US3613985A - Corner post - Google Patents

Corner post Download PDF

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Publication number
US3613985A
US3613985A US3613985DA US3613985A US 3613985 A US3613985 A US 3613985A US 3613985D A US3613985D A US 3613985DA US 3613985 A US3613985 A US 3613985A
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Prior art keywords
panels
panel
face
base panel
blank
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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James R Goodsite
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Westvaco Corp
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Westvaco Corp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D81/00Containers, packaging elements, or packages, for contents presenting particular transport or storage problems, or adapted to be used for non-packaging purposes after removal of contents
    • B65D81/02Containers, packaging elements, or packages, for contents presenting particular transport or storage problems, or adapted to be used for non-packaging purposes after removal of contents specially adapted to protect contents from mechanical damage
    • B65D81/05Containers, packaging elements, or packages, for contents presenting particular transport or storage problems, or adapted to be used for non-packaging purposes after removal of contents specially adapted to protect contents from mechanical damage maintaining contents at spaced relation from package walls, or from other contents
    • B65D81/053Corner, edge or end protectors
    • B65D81/054Protectors contacting two generally perpendicular surfaces of the packaged article, e.g. edge protectors
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D2581/00Containers, packaging elements, or packages, for contents presenting particular transport or storage problems, or adapted to be used for non-packaging purposes after removal of contents
    • B65D2581/02Containers, packaging elements, or packages, for contents presenting particular transport or storage problems, or adapted to be used for non-packaging purposes after removal of contents specially adapted to protect contents from mechanical damage
    • B65D2581/05Containers, packaging elements, or packages, for contents presenting particular transport or storage problems, or adapted to be used for non-packaging purposes after removal of contents specially adapted to protect contents from mechanical damage maintaining contents at spaced relation from package walls, or from other contents
    • B65D2581/051Details of packaging elements for maintaining contents at spaced relation from package walls, or from other contents
    • B65D2581/052Materials
    • B65D2581/053Paper in general, e.g. paperboard, carton, molded paper

Abstract

The present invention is embodied in a corner post construction for reinforcing shipping containers wherein the corner post comprises a plurality of panels of multi-ply corrugated paperboard or the like which panels are folded adjacent one another in face-to-face contact and secured together using an integral means which includes an aperture cut in one panel and a tab element formed from one or more of the other panels.

Description

United States Patent [72] Inventor James R. Goodsite Sandusky, Ohio [21] Appl. No. 830,001

[22] Filed June 3, 1969 [45] Patented Oct. 19, 1971 [7 3] Assignee Westvaco Corporation New York, N.Y.

[54] CORNER POST 6 Claims, 7 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 229/14 C, 206/46 FN, 229/DIG. 1 [51] Int. Cl 865d 5/50 [50] Field of Search 229/14 C, 34 HW, DIG. 1; 206/46 FN [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,932,438 4/1960 Smith 229/14 C 2,670,125 2/1954 Frankenstein 229/34 l-lW X 2,707,587 5/1955 Wittstein 229/34 2,271,265 1/1942 Kirby ..229/DlG. 1 UX 1,713,548 5/1929 Oppenheim 229/14 C X FOREIGN PATENTS 1,336,309 7/1963 France 229/14 C Primary ExaminerLeonard Summer Attorneys-Larry C. Hall and Robert S. Grimshaw ABSTRACT: The present invention is embodied in a corner post construction for reinforcing shipping containers wherein the corner post comprises a plurality of panels of multi-ply corrugated paperboard or the like which panels are folded adjacent one another in face-to-face' contact and secured together using an integral means which includes an aperture cut in one panel and a tab element formed from one or more of the other panels.

PATENTEUUCT 19 ml SHEET 10F, 2

lNVIz'N'I'r n: James R Goods/re ATT( )h N EY PATENTEUHBI 19 19?:

SHEET 2 BF 2 James R. Goods/re BY 02 w C. M AT IQRNEY CORNER POST BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF INVENTION This invention relates to an improvement and simplification in comer post construction and deals particularly with a comer post configuration having a figure 9" shape in cross section, which may be placed between a heavy appliance or the like and the walls of a container to protect the appliance during transportation and shipment.

