downstream peripheral edge of said passage and an upper material-carrying surface when in said closing relationship; and cooperative means on said leading edge of said closure member and on said downstream peripheral edge of said passage for guiding said closure member relative to the tray during such engagement of said leading edge with said peripheral edge to achieve an obstruction free flow path between the adjacent portions of the material-carrying surfaces of said tray and said closure member.
2. A module as in claim 1 wherein said cooperative means includes a beveled edge surface on said closure member and a correspondingly angled downturned lip at the downstream peripheral edge of said passage.
3. A module as in claim 2 wherein said lip has a curved configuration at the junction thereof with the material-carrying surface of said tray.
4. A module as in claim 1 further including: a frame mounting the tray, said closure member and said cooperative means; a pair of guide blocks secured to said closure member at its opposite sides and slidably engaged with said frame for supporting said closure member on the underside of the tray for longitudinal sliding movement into and out of said closing relationship; and mounting means on said frame and engageable with said blocks for guiding movement of said closure member and retaining it in assembly with said frame.
5. A module as in claim 4 wherein said blocks are formed of material different than that forming said closure member and having a relatively low coefficient of friction, and wherein said closure member is supported in close working relationship with but at a working clearance from the surfaces of adjacent portions of said frame.
6. A module as in claim 4 including spring means associated with said mounting means for yieldably urging said blocks into engagement with said frame.
7. A module as in claim 4 wherein said mounting means include longitudinally extending rods of substantially uniform cross section engageable in correspondingly shaped recesses in said blocks.
8. A distributor system for conveying material from a source downstream to a number of successive use points comprising: conveyor means having a plurality of successive and independently operable conveyor sections for conveying the material to each use point; gate means including an opening between adjacent conveyor sections and a closure normally closing each opening, said gate means being associated, one each, with said conveyor section, for transmitting material to each use point; wherein said conveyor section comprises an elongated tray connected at its upstream end to its associated gate means; a main frame and mounting means for independently and resiliently mounting each of the assemblies of said trays and associated gates on said frame for vibration relative thereto; power operated means including a plurality of actuators associated, one each, with said conveyor sections for independently operating each conveyor section to cause material to move downstream along such conveyor section; and sensor means associated with each gate for monitoring the quantity of material at a location corresponding to the location of such gate for controlling the actuator associated with the adjacent upstream conveyor section to caUse material to so move therealong toward such gate.
9. A distributor system for conveying material from a source downstream to a number of successive use points comprising: an elongated main frame having upstream and downstream ends; a plurality of vibratory modules independently and movably mounted on said main frame in succession from the upstream toward the downstream end thereof; each of said modules including a tray, an associated opening providing a passage for delivery of material from such module to a corresponding use point, and a closure arranged in operative relationship with the opening to provide a continuous flow path for the distribution of material through successive modules, wherein each of said modules has its associated opening at the upstream end thereof; further including means on each of said modules at the upstream ends thereof adjacent said opening cooperating with said tray to form a storage well over said openings; and power-operated means for vibrating said modules independently of one another to feed material independently to each of the wells.
10. A distributor system for conveying material from a source downstream to a number of successive use points comprising: an elongated main frame having upstream and downstream ends; a plurality of vibratory modules independently and movably mounted on said main frame in succession from the upstream toward the downstream end thereof; each of said modules including a tray and an associated opening providing a passage for delivery of material from such module to a corresponding use point, and a closure arranged in operative relationship with the opening to provide a continuous flow path for the distribution of material through successive modules, with said modules having their downstream ends vertically spaced above the upstream ends of their respective adjacent modules; and power-operated means for vibrating said modules independently of one another to feed material independently to each of the openings.
11. A distributor system for conveying material from a source to a plurality of use points spaced apart along a predetermined path, and comprising: conveyor means having a plurality of independently operable conveyor sections arranged in generally end-to-end relation along said path to convey material downstream along said path from the source and successively from one conveyor section to the next along said conveyor means; a plurality of gate means, one adjacent the downstream end of each of said conveyor sections, for transmitting material from said conveyor means to one of said use points, each of said gate means including an opening for delivering material from said conveyor means to the respective use point, and a closure member movable between open and closed relation with the opening, to block the passage of material to the use point when in said closed relation; power-operated means for independently operating said conveyor sections to cause material to move downstream along each conveyor section while it is operating; and sensor means adjacent each of said gate means for monitoring the quantity of material available for delivery through the opening and controlling the power-operated means to operate the adjacent upstream conveyor section to move material thereon toward the opening when said quantity is below a selected level.
12. A distributor system as defined in claim 11, wherein each conveyor section is assembled as a unitary, modular assembly having one of said gate means thereon, and the opposite ends of said modular assembly have nesting means thereon for interfitting with the adjacent ends of two substantially similar modular assemblies, said conveyor sections being nested together in series to form said conveyor means.
13. A distributor system as defined in claim 12, wherein the gate means of each of said modular assemblies is located at the upstream end of the assembly, to receive material from the next upstream conveyor section as the latter is operated, said sensor means for each of said gate means being operatively connected to the power operated means for the next upstream conveyor.
14. A distributor system as defined in claim 12 in which said nesting means comprise a downstream end portion on each of said modular assemblies that is necked down in lateral dimension, and an upstream end portion sized to telescope around the upstream end portion of the adjacent modular assembly.
15. A distributor system as defined in claim 11, wherein each of said conveyor sections has a material-supporting surface which is inclined upwardly from the upstream end thereof toward the downstream end, the upstream end being disposed beneath an overhanging end portion of the adjacent upstream conveyor section, and a transverse bulkhead at the upstream end of the conveyor section beneath the overhanging end portion of the adjacent upstream conveyor section, one of said gate means being located on each conveyor section adjacent said transverse bulkhead to receive material temporarily stored on said conveyor section adjacent said bulkhead.
16. A distributor system as defined in claim 11, in which said conveyor sections are inclined upwardly from the upstream ends thereof toward the downstream ends thereof, and the downstream ends are disposed at levels somewhat above the next adjacent upstream ends to overhang the latter and drop material thereon, and further including means preventing the escape of material from the upstream ends beneath the overhanging downstream ends, the openings of said gate means being formed in said inclined surfaces adjacent the lower upstream ends thereof, with the closure members normally closing the openings and forming continuations of the inclined surfaces of the conveyor sections.
17. A distributor system as defined in claim 11, wherein said conveyor sections comprise an elongated tray having an opening adjacent its upstream end constituting part of one of said gate means, and further including an elongated main frame extending along said path, and means mounting said trays on said frame in end-to-end overlapping relation and for vibratory movement relative to each other and relative to said frame, said power-operated means comprising independently operable vibrators connected to the respective trays.
18. A distributor system as defined in claim 17, wherein said closure members are disposed beneath the openings in said trays, against the undersides thereof, and are slidable longitudinally of said trays to said open positions.
19. A distributor system for conveying material from a source to a plurality of use points spaced apart along a predetermined path, and comprising: a frame; a plurality of generally horizontal, end-to-end vibratory conveyor trays mounted on said frame for vibratory movement relative thereto and to each other, said trays having ends in overlapped relation with the adjacent trays and each being supported on said frame with the material-carrying surface of the tray inclined upwardly from the upstream end toward the downstream end thereof; said downstream ends overhanging the upstream ends of adjacent downstream trays, and said upstream ends having transverse walls beneath the overhanging ends for retaining material on the trays and defining material-holding wells adjacent said upstream ends; means for independently vibrating each tray and moving material thereon from the upstream end toward the downstream end for delivery to the well of the next tray downstream; each tray having an opening in the material-carrying surface thereof in the area of said well, and extending across said surface adjacent the upstream end of the tray; closure means normally closing said openings and forming continuations of said material-carrying surfaces for carrying material from said wells along said trays as the latter are vibrated; means operable, on demand, to move said closure members to open positions to admit material through tHe openings, said use points receiving material from beneath said openings; and sensor means at each well for monitoring the level of material in the well and, when the level is below a preselected level, controlling the vibrating means of the next upstream conveyor to convey material thereon to the well.
US3731787A 1970-11-16 1970-11-16 Modular distributor system for bulk material Expired - Lifetime US3731787A (en)

