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US3676993A - Electronic watch - Google Patents

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Publication number
US3676993A
US3676993A US3676993DA US3676993A US 3676993 A US3676993 A US 3676993A US 3676993D A US3676993D A US 3676993DA US 3676993 A US3676993 A US 3676993A
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Grant
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Prior art keywords
fig
watch
circuit
resonator
frequency
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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John M Bergey
O Le Van James
Richard S Walton
Louis G Brethauer
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Hamilton Watch Co
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Hamilton Watch Co
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04CELECTROMECHANICAL CLOCKS OR WATCHES
    • G04C3/00Electromechanical clocks or watches independent of other time-pieces and in which the movement is maintained by electric means
    • G04C3/008Mounting, assembling of components
    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04BMECHANICALLY-DRIVEN CLOCKS OR WATCHES; MECHANICAL PARTS OF CLOCKS OR WATCHES IN GENERAL; TIME PIECES USING THE POSITION OF THE SUN, MOON OR STARS
    • G04B19/00Indicating the time by visual means
    • G04B19/24Clocks or watches with date or week-day indicators, i.e. calendar clocks or watches; Clockwork calendars
    • G04B19/243Clocks or watches with date or week-day indicators, i.e. calendar clocks or watches; Clockwork calendars characterised by the shape of the date indicator
    • G04B19/247Clocks or watches with date or week-day indicators, i.e. calendar clocks or watches; Clockwork calendars characterised by the shape of the date indicator disc-shaped
    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04BMECHANICALLY-DRIVEN CLOCKS OR WATCHES; MECHANICAL PARTS OF CLOCKS OR WATCHES IN GENERAL; TIME PIECES USING THE POSITION OF THE SUN, MOON OR STARS
    • G04B29/00Frameworks
    • G04B29/02Plates; Bridges; Cocks
    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04CELECTROMECHANICAL CLOCKS OR WATCHES
    • G04C3/00Electromechanical clocks or watches independent of other time-pieces and in which the movement is maintained by electric means
    • G04C3/04Electromechanical clocks or watches independent of other time-pieces and in which the movement is maintained by electric means wherein movement is regulated by a balance
    • G04C3/06Electromechanical clocks or watches independent of other time-pieces and in which the movement is maintained by electric means wherein movement is regulated by a balance using electromagnetic coupling between electric power source and balance
    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04CELECTROMECHANICAL CLOCKS OR WATCHES
    • G04C3/00Electromechanical clocks or watches independent of other time-pieces and in which the movement is maintained by electric means
    • G04C3/14Electromechanical clocks or watches independent of other time-pieces and in which the movement is maintained by electric means incorporating a stepping motor

Abstract

Disclosed is an electronic wristwatch in which a crystal oscillator drives an electromechanical resonator tuned to the oscillator output. The high frequency oscillator is connected through an integrated circuit divider and driver to the resonator coil so that the coil oscillations are slaved to the frequency of the divider output. A lever, rotatable on an eccentric forming a part of the resonator staff, drives an index wheel, in turn connected through a gear train to the watch hands. Provision is made for rapid calendar setting, automatic calendar drive and an on-off switch breaks the electronic circuit from a 3 volt battery in the watch when the setting arbor is moved to the off position.

Description

United States Patent Bergey et a].

' [15] 3,676,993 [451 July 18, 1972 [54] ELECTRONIC WATCH [72] inventors: John M. Bergey; James 0. Le Van; Richard S. Walton, all of Lancaster; Louis C. Brethauer, Landisville, all of Pa.

Primary ExaminerRichard B. Wilkinson Assistant Examiner-Edith C. Simmons Attorney-Le Blane & Shur 57 ABSTRACT Disclosed is an electronic wristwatch in which a crystal oscillator drives an electromechanical resonator tuned to the oscillator output. The high frequency oscillator is connected through an integrated circuit divider and driver to the resonator coil so C(il "58/23:, that the coil oscillations are slaved to the frequcncy of the i vider output. A lever, rotatable on an eccentric forming a part 0f 28, 34, ofthe resonator fi drives an index wheel in tum connected 7 through a gear train to the watch hands. Provision is made for [56] References Cited rapid calendar setting, automatic calendar drive and an on-off UNITED STATES PATENTS switch breaks the electronic circuit from a 3 volt battery in the 3 212 252 10/1965 Nak 58/23 R watch when the setting arbor is moved to the off posluon.

a1 3,526,088 9/1970 Meitinger ..58/23 BA 27 Claims, 55 Drawing Figures CRYSTAL FREQUENCY OSCILLATOR l DIVIDER DR'VER TRANSDUCER I I8 l2 IG Mmmmmmn sum 01% 15 CRYSTAL FREQUENCY m2 l L 24 I4 n0 2 our DRIVE m ||6\/T T/ua 86 90 94| 96 HG. 4A 18 li FF-l FF-Z FF-B :FF-l4 99 DRIVE OUT PATENTEU JUU 8 I972 PATENTEU JUL] 81972 FIG. 6

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sum 15 or 15- ELECTRONIC WATCH This invention relates to electrical timepieces and more particularly to a crystal controlled electronic watch having reduced size and increased reliability and efficiency of operation. In' the preferred embodiment disclosed, the timepiece takes the form of a watch in which the output of a crystal controlled oscillator operating at a frequency of 262,144 Hz is passed through a frequency divider to drive an electromechanical transducer resonator at a frequency of 16 Hz. The resonator is tuned to the output frequency of the frequency divider so that it is slaved to the quartz crystal oscillator and acts through an eccentric indexing mechanism to advance the gear train of the watch and ultimately rotate the watch hands over a conventional watch dial. Important features of the present invention include the provision of a transducer in the form of an electromechanical resonator which is separately tuned or regulated to the appropriate frequency so as to insure maximum power transfer to the watch hands and to provide maximum utilization of the limited amount of energy available from the relatively small battery incorporated in the watch case and forming the energy source for the watch.