In the packaging of heavy appliances such as refrigerators, air conditioners, driers and the like, cushioning pads are usually provided between the appliance and the walls of the container to protect the appliance from being injured during transportation and storage. One type of pad commonly used comprises a series of strips of corrugated paperboard adhered together in face contact to form a pad of substantial thickness which is sufficiently compressible to prevent injury to the appliance. Other pads take the form of foam-type rails or rigid fiberboard elements which are properly notched to conform to the contours of the product being shipped. While these pads are effective for their intended purpose, they require considerable time to assemble and use a substantial amount of material. It is an object of the present invention to provide a comer post pad capable of providing the desired cushioning effect and which is simple to produce and which is very economical to manufacture. Moreover it is an object of this invention to provide a corner post construction which serves as a spacing, retaining and stacking device in addition to its cushioning function.

A feature of the invention resides in the fact that the comer posts may be provided for the comers of the shipping container to protect the appliance and also to add vertical stacking strength to the container. When the appliance is provided with handles, knobs or other elements projecting outwardly from the surface thereof, in many cases the wall of the container must be spaced a substantial distance from the surface of the appliance itself. In such an event, the cushioning pad must be of very substantial thickness, or notched to clear the protrusions, in order to'fill the space between the appliance and the container. It was found that by folding a sheet of corrugated paperboard of multi-ply thickness, to provide a series of connected layers having a typically figure 9 shape in cross section, a pad could be economically fonned to fill the space between one wall of the container and a parallel wall of the appliance. By staggering the fold lines in the corrugated blank it became possible to form flanges, or cushioning cells in the comer post itself, for intimately hugging the contours of the appliance. The comer post was then provided with integral securing means in the panels to hold the entire structure together. A pad so formed was accordingly substantially less expensive than a pad built up of many thicknesses of corrugated board adhered together, or, than any of the other comer post constructions previously deemed satisfactory.

Another feature of this invention is the provision of a novel blank assembly for a comer post which is normally flat and which is cut and scored to be readily foldable to its usable figure 9 configuration.

An additional feature of the present invention resides in the incorporation in the blank itself of means for locking the several panels of the corner post together in its final configuration.

With the above and other objects in view that will hereinafter appear, the nature of the invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description, the appended claims and the several views illustrated in the accompanying drawing.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING FIG. I shows in blank form one embodiment of the comer post of the present invention;

FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of the completely formed comer post construction of FIG. 1 ready for insertion into a shipping container;

FIG. 3 shows a top view of the FIG. I comer post inserted in a shipping container with the article to be shipped illustrated by broken lines;

FIG. 4 shows in blank form a second embodiment of the comer post of the present invention;

FIG. 5 shows a perspective view of the completely formed corner post construction made from the FIG. 4 blank;

FIG. 6 shows a top view of the FIG. 4 comer post inserted in a shipping container with the article to be shipped illustrated by broken lines; and,

FIG. 7 shows an alternative embodiment of the construction shown in FIG. 5.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The comer post of the present invention is formed from a single sheet of foldable sheet material, such as fiberboard and commonly multi-ply sections of corrugated paperboard, that is scored, cut and folded in a specific manner further described herein. The corner post so constructed serves to function as an interpacking within a shipping container to position and retain an article within the shipping container in spaced relationship with respect to the walls thereof.

