US3629962A - Shoe outsole - Google Patents

Shoe outsole Download PDF

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US3629962A
US3629962A US3629962DA US3629962A US 3629962 A US3629962 A US 3629962A US 3629962D A US3629962D A US 3629962DA US 3629962 A US3629962 A US 3629962A
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sole
recess
side
area
surface
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Louis C Brock
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Louis C Brock
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/22Soles made slip-preventing or wear-resisting, e.g. by impregnation or spreading a wear-resisting layer
    • A43B13/223Profiled soles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B5/00Footwear for sporting purposes

Abstract

An outsole has a generally flat ground-engaging surface and elongated recesses projecting upwardly into the sole proper from the ground-engaging surface. One recess extends transversely across the toe area of the sole. Another extends longitudinally along the outer side of the sole in the ball area. Still others extend obliquely through the ball area and terminate in the vicinity of the shank area. Two more are arranged side-by-side in the heel area and extend longitudinally therein. All recesses have arcuate longitudinal margins and are V-shaped in transverse cross section. The foregoing arrangement and configurations of the recesses afford excellent footing when quick starts or changes in position are attempted, both in forward and lateral directions.

Description

United States Patent [72] Inventor Louis C. Brock 9716 Bonhomme Estates Drive, Olivette, Mo. 63132 [21] Appl. No. 16,364 [22] Filed Mar. 4, 1970 [45] Patented Dec. 28, 1971 [54] SHOE OUTSOLE 9 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. Cl 36/59 C [51] lnt.Cl ....A43b 13/00 [50] Field of Search 36/59 C, 28, 14

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS D78,502 5/1929 Blair 36/59CUX 1,988,784 l/1935 Carrier 36/59C 2,611,194 9/1952 De Nitzio 36/59C Primary Examiner-Alfred R. Guest Att0rneyGravely, Lieder & Woodruff ABSTRACT: An outsole has a generally flat ground-engaging surface and elongated recesses projecting upwardly into the sole proper from the ground-engaging surface. One recess extends transversely across the toe area of the sole. Another extends longitudinally along the outer side of the sole in the ball area. Still others extend obliquely through the ball area and terminate in the vicinity of the shank area. Two more are arranged side-byside in the heel area and extend longitudinally therein. All recesses have arcuate longitudinal margins and are V-shaped in transverse cross section. The foregoing arrangement and configurations of the recesses afford excellent footing when quick starts or changes in position are attempted, both in forward and lateral directions.

SHOE oursou:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates in general to footwear and more particularly to outsoles for shoes.

In many athletic events movements in lateral directions are just as important as movements in the forward direction, and therefore it is important to have good footing or traction for lateral starts as well as forward starts. This is particularly true in baseball For example, when attempting to steal a base, the base runner invariably starts with his body facing the pitcher and feet positioned perpendicularly to the base path, since in that position the runner can easily retreat to base from which he has taken a lead or else move on to the next base. The position furthermore does not disclose the runner's intentions to the opposing pitcher. Likewise, the batter positions his feet in the batters box such that they are perpendicular to the path of the ball. When the batter swings at a pitch he again shifts his weight in a lateral direction and it is therefore important that the batter have good footing in a lateral direction also. Similarly, in fielding a ballplayer moves laterally as often as forwardly and backwardly, particularly if he is playing one of the infield positions, and consequently lateral thrust is an important factor in fielding also.

