US3726245A - Watercraft - Google Patents

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US3726245A
US3726245A US3726245DA US3726245A US 3726245 A US3726245 A US 3726245A US 3726245D A US3726245D A US 3726245DA US 3726245 A US3726245 A US 3726245A
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watercraft
cockpit
pontoons
hull
flotation
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J Critcher
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PIPPIN R
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PIPPIN R
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B13/00Conduits for emptying or ballasting; Self-bailing equipment; Scuppers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B1/00Hydrodynamic or hydrostatic features of hulls or of hydrofoils
    • B63B1/02Hydrodynamic or hydrostatic features of hulls or of hydrofoils deriving lift mainly from water displacement
    • B63B1/10Hydrodynamic or hydrostatic features of hulls or of hydrofoils deriving lift mainly from water displacement with multiple hulls
    • B63B1/12Hydrodynamic or hydrostatic features of hulls or of hydrofoils deriving lift mainly from water displacement with multiple hulls the hulls being interconnected rigidly

Abstract

A multipurpose watercraft having spaced bouyant foam-filled pontoons with wide flat bottoms, laterally extending longitudinal stabilizing flanges, and supporting therebetween an open suspended cockpit mid-hull with rear sloping bottom and spaced corner self-bailers spaced above the normal flotation waterline of the craft. A mast is removably inserted in a laterally reinforced mast socket disposed beneath and connecting through a seat in the cockpit.

Description

[22] Filed:

llnited States Patent 1 91 .Critcher 41 WATERCRAFT v 75] Inventor: John L. Critcher, Cockeysville, Md.

73] Assignee: Reginald F. Pippin, ,In, a part interest Aug. 3, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 60,351

52 Us. (:1. ..114/61, 9/6, 114/05 F,

114/435 511 161.01 ..B63b 3/00, B636 35/00 58 Field Of Search ..1 14/61, 43.5, 66.5 F, 114/05 F, 185, 140, 44, '45, 39; 9/3, 7

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS- 2,704,529 3/1955 116166,; ..114/61 x 2,884,883 5/1959 Pujol ..114/185 674,597 5/1901 Buckel ..9/4 A 3,065,724 11/1962 Tritt..; ..114/219X 1451 Apr. 10, 1073 3,126,855 3/1964 Freeburg ....1 14/45 2,375,973 5/1945 Cooper et a1 3,403,652 10/ 1968 Hardy 3,448,712 6/1969 Lehmann et a1 3,115,860 12/1963 Payne ..1 14/66.5 F

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 255,246 7/1926 Great Britain ..1 l4/66.5 F

Primary Exaininer-Trygve M. Blix A homey-Reginald F. Pippin, Jr.

[ ABSTRACT A multipurpose watercraft having spaced bouyant foam-filled pontoons with wide flat bottoms, laterally extending longitudinal stabilizing flanges, and supporting therebetween an open suspended cockpit mid-hull with rear sloping bottom and spaced comer selfbailers spaced above the normal flotation waterline of the craft. A mast is removably inserted in a laterally reinforced mast socket disposed beneath and connecting through a seat in the cockpit.

22 Claims, 22 Drawing Figures PATENTED 1 @1973 3.726245 sum 2 [1F 7' Inventor:

PATENTEU 3.726.245

sum 3 OF 7 In ven for:

PATENTEU 3.726245 SHEET l 0F 7 fnvenfor:

(/a/m/ z. m fw/z/z PATENTED 1 01975 3. 726 245 sum 5 UF 7 Inventor PATENTEDAFR101973 3.726.245

SHEET 5 OF 7 [r2 verifor PATENTEDAPRIOIGYS 3 726,245

SHEET 7 OF 7 WATERCRAFT This invention relates to a twin pontoon watercraft which has multipurpose capability, including sailing, powered ski towing, and rowing, and which possesses substantial lateral stability as well as a gravity action self-bailing arrangement.

It is a feature of the invention to provide a novel selfbailing catamaran watercraft.

A further feature is the provision of a watercraft which has simple yet rugged and stable construction for economy of manufacture.

Still a further feature is the provision of a catamaran watercraft with improved lateral stabilizing shallow draft'pontoons.

Another feature is the provision of a catamaran watercraft having provision for mounting an outboard engine while minimizing propeller spray entry into the cockpit.

A still further feature is the provision of a pontoon watercraft, the pontoons of which are sufficiently efficient and laterally stable to enable both reasonable sailing efficiency and lateral stability, and powered planing efficiency.

Still further features and attendant advantages will become apparent to one skilled in the art from a reading of the following detailed description of an embodiment of the invention, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGS. 1 and 2 are respectively rear and front perspective views of a watercraft according to the invention, and showing in phantom a typical sail attachment.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the embodiment of FIGS. 1

and 2, with sail removed.

FIG. 4 is a section view taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 4a is a fragmentary section view illustrating the cross brace connector assembly.

FIG. 5 is a front elevation view of the embodiment, minus sails.

FIG. 6 is a section view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal section view showing one of the two gravity-flow selfbailers.

FIG. 8 is a section view taken on line 8-8 of FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a partially exploded perspective view of the watercraft, showing the pontoon and cross-brace connector assembly separated from the mid-hull cockpit, with one pontoon illustrated in phantom to better illustrate the interior rigidifying framework of the pontoons.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary section view, partially in phantom, illustrating the pontoon framework and midhull-to-pontoon connections and mast support structure.

FIG. 1 1 is a fragmentary section view-showing the at- I tachment of peripheral rubber bumper to the pontoon and cross brace connector assembly.

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary view illustrating the releasable detent securing arrangement for the removable rear center seat section.

FIGS. 13 and 14 are schematic rear view in partial section of two modified constructions.

FIGS. 15 and 16 are schematic illustrations of the spray deflection problem and the spray deflection action by the spray deflector.

FIGS. 17 through 20 are schematic functional stability comparison views of the shallow draft catamaran pontoon arrangement according to one aspect of the present invention relative to a conventional deeper draft catamaran pontoon arrangement.

FIG. 21 is a schematic illustration of the lateral motion stabilizing action of the flanged pontoon arrangement.

Referring now in detail to the figures of the drawings, FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate one physical embodiment of the invention, with sail attached, and the remaining figures having the sail removed for clarity of illustration, as the sail is one of several featured modes of utilization. In the illustrative embodiment the invention takes the form of a twin pontoon catamaran watercraft 11, including two identical mirror image pontoons 13 spaced laterally apart and inter-connected through the medium of a front cross-brace connector 61 and a rear cross-brace connector 71 suitably secured thereto,

preferably by welding. Secured in raised suspended position between the two pontoons 13 is a mid-hull cockpit 33 which may be employed for personnel and cargo carrying.