Referring particularly to FIG. I, there is illustrated a blank 10 of corrugated paperboard, or the like which is of substantially rectangular configuration and which comprises a plurality of panels I], 13, l5, l7 and 19 separated from one another by fold lines l2, 14, I6 and 18. The scored fold lines l2, l4, l6 and 18 each define the marginal edges of the post panels which are preferably folded in a particular manner to produce the cushioning cell post configuration shown in FIG. 2. It will be noted, however, that the lateral width of panels I5 and I9 is less than the width of panel 11 and greater than the width of panels 13 and 17. These panels are so proportioned so that when all of the panels are folded along their respective fold lines, panels 11 and 19 lie parallel to one another, and in faceto-face contact. Panel 15 remains substantially parallel to panels 11 and 19 being separated from panel 19 only by an amount that is substantially equal to the width of panels 13 g and 17. Further, panels 13 and I7 assume a parallel relationship with one another but separated by the width of panels 15 and 19. This final configuration when inserted in the respective comers of the shipping container as shown in FIG. 3, yields paired interior comer posts wherein the cushion cells have their internal faces 17 facing one another and spaced apart a distance which is equal to the width of the article for which the interpacking is designated to support. One of the panels lI assumes a position contiguous with one wall of the shipping container. The corner posts, when so positioned, offer protection along one face of the article equal to the thickness of the corner post blank while the adjacent face is protected and spaced from its shipping container wall by the full width of the two panels 15 and 19 which form two walls of the cushioning cell. FIG. 3 shows one end of a shipping carton 31 with the corner posts inserted to position and retain the article 32, and also shows to advantage the typically figure 9 shape of the corner post.

Referring again to FIGS. 1 and 2, there is illustrated the novel locking means for retaining the comer post in its assembled condition. Panel 11 includes a cutout 21 defined by cut lines 24, 25, 26 and 27 preferably in the shape of a trapezoid,

- although cutouts of a different shape could easily be employed within the scope of the invention. The cutout 21 in panel II is so designed to cooperate with a similarly shaped tongue member 23 partially formed from blank material in panels I5 and I? and which extends completely across panel 17. Fold line 22 in panel 19 forms one boundary of the tongue member 23 with cut lines 29, 30 extending from the extremities of the fold line 22 and joining a third cut line 28 to form the other boundaries of the tongue 23. The tongue configuration thus formed corresponds exactly with the shape of the cutout 21 in panel 11 and it is so positioned in order that the tongue 23 might be inserted in and frictionally engage the cutout 21 when the corner post panels are folded as described hereinbefore and as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3.

It will be noted that the comer post formed from the blank shown in FIG. 1 requires only a series of four simple forward folds and the manipulation of the tongue member 23 to engage slot 21 and hold the panels together. Hence the corner post can be shipped to the user in blank form for easy assembly at the point of use. The length of the panels 11, 13, 15, 17 and 19 is generally selected to be somewhat longer than the height of the article to be packed. This way the comer posts also serve to provide stacking strength to the shipping contamer.

FIG. 3 shows in detail how the comer post formed from the blank of FIG. 1 would be used in normal operation. The outer shipping container 31 could be of any desired size or configuration but would generally take the form of a regular slotted container. A shipping container of this type comprises a rectilinear body portion made up of four foldably connected sidewalls with each sidewall having bottom and top closure flaps foldably connected to the edges thereof.

In order to assemble an article 32 with corner post protection in a container such as container 31, the container would first be formed by closing the bottom flaps (not shown) thus resulting in an open top box. The corner posts in their assembled condition, having been previously folded and locked in position, would be inserted in the respective corners (two shown in FIG. 3) through the open top. The dimensions of the comer post would have been previously determined so as to fit snugly around the periphery of the article 32. The article 32 to be shipped, shown schematically in FIG. 3 would then be inserted into the shipping container 31 to be supported in a spaced relationship from the walls of the container.

It should be understood by those skilled in the art that the drawing illustrates only a preferred embodiment of this invention. If it was desired to support a particular article in an even greater spaced relationship with respect to the walls of a shipping container, then a plurality of reversely folded panels could be provided. FIGS. 4-6 show such a comer post formed by using the comer post of FIG. 2 as its basis.

