US3616137A - Pile weatherstripping with monofilament thermoplastic backing - Google Patents

Pile weatherstripping with monofilament thermoplastic backing Download PDF

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US3616137A
US3616137A US3616137DA US3616137A US 3616137 A US3616137 A US 3616137A US 3616137D A US3616137D A US 3616137DA US 3616137 A US3616137 A US 3616137A
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Prior art keywords
pile
fabric
tape
material
weatherstrip
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Expired - Lifetime
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Robert C Horton
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Kessler Products Co Inc
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Kessler Products Co Inc
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05CEMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05C17/00Embroidered or tufted products; Base fabrics specially adapted for embroidered work; Inserts for producing surface irregularities in embroidered products
    • D05C17/02Tufted products
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E06DOORS, WINDOWS, SHUTTERS, OR ROLLER BLINDS IN GENERAL; LADDERS
    • E06BFIXED OR MOVABLE CLOSURES FOR OPENINGS IN BUILDINGS, VEHICLES, FENCES OR LIKE ENCLOSURES IN GENERAL, e.g. DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, GATES
    • E06B7/00Special arrangements or measures in connection with doors or windows
    • E06B7/16Sealing arrangements on wings or parts co-operating with the wings
    • E06B7/22Sealing arrangements on wings or parts co-operating with the wings by means of elastic edgings, e.g. elastic rubber tubes; by means of resilient edgings, e.g. felt or plush strips, resilient metal strips
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor
    • Y10T156/1052Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor with cutting, punching, tearing or severing
    • Y10T156/1054Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor with cutting, punching, tearing or severing and simultaneously bonding [e.g., cut-seaming]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23907Pile or nap type surface or component
    • Y10T428/23929Edge feature or configured or discontinuous surface
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23907Pile or nap type surface or component
    • Y10T428/23957Particular shape or structure of pile
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23907Pile or nap type surface or component
    • Y10T428/23979Particular backing structure or composition

Abstract

A pile weather stripping is provided having a tape fabric of monofilament thermoplastic yarn, heat-welded along the tape edges to prevent ravelling. The weatherstrip is of the type having a central longitudinally extending woven pile area and two bare side areas for insertion into slots. The woven pile may also be heat-welded to the fabric on the back side of the tape, and the bare side areas may be formed from originally all-pile material by heat-melting and crushing flat the pile along these side areas to fuse the pile and fabric together.

Description

United States Patent 72] Inventor Robert C. Horton Rochester, N.Y. [21] Appl. No. 873,315 [22] Filed Nov. 3, 1969 [45] Patented Oct. 26, 1971 [73] Assignee Kessler Products Co., Inc.

Youngstown, Ohio [54] PILE WEATHERSTRIPPING WITH MONOFILAMENT THERMOPLASTIC BACKING 4 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 161/66, 49/475, 49/489, 156/72, 156/251, 161/86 [51] Int. Cl ..D05c 17/02, E06b 7/16 [50] Field of Search 156/72, 251; 161/66, 65, 67, 80, 81, 86; 49/475, 489

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,002,253 10/1961 Kessler 161/66 X 3,074,835 l/1963 Gordon 1. 161/67 3,285,797 11/1966 Harrison et a1. 156/72 3,468,746 9/1969 Scheier 161/86 X 3,515,623 6/1970 Bates 161/86 Primary Examiner-Robert F. Burnett Assistant Examiner--Raymond O. Linker, .Ir, Attorney-Max L. Libman PATENTEDIJB 26 I97! 3,616,137

I 1 I 1 I 1 INVENTOR Robert C, Horton ATTORNEY PILE WEATHERSTRIPPING WITH MONOFILAMENT THERMOPLASTIC BACKING This invention relates to weather strip of the pile type, similar to that shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,002,253, in which the pile material runs longitudinally of a fabric tape by which it is supported and from which it extends on the front side, leaving a substantial area of tape material on either side of the centerline for retention in a channel of wood, metal, or plastic material which forms a support and backing for the Weatherstripping. The pile material is a thermoplastic synthetic material, such as a nylon or polypropylene yarn. The pile is woven into the backing much the same way as in a woven rug or velvet material and pile height is determined by cutting and/or shearing by methods common in the art. In prior practice, the back side of the tape is usually impregnated with a suitable sizing such as polyester resin material and also serves to retain the pile fibers finnly locked in position. The above procedure may be carried out in the fabrication of this Weatherstripping along a number of parallel lines on a single sheet of material, which is then cut midway between the parallel lines of pile stitching to form the desired strips.