Battery powered Wristwatches and other small portable timekeeping devices of various types are well known and are commercially available. The first successful commercial electric watch was of the type shown and described in assignee's US. Pat. No. RE. 26,187, issued Apr. 4, I967 to John A. Van Horn et al for Electrical Watch. Electric watches of this type employ a balance wheel and hairspring driven by the interaction of a current carrying coil and a magnetic field produced bysmall permanent magnets. Other types of mechanically regulated battery operated Wristwatches are also known.

Considerable effort has recently been directed toward the development of a high accuracy wristwatch which does not employ electromechanical oscillators as the master time reference. One approach which has been considered and has been subjected to substantial investigation is the use of completely electronic circuitry to generate a master drive signal. For example, it has been proposed to provide a low frequency .oscillator or pulse generator operating at the desired timekeeping rate for a direct drive of the time display through an electromechanical energy converter. However, difficulties have been encountered in implementing this construction, including the difficulty in providing a low frequency oscillator having sufficient stability and realistic size and power dissipation for use in a wristwatch. In order to overcome these and other difficulties, it has been proposed to use a high frequency oscillator as the frequency standard in conjunction with a quartz crystal for maintaining frequency stability and a divider for dividing-down the frequency of the crystal controlled oscillator to produce an output at a suitable timekeeping rate. A structure of this type is disclosed, for example, in assignee's copending application Ser. No. 768,076, now US. Pat. No. 3,560,998 filed Oct. 16, 1968, and in assignees copending application Ser. No. 568, filed Jan. 5, 1970.

The present invention is directed to a crystal controlled wristwatch of the same general type as disclosed in the abovementioned copending applications which are both incorporated herein by reference, and, more particularly, to an overall watch construction which evidences the substantially increased accuracy of a relatively high frequency crystal controlled oscillator, while at the same time providing for maximum power transfer and minimum power drain, all in a small, compact arrangement suitable for use as a wristwatch of conventional size.

In the present invention, the'output of a crystal controlled oscillator operating at a frequency determined by the crystal of 262,144 Hz is passed through an integrated circuit flip-flop counting chain forming a l4-stage frequency divider to produce a binarily related output electrical signal at a frequency of 16 Hz. The electrical output from the frequency divider passes through a driver which amplifies and shapes the 16 Hz signal for application to the coil of an electromechanical transducer in the form of a hairspring regulated oscillatory coil having a natural frequency tuned to the divider output of 16 Hz. An eccentrically mounted index lever drives an index wheel to convert the resonator oscillations into a unidirectional rotary drive for the watch hands which are driven from the resonator through a series of gears and pinions forming a watch train.

The crystal oscillator, frequency divider and driver are all preferably formed from integrated circuits employing complementary pairs of MOS transistors to insure minimum power drain from the watch battery which, because of the reduced power drain and maximum power transfer afforded by the watch construction, may take the form of a 3 volt power supply. Since the resonator is in the form of an electrical coil through which current is passed from the output of the oscillator, the transducer coil oscillates in synchronism with and is slaved to the crystal oscillator output. The transducer comprises a single multi-turn coil mounted between a pair of permanent magnets and adapted to oscillate in the permanent magnetic field established by the magnets. Resonator oscilla' tions are sustained by a pair of hairsprings which also function to establish electrical connection from the crystal oscillator by way of the frequency'divider and driver to the opposite ends of the coil. The natural frequency of the resonator is regulated by a pair of more or less conventional regulator pins engaging one of the resonator hairsprings so that the optimum resonator frequency may be selected for maximum power transfer through the system to the watch hands.

Forming a part of the watch construction is a two-position setting arbor which acts through a clutch assembly when in a first or arbor-in position to permit the watch to run in a normal fashion and at the same time makes it possible through rotation of the arbor to set a calendar ring or date mechanism in the watch. When the watch arbor is pulled out to a second position, the gear train is stopped, the power supply circuit from the battery to the electrical components of the watch is opened and rotation of the arbor in the outermost of two possible positions acts through the clutch assembly to set the watch hands. An additional important feature of the present invention includes the provision of a rapid set feature for rapidly setting the calendar or date ring to the desired position as might be required at the end of a month or after the watch has been stopped for a substantial period of time. In conjunction with the rapid calendar set, an automatic calendar drive system assures that the calendar ring will be advanced one date every 24 hours at or near midnight.

It is therefore one object of the present invention to provide an improved electronic timepiece.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved crystal controlled watch.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved electronic wristwatch having the accuracy of a relatively high frequency crystal controlled oscillator.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved wristwatch utilizing complementary MOS circuits throughout substantially the entire watch so as to minimize power drain on the energy source or battery incorporated in the limited space available in the watch case.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an electronic wristwatch in which an electromechanical transducer in the form of a hairspring controlled resonator is slaved to the output frequency of a crystal controlled oscillator.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an electronic watch in which a crystal controlled oscillator drives an electromechanical resonator through a frequency divider and in which the resonator is separately tuned to the output frequency of the divider for maximum power transfer through 1 the system.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a crystal controlled wristwatch having reduced size, weight and power drain so that the wristwatch may be operated from a conventional 3 volt battery incorporated in the watch case.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved hand and calendar setting mechanism for an electronic watch.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved watch calendar drive and calendar setting mechanism particularly adapted for an electronic watch.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a crystal controlled electronic watch in which a major portion of the electronic circuitry is formed from integrated circuits so as to occupy a minimum space within the watch case.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an electronic watch having an improved electromechanical transducer coupled to the watch hands through an improved gear .train construction.