FIG. 4 shows in blank form a second embodiment of the invention. There is illustrated a blank 40 of corrugated paperboard or the like which is of substantially rectangular configuration and which comprises a plurality of panels hingedly connected together. Panels 41 and 43 are of substantially the same width and are separated from one another by a cutscored line 42. A cut-score line is provided in the illustrated blank since it is preferably formed from corrugated paperboard of multi-ply thickness and when panel 41 is folded in the assembled condition, the multiple thickness makes folding along an ordinary score difficult if not impossible. Connected to the free edge of panel 43 is the remainder of the corner post blank which is substantially the same as the blank used in the FIG. 1 embodiment. Panels 45, 47, 49 and 51 are each connected along fold lines 44, 46, 48 and 50 to form the cushioning cell or flange portion of the comer post. As pointed out above, panels 41 and 43 are of substantially the same width and form what might be called the base of the corner post when these panels are reversely folded 180 about cut-score 42. Panels 47 and 51 are of approximately the same width as in the FIG. 1 embodiment and along with smaller panels 45 and 49 form that portion of the corner post cushioning cell which acts to space the article from the walls of the shipping container.

The various panels of the FIG. 4 blank are accordingly sized, so that when panels 51, 49, 47 and 45 are folded forward in the same direction, and, panel 41 is reversely folded, a comer post as shown in FIG. 5 results. In this condition, panels 41, 43 and 51 lie substantially parallel to and in face-to-face contact with one another to form a typically figure 9" configuration. In addition, panels 45 and 49 assume a parallel relationship with one another, but separated by the width of panels 47 and 51. Panel 47 remains substantially parallel to panels 41, 43 and 51 being separated from panel 51 only by an amount that is substantially equal to the widths of panels 45 and 49. This final configuration when inserted into the respective comers of a shipping container as in normal use, yields paired interior corner posts having their internal faces 49 facing one another and spaced apart a distance which is equal to the width of the article for which the interpacking is designated to support. Panel 41 assumes a position contiguous with one wall of the shipping container whereas panel 45 lies against the adjacent container wall.

The comer posts of this embodiment when positioned in their respective vertical comers, as shown in part in FIG. 6, offer protection along one face of the article as measured by the thickness of the two panels 41, 43 of the corner post blank. The adjacent face of the article is protected and spaced from its shipping container wall by the full width of the two panels 47, 51. The FIG. 6 illustration clearly indicates the amount of protection afforded to the edges of the article.

An additional variation on the FIG. 4 comer post embodiment could be achieved by redimensioning the width of panel 41 and folding it in the opposite direction to overlie panel 43 and abut against the face of panel 49. This variation would still utilize the features of the present invention and would still yield double wall protection as illustrated in FIG. 5, but the alternative folding of panel 41 would require less material and would be simpler to erect.

It was found that when panel 41 was carefully dimensioned for the alternative method, the corner post was able to hold itself together because of the frictional fit between the end of panel 41 and panel 49. This frictional fit permitted the use of only a single locking tab in the main body of the corner post in the same manner that the FIG. I embodiment was constructed. Secondary benefits derived from this alternative construction included the presentation of a smooth surface to the product and an increase in stacking strength over that obtained with the conventional FIG. 4 embodiment blank having two locking tabs. Another feature of this alternative construction was discovered when coated comer posts were to be supplied. It was found that with the alternative folding method, the corner post blank needed coating on one side only to present an all coated exterior when erected.

Referring again to FIGS. 4 and 5 there is illustrated the novel locking means for retaining the various panels of the comer post in its assembled condition. The panels 41 and 43 are shown as having cutout areas 52, 58, 64 and 70 which are adapted to cooperate with tab members and 86 cut from panels 47, 49 and 51. The cutout areas 52 and 58 of panel 41 are defined respectively by cut lines 53-56 and 59-62, and are shown to be of trapezoidal shape with their longer base adjacent the cutout areas 64 and 70 of panel 43 are defined respectively by the cut lines 65-68 and 71-74, and are shown to be of trapezoidal shape with their longer base also adjacent the cut-score line 42. This particular configuration renders the cutouts reversed with respect to one another in the blank, but contiguous with one another when panel 41 is reversely folded to lie in face-to-face contact with panel 43. Of course, the eutout shape could be changed to a different pattern if desired within the scope of the present invention. Naturally, however, the tab element shape would have to be the same as that of the cutout in order for the frictional lock to be effective.