As is indicated in the figures, particularly FIG. 4, each of the cross-brace connectors 61 and 71 and the bottom of the mid-hull cockpit 33 is disposed substantially above the normal flotation waterline of the total watercraft 11, thereby contributing to the efficiency of the water-craft in the water and providing a central clear water flow path between the two pontoons.

In addition, the disposition of the mid-hull cockpit 33 substantially above the normal flotation waterline of the craft ll enables the advantageous provision according to the invention of a unique self-bailing arrangement, whereby any water finding its way into the cockpit 33 will be drained by gravity from the cockpit, independent of whether the craft 11 is in motion or not. To this end, the cockpit 33 has its bottom 35 tilted or slanted downwardly and rearwardly along its entire length from fore to aft, and is advantageously flat over its major surface area. This rearwardly slanted disposition of the cockpit floor or deck 35 is maintained in the quiescent state of the craft 11 by fixing this tilt of the cockpit 33 in this respect relative to the normal flotation waterline of the pontoons 13 under the self-loaded condition as a total watercraft 11. Thus, as shown in FIG. 4, the major and rear area of the mid-hull cockpit bottom 35 is maintained in a normal quiescent position at a tilt angle as indicated by the letter A, and for this and other purposes the further most forward portion of the deck 35 of the cockpit 33 is tilted at this or a greater angle relative to the normal flotation waterline, and the forward nose wall 41b of the cockpit 33 is tilted at a still greater angle. By so providing a continuous fore to aft slant of the deck 35, it will be seen that water entering the cockpit will flow toward and into the rear section of the boat, unless impeded by interior obstacles.

The water accumulating at the rear of the cockpit 33 by gravity flow along the downwardly and rearwardly slanted deck 35 thereof is normally continuously discharged by gravity flow through two self-bailers 101. The two self-bailers are disposed at opposite lateral corners of the cockpit and on the rear transom wall of wall 41a, each having an orifice 103, the entrance of which is level with the deck and at or closely adjacent a respective rear corner. In addition, the self-bailers 101 are each provided with a check valve, which may take various suitable forms, the illustrative example being formed as a single tube extension 105 with a free check flotation ball 107 disposed therein and retained in place by a cross pin 109.

It will be noted from FIG. 4 that the self-bailers 101 are disposed above the normal waterline of the craft 11, including both the entrance orifice 103 and the zone of the check ball 107, thereby enabling the continuous gravity discharge of water from the cockpit 33 through one or both of the corner self-bailers 101, without requirement for craft motion. It will also be appreciated that by providing the self-bailers 101 at the opposite corners of the cockpit, the deck 35 is enabled to be substantially flat, which is a desired configuration for personnel comfort and maneuverability. Thus, with the flat deck 35 of the cockpit 33, it will be appreciated that the water will drain out from the cockpit through one or both of the self-bailers 101 irrespective of the lateral tilt or non-tilt of the craft 11, although of course there may be moments when forward, downward tilting of the craft will prevent rearward water flow along the deck 35, as it is not desirable to provide such a very large slant to the deck 35 as to always maintain rearward slanting under all sea states, such as in heavy seas. A relatively shallow angle, of for instance 50, is quite adequate for the present purpose, while still providing comfortable personnel maneuverability and footing on the deck 35.

In view of the desirability of the deck 35 being as flat as possible for personnel comfort and maneuverability thereabout, the illustrated embodiment is highly preferred. However, it will be appreciated that the selfbailing may be effected with less desirable arrangements, while still providing the continuous gravity-flow self-bailing characteristics which are effected by the basic configuration of dual pontoons carrying a midhull cockpit with its bottom deck disposed above the normal flotation waterline of the craft, and with gravity self-bailers at the low point or points of the cockpit bottom deck. For instance, the bottom deck 35 may be slightly crowned or form a slight inverted V, with the crown or apex extending along the centerline of the deck 35 as illustrated in FIG. 14, and with the deck 35 also rearwardly slanted downwardly and with similar corner self-bailers 101 provided in the rear transom wall, as in FIG. 1. Alternatively, and substantially less desirable, is the provision of a single self-bailer in conjunction with a slight V-sloped deck 35, also rearwardly slanted downwardly, and with the self-bailer 101 disposed in the rear transom wall, as shown schematically in FIG. 13.

As shown in FIG. 7, it will be appreciated that while check ball 107 will normally enable free flow gravity passage of the water from the deck 35 through the apperture 103, inasmuch as the ball 107 is substantially above the normal water flotation waterline and is thereby resting against the support pin 109, the canting of the boat in heavy sea state conditions, or by the wash of a wave against the rear wall 41a of the cockpit, will result in the check ball 107 bouyantly rising, as the check ball 107 is of buoyant, preferably hollow, con struction, such as of plastic or rubber material, and the rising of the check ball 107 within the stepped-down diameter upper mid-zone section of tube and the sealing thereof against the reduced diameter mouth 105a will substantially effectively close the discharge orifice 103 to thereby prevent undesired entry of water past the check ball 107 into the cockpit 33. Upon the removal of the upward water pressure by the subsequent lowering of the water level relative to the cockpit 33 and self-bailer 101, the check ball 107 will again freely return under gravity action to its lowermost position against the retaining pin 109, thereby permitting any accumulated water in the cockpit 33 to freely flow out through one or both of the orifices 103 of the two self-bailers 101, depending on the instant craft attitude.

The self-bailer discharge tubes 105 are canted rearwardly and downwardly, and have a generally horizontal discharge mouth configuration, thereby further aiding in assuring water exit therethrough during forward motion when water flow or wave action might result in relative motion of the self-bailers forwardly through a quantity of water or spray. It will also be apparent that during such relative forward motion any rearward passage of water past and in total contact with the discharge tube 105 will result in venturi discharge suction assist for the self-bailers, in addition to the normal otherwise gravity flow discharge action therethrough due to the normal vertical suspension of the mid-hull 33 and self-bailers 101 above the normal flotation waterline of the craft 1 1.