Athletic shoes of current manufacture are designed primarily for forward movement and little consideration is given to the footing necessary to have quick lateral starts and good lateral movements.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION One of the principal objects of the present invention is to provide a shoe outsole which affords excellent footing for movements in lateral directions as well as the forward direction. Another object is to provide a shoe sole which provides good footing and quick starts on natural outdoor surfaces such as dirt and turf. A further object is to provide a shoe, having an outsole of the type described, which is extremely comfortable. Another object is to provide a shoe sole which does not damage or injure the surface it engages and therefore is suitable for use on many types of athletic surfaces, both indoors and outdoors. Still another object is to provide a shoe sole which is attractive in appearance and economical to manufacture. A further object of this invention is to provide a shoe suitable for young athletes, said shoe providing traction without spikes. Still another object is to provide an athletic shoe sole with wide recesses which are easily cleaned and which are not easily clogged with foreign matter. These and other objects and advantages will become apparent hereinafter.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is embodied in an outsole having an outer fieldengaging surface and a plurality of traction inducing surfaces at a different elevation from the first surface. The traction-inducing surfaces are arranged across the field-engaging surface to afford excellent footing for movements in both forward and lateral directions. The invention also consists in the parts and in the arrangements and combinations of parts hereinafter described and claimed.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings which form part of the specification and wherein like numerals and letters refer to like parts wherever they occur:

FIG. 1 is a bottom plan view of an outsole constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along line 22 of FIG. 1 and further showing the remaining portion of the shoe in phantom; and

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows an outsole 2 which is particularly suited for use on canvas athletic and leisure shoes designated by the broken lines 3 in FIG. 2. It is also suitable for use on shoes of other varieties and shoes manufactured from other compositions. Preferably the outsole 2 is molded as an integral unit from a flexible elastomeric substance.

The outsole 2 has an upper surface 4 which fits against and is secured normally by way of an adhesive to the insole of the shoe 3. It also has a flat side face 6 which projects above the upper surface 4 to form a continuous lip 8 (FIGS. 2 and 3) around the sole 2. The lip 8 surrounds and obscures the insole of the shoe 3.

The outsole 2 has a bottom surface 10 which for the most part is flat. The surface 10 engages the field or playing surface and, unlike the surface 4, has a roughened texture to increase the friction between it and whatever playing surface it may engage. For convenience of reference, the sole 2, and particularly the bottom ground-engaging surface 10 thereof, may be divided into a toe area 12 which underlies the wearers toes, a ball area 14 presented underneath the ball of the wearers foot, a shank area 16 over which the wearers instep extends, and a heel area 18 which is located beneath the wearers heel. The side face 6 may be divided into an inner side 20 and an outer side 22. Both sides 20 and 22 curve toward one another at the shank area 16 and the curvature of the former is more pronounced than the curvature of the later, the point of greatest curvature thereon being at the juncture of the ball area 14 and the shank area 16.

Extending transversely across the toe area 12 is an elongated recess 30 which intersects the flat bottom surface 10 at parallel leading and trailing margins 32 and 34. Both the leading and trailing margins 32 and 34 have a slight amount of curvature, and are oriented with their concave sides presented rearwardly toward the heel area 18. Thus, the recess 30 possesses a slightly arcuate configuration. In cross section the recess 30 is V-shaped, having converging flat surfaces 38 and 40 extending inwardly from the margins 32 and 34, respectively. Those surfaces 38 and 40 intersect at a raised centerline 42. The side margins 34 have side surfaces 44 extending upwardly from them, and while those surfaces converge, they do not intersect each other but instead intersect the converging flat surfaces 38 and 40. The surfaces 38 40 and 44 induce greater traction than might otherwise be available if the bottom surface 10 were continuous and not interrupted with recesses such as the recess 30.

Behind the recess 30 the ball area 14 is provided with another downwardly opening elongated recess 50 which likewise is V-shaped in transverse cross section and has parallel arcuate margins. Indeed, the recess 50 is for all practical purposes identical to the recess 30 except for the fact that it is slightly longer and is oriented in a different direction. The configuration of the recess 50 will therefor not be described in greater detail. The recess 50 is set slightly inwardly from the outer side 22 of the side face 6, and the convex sides of its arcuate margins are presented outwardly.

