US3661467A - Mop with reservoir - Google Patents

Mop with reservoir Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3661467A
US3661467A US3661467DA US3661467A US 3661467 A US3661467 A US 3661467A US 3661467D A US3661467D A US 3661467DA US 3661467 A US3661467 A US 3661467A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
reservoir
sponge
mop
handle
head
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Gerald J Dalton
Original Assignee
Gerald J Dalton
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Gerald J Dalton filed Critical Gerald J Dalton
Priority to US6564270A priority Critical
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3661467A publication Critical patent/US3661467A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L13/00Implements for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L13/10Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing
    • A47L13/14Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing combined with squeezing or wringing devices
    • A47L13/146Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing combined with squeezing or wringing devices having pivoting squeezing plates

Abstract

A sponge mop having a firm backed scrubbing surface and a mopping face on a sponge head and means whereby dirty water accumulated by the sponge head during mopping is pressed from the sponge head into a mop reservoir from which it may be poured into an available receptacle.

Description

United States Patent Dalton [451 May 9,1972
[ MOP WITH RESERVOIR [72] Inventor: Gerald J. Dalton, 459 North 250 East,
Kaysville, Utah 84037 [22] Filed: Aug. 20,1970
[21] Appl.N0.: 65,642
[52] U.S. Cl. ..401/138, 15/118, 15/119 A, 15/144, 401/13 [51] Int. Cl ..A47l 13/146, A471 13/22 [58] FieldofSearch ..15/98,118,116.1,l19.1,260, 15/261; 401/13, 16-18, 23, 24,138
[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,834,036 5/1958 Shannon ..401/13 2,624,899 1/1953 Smith 401/13 3,000,039 9/1961 Car1son.... 401/23 1,502,148 7/1924 Magatom. ..,.l5/98 1,059,427 4/1913 Barnwell ..401/13 Primary Examiner-Daniel Blum Att0rneyB. Deon Criddle [5 7] ABSTRACT A sponge mop having a firm backed scrubbing surface and a mopping face on a sponge head and means whereby dirty water accumulated by the sponge head during mopping is pressed from the sponge head into a mop reservoir from which it may be poured into an available receptacle.
6 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PATENTEUMM 9 I972 3,661,467
sum 1 OF 3 INVENTOR.
GERALD J. DALTON \PZZBY: 3 6014% ATTORNEY PATENTEBMAY 9 I972 SHEET 2 0F 3 Fl G 6 37 3e 2a was 21 27 INVENTOR: GERALD J. DALTON ATTORNEY PATENTEDMAY 9 I912 22W 3 OF 3 FIG IO 1N VENTOR: GERALD J. DALTON EQM/ ATTORNEY BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to mops for cleaning floors and the like and is particularly concerned with sponge-type mops.
2. Prior Art In the past, a great number of mops of different types have been proposed, but sponge-mops have become more and more popular. These mops have, in many instances, replaced the previously more commonly used string mops. This change has possibly been due to the low cost involved in producing sponge mops and replacement heads for them, and the easy manner in which they are used and cared for.
In general, the sponge mops currently available on the market include a sponge head that must be squeezed dry during and after a mopping operation. In the past, this has required that an operator bend and use both hands to squeeze the sponge. A lever operated press may be provided to simplify such squeezing, but this still requires bending or stooping and the utilization of both hands.
In my co-pending application for U.S. Pat., Ser. No. 44,999, there is disclosed a mop having a reservoir arranged such that flow into the reservoir is through the mop head.
So far as I am aware, however, there is not currently available commercially a sponge mop having a reservoir arranged such that a mopping head can be squeezed dry by foot action alone. Also, stooping or bending is required when available mops are used, either to pick up dirty water or to pour clean water onto the floor.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a principal object of the present invention to provide a sponge mop that can be used to accomplish the various-steps involved in mopping, i.e. spreading a solvent solution; scrubbing; scouring; sponging up dirty water; squeezing the dirty water from the sponge; and pouring ofi the dirty water thus collected, all while the operator remains in an erect posture.
Other objects are to provide a mop that is low in cost and that has an easily and economically replaceable mop head, which will give continued, dependable service.
Principal features of the invention in one preferred embodiment include a sponge head and reservoir mounted so as to rotate and present sponging and scrubbing surfaces at optimum work angles with respect to a handle.
In another preferred embodiment, a reservoir is mounted on the handle so as to swing to a position beneath the sponge head. This reservoir will normally maintain its position either above or below the sponge surface. The reservoir, forming part of the sponge head assembly, is used in pouring clean solvent onto a surface to be cleaned, and to catch dirty water as it is squeezed from the sponge head. The reservoir can be emptied into any convenient receptacle. Squeezing of the sponge is accomplished by applying foot pressure against a pressure plate positioned above the sponge to compress the sponge against a reservoir beneath the sponge and into which the dirty water is forced. Alternatively, foot pressure may be applied against the top of a sponge mounting surface to compress the sponge against a reservoir moved into a receiving position from a stored position on the handle. A pouring spout may be provided on the reservoir to facilitate discharge of the accumulated dirty water without re-wetting of the sponge.
A scrubbing or abrasive material may be fixed to the bottom and or more edges of the reservoir where it can be used for scrubbing purposes, and if necessary, as a non-skid surface to aid in positioning of the reservoir.
The mop handle is either fixed at an optimum work angle to the sponge holder, whereby the sponge or a scrubbing surface pivoted beneath the sponge can be easily used, or it is attached by a hinge which provides for rotation of the sponge reservoir assembly such that the sponge surface and the scrubbing surface can each be operated at the optimum work angle.
Additional objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the followingdetailed description and drawings, disclosing what are presently contemplated as being the best modes of the invention.
THE DRAWINGS In the drawings:
FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the invention, with the mop handle shown fragmentarily;
FIG. 2, a side view, with the mop head and reservoir assembly shown in solid lines in one position and with an alternate position shown with dotted lines;
FIG. 3, a front elevation view;
FIG. 4, a bottom view of the invention as shown in FIG. 1;
FIG. 5, a vertical section, taken on line 5--5 of FIG. 1;
FIG. 6, a horizontal section, taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 1;
FIG. 7, a perspective view of another embodiment of the invention, again with the handle shown fragmentarily;
FIG. 8, a side elevation view of the embodiment of FIG. 7,
showing the reservoir beneath the mop head in solid lines and rotated'to an out-of-the-way position, in dotted lines;
FIG. 9, a top perspective view of the reservoir; and
FIG. 10, a vertical section showing the handle and reservoir catch assembly, and taken on the line 10-10 of FIG. 8.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to the drawings:
In the illustrated preferred embodiment of FIGS. 1-6, the mop of the invention, shown generally at 20, includes a mop head 21, a reservoir 22, and a lever operated press 23, all of which are attached by a bolt 19, to the handle 24.
The mop head includes a sponge portion 21a, made of cellulose, rubber, plastic or other suitable sponge material and fixed to a backing plate 21b. The edges of the sponge portion are bevelled away from the backing plate so that the mop can be easily used to clean into corners and to allow easier emptying of reservoir 22, all as will be further explained. The backing plate, as shown best in FIG. 6, has a plurality of openings 21: therethrough, through which water may be pressed from the sponge head. The backing plate and the sponge head secured to it, are removably attached by screws 26, shown best in FIG. 6, to supports 27 that extend across an otherwise open face of the reservoir 22.
' The sponge portion 210, can be attached to the backing plate 21b with an adhesive or with any other permanent, semipermanent or releasable holding means.
The bevelled edges of the sponge portion 210 extend outwardly .beyond the lips of the reservoir 22 so that they will reach into corner areas without being obstructed by solid portions of the mop and these edges may be coated with an impervious or non-pourous coating 27. This coating may be rubber latex, for example, or particularly in the case of a cellulose sponge, it may be a skin formed of the same sponge material, but without the pores and openings'formed throughout the rest of the sponge portion. The coating serves to prevent reentry of water into the mop head 21 as it is poured from the reservoir 22. A pouring spout 28 formed in an end wall of the reservoir 22, further facilitates the elimination of water from the reservoir and as water is poured from the reservoir the spout directs it away from the sponge portion, thereby avoiding re-wetting of the sponge.
A scrubbing material 29 is preferably fixed to the bottom and edges of the reservoir 22. This scrubbing material can be adhesively fastened, for example, and can be made of any suitable, durable material. Nylon mesh materials and a product sold under the trademark Scotch Brite," and made by the Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Corporation, for example, have been found to be very satisfactory for the purpose. The scrubbing material, in addition to providing a somewhat abrasive action, also serves as a means for holding the mop head on a floor surface as the reservoir 22 is repositioned as will be further explained.
The lever operated press 23, is hinged at 30, so that it may be rotated out of the way of the working surface of the sponge portion 21, when not in use. Springs 31, shown best in FIG. 4, bias the press 23, against the handle where it rests until it is needed to squeeze the sponge 21. Ribs, shown generally at 32, may be used to reinforce the surface of press 23. Rotation of press 23 around hinge 30, in opposition to spring 31, places the press in contact with the mopping face of sponge portion- 22a. Continued rotation will squeeze the sponge portion betweenthe press andthe backing plate, forcing any water contained in the sponge portion through the openings 22c and in to the reservoir 22.
- The ribs 32, together with a plurality of projections 33 on the face of press 23 serve to transmit increased pressures to small selected areas of the sponge portion. It has been found that such differential pressure application in effect wrings out and more effectively eliminates water from the sponge portion 21a during the squeezing operation.
' In performing mopping and squeezing operations, it is necessary for the mop reservoir and mop head 21 and 22 to be rotated into positions'with respect to the handle 24. This is accomplished by forcing the sponge portion 21a or the scrubbing material 29 hard against the floor so that the mop head 20 is frictionally held while the handle is rotated with respect thereto. Brackets 34 and 35, shown best in FIG. 4, project from a mounting plate 36 affixed to reservoir 22 and are pivotally connected to brackets 37 and 38 on a ferrule 39 into which one end of the handle 24 is inserted and secured. The bolt 19 has the springs 31 therearound with one arranged to be compressed between the bracket 38 and a washer 41 on the bolt 19, and the other arranged to be compressed between bracket 37 and a washer 42 secured by a wing nut on the other end of bolt 19. The compressed springs 31 thus maintain a compression force I against the contacting surfaces of the brackets such that the frictional engagement of the faces of brackets 34 and 35 with the faces of brackets 37 and 38 resists undesired turning of the mop head with respect to the haridle. Rotation of the mop head with respect to the handle is limited so that the optimum work angles of the mopping face of the sponge portion and of the scrubbing material with respect to the handle are achieved. The amount of rotation of. the mop head is restricted by engagement of the mop reservoir assembly 21-22, coming in contact with the hinge 30 of the I press assembly 23 when the unit is positioned for scrubbing with scrubbing material 29 and for squeezing of dirty water from the sponge portion 21 into.the reservoir 22. Rotation in the other direction, is restricted by abuttrnent of the brackets which mounts the press hinge 30 with the handle 24. In this position an optimum work angle between the sponge portion 21 and the handle 24, is maintained for effective cleaning and scrubbing of a floor surface.