In accordance with the present invention, the tape fabric is made of woven monofilament yarns to achieve stiffness of the backing on pile Weatherstripping. Such yarns may be made relatively stiff and rigid, and therefore the usual backing or sizing material can be eliminated, the edges of the tape can be heat-melted to provide a well-defined nonravelling edge and the loops of the tufts may similarly be heat-welded to the thermoplastic fabric material to thus provide a durable, unitary Weatherstrip having very desirable characteristics at a very low cost. Alternatively, the Weatherstripping may be formed from a sheet of material similar to velvet or other pile fabric, the pile material being also composed of thermoplastic threads, the sheet material being slit into a number of narrow tapes and the pile material being heat-melted and crushed down onto the original fabric material at the edges, leaving a center pile as before, with two edge areas composed of the original fabric material and the flattened and fused pile material used together to form relatively rigid side areas, which is highly desirable when the material is pulled into place in a narrow groove, typically of aluminum or plastic, for use as Weatherstripping.

The specific nature of the invention, as well as other objects and advantages thereof, will clearly appear from a description of a preferred embodiment as shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. I is a transverse sectional view of an aluminum window frame provided with a pile Weatherstrip;

FIG. 2 is a transverse sectional view of one form of Weatherstrip according to the invention; and

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view of another form of Weatherstrip.

Referring to FIG. 1, a Weatherstrip consisting of a fabric strip 2 and a pile 3 supported thereby is shown mounted in a groove 4 in a typical aluminum window frame 6 retaining a glass window 7, and sliding in a groove 8 of a window frame. Since the groove 4 is relatively narrow, in order to engage the Weatherstrip, and usually fairly long, it is desirable for the tape material to be somewhat rigid, or at least not too limp, and for it to have a fairly hard surface, so that there is not too much friction when the tape is drawn through the groove in order to assemble it to the window frame 6. Both of these objectives are achieved according to the invention, as shown in FIG. 2, by making the tape material of woven monofilament fibers as shown at 11 for the weft or filler threads and 12 for the warp threads. Since these are monofilaments of thermoplastic material, they are both more rigid and less subject to stretching than the usual threads composed of a plurality of much smaller fibers twisted together. This is an advantage in the present case, as it is desirable to have the tape reasonably nonstretchable; since in assembly Weatherstripping is pulled into the groove 4 for the full length of the extrusion with which it is used, and the extrusion is then cut to length with the Weatherstripping being severed at the same time. If the Weatherstripping is stretchable, it then shrinks a considerable distance into the groove, leaving a portion of the frame unprotected by Weatherstripping. Furthermore, the hard smooth surface of the monofilament threads provides lower friction when pulling the Weatherstripping into a slot, and thus makes the assembly easier.

The pile 3 is formed from a yarn which is woven into the fabric to form a tight loop or bight on the back side as shown at 13, and is cut flat some distance from the fabric as shown at 114 so that the cut ends of the originally twisted individual fibers of cord I3 fray out to form the desired bushy pile effect. While it is possible for the material to be left in the condition shown at 13, where it is held in place merely by friction, it is preferred that the bight or loop be heat-melted as shown at I6 into a flat mass which is partially fused to the tape fabric and thus retained firmly in place, without. adding substantially to the thickness of the tape backing material. The edges of the tape are similarly fused as shown at 15 to form a strong welded edge which will not rave] and which eliminates fraying when the Weatherstripping is inserted into the groove 4i by use of an insertion machine, as is often used in this art. The plastic weld can be accomplished in any known way, such as the use of hot wires, hot blades, ultrasonic frictional heat, or any other ac ceptable production method. The pile yarn is thermoplastic material. The monofilament threads Ill and I2 need not be round as shown, but may be of any useful cross-sectional shape.

FIG. 3 shows a Weatherstrip made by an alternate method. In this case, a sheet of material is used which is originally entirely pile material over its entire face area, the pile being formed of closely spaced rows as shown at I6, I7 and I8, etc., of thermoplastic yarn similar to that described in FIG. 2, except that the entire surface of the material is initially covered with such yarn. In other words, the material employed is a pile fabric having an appearance on the pile side similar to velvet. The material is then subjected to heat and pressure along parallel lines at areas such as I9, 211 and 22 to melt and flatten the pile so that it forms a thin layer of flattened crushed pile material as shown at 23 in parallel spaced rows along the fabric, leaving spaced parallel lines of uncrushed pile as shown at 25 and 26. Although only two such lines are shown in FIG. 3, it will be understood that this can be applied to a fairly large sheet and a large number of tapes can be made simultaneously. On the bottom side of the tape, the looped portions are also melted by this treatment to form in effect, a thin layer of crushed and melted pile material as shown at 27, both layers 23 and 27 being fusably adhered to the original pile fabric 2', which may be the same as fabric 2 shown in FIG. 2. The sheet is then out along the center lines of the crushed areas as indicated by lines A-A and BB, and in this case the use of hot knives is not necessary, because the crushed and melted pile welded the backing monofilaments together, preventing the possibility of fraying.