The ball area 14 is traversed by another recess 52 which like the recess 30 is V-shaped in cross section and has arcuate leading and trailing margins. The recess 52 commences adjacent to the inner side 20 of the side face 6 directly opposite from the recess 50 and extends obliquely toward the shank area 16. At its other end the recess 52 passes behind the recess 50 and terminates adjacent to the other side 22 within or close to the front portion of the shank area 16. In this area that is behind the recess 50, the curvature of the leading and trailing margins of the recess 52 diminishes and the recess 52 assumes a generally straight direction. The convex sides of the leading and trailing margins of the recess 52 are presented forwardly toward the recesses 30 and 50.

Generally paralleling the recess 52 and located immediately inwardly from and to the rear of it is another oblique recess 54 which also has arcuate margins and a V-shaped cross-sectional configuration. The forward end of the recess 52 commences adjacent to the inner side 20 of the side face 6, while the rear end thereof extends into and terminates within the shank area 16. The recess 54 extends only partially across the bottom surface 10, and its rear end is for the most part disposed within the inner half of the shank area 16. Since the recess 54 parallels the recess 52, the convex sides of its arcuate margins are oriented in the same direction. Thus, the convex sides of its margins are presented toward the recesses 52 and 50.

To the rear of the recess 54 where the narrowest portion of the shank area 16 exists, the shank area 16 is free of recesses. it is, however, traversed by a pair of slightly embossed ribs 56, and in between the ribs 56 that flat bottom surface has a slightly rougher texture than the remaining portion of the bottom surface 10.

The heel area 18 has a pair of recesses 58 which are located opposite each other. The recesses 58, like the recess 50, are oriented longitudinally of the bottom surface 10 and, furthermore, have arcuate longitudinal margins and a V-shaped cross-sectional configuration. The inner recess 58 is located adjacent to the inner side 20 of the side face 6 and has the convex sides of its margins presented toward that side 20. The outer recess 58 is located adjacent to the outer side 22 of the side face 6, and the convex sides of its arcuate margins are presented toward that side 22.

The outsole 2 is ideally suited for use on natural outdoor surfaces such as dirt and turf. On either type of surface and particularly the former, excellent footing or traction in a forward direction is provided, and this is attributable primarily to the recess 30. in particular, that recess extends transversely of the bottom surface 10 and the foot and permits dirt or turf to enter the sole 2 across substantially the entire width of the bottom surface 10. This in turn creates a firmer bite into the dirt or turf so that the chances of slipping are minimized. lnasmuch as the toe is the last portion of the foot to leave the ground when walking or running forwardly and is the portion of the foot through which the forward thrust is applied, the bite is maintained throughout the duration the foot is on the ground. In other words, the only fully transverse recess in the sole 2, that is the recess 30, is positioned in the toe area 12, and during forward motion that area remains in engagement with the ground for the longest duration and at the time when the leg muscles apply the forward thrust.

The recesses 50, 52 and 54 also assist in establishing a bite into the ground, but by reason of their position and orientation, they are not as effective as the recess 30 insofar as movement in a forward direction is concerned.

As previously noted, however, in many sports footing in a lateral direction is just as important as or perhaps even more important than footing in a forward direction. The outsole 2 affords excellent footing or traction in either lateral direction due to the generally longitudinal orientation of the recesses 50 and 58, and the oblique orientation of the recesses 52 and 54. All of the recesses 50, 52, 54 and 58 permit the dirt or turf to enter the sole 2 for along approximately the entire length of that sole 2 so as to establish a good bite with the ground. Consequently, when the leg muscles push off to move the body in a lateral direction, good traction is achieved and slippage is again minimized. Thus, the lateral thrust exerted by the legs is put to maximum benefit and little of it is wasted.

In many instances, as the leg exerts lateral thrust the foot tends to pivot on its ball. The oblique orientation and arcuate contour of the recesses 54 and 56 permit such pivoting, yet remain positioned to afford maximum thrust in an oblique direction without slippage also.

in view of the foregoing, excellent footing is achieved and quick starts are possible in both forward and lateral directions. This improved footing, and particularly the ability to derive exceptional lateral thrust, makes the outsole 2 ideally suited for sandlot baseball and softball games. Indeed, it has been said that the shoes equipped with outsoles 2 are closest to spikedshoes yet in flat sole shoe.