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DE2502943A1 (en) * 1974-02-28 1975-09-04 Vaughn Gregor Distribution device for foerderung of good, stock source of a consumer to make up a number of
US3938654A (en) * 1971-04-02 1976-02-17 Karl M. Reich Maschinenfabrik Method and machine for conveying and aligning rod-shaped fasteners
US4029198A (en) * 1973-07-05 1977-06-14 Lingl Corporation Method and apparatus for forming groups of bricks
US4050572A (en) * 1974-04-12 1977-09-27 Lipe-Rollway Corporation Accumulator and feeder
US4227607A (en) * 1979-04-16 1980-10-14 Malavenda Peter P High volume method and system for dynamically storing articles for sorting and routing
DE3441423C1 (en) * 1984-11-13 1986-02-20 Ottmar Tallafus Apparatus for preserving and packaging sensitive foods
US4921090A (en) * 1984-03-26 1990-05-01 Fmc Corporation Vibratory conveyor
US5183143A (en) * 1991-05-31 1993-02-02 Triple/S Dynamics, Inc. Apparatus and methods for conveying materials
US5207310A (en) * 1991-06-18 1993-05-04 K.M.G. Systems Ltd. Vibratory conveyor
US5211277A (en) * 1991-05-29 1993-05-18 Wright Machinery Company Limited Vibratory conveyor
US5409101A (en) * 1994-02-03 1995-04-25 Allen Fruit Co., Inc. Variably-controlled vibratory conveyor
US5611420A (en) * 1995-07-27 1997-03-18 J & J Snack Foods Corp. Dough-Handling Machine
US5860504A (en) * 1994-11-16 1999-01-19 Lockheed Martin Corporation Transfer buffer and inserter and method
EP0900750A2 (en) * 1997-09-04 1999-03-10 Wright Machinery Limited Vibratory conveyor and control system therefor
US6119849A (en) * 1999-02-17 2000-09-19 Paul A. Svejkovsky Linear motion conveyor with gate mechanism and method
US6848568B1 (en) * 2002-08-06 2005-02-01 Lawrence Gene Nibler Bulk material distribution system
US20080202891A1 (en) * 2007-02-22 2008-08-28 Key Technology, Inc. Vibratory system for distributing articles
US8096407B1 (en) * 2010-11-09 2012-01-17 Nicholas Meredith Poly phase drive and drive controller system
DE10218303B4 (en) * 2001-04-25 2012-12-27 Paul A. Svejkovsky Conveyor with adjustable terminal discharge element for proportionally dividing a metered delivery volume on two Fördergutströme
ES2406384R1 (en) * 2011-04-14 2013-10-29 Tna Australia Pty Ltd sliding conveyor
US20160009502A1 (en) * 2014-02-21 2016-01-14 Paul A. Svejkovsky In-line adjustable gate