In using the invention, as best shown in FIG. 2, the user will typically rotate the mop head to a position where the open face of the reservoir is turned up. Then the unit is placed in a bucket of cleaning solvent, i.e. water and detergent, and the reservoir is filled and used to transport the cleaning solvent to the surface to be cleaned. Rotation of the mop head will dump the solvent onto the surface. The scrubbing material 29 can then be used or the mop head can be rotated such that the sponge portion can be used for mopping operations. When the sponge portion becomes saturated or when it is desired to dry out the sponge portion the operator again rotates the mop head such that the scrubbing material on the bottom of the reservoir 22 is resting on the floor. Using a foot on lever 44,
voir past the bevelled edges of the sponge portion by a spout 28 or because the edges of the sponge portion are coated to prevent moisture absorption therethrough. All steps that involved in a mopping operation may be accomplished by a user while in an essentially erect position.
In FIGS. 7-9, there is shown another embodiment of the invention. In this embodiment, the mop head 50 includes a sponge portion 51 that is fixed to a backingplate 52. The backing plate is attached so as to present an optimum work angle for a mopping face of the sponge portion with respect to an upwardly extending handle 53. Two screws 54a and 54b, secure a ferrule 54 on the lower end of the handle to the backing plate 52.
A reservoir 55 is pivotally connected to the handle '53 by means of a bolt 69 that extends through the handle. and through bolt head 59a on ends of spring loaded hangars 56 and 57, the other ends of which are affixed by rivets 58 to the reservoir. The hangers, as best seen in FIGS. 9 and 10 each comprise a nut, bolt and washer. Each hangar has a bolt 59 with a spring 60 surrounding the boltand positioned between a bolt head 59a, through which pivot bolt ,69 transversely extends, and a web 61 of a bracket 62. The brackets 62 are secured by the rivets 58 to the reservoir and receive the ends of bolts 59 opposite heads 59a through the webs61. A cotter pin 63 or other suitable holding device is then inserted through or secured to the ends of the bolts to keep them from moving through the webs as the springs'bias the webs and brackets away from the pivot bolt 69. The springs 60 thus hold the reservoir at the ends of the bolts remote from heads 59a and such that as the reservoir is swung from the dotted line position of FIG. 8 to the solid position, the reservoir will move beneath the sponge portion. Thereafter, pressure applied to the top of the backing plate of the sponge portion will force the sponge portion towards the reservoir down onto the reservoir while compressing the springs.
A perforated plate 65 is fixed over the central top portion of the reservoir so that as the sponge member is forced against the plate 65 water is squeezed from the sponge portion and moves through the perforations and around the edges of the plate into the reservoir.
When pressure on the backing plate is released the sponge portion relaxes and expands and the springs again bias the sponge member upwardly with respect to the reservoir. Scrubbing material 67, which may be used for cleaning when the sponge portion is above the reservoir, is fixed to the bottom and edges of the reservoir. The scrubbing material also tionally engage a wear plate portion 68 of the ferrule 54 and to thereby hold the reservoir against the handle in an out of the way position.
While not shown, it shouldbe obvious that the edges of sponge portion 51 may be coated to prevent re-wetting and that one or more pour spouts can be provided on the reservoir to prevent re-wetting, all as disclosed in connection with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-6.
Typically, in using the mop as shown in FIGS. 7-9, a user may have the reservoir in its lowered position beneath the sponge portion and may then fill the reservoir with a suitable cleaning solution before turning the mop handle to dump the solution onto a floor to be mopped. While the reservoir is in its lowered position the scrubbing material can be used if needed. The reservoir is moved to its raised position and is locked to the handle and the sponge portionis used for normal cleaning operations. As the sponge member accumulates water, the reservoir is moved to its lowered position; the water is then squeezed out into the reservoir and the reservoir is emptied into a convenient receptacle. The pressure on thebacking plate of the sponge foot and there is no portion is applied, generally by auser's need for a user to bend or to use his hands in any way for the squeezing operation or the disposal of water accumulated in the sponge portion.
Although preferred embodiments of my invention have been herein described, it is to be understood that the present disclosure is made by way of example and that variations are possible, without departing from the scope of the hereinafter claimed subject matter, which subject matter I regard as my invention.
I claim:
1. A mop unit comprising a mop head having a sponge portion with a mop face;
a handle, fixed to and projecting from the mop head;
a reservoir having an open top thereinto;
means connecting said reservoir to said mop head;
means for positioning said reservoir whereby the open top thereof is beneath the sponge portion and an out of the way position whereby said reservoir is away from the mop head;
a reaction surface extending partially across the open top and against which one surface of the sponge portion is adapted to be compressed;
resilient means between the mop head and the reservoir whereby the mop head is biased away from the reaction surface and can be pushed thereagainst; and
means for transmitting pressure application to an opposite surface of the sponge portion, whereby water in the sponge portion is squeezed therefrom into the reservoir.
2. A mop unit as in claim 1, wherein the reservoir is pivotally connected to the handle.
3. A mop unit as in claim 2, wherein the means for positioning the reservoir beneath the sponge portion comprises arms pivotally connected to the handle, brackets connected to the reservoir and means slidably connecting the brackets to the arms; and wherein the resilient means comprises springs surrounding the arms and biasing the brackets towards the ends of the arms remote from their pivot connections with the handle.
4. A mop unit as in claim 3, further including means to releasably clamp the reservoir to the handle when it is in its out-of-the-way position.
5. A mop unit as in claim 4, wherein the means to releasably clamp the reservoir to the handle comprises the brackets, arranged to frictionally engage opposite sides of the handle.
6. A mop unit as in claim 4, further including a scrubbing material fixed to the bottom of the reservoir.
l i =8 III