In order to provide a desired flow path from front to rear, the seats 37 and 39 in the cockpit 33 are provided with supports which enable the effective flow of water therepast along the bottom deck 35. In this respect, the rear seat 39 is provided with knee brace supports 39b which may be suitably secured respectively to the seat 39 and the cockpit deck 35, as by welding, riveting, or the like. In addition, the seat 39 is preferably secured at its respective ends to the upstanding outwardly tilted side walls 41 of the cockpit 33. The rear seat also advantageously is provided with a removable center section 39a, in order to enable the mounting of both small and large size motors on the transom 41a of the cockpit 33. Normally, small size motors will not require the removal of the center seat section 390.

The removable rear center seat section 39a may be suitably removably secured in place to the respective adjoining side rear seat sections, as through the medium of releasable detent pins 39c, as illustrated for instance in the fragmentary exploded view of FIG. 12. These releasable detent pins 390 may be spaced at suitable positions, as may be desired for adequate securing purposes, the pins being releasably engageable with corresponding complementary apertures 39g in an adjoining wall section of the respective side seat portions.

The center and forwardmost seat 37 serves the dual purpose of providing a seating surface as well as providing a mast support socket, as indicated at 37a. Thus, a sail 53 may be suitably mounted on a main mast 53a with boom 53b, by insertion of the main mast into the mast socket 370, and the mast may then be secured in place as by a mast lock pin 53c. Further or different sails may be provided as may be desired, including for instance a job sail 55, and/or spinnaker (not shown),

and fore-stay and aft-stay lines 57 may be secured to securing eyes 59 provided on the upper surface of the front and rear cross-brace connectors 61, 71, and at the ends of the pontoons 13.

Further cross bracing of the combined seat and mast socket 37,37a is provided in the form of an undersupport platform therefor, including forward and rear box beams 37b and 37h, which are secured as by welding at their opposite lateral ends to the upstanding side walls 41 of the cockpit, and are likewise secured at spaced positions therealong to the deck by spacers 37c, providing floor or deck drain passageways 37d therebetween. A lateral Y-brace is formed with the mast socket tube 37a at its center, and includes two rearwardly angled vertical plate braces 37g and a longitudinal vertical plate brace 37j, each of which is suitably secured, as by welding, to the mask socket tube-and the adjoining section of the respective box beams 37b and 37h. In addition, the seat 37 is secured to the mast socket tube 37a and is welded at its opposite ends to the side walls 41 of the cockpit, thereby further bracing the mast socket. Further lateral bracing is effected by utilization of further angle braces 37e, and the mast socket 370 is effectively bottomed by further generally horizontal brace plate 37f which is likewise welded or otherwise suitably secured to the adjoining cross bracing members of the seat/mast socket arrangement.

The mast socket tube may suitably have formed thereintransverse anchor pin apertures 37a, and the brace 37j may accordingly have a notch cut therein to enable the mast anchor pin 53c to be readily removably inserted through apertures 37a.

The rear box beam 37h is preferably formed with window openings 37h to enable the space beneath the seat to be used also as a storage area, if so desired. A false bottom plate (not shown) may be suitably secured between box beams 37b and 37h and spaced above the deck 35 to enable water-free storage beneath the seat 37, yet still permit free rearward water passage for full self-bailing discharge.

The box beams 37b and 37h serve a further additional function, of providing lateral bracing for securing of the cockpit 33 to the pontoons 13. To this end, the cockpit 33 is secured to the pontoons through the medium of securing bolts or screws 91 which extend through the opposite ends of the box beams 37b, 37h and the side walls 41 of the cockpit, as well as through the inner lateral skin 270 of the pontoon, being threadingly anchored in relatively thick anchor or tie plates 27d which are suitably welded at aligned spaced positions on the internally inner surfaces of the pontoon skin 27c. The securing of the cockpit 33 to the pontoons 13 is effected in the foregoing manner at the center and forward end of the cockpit 33, and similar securing of the cockpit to the pontoons 13 is effected at the rear of the cockpit by passage of of securing screws 91 through the side walls 41 of the cockpit and into similar anchor or tie plates 27d in the pontoons. In order to economize on material and weight, the rear wall or transom 41a of the cockpit serves as an effective lateral cross brace, by effecting the securing of the cockpit to the pontoons through screw or bolt holes located closely adjacent the rear transom wall 41a.

As a particular aid to insuring ease of passage through heavy sea state conditions of the supporting water surface, the craft is provided with forward and rearward effectively open spaces F0 and R0 between the forward and aft ends of the cockpit 33 and respective forward and aft cross-brace connectors 61 and 71 respectively. If desired for added personnel room and/or ease of personnel movement over the craft, an open-work grating or apertured deck may be secured, preferably removably, over the open spaces F0 and R0, with some reduction in water passage in this zone but with some compensating advantages by way of added effective deck space.

The lower surfaces 61a and 71a of cross brace connectors 61 and 71 are respectively downwardly and in-- wardly oppositely inclined, as shown in FIG. 4 and 4a particularly, thereby aiding in providing bouyant raising of the respective forward or rearward ends of the craft 11 upon the encountering from the front or rearward end thereof of a heavy wave form which may strike the forward or aft sections of the craft respectively. In addition, the forward and rearward bottom ends, 13f and 13r respectively, of the pontoons are similarly inclined to provide for similar bouyant raising of the forward or rearward respective sections of the craft upon the encountering of an upward wave form, it being noted in this respect that the pontoons extend a substantial distance forwardly and rearwardly of the cockpit 33, thereby effectively tending to anticipate and raise the craft in the required forward or rearward zones prior to encountering of a wave by the adjacent forward or rearward sections of the cockpit 33, the front and rear cross brace connectors 61 and 71 likewise functioning in this respect, although only under relatively severe wave form action such as to strike the lower surfaces 610 or 71a thereof before effective raising of the pontoons 13 has occurred.

The pontoons 13 are effectively longitudinally and transversely cross braced through the medium of an internal lightweight, yet high in strength, structurally braced network, including a plurality of longitudinally spaced T-braces, each formed of a cross angle brace 21 and a vertical angle brace 23 secured together as by welding, and each of the spaced T-braces being intersecured in a single unit through the medium of a longitudinal vertically on-edge strip brace 25 also secured to one or both of the angle braces 21 and 23 of each of the T-braces, as by welding. The longitudinal strip brace is likewise suitably welded or otherwise secured to an end connector.26at each of its longitudinal ends, which end connectors 26 are in turn welded, or otherwise suitably secured, to the respective end wall skins 27g of the pontoons 13 as shown in FIG. 4a, such end connectors 26 being of relatively thick material of substantial strength so as to serve as anchors for anchor bolts or screws 26a which are employed to secure the cross brace connectors 61 and 71 to the respective pontoons 13. In this respect, the cross brace connectors 61- and 71 may also, or alternatively be, welded to the pontoons 13 to provide a desired degree of unitary inter-connection strength and a smooth crack-free surface joint, although the presently illustrated bolt-connected separably intersecured pontoon and cross-brace connector arrangement is preferred for ease of parts replacement, as may be required.