These and further objects and advantages of the invention will be more apparent upon reference to the following specification, claims, and appended drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a simplified overall block diagram of a crystal controlled wristwatch constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a partially schematic diagram of the electromechanical transducer in the form of a hairspring controlled resonator forming a part of the watch of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view taken at right angles to that of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an overall electrical circuit diagram for the electronic watch of the present invention;

FIG. 4A is a circuit diagram of the integrated circuit forming the overall circuit of FIG. 4;

FIG. 5 is an internal-train side plan of the movement assembly of an electronic watch constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 6 is an external train side plan of the movement assembly ofthe watch ofFIG. 5;

F IG. 6A is a view of the underside of the circuit board forming a part of the watch;

FIG. 6B is a cross section taken along line 68-63 of FIG. 6A;

FIG. 7 is a dial side plan view of the movement assembly of the watch of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a partial plan view corresponding to FIG. 7 showing the setting clutch mechanism moved to a second or outermost watch hand setting position;

FIG. 9A is a vertical cross section through the watch of FIGS. 5 -8 showing the tuning capacitor and quartz crystal;

FIG. 9B is a vertical section through the watch showing the integrated circuit package mounting;

FIG. 9C is a vertical section showing a portion of the on-off switch for the watch;

FIG. 10A is a vertical section showing the resonator regulator;

FIG. 10B is a vertical cross section showing the manner of mounting the permanent magnet shunt forming a part of the resonator assembly;

FIG. 10C is a vertical cross section showing the hairspring controlled resonator and the eccentric index mechanism of the watch;

FIG. 10D is a vertical cross section showing a portion of the switch spring establishing electrical connection to one side of the watch battery;

FIG. 1 1A is a vertical cross section showing a portion of the gear train for driving the watch hands;

FIG. 11B is a vertical cross section showing the arrangement for establishing electrical connection to one end of the resonator coil through one end of the resonator hairsprings;

FIG. C is a vertical cross section taken at right angles to the cross section of FIG. 11B and further illustrating the hairspring contacts and a portion of the watch driver circuit;

FIG. 12 is a vertical cross section through the watch of FIGS. 5 -8 showing a portion of the gear train and illustrating the watch setting and calendar setting mechanisms;

FIG. 13 is a plan view of the switch spring forming a part of the on-off switch for the watch of the present invention;

FIG. 14 is an elevational view of a portion of the spring of FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is an elevational view of an additional portion of the switch spring of FIG. 13;

FIG. 16 is a plan view'of the switch arm forming a part of the on-off switch of the watch of the present invention;

FIG. 17 is an elevational view of the switch arm of FIG. 16;

FIG. 18 is a plan view of the watch setting lever used to actuate the on-off switch; I

FIG. 19 is an elevational view with parts in section of the setting lever of FIG. 18;

FIG. 20 is a plan view with parts in section of the regulator cock assembly showing the regulator for the stronger hairspring of the resonator;

FIG. 21 is a plan view of the stud for securing the end of the regulator hairspring;

FIG. 22 is an elevational view of the regulator spring stud of FIG. 21;

FIG. 23 is a plan view of the shunt and permanent magnet assembly for the resonator of the watch of the present invention;

FIG. 24 is a cross section through the shunt and permanent magnet taken along line 24-24 of FIG. 23;

FIG. 25 is a plan view of the index lever guide forming a part of the watch of the present invention;

FIG. 26 is a cross section through the index lever guide taken along line 26-26 of FIG. 25;

FIG. 27 is a plan view of the pawl bridge assembly for the index wheel of the watch of the present invention;

FIG. 28 is a cross section taken along line 28-28 of FIG. 27;

FIG. 29 is a plan view of the eccentric post used to adjust the position of the pawl bridge assembly of FIGS. 27 and 28;

FIG. 30 is an elevational view of the eccentric post of FIG. 29;

FIG. 31 is a plan view of the upper connector for establishing electrical connection to the weaker or resonator coil hairspring of the resonator;

FIG. 32 is a plan view of the resonator hairspring lower connector;

FIG. 33 is a plan view of the date indicator drive assembly for driving the date indicator or calendar ring from the watch train;

FIG. 34 is a cross section taken along line 34-34 of FIG. 33 through the date indicator drive assembly;

FIG. 35 is a plan view showing the cam forming a part of the date indicator drive assembly of FIGS. 33 and 34;

FIG. 36 is a plan view of the index ring forming a part of the indicator drive assembly of FIGS. 33 and 34;

FIG. 37 is an elevational view of the index ring of FIG. 36;

FIG. 38 is an elevational view of the clutch forming a part of the setting assembly of the watch of the present invention;

FIG. 39 is a cross section through the clutch of FIG. 38 taken along the line 39-39 of that FIGURE;

FIG. 40 is a plan view of the rapid set assembly forming a part of the watch of the present invention;

FIG. 41 is a cross section through the rapid set assembly taken along the line 41-41 of FIG. 40;

FIG. 42 is a plan view of the pawl forming a part of the rapid set assembly of FIGS. 40 and 41;