This type of tape is generally similar to that shown in FIG. 2, except that it tends to be thicker and stiffer, which is an advantage whcre these qualities are required. Another advantage is that for a given pile height, it is common for two or more widths of stripping to be required. The present construction allows widths to be determined after weaving, thus decreasing the woven product inventory. Furthermore, accurate slitting into individual strips from a wide width is possible because the distance from one pile row to the next is more uniform than that obtained when pile rows are woven in and further affected by the application of a stiffening resin, as in the prior art construction.

Both of the above types of construction provide a tape which is lighter in weight than the prior art construction with its relatively thick and heavy backing, so that in addition to being less expensive to ship, the lower weight also reduces damage to the pile area when the Weatherstrip is scatterpacked into boxes rather than put up on reels. The tape thickness is less than a spun yarn backing, permitting a smaller aluminum groove.

mass is flattened out against the tape fabric,

h. the threads at the side edges of the tape being welded together to form nonravelling edges.

2. The invention according to claim 1, said bare side areas It will be understood that the invention is not limited to the exact embodiment shown and that various modifications can be made in construction and arrangement within the scope of the invention.

I claim: 1. a. A weatherstrip comprising b. a narrow tape fabric backing of monofilament thermoplastic threads, some extending longitudinally of the tape in the warp direction and some extending transversely of the tape in the weft or filler direction,

0. and at least one longitudinally extending continuous row of bushy tufts running along the central area of the length of the tape,

d. each said tuft comprising a bunch of short individual fibers looped through said tape to form a bight at the back side of the Weatherstrip and frayed out to form a bushy tuft at the front side of the weatherstrip,

e. each said tuft touching the adjacent tufts to from a continuous longitudinally extending mat along the center area of the front side of the tape, leaving two longitudinally extending bare side areas of the tape fabric,

. said tuft fibers being in the form of individual thermoplastic fiber threads,

. the bight of said tufts on the back side of the tape being heat-welded to each other and the tape fibers to form an adherent mass on -the bottom of the Weatherstrip, which being composed of the tape fabric with crushed and melted tufi fibers adhered to said fabric on the top side, and crushed and melted loop fibers adhered to the fabric on the bottom side to form a unitary tape mass.

3. Method of making Weatherstrip comprising:

a. providing a sheet of tufted pile material consisting of a base fabric comprised of monofilament thermoplastic threads, some lying in the warp direction and some in a weft direction, and a tufted pile of material of thermoplastic threads looped through said base fabric,

b. melting and crushing parallel, spaced elongated areas of said pile in the warp direction, leaving longitudinal rows of uncrushed pile material between said elongated areas,

c. cutting said sheet longitudinally along at least some of said spaced areas to make a plurality of individual weatherstrips each having a tufted central portion and bare edge portions of the original tape fabric with crushed and melted tuft fibers adhered thereto.

4. The invention according to claim 3, including melting and crushing the loop or bight portions of the pile on the back side of the Weatherstrip so as to adhere to the base fabric.

Claims (3)

  1. 2. The invention according to claim 1, said bare side areas being composed of the tape fabric with crushed and melted tuft fibers adhered to said fabric on the top side, and crushed and melted loop fibers adhered to the fabric on the bottom side to form a unitary tape mass.
  2. 3. Method of making weatherstrip comprising: a. providing a sheet of tufted pile material consisting of a base fabric comprised of monofilament thermoplastic threads, some lying in the warp direction and some in a weft direction, and a tufted pile of material of thermoplastic threads looped through said base fabric, b. melting and crushing parallel, spaced elongated areas of said pile in the warp direction, leaving longitudinal rows of uncrushed pile material between said elongated areas, c. cutting said sheet longitudinally along at least some of said spaced areas to make a plurality of individual weatherstrips each having a tufted central portion and bare edge portions of the original tape fabric with crushed and melted tuft fibers adhered thereto.
  3. 4. The invention according to claim 3, including melting and crushing the loop or bight portions of the pile on the back side of the weatherstrip so as to adhere to the base fabric.
US3616137D 1969-11-03 1969-11-03 Pile weatherstripping with monofilament thermoplastic backing Expired - Lifetime US3616137A (en)