The T-braces 21,23 are suitably secured to the skin 27 forming the outer walls of the respective pontoons 13, preferably by welding at their junction zones, and in this respect welding may be effected at only the upper end of the vertical angle braces 23 and the two opposite ends of the transverse angle braces 21. It is not necessary to weld the lower end of the vertical angle braces 23 to the skin 27a forming the bottom of the pontoons l3, and this is an aid in enabling the assembly of the pontoons, as the entire bottom pontoon skin 27a may be added and secured in place after otherwise assembling the internal bracing and the remaining portion of the skin 27b, 270 to the internal bracing 21,23 and 25. The bottom skin 27a may be suitably secured to the remaining skin 27b, 27c by welding of lower side bend flanges 27b and 27c to lateral extensions 27a of the bottom skin 27a.

The inter-secured flanges 27a,27b thus form laterally extending side stabilization flanges 13a for lateral stabilization of the pontoons l3, and consequently the entire craft 11, within the water, as will be discussed hereinafter. In this respect, additional laterally extending side flanges may be formed, if so desired, on the skin surfaces 27b and 27c, as by welding or other desired securing to provide further lateral stabilization as may be required or desired. Such additional side flanges are desirably normally below the normal waterline of the pontoons 13, but may also lie above the waterline so as to come into action only under heavy lateral sea state conditions or when other strong lateral motion forces that are encountered under other sea states resulting in heavy lateral movement of water relative to the pontoons 13 or vice versa.

While the pontoons 13 may be employed in hollow construction with only the internal bracing as described, and for light duty action without such bracing, it is highly desirable to provide flotation foam therewithin, about and between the bracing 21-25. To this end, the skin 27b may be provided along its upper surface with spaced filling holes for filling of the interior of the pontoons with suitable flotation foam material which may thereby be foamed in place, after which fill plugs 29 of suitable construction, such as self-locking plastic plugs, may be secured in place. In this respect, the pontoons are preferably provided with a fill opening and fill plug 29 for each sequential longitudinal zone disposed between the sequentially spaced T- braces 21,23. It will also be noted that the T-brace construction enables relatively free flow of flotation forming foam liquid between the zones, to insure adequate and full equalization and filling of the total pontoon interior.

In addition to the laterally extending side stabilization flanges 13a for lateral stabilization of the craft '11, the pontoons 13 also have secured thereto, as by welding, longitudinal T-strip keel flanges 1312 along the undersurface of the pontoon skin 27a. These T-strip keel flanges 13b are generally longitudinally vertically aligned with the vertical angle braces 23 of the internal rigidifying bracing 21-25, and accordingly afford material additional strength to the pontoons, particu larly in those instances where the entire craft may be supported on the T-strip keel flanges 13b, as where the craft may be supported on a hard surface outside the water. In addition, the high strength construction of the T-strip keel flanges and pontoon inner T-brace framework enables the T-strip keel flanges to be utilized for connection thereto of an underlying hydrofoil arrangement, which may suitably be a hydrofoil (not shown) extending in common between and beneath the two pontoons, and secured thereto as by bolts extending through holes 13b at spaced positions along the T- strip keel flanges.

Each of the T-strip keel flanges 13b desirably extends not only along the flat bottom surface skin 27a of the respective pontoon 13, but also along the forward slanted bottom surface skin at the forward end of the craft, and while such may be also provided along the rear slanted bottom surface skin, such does not normally come into substantial effective keeling action to the extent that the provision of the T-strip keel flanges aids in this respect on the forward slanted bottom surface skin.

The lateral stabilizing action of the laterally extending lateral stabilization flanges 13a, as well as the vertical T-strip keel flange 13b for each pontoon 13 is schematically illustrated in FIG. 21. As will be seen from this figure, relative lateral motion between the pontoon 13 and the water will necessitate side flow displacement of the water immediately adjacent the lateral sides of the pontoon, thereby requiring the water on the side facing the direction of motion of the pontoon to flow laterally downwardly and/or longitudinally and around the pontoon edges. Lateral downward motion of the water during this displacement will require the water to pass in a horizontally transverse reverse-flow course toward itself around the respective bottom lateral stabilization flange 13a, thereby providing an ef fective lateral stabilizing resisting action to motion of the pontoon l3 laterally in the water. As will be seen from this figure, lateral displacement of the pontoon 13 will likewise require the usual vertical keel water displacement about the vertical T-strip keel flange 13b, although it will also be seen that the substantially more restrictive and resistive lateral reverse flow of the water is not required in this respect. If so desired, further lateral resistive action may also be effected by forming the T-strip keel flange 13b as l-strip keel flanges, although this will not normally be required. In addition, further additional laterally extending lateral stabilization parallel longitudinal side flanges similar to flanges 13a may be, provided, as by welding, on the upper side wall surfaces of the pontoons 13, preferably beneath the normal flotation waterline of the pontoons, as heretofore noted. However, such laterally extending side stabilization flanges may also be formed above the normal waterline as noted heretofore, in which instance higher sea state conditions or greater lateral motion forces may bring such lateral stabilization flanges into operation. In this respect, the elastic peripheral bumper flange 17 may and does also serve as an effective high sea state lateral stabilization flange, in addition to its usual bumper function.