FIG. 43 is an elevational view of the pawl of FIG. 42;

FIG. 44 is a plan view of the friction washer forming a part of the setting mechanism of the present invention; and

FIG. 45 is an elevational view of the friction washer of FIG. 44. Referring to the drawings, FIG. 1 is a simplified block diagram of an electronic watch constructed in accordance with the present invention and generally indicated at 10. The watch comprises a frequency standard 12, preferably in the form of a crystal controlled oscillator which produces output pulses having a frequency of 262, I 44 Hz with the stability of the controlling crystal. The output from oscillator 12 is applied by way of lead 14 to a multistage frequency divider 16 where the frequency of the electrical signal is reduced to a value useful for driving the hands of a watch. In the preferred embodiment, the output of frequency divider l6 appearing on lead 18 has a frequency of 16 or 32 Hz and, in the preferred embodiment, the frequency divider takes the form of a l4 stage binary chain of flip-flops to produce an output frequency of 16 Hz. This output is applied to a driver 20 which acts as a pulse shaper to shape the pulses and apply them to a transducer 22. The transducer converts the electrical pulses into physical motion to actuate a watch display 24 which, in the preferred embodiment, consists of a gear train and conventional watch hands rotating about the dial of a conventional watch face. Oscillator 12 and frequency divider 16 are preferably made from integrated circuit components utilizing complementary MOSFET transistors as disclosed in assignees copending application Ser. No. 768,076, filed Oct. 6, 1968, and incorporated herein by reference. Driver 20 is preferably also formed partially from MOSFET transistors and is of the type disclosed in assignees copending application Ser. No. 568, filed Jan. 5, 1970, and also incorporated herein by reference.

The transducer 22 takes the form generally illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 and more fully described in assignees copending application Ser. No. 46,936, filed June 17, 1970, now US. Pat. No. 3,641,761. The transducer comprises a pair of permanent magnets 26 and 28 positioned on opposite sides of an electrical coil 30. Coil 30 is formed of many turns of wire, as illustrated in FIG. 3, and is mounted on a core 32 connected to a pair of resonator sections or balance staff sections at its upper and lower ends consisting of upper section 34 and lower resonator section 36. The ends of the resonator staff are received in bearings 38 and 40 so that the coil, core, and balance staff are all mounted for oscillating movement in the magnetic field formed by permanent magnets 26 and 28. Attached to upper section 34 of the resonator staff is the inner end of a regulating hairspring 42 having its other end secured to'a fixed portion of the watch as indicated at 44. A lower hairspring 46 similarly has its inner end connected to the lower section 36 of the balance staff and its outer end 48 secured to a fixed portion of the watch. The upper end of coil 30 is connected to ground as at 50, through section 34 to hairspring 42 and the lower end of coil 30 is similarly electrically connected to driver circuit 20 as at 52, through lower section 36 to hairspring 46 and stud 48. I-Iairsprings 42 and 46 are electrically connected to opposite sides of a suitable power supply, such as a 3 volt battery, located in the watch case, through driver circuit 20. which controls electrical current flow from one side of the battery to the other through the coil by way of the hairsprings and the balance staff sections.

Power takeoff from the oscillating coil is by way of an cecentric, generally indicated at 54, mounted on the lower section 36 of the resonator staff and by way of an index lever 56 to an index wheel 58, in turn connected through the watch train to the watch hands. Index wheel 58 is provided with ratchet-shaped teeth 60 which are engaged by an index jewel 62 on the outer end of an index lever 56 so that index wheel 58 rotates in accordance with the oscillating movement of the coil and resonator stafi.

FIG. 4 is an overall circuit diagram showing the electrical circuit for the watch of the present invention. The circuit, generally indicated at 66, comprises a positive supply terminal 68 and a negative supply terminal 70 connected to opposite sides of the watch battery and supplying power by way of leads 72 and 74 to the crystal oscillator 12. The oscillator comprises a quartz crystal 76 dimensioned to establish an operating frequency for the oscillator of 262,144 Hz. The quarts crystal is connected between the gates and drains of a pair of complementary connected MOSFET transistors comprising P-channel transistor 78 and N-channel transistor 80. Connected in parallel with crystal 76 is a 50 magaohm resistor 82 and a variable tuning capacitor 84 tunable over a range of from 0.8 to 1.8 picofarads. By suitably adjusting the value of tuner or tuning capacitor 84, the output frequency of the oscillator can be adjusted to 262,144 I-Iz.

Complementary output signals are developed from the oscillator on leads 86 and 88 and applied to the first stage 90 of a 14 stage integrated circuit flip-flop chain forming frequency divider 16. The output from the 14th stage of the divider passes to driver 20 which includes an RC differentiator comprising a 300 picofarad capacitor 92 and a 4.7 megaohm resistor 94. The differentiated impulses are applied to the gates of a pair of complementary connected MOSFET transistors 96 and 98. The output signal developed on the two drains of these transistors is passed through a l megaohm resistor 100 to the base 102 of a P-N-P junction transistor 104 which acts as a switching transistor and includes an emitter 106, and collector 108. The transducer resonator coil 30 is connected between transistor collector 108 and the negative terminal 70 of the power supply. As a result, the resonator is driven to oscillate at a frequency of 16 Hz in accordance with the output frequency from the 14th stage of divider 16.