Claims (6)

1. A mop unit comprising a mop head having a sponge portion with a mop face; a handle, fixed to and projecting from the mop head; a reservoir having an open top thereinto; means connecting said reservoir to said mop head; means for positioning said reservoir whereby the open top thereof is beneath the sponge portion and an out of the way position whereby said reservoir is away from the mop head; a reaction surface extending partially across the open top and against which one surface of the sponge portion is adapted to be compressed; resilient means between the mop head and the reservoir whereby the mop head is biased away from the reaction surface and can be pushed thereagainst; and means for transmitting pressure application to an opposite surface of the sponge portion, whereby water in the sponge portion is squeezed therefrom into the reservoir.
2. A mop unit as in claim 1, wherein the reservoir is pivotally connected to the handle.
3. A mop unit as in claim 2, wherein the means for positioning the reservoir beneath the sponge portion comprises arms pivotally connected to the handle, brackets connected to the reservoir and means slidably connecting the brackets to the arms; and wherein the resilient means comprises springs surrounding the arms and biasing the brackets towards the ends of the arms remote from their pivot connections with the handle.
4. A mop unit as in claim 3, further including means to releasably clamp the reservoir to the handle when it is in its out-of-the-way position.
5. A mop unit as in claim 4, wherein the means to releasably clamp the reservoir to the handle comprises the brackets, arranged to frictionally engage opposite sides of the handle.
6. A mop unit as in claim 4, further including a scrubbing material fixed to the bottom of the reservoir.
US3661467D 1970-08-20 1970-08-20 Mop with reservoir Expired - Lifetime US3661467A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US6564270A true 1970-08-20 1970-08-20