The V-shaped cross-sectional shape of the recesses 30, 50, 52, 54 and 58 affords excellent thrust and traction, yet resists the tendency for dirt and other foreign matter to lodge in those recesses. Also by reason of the V-shaped configuration the recesses 30, S0, 52, 54 and 58 are easily cleaned of dirt and foreign matter which may become lodged in them. The side walls of the recesses are at an angle of l0 or more, preferably more than 20 with the vertical. The recesses are slightly more than one half the thickness of the sole for wearing qualities and protection of the foot against stepping on sharp objects or pebbles.

Since the outsole 2 has no projections extending downwardly from its flat bottom surfaces 10, it is suitable for use on artificial surfaces such as asphalt and wood, the former of which is found primarily outdoors, while the latter is used indoors for such sports as basketball and volleyball.

This invention is intended to cover all changes and modifications of the example of the invention herein chosen for purposes of the disclosure which do not constitute departures from the spirit and scope of the invention,

What is claimed is:

1. An outsole formed from a flexible material and comprising a generally flat surface and elongated traction-inducing surfaces presented at a different elevation than the generally flat surface, the elongated traction-inducing surfaces being V- shaped in transverse cross section and having arcuate longitudinal margins, one elongated traction-inducing surface extending transversely of the sole at the toe area thereof, another traction-inducing surface extending longitudinally of the sole adjacent to the outer side thereof in the ball area of the sole, still another traction-inducing surface extending obliquely from the inner side of the sole across the ball area to the outer side of the sole and terminating behind the longitudinal traction-inducing surface, and more elongated tractioninducing surfaces extending longitudinally of the sole and in side-by-side relation at the heel area of the sole.

2. An outsole formed from a flexible material and comprising a plurality of elongated recesses, the longitudinal margins of which are generally parallel and arcuate, one recess being in the toe area of the sole and oriented generally transversely of the sole with the convex sides of its arcuate margins presented forwardly, another recess being in the ball area of the sole adjacent the outer side thereof and oriented generally longitudinally of the sole with the convex sides of its arcuate margins being presented toward the outer side of the sole, still another recess extending obliquely across the sole and having its forwardmost end adjacent to the inner side of the sole generally opposite from the longitudinal recess and its rearmost end adjacent to the outer side of the sole to the rear of the longitudinal recess, the oblique recess having the convex sides of its arcuate margins presented toward the longitudinal recess in the ball area, and a pair of the recesses being located side by side in the heel area of the sole and oriented longitudinally of the sole with the convex sides of the arcuate margins for each heel recess being presented toward the side of the sole closest to that recess.

3. An outsole according to claim 2 wherein the recesses are V-shaped in transverse cross section.

4. An outsole according to claim 2 wherein the ground-engaging surface has a rough texture.

5. An outsole for providing substantial thrust in directions lateral to the body; said outsole being formed from a flexible material and having a generally flat ground-engaging surface and a plurality of elongated recesses opening outwardly from the ground-engaging surface and being completely isolated from one another by the ground-engaging surface, one recess being located adjacent to the outer side of the sole in the ball area thereof and oriented generally longitudinally of the sole, another recess extending obliquely across the sole and having its forwardmost end adjacent the inner side of the sole and its rearmost end adjacent to the outer side of the sole to the rear of the longitudinal recess, and still another recess being located in the heel area of the sole and extending longitudinally of the sole.

6. An outsole according to claim 5 wherein yet another elongated recess is in the toe area of the sole ahead of the longitudinal recess in the ball area and is oriented generally transversely of the sole.

7. An outsole according to claim 6 wherein still another recess extends obliquely in the sole, the second oblique recess being located to the rear of the first oblique recess.