FIG. 4A is a circuit diagram of the integrated circuit forming a major portion of the overall watch circuit 66 of FIG. 4. The integrated circuit 110 of FIG. 4A includes MOSFET transistors 78 and 80, the 14 complementary MOSFET flipflop stages of the divider, and the complementary MOSF ET transistors 96 and 98 forming a part of the driver circuit. Integrated circuit 110 is provided with leads 112 and 114 connected to the crystal 76 of FIG. 4 and with additional leads 116 and 118 connectable to opposite sides of capacitor 92 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 5 is an internal train side plan view of the movement assembly of the watch 10 of the present invention. A major support element in the watch comprises the pillar plate 120on which is mounted a regulator cock 122 by means of screw 124 which carries bearing 38 supporting one section 34 of the resonator stafi mounted coil 30 and coil bobbin or core 32. Similarly secured to the pillar plate is a coil cock 126 attached by screw 128 and carrying the bearing 40 supporting the other end of the coil assembly, i.e., the end of the other resonator staff section 36. While bearings 38 and 40 are illustrated in FIG. 5 as jewel bearings, it is understood that oilless shockproof bearings as shown and described in assignees copending application Ser. No. 9,287, filed Feb. 6, 1970, and incorporated herein by reference, may be substituted for the jewel bearings 38 and 40 illustrated in the drawings. Hairspring 46 is connected to resonator stalf section 36 by a collar 130 and the regulator hairspring 42, which preferably has a strength approximately six times the strength of hairspring 46, is similarly connected to resonator staff section 34 by a second collar 132.

Index lever 56 is rotatably mounted on the eccentric 54 forming a short portion of resonator staff section 36 and carries an index jewel 62 which meshes with the ratchet teeth 60 of index wheel 58. Rotation of the index wheel 58 in conjunction with oscillations of coil 30 acts through a gear train to drive the watch hands which train includes a sixth wheel 134, a fifth wheel 136, a fourth wheel 138, and a third wheel 140. Pillar plate 120 is also provided with an adjustable post 142 which carries one end of a friction spring 144 engaging a portion of the gear train for a purpose more fully described below. Additional elements shown in FIG. 5 are the on-off switch plate 146, a two-position setting arbor 148, a clutch carried for rotation with setting arbor 148, and a pair of bar shunts 152.

FIG. 6 is a train side plan view of the movement assembly of the watch of the present invention in which like parts bear like reference numerals. In FIG. 6 coil 30 is shown as centered between the permanent magnets 26 and 28. These magnets engage and are secured to a hollow rectangular shunt or keeper 153 which cooperates with bar shunts 152 and is secured to the pillar plate 120 by shunt screws 154 and 156. Also mounted to the pillar plate 120 by three screws 158, 160, and 162, is printed circuit board 164 which is apertured to receive the crystal 76 and the integrated circuit package 110 of FIG. 4A. Located partially between the pillar plate and the printed circuit board 164 is the tuner or tuning capacitor 84 which is adjustable between the solid line position illustrated and the dashed line position 166. Carried by the underside of the circuit board 164 in FIG. 6 is an electrical printed circuit which is grounded to the pillar plate which is in turn connected to the negative side of the watch battery by screw 160. The positive side of the power supply battery is connected through a switch spring, a portion of which is illustrated at 166 in FIG. 6, to a post 168 which forms the positive or ungrounded terminal for the electrical circuit 66 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6A is a view of the underside of the circuit board 164 flipped over 180 showing the printed circuitry on the underside of the board and FIG. 6B is a cross section through the printed circuit package taken along line 6B-6B of FIG. 6A. Referring to FIGS. 6, 6A and 6B, the electrical circuit may be traced as follows. The negative side of the battery is grounded to the pillar plate which makes connection through screw 160 of FIG. 6 to a conductive pad 170 and printed circuit lead 172 to the negative power supply terminal 174 of integrated circuit package 110 and to one side of resistor 94. The other side of this resistor is connected to integrated circuit temrinal 118 as is one side of capacitor 92. The other side of capacitor 92 is connected to integrated circuit terminal 116. The positive side of the power supply is through pin 168 in FIG. 6 to printed circuit pad 176 in FIG. 6A and by way of printed circuit lead 178 to integrated circuit terminal 68. Connected across integrated circuit terminals 112 and 114 is resistor 82 and also connected across these terminals by printed circuit leads 180 and 182 is the tuning capacitor 84. Leads 184 and 186 connect crystal 76 in parallel with the tuner 84. An output is taken from the integrated circuit package 110 by way of terminal 99 and lead 188. A second lead 190 supplies B+ power power from the printed circuit board 164 to the remaining portions of the watch circuit.