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3661467A true US3661467A (en) 1972-05-09

Family

ID=22064124

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3661467D Expired - Lifetime US3661467A (en) 1970-08-20 1970-08-20 Mop with reservoir

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3661467A (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5080517A (en) * 1990-08-07 1992-01-14 Lynn William R Mop assembly for applying clean liquids and removing dirty liquids
US20040231700A1 (en) * 2000-10-11 2004-11-25 Russell Bell Cleaning system with scrubbing portion
US20070231056A1 (en) * 2006-03-15 2007-10-04 Ecolab, Inc. Method and apparatus of applying a floor product solution

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1059427A (en) * 1912-07-13 1913-04-22 H W Raiford Combination scrub-brush and mop.
US1502148A (en) * 1921-09-10 1924-07-22 Magaton Silvio Floor-scrubbing machine
US2624899A (en) * 1951-03-12 1953-01-13 Thomas S Smith Venetian blind cleaning device
US2834036A (en) * 1955-04-22 1958-05-13 Mary E Shannon Combined mop, squeezer and reservoir
US3000039A (en) * 1956-04-19 1961-09-19 Carlson Walter Cleaning device for floors and the like

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1059427A (en) * 1912-07-13 1913-04-22 H W Raiford Combination scrub-brush and mop.
US1502148A (en) * 1921-09-10 1924-07-22 Magaton Silvio Floor-scrubbing machine
US2624899A (en) * 1951-03-12 1953-01-13 Thomas S Smith Venetian blind cleaning device
US2834036A (en) * 1955-04-22 1958-05-13 Mary E Shannon Combined mop, squeezer and reservoir
US3000039A (en) * 1956-04-19 1961-09-19 Carlson Walter Cleaning device for floors and the like

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5080517A (en) * 1990-08-07 1992-01-14 Lynn William R Mop assembly for applying clean liquids and removing dirty liquids
US20040231700A1 (en) * 2000-10-11 2004-11-25 Russell Bell Cleaning system with scrubbing portion
US20070231056A1 (en) * 2006-03-15 2007-10-04 Ecolab, Inc. Method and apparatus of applying a floor product solution
US8292536B2 (en) 2006-03-15 2012-10-23 Ecolab Usa Inc. Method and apparatus of applying a floor product solution

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US10398274B2 (en) Bare floor cleaner
US9918606B2 (en) Bare floor cleaner
DE60316144T2 (en) MOTORALLY DRIVEN CLEANING / POLISHING DEVICE
US10595690B2 (en) Cleaning apparatus
AU2001245978B2 (en) Advanced cleaning system
US5548865A (en) Floor cloth bucket and wringer device
US7159275B2 (en) Glass surface cleaning machine
US8662778B2 (en) Floor finish application assembly and method
US8894315B2 (en) Cleaning device
US5177831A (en) Cloth-covered sponge mop
US3789449A (en) Hard surface floor cleaner
US5735620A (en) Multi-purpose cleaning tool
US2304127A (en) Mop
EP2224839B1 (en) Cleaning device
US8267607B2 (en) Surface working apparatus
US20150238005A1 (en) Cleaning device having onboard replaceable cleaning pad and onboard replaceable cleaning solution
US3820905A (en) Combination cleaner polisher and waxing device for walls and floors
EP0780084B1 (en) Wet cleaning suction nozzle
US2678458A (en) Mop with detachable brush
EP2359731B1 (en) Power mop with exposable scrub brush
US20030205243A1 (en) Roller self-wringing sponge mop with scrubber
US8397338B2 (en) Multi-purpose mop system and method of use
US20040253041A1 (en) Advanced cleaning system
US4491998A (en) Scrubber mop
US7594294B2 (en) Cleaning implement