Furthermore, in the FIG. 4 blank, two locking devices have been illustrated although one, or, even more than two could be used with varying degrees of success. It was found that due to the added thickness of the FIG. 5 comer post, as compared with the FIG. 2 post, more locking devices were needed to hold the panels in their assembled condition. Where too few locking devices were provided for, the panels tended to come unlocked, and, of course, too many locking tabs and slots weakened the comer post thereby impairing its compression strength in stacking.

The tab elements 80 and 86 are each shown as being partially formed from the blank material in panels 47 and 51 while extending completely across panel 49. Each of the tabs 80 and 86 are formed in part by cut lines 82-84 and 87-89,

respectively, which cut lines extend back to fold lines 81 and 85. The tab elements thus formed are also trapezoidal in shape and correspond precisely with the shape and position of the cutout areas in panels 41 and 43 when they are folded to lie in face-to-face contact with one another. In this manner, the tongue or tab elements 80, 86 may be inserted in and frietionally engage the cutout areas 52, 64 and 58, 70 when the corner post panels are folded as described hereinbefore and as illustrated in N68. 5 and 6.

Therefore, the corner post configuration shown in blank form in FIG. 4 can be readily shipped to the user in the flattened condition for assembly at the point of use. Only a few simple folds are required to assemble the comer post and lock it in the usable condition.

The fold lines M, 46, 48 and 50 of blank 40 are illustrated as being conventional fold lines, and fold line 42 is illustrated as a cut-score line. The reason for this distinction being the need to have greater foldability at fold line 42 than that needed along fold lines 44, 46 and 48. The panels only require a 90 fold along fold lines 44, 46 and 48 whereas a 180 reverse fold is needed at fold line 42. In order to strengthen the blank along fold line 42, there is illustrated a plurality of hinged members 75 made from an uncut portion of the blank. Each of the hinges is formed by cut lines 76 which are perpendicular to cut-score 42 and fold lines 77, 78 which are parallel to cut-score 42. Of course, the cut-score 42 and hinge members 75 would be made in the same face of the blank as the fold lines Ml, 46, 48 and 50 even though they were to be folded in different directions. It should also be pointed out that the necessity for the illustrated form of score lines is dictated by the thickness and consistency of the material from which the comer post blank is made. This would accordingly be the preferred method, although not the only method of handling corrugated paperboard blanks of multiple thickness.

It will further be understood by those skilled in the art that the drawing illustrates only two of the possible embodiments which this invention could take. If it was desired to support a particular article in even greater spaced relationship with respect to the shipping container walls, a plurality of additional panels could be provided while retaining the novel locking feature in each panel as described herein. It would also be possible to vary the spacing and heights of the article positioning cushioning cells or flanges to accommodate articles of different size and shape. Moreover, where the packaged article had a variety of protuberances, such as knobs, dials or corners, cutouts could be made in the blank to accommodate same without impairing the function of the comer post. Other details of construction could also be altered without departing from the principles of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A cushioning member formed from a blank of foldable sheet material comprising:

a. a base panel;

b. a plurality of cushioning cell forming panels, separated from one another along parallel fold lines and attached to one edge of said base panel;

0. said blank comprising at least five distinct panels including said base panel, so that the cushioning cell forming panels form a corner post when folded with said first and fifth panels lying parallel and in face-to-face contact with one another, and said second and fourth panels being parallel but separated from one another;

d. integral means formed from said panels for securing said panels together;

c. said integral means further comprising an aperture formed in the base panel and a cooperating locking tab cut from the third and fourth panels and hinged in the fifth panel;

f. said blank including at least one additional panel hingedly attached to the free edge of said base panel and folded over to lie parallel and in face-to-face contact with said base panel; and, g. said one additional panel including an aperture which IS contiguous with the aperture in said base panel and which cooperates with the locking tab to maintain said first, fifth and said one additional panels in face-to-facc contact.

2. The comer post of claim 1 wherein said corner post when folded has a substantially figure 9 cross-sectional configuration.

3. The cushioning member of claim 2 wherein said blank of foldable sheet material comprises corrugated paperboard.

ll. The cushioning member of claim 3 wherein said corrugated paperboard is of multiple web construction.