Referring again to FIG. 6, the two leads 188 and 190 extend along the edge of pillar plate 120 to a connector assembly, generally indicated at 192, provided to establish electrical connection through hairspring 46 to the active end of coil 30. The connector assembly includes the driver resistor 100 and the driver transistor 104. The other end of coil 30 is grounded to the pillar plate by way of regulator hairspring 42 and a hairspring stud 194. Other elements illustrated in FIG. 6 are the train bridge 196 secured to the pillar plate by screws 198 and 200, an index cock 202 which supports index wheel 60 and index lever guide 204 which is secured to the index cock 202 by a screw 206 and includes a head 208 overlying index lever 56 and also shown is a pawl bridge assembly 210 which sup ports a pawl engaging the teeth 60 of the index wheel. Also shown in FIG. 6 is the foot 212 of a dial which is received through an aperture 214 in the pillar plate and secured by a set screw or dial foot'screw 216. It is understood that a second dial foot is secured by a similar screw in a second aperture 217 on the opposite side of the pillar plate as illustrated near the top of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a dial side plan view of the watch 10 and FIG. 8 is a partial plan view similar to FIG. 7 showing the clutch mechanism when the setting stem is pulled to its outermost position. Rotatably mounted on the pillar plate 120 is a date indicator or calendar ring 218 provided with date indicia 220 and internal teeth 222 by means of which the ring 218 is rotated and driven to provide an indication through an appropriate window in the dial (not shown) of the correct date. Calendar ring 218 is retained on the pillar plate by a calendar bridge, portions of which are indicated at 224 and which is secured by screws, such as screws 226 and pins 228. The calendar ring is driven from the watch train by a date indicator drive assembly, generally indicated at 230. The watch train is illustrated as including the hour wheel 232 and the minute wheel 234. Calendar ring 218 is restrained by a date jumper 236 pivotal at one end about pin 238 and carrying at its other end a head 240 engaging the calendar ring teeth 222. Head 240 is biased into engagement with the calendar ring teeth by a substantially U-shaped date jumper spring 242 having one end 244 engaging the date jumper and its other end 246 secured in a recess of bridge 224.

The watch is set by rotating the setting arbor 148 on which is mounted the clutch 150. When the two-position setting arbor 148 is in its innermost position, as illustrated in FIG. 7, the watch runs normally. Rotation of the setting arbor in this positions causes a rapid set assembly 252 to rotate the calendar ring 218 to provide calendar setting. During rotation of the calendar ring, date jumper 236 slides over successive teeth 222 by slightly compressing spring 242. When the setting arbor is pulled to its outermost position, the setting assembly assumes the position illustrated in FIG. 8. At this time, the watch train is positively braked, the on-off switch is open removing power from the electrical circuit, and rotation of the stern in this outermost position acts through an intermediate setting wheel 250 to set the hands of the watch including date indicator assembly 230. Principal components of the setting mechanism include the intermediate setting wheel 250, clutch 150, the rapid set assembly 252, a clutch lever 258 having its lower end received in the clutch slot, and a setting cap spring 260 secured to the pillar plate by screws 262 and 264. Secured to the clutch lever at one end is an L-shaped brake spring 266 which has one end bent downwardly into the plane of the paper in FIGS. 7 and 8 to extend through an elongated slot 268. When arbor 148 is moved outwardly from the position illustrated in FIG. 7 to the position illustrated in FIG. 8, the bent over end of spring 266 engages the teeth 270 on the sixth wheel 134 of the gear train, thus resiliently stopping the train.

FIGS. 9 through 12 show various cross sections illustrating principal components of the watch construction of FIGS. 58. FIG. 9A is a vertical cross section through a portion of the watch showing the quartz crystal 76 controlling the watch frequency. FIG. 9B is a vertical cross section illustrating the mounting of the integrated circuit package 110. FIG. 9C is a cross section illustrating a portion of the on-off switch which is opened to break the supply of power to the electrical circuit from the battery when the setting arbor is pulled to its outermost position of FIG. 8. FIG. 10A is a cross section showing the regulator cock and regulator for the stronger hairspring 42 of the resonator. FIG. 10B is a cross section through one of the shunt screws showing the manner of mounting the permanent magnet shunt to the pillar plate. FIG. 10C is a cross section through the resonator showing the oscillatory coil 30 and its mounting and also illustrating the eccentric assembly for coupling the oscillations of coil 30 to the index wheel 58. FIG. 10D is a cross section showing the remaining portion of the on-off switch spring and illustrating the electrical connection of the positive or ungrounded side of the watch battery. FIG. 11A is a vertical cross section showing a portion of the gear train and also illustrating additional features of the eccentric drive to the index wheel. FIG. 11B is a cross section through the contact assembly showing how electrical connection is made from the positive side of the power supply to the weaker of the two hairsprings 46. FIG. 11C is a further cross section of the contact assembly taken at right angles to FIG. 11B. Finally, FIG. 12 is a vertical cross section showing additional portions of the gear train, and also illustrating a portion of the setting mechanism and a portion of the calendar drive assembly.

Referring to FIG. 9A, the back of the watch is closed off by a battery spring 272 which is secured to the outer periphery of the pillar plate by a plurality of screws, such as the screw 274. Spring 272 is slotted at appropriate points, such as is illustrated at 276, to receive the shanks of screws 274. Positioned between spring 272 and the pillar plate 120 is a conventional 3 volt battery 278 which is of circular cross section and which extends over the entire back of the watch. Battery 278 is preferably provided with an annular coating of electrical insulating material 280 extending over its upper, lower and side edges to insulate the battery from the pillar plate. The upper side or negative side of the battery is electrically connected to the conductive spring 272 which is in turn grounded to the pillar plate 120 by the screws 274. The printed circuit board 164, which is made of several laminations of electrical insulating material, has conductive circuitry on its underside, as illustrated in FIG. 9A, and is secured to the pillar plate by a plurality of screws as previously described, such as the screw in FIG. 9A. The circuit board is apertured as at 282 to receive the upper end of piezoelectric crystal 76 and the crystal is mounted to the circuit board by suitable potting material (not shown), such as epoxy or the like. As previously described, the calendar bridge 224 is secured to the pillar plate 120 by screws such as screws 226 (FIG. 9B) and pins 228 as to retain for rotation about the pillar plate 120 the date indicator or

Claims (27)