8. An outsole according to claim 7 wherein the front end of the second oblique recess is located adjacent to the inner side of the sole and the rear end is located within the shank area of the sole 9. An outsole for providing substantial thrust in directions lateral to the body; said outsole being formed from a flexible material and having a generally flat ground-engaging surface and a plurality of elongated recesses opening outwardly from the ground-engaging surface and being completely isolated from one another by the ground-engaging surface, one recess being in the toe area of the sole and oriented generally transversely of the sole, another recess being located adjacent to the outer side of the sole to the rear of the transverse recess and being oriented generally longitudinally of the sole, still another recess extending obliquely across the sole and having its forward end adjacent to the inner side of the sole and directly across the sole from the longitudinal recess, and yet another recess being located in the heel area of the sole and extending longitudinally of the sole.

i i 1! t

Claims (9)

1. An outsole formed from a flexible material and comprising a generally flat surface and elongated traction-inducing surfaces presented at a different elevation than the generally flat surface, the elongated traction inducing surfaces being V-shaped in transverse cross section and having arcuate longitudinal margins, one elongated traction-inducing surface extending transversely of the sole at the toe area thereof, another traction-inducing surface extending longitudinally of the sole adjacent to the outer side thereof in the ball area of the sole, still another traction-inducing surface extending obliquely from the inner side of the sole across the ball area to the outer side of the sole and terminating behind the longitudinal tractioninducing surface, and more elongated traction-inducing surfaces extending longitudinally of the sole and in side-by-side relation at the heel area of the sole.
2. An outsole formed from a flexible material and comprising a plurality of elongated recesses, the longitudinal margins of which are generally parallel and arcuate, one recess being in the toe area of the sole and oriented generally transversely of the sole with the convex sides of its arcuate margins presented forwardly, another recess being in the ball area of the sole adjacent the outer side thereof and oriented generally longitudinally of the sole with the convex sides of its arcuate margins being presented toward the outer side of the sole, still another recess extending obliquely across the sole and having its forwardmost end adjacent to the inner side of the sole generally opposite from the longitudinal recess and its rearmost end adjacent to the outer side of the sole to the rear of the longitudinal recess, the oblique recess having the convex sides of its arcuate margins presented toward the longitudinal recess in the ball area, and a pair of the recesses being located side by side in the heel area of the sole and oriented longitudinally of the sole with the convex sides of the arcuate margins for each heel recess being presented toward the side of the sole closest to that recess.
3. An outsole according to claim 2 wherein the recesses are V-shaped in transverse cross section.
4. An outsole according to claim 2 wherein the ground-engaging surface has a rough texture.
5. An outsole for providing substantial thrust in directions lateral to the body; said outsole being formed from a flexible material and having a generally flat ground engaging surface and a plurality of elongated recesses opening outwardly from the ground-engaging surface and being completely isolated from one another by the ground-engaging surface, one recess being located adjacent to the outer side of the sole in the ball area thereof and oriented generally longitudinally of the sole, another recess extending obliquely across the sole and having its forwardmost end adjacent the inner side of the sole and its rearmost end adjacent to the outer side of the sole to the rear of the longitudinal recess, and still another recess being located in the heel area of the sole and extending longitudinally of the sole.
6. An outsole according to claim 5 wherein yet another elongated recess is in the toe area of the sole ahead of the longitudinal recess in the ball area and is oriented generally transversely of the sole.
7. An outsole according to claim 6 wherein still another recess extends obliquely in the sole, the second oblique recess being located to the rear of the first oblique recess.
8. An outsole according to claim 7 wherein the front end of the second oblique recess is located adjacent to the inner side of the sole and the rear end is located within the shank area of the sole.
9. An outsole for providing substantial thrust in directions lateral to the body; said outsole being formed from a flexible material and having a generally flat ground engaging surface and a plurality of elongated recesses opening outwardly from the ground-engaging surface and being completely isolated from one another by the ground-engaging surface, one recess being in the toe area of the sole and oriented generally transversely of the sole, another recess being located adjacent to the outer side of the sole to the rear of the transverse recess and being oriented generally longitudinally of the sole, still another recess extending obliquely across the sole and having its forward end adjacent to the inner side of the sole and directly across the sole from the longitudinal recess, and yet another recess being located in the heel area of the sole and extending longitudinally of the sole.
US3629962A 1970-03-04 1970-03-04 Shoe outsole Expired - Lifetime US3629962A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1993020725A1 (en) * 1992-04-09 1993-10-28 A.D. One Sports, Inc. Sport shoe and support system
NL1001364C2 (en) * 1995-10-06 1997-04-08 Bata Nederland Bv Sole for footwear.
US5752332A (en) * 1992-05-13 1998-05-19 Asics Corporation Hard plate for spiked track shoes
US5784808A (en) * 1993-03-01 1998-07-28 Hockerson; Stan Independent impact suspension athletic shoe
US20090313856A1 (en) * 2008-06-20 2009-12-24 Arizumi James K Flexible sole for an article of footwear
US8322049B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2012-12-04 Nike, Inc. Wear-resistant outsole
US20140082968A1 (en) * 2012-09-21 2014-03-27 Nike, Inc. Tread Pattern For Article of Footwear
US9179737B2 (en) 2013-01-31 2015-11-10 Nike, Inc. Sole assembly with plural portions that cooperatively define chamber
US9743711B2 (en) 2013-01-31 2017-08-29 Nike, Inc. Sole assembly with plural portions that cooperatively define chamber