5. The corner post of claim 4 wherein said one additional panel is narrower than said first base panel and lies parallel and in face-to-face contact with the front side of said first base panel.

6. The corner post of claim 4 wherein said one additional panel is substantially the same width as said first base panel and lies parallel and in face-to-face contact with the backside of said first base panel.

Claims (6)

1. A cushioning member formed from a blank of foldable sheet material comprising: a. a base panel; b. a plurality of cushioning cell forming panels, separated from one another along parallel fold lines and attached to one edge of said base panel; c. said blank comprising at least five distinct panels including said base panel, so that the cushioning cell forming panels form a corner post when folded with said first and fifth panels lying parallel and in face-to-face contact with one another, and said second and fourth panels being parallel but separated from one another; d. integral means formed from said panels for securing said panels together; e. said integral means further comprising an aperture formed in the base panel and a cooperating locking tab cut from the third and fourth panels and hinged in the fifth panel; f. said blank including at least one additional panel hingedly attached to the free edge of said base panel and folded over to lie parallel and in face-to-face contact with said base panel; and, g. said one additional panel including an aperture which is contiguous with the aperture in said base panel and which cooperates with the locking tab to maintain said first, fifth and said one additional panels in face-to-face contact.
2. The corner post of claim 1 wherein said corner post when folded has a substantially figure ''''9'''' cross-sectional configuration.
3. The cushioning member of claim 2 wherein said blank of foldable sheet material comprises corrugated paperboard.
4. The cushioning member of claim 3 wherein said corrugated paperboard is of multiple web construction.
5. The corner post of claim 4 wherein said one additional panel is narrower than said first base panel and lies parallel and in face-to-face contact with the front side of said first base panel.
6. The corner post of claim 4 wherein said one additional panel is substantially the same width as said first base panel and lies parallel and in face-to-face contact with the backside of said first base panel.
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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3734389A (en) * 1971-04-15 1973-05-22 Inland Container Corp Package corner post
US3854650A (en) * 1972-05-24 1974-12-17 Sony Corp Cushion
US3900156A (en) * 1974-05-16 1975-08-19 Jr Alexander B Clark Corner pad
US3957196A (en) * 1975-02-19 1976-05-18 Hoerner Waldorf Corporation Corner pad
US3982682A (en) * 1976-03-04 1976-09-28 Westvaco Corporation Corner post
JPS525868U (en) * 1975-06-24 1977-01-17
US4027817A (en) * 1976-10-04 1977-06-07 Westvaco Corporation Self-locking cushioning member
US4248350A (en) * 1979-10-22 1981-02-03 Westvaco Corporation Corner post with integral lock
US4399915A (en) * 1981-10-15 1983-08-23 Champion International Corporation Machine foldable corner post
US4595137A (en) * 1985-06-17 1986-06-17 Kupersmit Julius B Reinforcing element for collapsible container
US6012587A (en) * 1998-07-20 2000-01-11 Tenneco Packaging Inc. Pallet load corner protector with locking tabs
US6082571A (en) * 1995-06-07 2000-07-04 D. J. Avery Group, Inc. Sheath-structure container and method for manufacturing thereof
WO2002102681A1 (en) * 2001-06-15 2002-12-27 Sonoco Development, Inc. Single-piece fold-to-shape protective device
US20050082200A1 (en) * 2003-10-15 2005-04-21 Robinson Jack B.Jr. Edge protector
US20050121357A1 (en) * 2003-10-15 2005-06-09 Robinson Jack B.Jr. Edge protector
US20060124641A1 (en) * 2004-11-09 2006-06-15 Karow Mark P Collapsible construction barrier
US20090065392A1 (en) * 2007-09-07 2009-03-12 Gustin Christopher M Packaging member
US9169063B2 (en) * 2012-05-29 2015-10-27 Sierra Packaging Solutions Corner boards, container assemblies including the same, and methods of making and using the same
US9511920B2 (en) 2013-07-09 2016-12-06 T & M Design, Llc Edge protector