1. An electronic timepiece having sufficiently small size for use as a wristwatch comprising an oscillator for producing a series of electrical timing impulses of precise frequency, a divider coupled to the output of said oscillator for reducing the frequency of the timing impulses, an electromechanical resonator coupled to said divider for converting said electrical timing impulses into a mechanical drive, said resonator including a coil coupled to the output of said divider and mounted for oscillatory motion, a mechanical time display coupled to said resonator, and means coupled to said resonator for adjusting its natural frequency to the output frequency of said divider.
2. A timepiece according to claim 1 wherein said coil is mounted on a resonator staFf rotatably supported by bearings at each end.
3. A timepiece according to claim 2 including a hairspring coupled to said resonator staff for sustaining the oscillations of said coil.
4. A timepiece according to claim 3 wherein said coil oscillates between about + or - 90* and + or - 145* from its rest position during normal operation of said timepiece.
5. An electronic timepiece having sufficiently small size for use as a wristwatch comprising a crystal controlled oscillator for producing a series of electrical timing impulses, an integrated circuit frequency divider coupled to the output of said oscillator for reducing the frequency of the timing impulses, an electromechanical resonator including a coil coupled to said divider for converting said electrical timing impulses into a mechanical drive, a mechanical time display coupled to said resonator, said coil being mounted for oscillatory motion, a hairspring coupled to said coil for sustaining the coil oscillations, and a regulator coupled to said hairspring for tuning the natural frequency of said resonator to the frequency of the divider output.
6. A timepiece according to claim 5 wherein said resonatOr is tuned to a natural frequency of about 16 Hz.
7. A timepiece according to claim 5 wherein said resonator is tuned to a natural frequency of about 32 Hz.
8. A timepiece according to claim 5 wherein said oscillator includes a variable capacitor for tuning the output frequency of said oscillator.
9. A timepiece according to claim 5 wherein said regulator comprises a pair of regulator pins adjustable along the length of an outer turn of said hairspring.
10. A timepiece according to claim 5 including a resonator staff rotatably mounted at each end and carrying said coil, said hairspring being coupled to said staff and establishing electrical connection to one end of said coil, and a second hairspring coupled to the other end of said resonator staff and establishing electrical connection to the other end of said coil.
11. A timepiece according to claim 10 wherein said hairspring coupled to said regulator is substantially stronger than said second hairspring.
12. An electronic timepiece according to claim 5, wherein said time display comprises a plurality of watch hands, said resonator including an eccentric, an index wheel, a lever pivoted at one end to said eccentric and having a jewel at its other end driving said index wheel, and a gear train coupling said index wheel to said watch hands.
13. A timepiece according to claim 12 including a pawl bridge, a pawl mounted on said bridge and engaging said index wheel, and means for adjusting said pawl bridge about the rotational axis of said index wheel to balance the stroke of said lever.
14. A timepiece according to claim 12 including an index lever guide having a bifurcated end received over said lever to restrain said lever against excessive lateral movement.
15. A timepiece according to claim 12 wherein said hands comprise a sweep second hand, a minute hand and an hour hand, said watch train including a fourth wheel coupled to said second hand, a center wheel coupled to said minute hand and an hour wheel coupled to said hour hand.
16. A timepiece according to claim 15 wherein the drive through said watch train is from said index wheel to a sixth wheel, from said sixth wheel to a fifth wheel, from said fifth wheel to said fourth wheel, from said fourth wheel to a third wheel, from said third wheel to said center wheel, from said center wheel to a minute wheel and from said minute wheel to said hour wheel.
17. An electronic timepiece having sufficiently small size for use as a wristwatch comprising a crystal controlled oscillator for producing a series of electrical timing impulses, an integrated circuit frequency divider coupled to the output of said oscillator for reducing the frequency of the timing impulses, an electromechanical resonator including an oscillatory coil and a hairspring foR converting said electrical timing impulses into a mechanical drive, a mechanical time display coupled to said resonator, a regulator coupled to said hairspring, and a printed circuit board mounted in said timepiece, said printed circuit board carrying said oscillator and said integrated circuit divider and including printed circuit leads establishing electrical connection between the oscillator and divider.
18. A timepiece according to claim 17 including a driver coupling said divider to said resonator coil.
19. A timepiece according to claim 18 wherein said oscillator, divider and driver each include integrated circuit components contained in a common integrated circuit package mounted on said printed circuit board.
20. A timepiece according to claim 19 wherein said integrated circuit components comprise complementary pairs of MOSFET transistors.
21. A timepiece according to claim 17 including a battery, a fixed contact on said circuit board electrically coupled to said oscillator and divider, and a manually movable switch coupling said battery to said fixed contact.
22. A timepiece according to claim 21 wherein said switch comprises a switch spring having one end resiliently engaging one side of said battery.
23. A timepiece according to claim 22 including a setting arbor, said switch spring having a second end with a contact movable into and out of engagement with said fixed contact, and means coupling said arbor to said second end of said switch spring whereby said second end of said switch spring is moved in accordance with the position of said arbor.
24. A timepiece according to claim 23 wherein said contacts are open when said arbor is in its outermost position.
25. A timepiece according to claim 24 including a clutch and clutch lever coupled between said arbor and said spring, said movable contact being actuated by said clutch lever.
26. A timepiece according to claim 25 including a watch train coupling said resonator to said display, and a setting wheel coupling said clutch to said train whereby the display may be adjusted by rotation of said arbor in said outermost position.
27. A timepiece according to claim 26 including a brake spring movable with said clutch lever for engagement with said train when said arbor is in said outermost position.
US3676993A 1970-08-13 1970-08-13 Electronic watch Expired - Lifetime US3676993A (en)