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Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3946096A (en) * 1970-04-23 1976-03-23 Phillips Petroleum Company Securing a filamentous extrudate into a base material matrix at least one of which is expandable
US3953631A (en) * 1974-09-04 1976-04-27 Deering Milliken Research Corporation Dust collection mats
US3979920A (en) * 1971-12-13 1976-09-14 National Research Development Corporation Sealing means
US3982977A (en) * 1974-09-04 1976-09-28 Deering Milliken Research Corporation Dust collection mats
US3988488A (en) * 1975-01-22 1976-10-26 Inmont Corporation Leatherlike fabrics
US4055693A (en) * 1975-01-22 1977-10-25 Inmont Corporation Leatherlike fabrics
US4699818A (en) * 1984-08-14 1987-10-13 Evans Robert D Weatherstripping including method and apparatus for the manufacturing thereof
US4705706A (en) * 1986-09-16 1987-11-10 Avco Synthetic Turf Production Distribution, Inc. Tufted carpeting having stitches thermally bonded to backing
US4713130A (en) * 1984-08-14 1987-12-15 Amesbury Industries, Inc. Tufting process and apparatus for manufacturing weatherstripping
US4849270A (en) * 1984-08-14 1989-07-18 Amesbury Industries, Inc. Tufting process and apparatus for manufacturing weatherstripping
EP0330415A2 (en) * 1988-02-23 1989-08-30 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Sheet material used to form portions of fasteners
US4970829A (en) * 1990-04-13 1990-11-20 Brautigam Richard H Weatherstripping
US20010046825A1 (en) * 1999-03-03 2001-11-29 Smith Kirk D. Carpet backing components and methods of making and using the same
US6418974B1 (en) 2001-01-12 2002-07-16 Si Corporation Woven fabric using three dimensional and flat weave in combination, related methods and filter element
US20020148555A1 (en) * 2001-04-16 2002-10-17 Omega International Method of cutting and sealing material
US6475592B1 (en) 1997-04-29 2002-11-05 Darwin Enterprises, Inc. Carpet backing that provides dimensional stability
US6479125B1 (en) 1997-04-29 2002-11-12 Darwin Enterprises, Inc. Backing for tufted carpet that imparts dimensional stability
US20040258853A1 (en) * 2003-06-18 2004-12-23 Nhoconnections, Inc. Products made with strips of fleece material
US7338698B1 (en) 1997-02-28 2008-03-04 Columbia Insurance Company Homogeneously branched ethylene polymer carpet, carpet backing and method for making same
US20080095974A1 (en) * 2006-10-24 2008-04-24 Gerhard Hoffe Method of Producing a Carpet or Rug, and a Carpet or Rug Produced by Such Method
US20090094899A1 (en) * 2006-05-17 2009-04-16 David Loughney Linear Weatherstripping and Dust Plugs Having Multidirectional Flexibility
US20100170160A1 (en) * 2006-06-21 2010-07-08 Albanese James V Weatherstrip adapted to be captured in t-slots
WO2012076348A3 (en) * 2010-12-06 2012-08-02 Niaga Bv A method to produce a pile textile product and a textile product resulting from the same
US20120219751A1 (en) * 2009-11-09 2012-08-30 Kaneka Corporation Pile fabric and process for producing same
US8283017B2 (en) 1997-02-28 2012-10-09 Columbia Insurance Company Carpet, carpet backings and methods
US9051683B2 (en) 1997-02-28 2015-06-09 Columbia Insurance Company Carpet, carpet backings and methods
US20190010753A1 (en) * 2017-07-06 2019-01-10 Veka Inc. Recyclable weatherstrip sashes and frames for polyvinyl chloride windows and doors

Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3946096A (en) * 1970-04-23 1976-03-23 Phillips Petroleum Company Securing a filamentous extrudate into a base material matrix at least one of which is expandable
US3979920A (en) * 1971-12-13 1976-09-14 National Research Development Corporation Sealing means
US3953631A (en) * 1974-09-04 1976-04-27 Deering Milliken Research Corporation Dust collection mats
US3982977A (en) * 1974-09-04 1976-09-28 Deering Milliken Research Corporation Dust collection mats
US3988488A (en) * 1975-01-22 1976-10-26 Inmont Corporation Leatherlike fabrics
US4055693A (en) * 1975-01-22 1977-10-25 Inmont Corporation Leatherlike fabrics
US4699818A (en) * 1984-08-14 1987-10-13 Evans Robert D Weatherstripping including method and apparatus for the manufacturing thereof
US4713130A (en) * 1984-08-14 1987-12-15 Amesbury Industries, Inc. Tufting process and apparatus for manufacturing weatherstripping
US4849270A (en) * 1984-08-14 1989-07-18 Amesbury Industries, Inc. Tufting process and apparatus for manufacturing weatherstripping
EP0260872A3 (en) * 1986-09-16 1989-11-08 Avco Synthetic Turf Production Distribution Inc. Tufted carpeting having stitches thermally bonded to backing
US4705706A (en) * 1986-09-16 1987-11-10 Avco Synthetic Turf Production Distribution, Inc. Tufted carpeting having stitches thermally bonded to backing
EP0260872A2 (en) * 1986-09-16 1988-03-23 Avco Synthetic Turf Production Distribution Inc. Tufted carpeting having stitches thermally bonded to backing
EP0330415A2 (en) * 1988-02-23 1989-08-30 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Sheet material used to form portions of fasteners
EP0330415A3 (en) * 1988-02-23 1991-07-17 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Sheet material used to form portions of fasteners
US4970829A (en) * 1990-04-13 1990-11-20 Brautigam Richard H Weatherstripping
US8496769B2 (en) 1997-02-28 2013-07-30 Columbia Insurance Company Carpet, carpet backings and methods
US9051683B2 (en) 1997-02-28 2015-06-09 Columbia Insurance Company Carpet, carpet backings and methods
US9376769B2 (en) 1997-02-28 2016-06-28 Columbia Insurance Company Homogeneously branched ethylene polymer carpet backsizing compositions
US7338698B1 (en) 1997-02-28 2008-03-04 Columbia Insurance Company Homogeneously branched ethylene polymer carpet, carpet backing and method for making same
US8283017B2 (en) 1997-02-28 2012-10-09 Columbia Insurance Company Carpet, carpet backings and methods
US7910194B2 (en) 1997-02-28 2011-03-22 Columbia Insurance Company Homogenously branched ethylene polymer carpet backsizing compositions
US6479125B1 (en) 1997-04-29 2002-11-12 Darwin Enterprises, Inc. Backing for tufted carpet that imparts dimensional stability
US6475592B1 (en) 1997-04-29 2002-11-05 Darwin Enterprises, Inc. Carpet backing that provides dimensional stability
US20010046825A1 (en) * 1999-03-03 2001-11-29 Smith Kirk D. Carpet backing components and methods of making and using the same
US6418974B1 (en) 2001-01-12 2002-07-16 Si Corporation Woven fabric using three dimensional and flat weave in combination, related methods and filter element
US20020148555A1 (en) * 2001-04-16 2002-10-17 Omega International Method of cutting and sealing material
US20040258853A1 (en) * 2003-06-18 2004-12-23 Nhoconnections, Inc. Products made with strips of fleece material
US20090094899A1 (en) * 2006-05-17 2009-04-16 David Loughney Linear Weatherstripping and Dust Plugs Having Multidirectional Flexibility
US20100170160A1 (en) * 2006-06-21 2010-07-08 Albanese James V Weatherstrip adapted to be captured in t-slots
US8769876B2 (en) * 2006-06-21 2014-07-08 Ultrafab, Inc. Weatherstrip adapted to be captured in t-slots
US20080095974A1 (en) * 2006-10-24 2008-04-24 Gerhard Hoffe Method of Producing a Carpet or Rug, and a Carpet or Rug Produced by Such Method
US20120219751A1 (en) * 2009-11-09 2012-08-30 Kaneka Corporation Pile fabric and process for producing same
US9096047B2 (en) 2010-12-06 2015-08-04 Again Ip B.V. Method to produce a textile product and a textile product resulting from the same
CN103298994A (en) * 2010-12-06 2013-09-11 尼亚加有限责任公司 A method to produce a textile product and a textile product resulting from the same
CN103298994B (en) * 2010-12-06 2016-03-23 阿盖恩Ip有限责任公司 The method of producing fine hair class textiles and the textiles obtained by the method
WO2012076348A3 (en) * 2010-12-06 2012-08-02 Niaga Bv A method to produce a pile textile product and a textile product resulting from the same
AU2011340827B2 (en) * 2010-12-06 2017-11-23 Dsm Ip Assets B.V. A method to produce a pile textile product and a textile product resulting from the same
US10017899B2 (en) 2010-12-06 2018-07-10 Again Ip B.V. Method to produce a pile textile product and a textile product resulting from the same
US10422075B2 (en) 2010-12-06 2019-09-24 Again Ip B.V. Method to produce a pile textile product and a textile product resulting from the same
US20190010753A1 (en) * 2017-07-06 2019-01-10 Veka Inc. Recyclable weatherstrip sashes and frames for polyvinyl chloride windows and doors

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