It will be apparent that the lateral stabilization flanges 13a and the vertical T-strip keel flanges present a relatively low forward directional profile, thereby adding very little drag to the forward motion of the craft. In addition, as will be apparent, such stabilization flanges add materially to the structural rigidity of the pontoons 13. In this respect, further structural rigidity is added to the cockpit 33 through the medium of longitudinal parallel strip flange braces 36 secured, as by welding, at spaced lateral positions across the width of the undersurface of the deck 35. These longitudinally extending rigidifying strip flange braces 36 also present a relatively small forward profile, being parallel with the longitudinal axis of the watercraft 11, and also normally present no direct water drag on forward motion of the craft under calm sea state conditions inasmuch as they are normally disposed above the waterline in view of the vertically suspended and disposition of the cockpit 33 above the waterline on which they are formed. If so desired, these longitudinal strip flanges 36 may also be formed as T-strip flanges or I-strip flanges, thereby providing additional structural rigidity and further aiding in lateral stabilizing action against high sea states, although it will be apparent that the illustrated construction of the rigidifying longitudinal strip flanges 36 also serves as an important aid in lateral stabilization under greater sea states. In connection with the rigidifying action of the downwardly depending longitudinally extending strip flanges 36, it will be noted that this exterior rigidifying construction enables the internal deck surface to be smooth and unencumbered, while affording sufficient rigidity to the craft cockpit deck 35. In further rigidifying the cockpit 33, the gunwhale 43 is formed in the illustrated embodiment as a peripheral rounded or flat lip of substantial width, this substantial width also providing for personnel comfort in affording additional seating space. In addition, the forward end section 43a of the gunwhale is of even wider width, and further aids in reducing the likelihood of water entering the cockpit during forward motion or under heavy sea states.

The craft is, as has been heretofore noted, capable of utilization in various modes, including both sailing and/or with power assist or power propulsion, as through the medium of an outboard motor M. In this respect, as illustrated schematically in FIG. 15, there is some possibility and likelihood of spray deflection from the propeller P onto the rear cross brace connector 71 and back into the cockpit 33. The spray action may also be sometimes present in other forward motion conditions, as with sails when the vesselis tilted heavily to one side. As an aid to alleviating this difficulty, and also for the purpose of providing a more efficient water passage configuration, the watercraft is provided with a spray deflector 81 which is downwardly and rearwardly inclined on its undersurface and is disposed rearwardly of the cockpit 33 and in front of the rear cross brace connector 71. In a preferred embodiment of this spray deflector 81, the deflector takes the form of a plate having drain apertures 81a formed therein at spaced intervals across its width and at or near its bottom end, and this spray deflector plate is preferably pivotably mounted for tilting upwardly and out of the way, particularly when the motor M is required to be attached or upwardly tilted for travel, as on a trailer or for other mounting of the craft 11 out of the water and on a hard supporting forward surface. To this end, the spray deflector plate 81 is advantageously pivotally mounted at its lower end as by a transverse hinge or hinges secured to the lower forward end portion of the cross brace connector 71. Water may also drain out through and past the securing hingeor hinges 81b. The resulting passage of the water into contact with the spray deflector plate 81 substantially alleviates the problem of spray entering from the rear into the cockpit as a result of otherwise striking the rear cross'brace connector 71. Selectively releasable securing of the spray deflector 81 in operating position, as shown, may be readily effected by provision of a spring biased releasable detent pin 83 which may releasably slidably fit into an anchor plate aperture formed on the side wall of the pontoon skin adjacent the spray deflection plate 81, as illustrated generally in FIGS. 3 and 9.

The multipurpose catamaran watercraft 11 is particularly advantageous, not only as a sail craft, but also as a motor powered craft for relatively efficient planing travel along the water. To this end, the pontoons 13 are formed with substantially flat bottom surfaces, as noted heretofore, having substantially flat upwardly inclined front and rear ends thereof. In addition, the pontoons 13 are formed with relatively wide cross sectional shape, and their wide cross sectional shape is preferably formed to provide a very shallow draft for p the total watercraft 11. Thus, as illustrated in FIGS. 19

and 20, the cross sectional area of displacement 13R in the normal quiescient condition of the craft is rectangular, with the long side of the displacement rectangle horizontal, and the short side of the rectangle vertical.

This is quite different from the conventional catamaran construction as illustrated in FIGS. 17 and 18, in which the pontoons P are relatively narrow and have a deeper draft than their width. This basic difference in pontoon configuration serves several purposes in the present invention, including decreased drag and better ability to plane, as well as greater return torque moment stabilization in the transverse direction. This latter transverse stabilization characteristic is illustrated in FIG. 20 as compared to the deeper draft catamaran construction as illustrated in FIG. 1Q. Thus, for a given angle of tilt of the craft 11 transversely, as for instance to a point where one of the pontoons 13 is at the surface of the water, the return torque couple will be F -L whereas with the same angle of transverse tilting for the deeper draft vessel, the return torque couple will be (F A-L A)(F A-L Thus, the effective restoring torque arm L and the effective differential restoring torque force F is greater for a given angle of transverse tilt of the watercraft, thereby affording substantially increased lateral stability to the craft. In addition, the side flange strips 13a tend to reduce the transverse tilting motion of the craft about the center of gravity, as such side flange strips resist the passage of water there past in the vertical plane, as will be readily apparent.

The elastic peripheral bumper is advantageously secured, as by securing screws 17a in a groove formed as by interfacing angle strips welded to the pontoons 13, and by similar screws 17a" in spaced securing lips on the front and rear cross brace connectors 61,71 (see FIG. 4a), in this latter instance, the securing bolts 17a" shown) mounted and secured on the rear of the rear cross brace connector 71, at each lateral side immediately rearward of and fastened also to the pontoons 13(as by fastening to the keel flanges 13b), in which case a common rudder drive, such as a pulley and cable drive connection, may be employed in conjunction with a common steering unit such as a tiller or steering wheel disposed within the cockpit 33. As such rudder arrangements do not generally form a part of 1 the present invention, such are not illustrated, particularly inasmuch as various different rudder arrangements may be suitably employed. In addition, as will be readily apparent, some steering ability is obtainable by pivoting the motor M upon its vertical support axis, and this motor-pivot steering action may be used alone or in addition to the steering action of a separate rudder. or rudders such as generally described above.

While the invention has been illustrated and described in respect to several illustrative embodiments, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and improvements can be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention. Accordingly, the invention is not to be limited by the illustrated embodiments, but only by the scope of the appended claims.

That which is claimed is:

1. A watercraft comprising:

a pair of laterally spaced longitudinal pontoons,

a mid-hull secured to and carried between said pontoons and with its bottom spaced above the flotation waterline of the total watercraft,

said mid-hull having a bottom wall with upstanding peripheral walls, the interior surface of said bottom being inclined relative to the normal flotation waterline of said watercraft,

said mid-hull interior bottom surface being slanted in two directions,

said two directions forming an inverted generally crowned bottom interior,

and two self-bailing water discharge orifices in a wall of the mid-hull at the lowermost side zones of said inverted generally crowned bottom interior.