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
BE509059A (en) *
GB140302A (en) * 1919-07-25 1920-03-25 John James Hartopp Improvements in or relating to athletic boots and shoes
US1988784A (en) * 1932-05-17 1935-01-22 Firestone Footwear Company Sport shoe
US2611194A (en) * 1952-03-19 1952-09-23 Nitzio Anthony De Antislipping footgear
FR1142595A (en) * 1956-02-08 1957-09-19 A method for resole shoes and means for carrying out this method

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
BE509059A (en) *
GB140302A (en) * 1919-07-25 1920-03-25 John James Hartopp Improvements in or relating to athletic boots and shoes
US1988784A (en) * 1932-05-17 1935-01-22 Firestone Footwear Company Sport shoe
US2611194A (en) * 1952-03-19 1952-09-23 Nitzio Anthony De Antislipping footgear
FR1142595A (en) * 1956-02-08 1957-09-19 A method for resole shoes and means for carrying out this method

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1993020725A1 (en) * 1992-04-09 1993-10-28 A.D. One Sports, Inc. Sport shoe and support system
US5408761A (en) * 1992-04-09 1995-04-25 A. D. One Sports, Inc. Sport shoe and support system
US5752332A (en) * 1992-05-13 1998-05-19 Asics Corporation Hard plate for spiked track shoes
US5784808A (en) * 1993-03-01 1998-07-28 Hockerson; Stan Independent impact suspension athletic shoe
NL1001364C2 (en) * 1995-10-06 1997-04-08 Bata Nederland Bv Sole for footwear.
EP0766932A1 (en) * 1995-10-06 1997-04-09 Bata Nederland B.V. Outer sole for footwear
US20090313856A1 (en) * 2008-06-20 2009-12-24 Arizumi James K Flexible sole for an article of footwear
US8322049B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2012-12-04 Nike, Inc. Wear-resistant outsole
US8671592B2 (en) 2010-07-30 2014-03-18 Nike, Inc. Wear-resistant outsole
US20140082968A1 (en) * 2012-09-21 2014-03-27 Nike, Inc. Tread Pattern For Article of Footwear
US9179737B2 (en) 2013-01-31 2015-11-10 Nike, Inc. Sole assembly with plural portions that cooperatively define chamber
US9743711B2 (en) 2013-01-31 2017-08-29 Nike, Inc. Sole assembly with plural portions that cooperatively define chamber
US9744734B2 (en) 2013-01-31 2017-08-29 Nike, Inc. Sole assembly with plural portions that cooperatively define chamber

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