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US3778999A (en) * 1972-12-13 1973-12-18 Girard Perregaux Sa Electronic wristwatch
US3791133A (en) * 1972-06-22 1974-02-12 Citizen Watch Co Ltd Crystal oscillator type small timepiece
US3844104A (en) * 1972-04-08 1974-10-29 Itt Electromechanical transducer for watches
US4024677A (en) * 1974-05-24 1977-05-24 Ebauches S.A. Method of manufacturing an electric timepiece and electric timepiece obtained by carrying out this method
US4198809A (en) * 1977-05-28 1980-04-22 Citizen Watch Co., Ltd. Construction of an analogue crystal wrist watch
US4243329A (en) * 1977-11-01 1981-01-06 Citizen Watch Co., Ltd. Watch movement construction
US4351040A (en) * 1979-05-16 1982-09-21 Kabushiki Kaisha Suwa Seikosha Quartz crystal wristwatch
US4367050A (en) * 1978-09-21 1983-01-04 Ebauches S.A. Very thin electromechanical watch
US5821457A (en) * 1994-03-11 1998-10-13 The Panda Project Semiconductor die carrier having a dielectric epoxy between adjacent leads
US5824950A (en) * 1994-03-11 1998-10-20 The Panda Project Low profile semiconductor die carrier
US6339191B1 (en) 1994-03-11 2002-01-15 Silicon Bandwidth Inc. Prefabricated semiconductor chip carrier
US20040027923A1 (en) * 2002-06-18 2004-02-12 Tamotsu Ono Analog electronic timepiece having train wheel setting lever
US20050036405A1 (en) * 2003-01-10 2005-02-17 Asulab S.A. Timepiece having a mechanical movement associated with an electronic regulator
US20060072603A1 (en) * 2004-09-27 2006-04-06 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Broadcasting reception system and method for indicating time

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JPS4991279A (en) * 1972-12-29 1974-08-31
JPS5038378U (en) * 1973-08-01 1975-04-21
JPS52154673A (en) * 1976-06-18 1977-12-22 Seiko Instr & Electronics Ltd Wheel train mechanism of analog crystal watch
WO1980000380A1 (en) * 1978-08-02 1980-03-06 Nii Chasovoj Promy Reductor for electromechanical wrist watches with stepping motor and central seconds hand

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US3212252A (en) * 1963-06-04 1965-10-19 Citizen Watch Co Ltd Vibratory motor and controlled circuit for a small timepiece
US3526088A (en) * 1968-06-21 1970-09-01 Timex Corp Watch setting crown mechanism

Patent Citations (2)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3212252A (en) * 1963-06-04 1965-10-19 Citizen Watch Co Ltd Vibratory motor and controlled circuit for a small timepiece
US3526088A (en) * 1968-06-21 1970-09-01 Timex Corp Watch setting crown mechanism

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3844104A (en) * 1972-04-08 1974-10-29 Itt Electromechanical transducer for watches
US3791133A (en) * 1972-06-22 1974-02-12 Citizen Watch Co Ltd Crystal oscillator type small timepiece
US3778999A (en) * 1972-12-13 1973-12-18 Girard Perregaux Sa Electronic wristwatch
US4024677A (en) * 1974-05-24 1977-05-24 Ebauches S.A. Method of manufacturing an electric timepiece and electric timepiece obtained by carrying out this method
US4198809A (en) * 1977-05-28 1980-04-22 Citizen Watch Co., Ltd. Construction of an analogue crystal wrist watch
US4243329A (en) * 1977-11-01 1981-01-06 Citizen Watch Co., Ltd. Watch movement construction
US4367050A (en) * 1978-09-21 1983-01-04 Ebauches S.A. Very thin electromechanical watch
US4351040A (en) * 1979-05-16 1982-09-21 Kabushiki Kaisha Suwa Seikosha Quartz crystal wristwatch
US5824950A (en) * 1994-03-11 1998-10-20 The Panda Project Low profile semiconductor die carrier
US5821457A (en) * 1994-03-11 1998-10-13 The Panda Project Semiconductor die carrier having a dielectric epoxy between adjacent leads
US6339191B1 (en) 1994-03-11 2002-01-15 Silicon Bandwidth Inc. Prefabricated semiconductor chip carrier
US6977432B2 (en) 1994-03-11 2005-12-20 Quantum Leap Packaging, Inc. Prefabricated semiconductor chip carrier
US20040140542A1 (en) * 1994-03-11 2004-07-22 Silicon Bandwidth, Inc. Prefabricated semiconductor chip carrier
US6828511B2 (en) 1994-03-11 2004-12-07 Silicon Bandwidth Inc. Prefabricated semiconductor chip carrier
US20040027923A1 (en) * 2002-06-18 2004-02-12 Tamotsu Ono Analog electronic timepiece having train wheel setting lever
US20050036405A1 (en) * 2003-01-10 2005-02-17 Asulab S.A. Timepiece having a mechanical movement associated with an electronic regulator
US7306364B2 (en) * 2003-10-01 2007-12-11 Asulab S.A. Timepiece having a mechanical movement associated with an electronic regulator
US20060072603A1 (en) * 2004-09-27 2006-04-06 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Broadcasting reception system and method for indicating time

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
FR2108200A1 (en) 1972-05-19 application
GB1313010A (en) 1973-04-11 application
DE2113295A1 (en) 1972-02-17 application
FR2108200B1 (en) 1974-04-05 grant
DE2113295B2 (en) 1977-06-16 application

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