2. A watercraft comprising,

a hull having a bouyant water-engaging flotation section,

and longitudinally extending, laterally protruding, lateral-flow-restricting stabilization strip flanges disposed beneath the normal waterline of said water-engaging flotation section,

said hull comprising two longitudinally extending, laterally spaced pontoons, each forming a bouyant water-engaging flotation section, and each said flotation section having said longitudinally extending laterally protruding lateral-flow-restricting stabilization strip flanges disposed thereon,

said pontoons being substantially flat bottomed,

and said longitudinally extending stabilization strip flanges extending from opposite sides of each of said pontoons adjacent said flat bottom, said stabilization strip flanges forming a lateral continuation extension of said flat bottom,

and further said longitudinally extending stabilization strip flanges extending from said opposite sides of said pontoons and spaced above said bottom extension strip flanges.

3. A watercraft according to claim 2,

said further longitudinally extending stabilization strip flanges comprising dual purpose elastic bumper strips extending peripherally along said pontoons.

4. A watercraft according to claim 3, further comprising:

front and rear cross-brace connectors connecting between said pontoons,

said bumper strips extending also around the peripherally outer surfaces of said front and rear cross-brace connections.

5. A watercraft comprising,

a hull having a bouyant water-engaging flotation section,

and longitudinally extending, laterally protruding, lateral-flow-restricting stabilization strip flanges disposed beneath the normal waterline of said water-engaging flotation section,

said hull comprising two longitudinally extending, laterally spaced pontoons, each forming a bouyant water-engaging flotation section, and each said flotation section having said longitudinally extending laterally protruding lateral-flow-restricting stabilization strip flanges disposed thereon,

said pontoons being substantially flat bottomed,

and said longitudinally extending stabilization strip flanges extending from opposite sides of each of said pontoons adjacent said flat bottom, said stabilization strip flanges forming a lateral continuation extension of said flat bottom,

and a vertical T-strip keel flange extending along the flat bottom of each of said pontoons and being adapted for joint attachment thereto of a common hydrofoil,

said pontoons being interiorly vertically braced in the longitudinal zone thereof generally vertical aligned with said bottom keel strip flange.

6. A watercraft according to claim 5,

said pontoons having internal lateral, vertical, and longitudinal bracing with flotation foam therearound and therebetween.

7. A watercraft according to claim 6,

said internal lateral, vertical and longitudinal bracing comprising a plurality of longitudinally spaced T- braces, each formed of cross and inter-secured angle strips joined by an effectively common longitudinal vertical-bend-stiffing strip inter-secured thereto, and a surface skin secured over and to each of said T-braces and longitudinal strip.

8. A watercraft according to claim 7,

said T-braces and effectively common longitudinal strip being welded into inter-secured relation at their respective junctions,

and the said T-braces being welded to said surface skin at at least a major portion of their respective junctions.

9. A watercraft according to claim 8,

two cross-brace connectors connecting respectively across the front and rear of said pontoons, and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft,

and a mid-hull personnel-carrying cockpit section spaced from and between said cross-brace connectors and having its bottom disposed above the normal flotation waterline of said watercraft.

10. A watercraft according to claim 9,

the forward said cross-brace connector having a downwardly and rearwardly inclined lower surface spaced above the normal flotation waterline of said watercraft.

11. A watercraft according to claim 10,

and a downwardly and rearwardly inclined propeller spray deflector plate disposed rearwardly of said mid-hull personnel-carrying cockpit section and between said cockpit section and said rear crossbrace connector.

12. A watercraft according to claim 11,

both of said cross-brace connectors having oppositely inclined lower surfaces spaced above the normal ,water flotation waterline of said watercraft.

13. A watercraft according to claim 5,

said mid-hull cockpit section having a bottom with a plurality of exterior longitudinally extending bracing stringer downwardly depending strip flanges disposed generally normal to and along the lower exterior surface of said bottom to provide longitudinal vertical-bend bracing with minimum longitudinal water flow restriction and to enable unencumbered longitudinally brace-free bottom interior surface formation.

14. A watercraft according to claim 13,

said mid-hull cockpit section having a tapered forward nose section, and having a rearwardly, downwardly slanted bottom surface with an inverted generally crowned surface portion adjacent its rear end zone,

and gravity-flow water discharge self-bailers, one disposed at each rear corner zone of said inverted crowned surface portion of said mid-hull cockpit section and above the normal flotation waterline of said watercraft.

15. A watercraft comprising:

a mid-hull cockpit secured to and suspended between a pair of flotation pontoons and above the normal flotation waterline thereof through lateral cockpit-to-pontoon connection means,

and two cross-brace connectors additional to the structure of said cockpit and additional to said lateral cockpit-to-pontoon connection means connecting respectively across the front and rear ends of said pontoons and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft and movable below the waterline and into engagement with the water upon respective forward or rearward pitching of the watercraft, and being spaced forwardly and rearwardly respectively of said mid-hull cockpit.

16. A watercraft according to claim 15,

said cross-brace connectors having oppositely inclined lower surfaces.

17. A watercraft comprising,

a mid-hull cockpit secured to and suspended between a pair of flotation pontoons and above the normal flotation waterline thereof,

and two cross-brace connectors connecting respectively across the front and rear of said pontoons and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft,

said cross-brace connectors inclined lower surfaces,

and a downwardly and rearwardly inclined propeller spray deflector disposed rearwardly of said midhaving oppositely hull cockpit, and between said mid-hull cockpit and said rear cross brace connector,

said propeller spray deflector being spaced from the rear of said mid-hull cockpit.

18. A watercraft according to claim 17,

said mid-hull cockpit having a bottom with a plurality of exterior longitudinally extending bracing stringer strip flanges disposed generally normally to and along the lower exterior surface of said bottom to provide longitudinal bracing with minimum longitudinal water flow restriction and to enable unencumbered longitudinally brace-free bottom interior surface formation.

19. A watercraft according to claim 18,

said mid-hull cockpit having a rearwardly downwardly slanted interior deck surface,

and gravity-flow self-bailing water discharge orifices, one disposed at each of the rear corner zones of said mid-hull cockpit and above the normal flotation waterline of said watercraft.

20. A watercraft comprising,

a mid-hull cockpit secured to and suspended between a pair of flotation pontoons and above the normal flotation waterline thereof,

and two cross-brace connectors connecting respectively across the front and rear of said pontoons and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft,

and a downwardly and rearwardly inclined spray deflector secured between said pontoons and disposed in spaced relation rearwardly of said midhull cockpit, said spray deflector comprising a pivoted plate pivotally secured at its rear end zone to said rear cross-brace-connector, the pivot line therefor extending along the lower rear edge of said deflector.