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US1713548A (en) * 1924-09-10 1929-05-21 Ferdinand S Oppenheim Container
US2271265A (en) * 1939-05-22 1942-01-27 Hinde & Dauch Paper Co Protector
US2670125A (en) * 1948-03-19 1954-02-23 William P Frankenstein Carton
US2707587A (en) * 1952-05-07 1955-05-03 Jack A Wittstein Packing cartons
US2932438A (en) * 1956-06-25 1960-04-12 Crown Zellerbach Corp All paperboard shipping containers for water heaters
FR1336309A (en) * 1962-07-19 1963-08-30 A stuffing for packaging

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1713548A (en) * 1924-09-10 1929-05-21 Ferdinand S Oppenheim Container
US2271265A (en) * 1939-05-22 1942-01-27 Hinde & Dauch Paper Co Protector
US2670125A (en) * 1948-03-19 1954-02-23 William P Frankenstein Carton
US2707587A (en) * 1952-05-07 1955-05-03 Jack A Wittstein Packing cartons
US2932438A (en) * 1956-06-25 1960-04-12 Crown Zellerbach Corp All paperboard shipping containers for water heaters
FR1336309A (en) * 1962-07-19 1963-08-30 A stuffing for packaging

Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3734389A (en) * 1971-04-15 1973-05-22 Inland Container Corp Package corner post
US3854650A (en) * 1972-05-24 1974-12-17 Sony Corp Cushion
US3900156A (en) * 1974-05-16 1975-08-19 Jr Alexander B Clark Corner pad
US3957196A (en) * 1975-02-19 1976-05-18 Hoerner Waldorf Corporation Corner pad
JPS525868U (en) * 1975-06-24 1977-01-17
US3982682A (en) * 1976-03-04 1976-09-28 Westvaco Corporation Corner post
US4027817A (en) * 1976-10-04 1977-06-07 Westvaco Corporation Self-locking cushioning member
US4248350A (en) * 1979-10-22 1981-02-03 Westvaco Corporation Corner post with integral lock
US4399915A (en) * 1981-10-15 1983-08-23 Champion International Corporation Machine foldable corner post
US4595137A (en) * 1985-06-17 1986-06-17 Kupersmit Julius B Reinforcing element for collapsible container
US6082571A (en) * 1995-06-07 2000-07-04 D. J. Avery Group, Inc. Sheath-structure container and method for manufacturing thereof
US6012587A (en) * 1998-07-20 2000-01-11 Tenneco Packaging Inc. Pallet load corner protector with locking tabs
WO2002102681A1 (en) * 2001-06-15 2002-12-27 Sonoco Development, Inc. Single-piece fold-to-shape protective device
US6561357B2 (en) * 2001-06-15 2003-05-13 Sonoco Development, Inc. Single-piece fold-to-shape protective device
US20050082200A1 (en) * 2003-10-15 2005-04-21 Robinson Jack B.Jr. Edge protector
US20050121357A1 (en) * 2003-10-15 2005-06-09 Robinson Jack B.Jr. Edge protector
US7111734B2 (en) 2003-10-15 2006-09-26 Robinson Jr Jack B Edge protector
US7299924B2 (en) 2003-10-15 2007-11-27 Robinson Jr Jack B Edge protector
US20060124641A1 (en) * 2004-11-09 2006-06-15 Karow Mark P Collapsible construction barrier
US20060124642A1 (en) * 2004-11-09 2006-06-15 Karow Mark P Collapsible construction barrier
US7690321B2 (en) 2004-11-09 2010-04-06 Karow Mark P Collapsible construction barrier
US20090065392A1 (en) * 2007-09-07 2009-03-12 Gustin Christopher M Packaging member
US20100270368A1 (en) * 2007-09-07 2010-10-28 Gustin Christopher M Packaging member
US9169063B2 (en) * 2012-05-29 2015-10-27 Sierra Packaging Solutions Corner boards, container assemblies including the same, and methods of making and using the same
US10137657B2 (en) 2012-05-29 2018-11-27 Sierra Packaging Solutions Corner boards, container assemblies including the same, and methods of making and using the same
US9511920B2 (en) 2013-07-09 2016-12-06 T & M Design, Llc Edge protector

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