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GB9221418D0 (en) * 1992-10-13 1992-11-25 Mccain Foods Gb Ltd Materials handling device

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Cited By (30)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3938654A (en) * 1971-04-02 1976-02-17 Karl M. Reich Maschinenfabrik Method and machine for conveying and aligning rod-shaped fasteners
US4029198A (en) * 1973-07-05 1977-06-14 Lingl Corporation Method and apparatus for forming groups of bricks
JPS5618481B2 (en) * 1974-02-28 1981-04-30
JPS50127369A (en) * 1974-02-28 1975-10-07
US3917050A (en) * 1974-02-28 1975-11-04 Vaughn Gregor Distributor with discharge conveyors
DE2502943A1 (en) * 1974-02-28 1975-09-04 Vaughn Gregor Distribution device for foerderung of good, stock source of a consumer to make up a number of
US4050572A (en) * 1974-04-12 1977-09-27 Lipe-Rollway Corporation Accumulator and feeder
US4227607A (en) * 1979-04-16 1980-10-14 Malavenda Peter P High volume method and system for dynamically storing articles for sorting and routing
US4921090A (en) * 1984-03-26 1990-05-01 Fmc Corporation Vibratory conveyor
DE3441423C1 (en) * 1984-11-13 1986-02-20 Ottmar Tallafus Apparatus for preserving and packaging sensitive foods
US5211277A (en) * 1991-05-29 1993-05-18 Wright Machinery Company Limited Vibratory conveyor
US5183143A (en) * 1991-05-31 1993-02-02 Triple/S Dynamics, Inc. Apparatus and methods for conveying materials
US5207310A (en) * 1991-06-18 1993-05-04 K.M.G. Systems Ltd. Vibratory conveyor
US5409101A (en) * 1994-02-03 1995-04-25 Allen Fruit Co., Inc. Variably-controlled vibratory conveyor
US5860504A (en) * 1994-11-16 1999-01-19 Lockheed Martin Corporation Transfer buffer and inserter and method
US5611420A (en) * 1995-07-27 1997-03-18 J & J Snack Foods Corp. Dough-Handling Machine
EP0900750A3 (en) * 1997-09-04 2000-07-05 Wright Machinery Limited Vibratory conveyor and control system therefor
US6273240B1 (en) * 1997-09-04 2001-08-14 Wright Machinery Limited Vibratory conveyor and control system therefor
EP0900750A2 (en) * 1997-09-04 1999-03-10 Wright Machinery Limited Vibratory conveyor and control system therefor
US6119849A (en) * 1999-02-17 2000-09-19 Paul A. Svejkovsky Linear motion conveyor with gate mechanism and method
US6286665B1 (en) 1999-02-17 2001-09-11 Paul A. Svejkovsky Linear motion conveyor with gate mechanism and method
DE10218303B4 (en) * 2001-04-25 2012-12-27 Paul A. Svejkovsky Conveyor with adjustable terminal discharge element for proportionally dividing a metered delivery volume on two Fördergutströme
US6848568B1 (en) * 2002-08-06 2005-02-01 Lawrence Gene Nibler Bulk material distribution system
US7475767B2 (en) 2007-02-22 2009-01-13 Key Technology, Inc. Vibratory system for distributing articles
US20080202891A1 (en) * 2007-02-22 2008-08-28 Key Technology, Inc. Vibratory system for distributing articles
US8096407B1 (en) * 2010-11-09 2012-01-17 Nicholas Meredith Poly phase drive and drive controller system
ES2406384R1 (en) * 2011-04-14 2013-10-29 Tna Australia Pty Ltd sliding conveyor
US8727104B2 (en) 2011-04-14 2014-05-20 Tna Australia Pty Limited Slip conveyor
US20160009502A1 (en) * 2014-02-21 2016-01-14 Paul A. Svejkovsky In-line adjustable gate
US9567163B2 (en) 2014-02-21 2017-02-14 Paul A. Svejkovsky In-line adjustable gate

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CA940479A (en) 1974-01-22 grant
DE2101946C3 (en) 1978-04-27 grant
GB1319669A (en) 1973-06-06 application
DE2101946A1 (en) 1972-05-31 application
CA940479A1 (en) grant
BE761589A1 (en) grant
DE2101946B2 (en) 1977-08-25 application
BE761589A (en) 1971-06-16 grant

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