21. A watercraft comprising,

a mid-hull cockpit secured to and suspended between a pair of flotation pontoons and above the normal flotation waterline thereof,

and a cross-brace connector connecting across the rear of said pontoons and spaced above the normal waterline 'of said watercraft,

and a downwardly and rearwardly inclined propeller spray deflector disposed rearwardly of said midhull cockpit, and between said mid-hull cockpit and said rear cross brace connector,

said propeller spray deflector being spaced from the rear of said mid-hull cockpit.

22. A watercraft comprising,

a mid-hull cockpit secured to and suspended between a pair of flotation pontoons and above the normal flotation waterline thereof through lateral cockpit-to-pontoon connection means,

and two cross-brace connectors additional to the structure of said cockpit and additional to said lateral cockpit-to-pontoon connection means and connection respectively across the front and rear ends of said pontoons and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft and movable below the waterline and into engagement with the water upon respective forward or rearward pitching of the watercraft,

said cross-brace connectors having respectively forwardly and rearwardly extending oppositely inclined lower surfaces.

Claims (22)

1. A watercraft comprising: a pair of laterally spaced longitudinal pontoons, a mid-hull secured to and carried between said pontoons and with its bottom spaced above the flotation waterline of the total watercraft, said mid-hull having a bottom wall with upstanding peripheral walls, the interior surface of said bottom being inclined relative to the normal flotation waterline of said watercraft, said mid-hull interior bottom surface being slanted in two directions, said two directions forming an inverted generally crowned bottom interior, and two self-bailing water discharge orifices in a wall of the mid-hull at the lowermost side zones of said inverted generally crowned bottom interior.
2. A watercraft comprising, a hull having a bouyant water-engaging flotation section, and longitudinally extending, laterally protruding, lateral-flow-restricting stabilization strip flanges disposed beneath the normal waterline of said water-engaging flotation section, said hull comprising two longitudinally extending, laterally spaced pontoons, each forming a bouyant water-engaging flotation section, and each said flotation section having said longitudinally extending laterally protruding lateral-flow-restricting stabilization strip flanges disposed thereon, said pontoons being substantially flat bottomed, and said longitudinally extending stabilization strip flanges extending from opposite sides of each of said pontoons adjacent said flat bottom, said stabilization strip flanges forming a lateral continuation extension of said flat bottom, and further said longitudinally extending stabilization strip flanges extending from said opposite sides of said pontoons and spaced above said bottom extension strip flanges.
3. A watercraft according to claim 2, said further longitudinally extending stabilization strip flanges comprising dual purpose elastic bumper strips extending peripherally along said pontoons.
4. A watercraft according to claim 3, further comprising: front and rear cross-brace connectors connecting between said pontoons, said bumper strips extending also around the peripherally outer surfaces of said front and rear cross-brace connections.
5. A watercraft comprising, a hull having a bouyant water-engaging flotation section, and longitudinally extending, laterally protruding, lateral-flow-restricting stabilization strip flanges disposed beneath the normal waterline of said water-engaging flotation section, said hull comprising two longitudinally extending, laterally spaced pontoons, each forming a bouyant water-engaging flotation section, and each said flotation section having said longitudinally extending laterally protruding lateral-flow-restricting stabilization strip flanges disposed thereon, said pontoons being substantially flat bottomed, anD said longitudinally extending stabilization strip flanges extending from opposite sides of each of said pontoons adjacent said flat bottom, said stabilization strip flanges forming a lateral continuation extension of said flat bottom, and a vertical T-strip keel flange extending along the flat bottom of each of said pontoons and being adapted for joint attachment thereto of a common hydrofoil, said pontoons being interiorly vertically braced in the longitudinal zone thereof generally vertical aligned with said bottom keel strip flange.
6. A watercraft according to claim 5, said pontoons having internal lateral, vertical, and longitudinal bracing with flotation foam therearound and therebetween.
7. A watercraft according to claim 6, said internal lateral, vertical and longitudinal bracing comprising a plurality of longitudinally spaced T-braces, each formed of cross and inter-secured angle strips joined by an effectively common longitudinal vertical-bend-stiffing strip inter-secured thereto, and a surface skin secured over and to each of said T-braces and longitudinal strip.
8. A watercraft according to claim 7, said T-braces and effectively common longitudinal strip being welded into inter-secured relation at their respective junctions, and the said T-braces being welded to said surface skin at at least a major portion of their respective junctions.
9. A watercraft according to claim 8, two cross-brace connectors connecting respectively across the front and rear of said pontoons, and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft, and a mid-hull personnel-carrying cockpit section spaced from and between said cross-brace connectors and having its bottom disposed above the normal flotation waterline of said watercraft.
10. A watercraft according to claim 9, the forward said cross-brace connector having a downwardly and rearwardly inclined lower surface spaced above the normal flotation waterline of said watercraft.
11. A watercraft according to claim 10, and a downwardly and rearwardly inclined propeller spray deflector plate disposed rearwardly of said mid-hull personnel-carrying cockpit section and between said cockpit section and said rear cross-brace connector.
12. A watercraft according to claim 11, both of said cross-brace connectors having oppositely inclined lower surfaces spaced above the normal water flotation waterline of said watercraft.
13. A watercraft according to claim 5, said mid-hull cockpit section having a bottom with a plurality of exterior longitudinally extending bracing stringer downwardly depending strip flanges disposed generally normal to and along the lower exterior surface of said bottom to provide longitudinal vertical-bend bracing with minimum longitudinal water flow restriction and to enable unencumbered longitudinally brace-free bottom interior surface formation.
14. A watercraft according to claim 13, said mid-hull cockpit section having a tapered forward nose section, and having a rearwardly, downwardly slanted bottom surface with an inverted generally crowned surface portion adjacent its rear end zone, and gravity-flow water discharge self-bailers, one disposed at each rear corner zone of said inverted crowned surface portion of said mid-hull cockpit section and above the normal flotation waterline of said watercraft.
15. A watercraft comprising: a mid-hull cockpit secured to and suspended between a pair of flotation pontoons and above the normal flotation waterline thereof through lateral cockpit-to-pontoon connection means, and two cross-brace connectors additional to the structure of said cockpit and additional to said lateral cockpit-to-pontoon connection means connecting respectively across the front and rear ends of said pontoons and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft and movable below the waterline and into engagement with the water upon respective forward or rearward pitching of the watercraft, aNd being spaced forwardly and rearwardly respectively of said mid-hull cockpit.
16. A watercraft according to claim 15, said cross-brace connectors having oppositely inclined lower surfaces.
17. A watercraft comprising, a mid-hull cockpit secured to and suspended between a pair of flotation pontoons and above the normal flotation waterline thereof, and two cross-brace connectors connecting respectively across the front and rear of said pontoons and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft, said cross-brace connectors having oppositely inclined lower surfaces, and a downwardly and rearwardly inclined propeller spray deflector disposed rearwardly of said mid-hull cockpit, and between said mid-hull cockpit and said rear cross brace connector, said propeller spray deflector being spaced from the rear of said mid-hull cockpit.
18. A watercraft according to claim 17, said mid-hull cockpit having a bottom with a plurality of exterior longitudinally extending bracing stringer strip flanges disposed generally normally to and along the lower exterior surface of said bottom to provide longitudinal bracing with minimum longitudinal water flow restriction and to enable unencumbered longitudinally brace-free bottom interior surface formation.
19. A watercraft according to claim 18, said mid-hull cockpit having a rearwardly downwardly slanted interior deck surface, and gravity-flow self-bailing water discharge orifices, one disposed at each of the rear corner zones of said mid-hull cockpit and above the normal flotation waterline of said watercraft.
20. A watercraft comprising, a mid-hull cockpit secured to and suspended between a pair of flotation pontoons and above the normal flotation waterline thereof, and two cross-brace connectors connecting respectively across the front and rear of said pontoons and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft, and a downwardly and rearwardly inclined spray deflector secured between said pontoons and disposed in spaced relation rearwardly of said mid-hull cockpit, said spray deflector comprising a pivoted plate pivotally secured at its rear end zone to said rear cross-brace-connector, the pivot line therefor extending along the lower rear edge of said deflector.
21. A watercraft comprising, a mid-hull cockpit secured to and suspended between a pair of flotation pontoons and above the normal flotation waterline thereof, and a cross-brace connector connecting across the rear of said pontoons and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft, and a downwardly and rearwardly inclined propeller spray deflector disposed rearwardly of said mid-hull cockpit, and between said mid-hull cockpit and said rear cross brace connector, said propeller spray deflector being spaced from the rear of said mid-hull cockpit.
22. A watercraft comprising, a mid-hull cockpit secured to and suspended between a pair of flotation pontoons and above the normal flotation waterline thereof through lateral cockpit-to-pontoon connection means, and two cross-brace connectors additional to the structure of said cockpit and additional to said lateral cockpit-to-pontoon connection means and connection respectively across the front and rear ends of said pontoons and spaced above the normal waterline of said watercraft and movable below the waterline and into engagement with the water upon respective forward or rearward pitching of the watercraft, said cross-brace connectors having respectively forwardly and rearwardly extending oppositely inclined lower surfaces.
US3726245D 1970-08-03 1970-08-03 Watercraft Expired - Lifetime US3726245A (en)

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US3830178A (en) * 1973-04-26 1974-08-20 Us Navy Semisubmerged ship with hull extensions
WO1980000241A1 (en) * 1978-07-17 1980-02-07 A Demoinerie Dismountable twin boat
US4348972A (en) * 1980-05-23 1982-09-14 Parsons Vaughan V Multipurpose trimaran
WO1985001486A1 (en) * 1983-09-26 1985-04-11 Kitner William M Watercraft stabilizer flotation structure
US4548148A (en) * 1983-01-25 1985-10-22 Bloomfield Iii John W Glass bottom boat
US4781136A (en) * 1986-05-01 1988-11-01 Velden Cornelius W M V D Safety cockpit for powerboat
WO1989005260A1 (en) * 1987-12-02 1989-06-15 World Import S.R.L. Catamaran-type pleasure boat having simplified, modular bodywork
EP0459076A1 (en) * 1990-05-14 1991-12-04 Richard T. Takeuchi Stable racing catermaran with hydrofoil qualities
US6550178B1 (en) * 2001-08-15 2003-04-22 William H. Rogers Spear assembly
WO2004024554A2 (en) * 2002-09-11 2004-03-25 David Hulbert Service and survival dinghy
EP1619114A2 (en) * 2004-07-21 2006-01-25 Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica dell'Univerità degli Studi di Cagliari Multi-function watercraft
US20070095268A1 (en) * 2005-10-31 2007-05-03 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. Watercraft drain
US7249568B1 (en) 2003-01-24 2007-07-31 Cultrara William J Boat camper
US20090145345A1 (en) * 2007-10-25 2009-06-11 Richard Newcomb Emergency watercraft
US20120325135A1 (en) * 2011-06-22 2012-12-27 Hobie Cat Company, A Missouri Corporation QuadFoiler
US9475559B2 (en) 2013-07-03 2016-10-25 Hobie Cat Company Foot operated propulsion system for watercraft
US10858070B2 (en) * 2018-09-21 2020-12-08 Anthony Kalil Multi hull pontoon boat aft cockpit extension

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US3830178A (en) * 1973-04-26 1974-08-20 Us Navy Semisubmerged ship with hull extensions
WO1980000241A1 (en) * 1978-07-17 1980-02-07 A Demoinerie Dismountable twin boat
US4348972A (en) * 1980-05-23 1982-09-14 Parsons Vaughan V Multipurpose trimaran
US4548148A (en) * 1983-01-25 1985-10-22 Bloomfield Iii John W Glass bottom boat
WO1985001486A1 (en) * 1983-09-26 1985-04-11 Kitner William M Watercraft stabilizer flotation structure
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US20060096518A1 (en) * 2002-09-11 2006-05-11 David Hulbert Service and survival dinghy
US7249568B1 (en) 2003-01-24 2007-07-31 Cultrara William J Boat camper
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US20090145345A1 (en) * 2007-10-25 2009-06-11 Richard Newcomb Emergency watercraft
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US20120325135A1 (en) * 2011-06-22 2012-12-27 Hobie Cat Company, A Missouri Corporation QuadFoiler
US8720354B2 (en) * 2011-06-22 2014-05-13 Hobie Cat Co. Quadfoiler
US9475559B2 (en) 2013-07-03 2016-10-25 Hobie Cat Company Foot operated propulsion system for watercraft
US10858070B2 (en) * 2018-09-21 2020-12-08 Anthony Kalil Multi hull pontoon boat aft cockpit extension

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