US3602181A - Outboard motor steering control - Google Patents

Outboard motor steering control Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3602181A
US3602181A US3602181DA US3602181A US 3602181 A US3602181 A US 3602181A US 3602181D A US3602181D A US 3602181DA US 3602181 A US3602181 A US 3602181A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
rack
shaft
pinion
wire
mounted
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Garrett H Harris
Original Assignee
Garrett H Harris
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63HMARINE PROPULSION OR STEERING
    • B63H21/00Use of propulsion power plant or units on vessels
    • B63H21/24Use of propulsion power plant or units on vessels the vessels being small craft, e.g. racing boats
    • B63H21/26Use of propulsion power plant or units on vessels the vessels being small craft, e.g. racing boats of outboard type; Outboard propulsion power units movably installed for steering, reversing, tilting, or the like
    • B63H21/265Steering or control devices for outboards
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/20Control lever and linkage systems
    • Y10T74/20528Foot operated
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/20Control lever and linkage systems
    • Y10T74/20576Elements
    • Y10T74/20888Pedals

Abstract

An outboard motor including a hollow casing assembly for mounting on a boat. A upstanding tubular shaft is rotatably mounted in the casing assembly. A hollow pinion is mounted on the shaft and a rack meshes with the pinion. The rack is coupled to a steering control pedal and is mounted for movement in the casing transversely of the shaft. An electric motor is mounted on a lower end of the shaft, and a propeller is driven by the motor and directed transversely of the shaft. The rack is moved transversely of the shaft for turning the direction of the propeller for steering the boat. Leads to the motor extend through the hollow pinion and along the shaft. A second pinion which meshes with the rack, carries a direction indicating pointer.

Description

United States Patent [72] Inventor Garrett 11. Harris 157 S. Denver St., Jackson, Miss. 39209 [21] Appl. No. 835,168

[22] Filed June 20, 1969 [45] Patented Aug. 31, 1971 [54] OUTBOARD MOTOR STEERING CONTROL 11 Claims, 12 Drawing Figs.

['52] U.S.Cl 114/153, 115/18 [51] Int. Cl. .Q B63h 21/26 [50] Field olSearcli 114/153;

[56] ReIerencesCited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2.545.086 3/1951 Harris 1 15/18 3,091,977 6/1963 Kiekhaefer Primary Examiner-Andrew H. Farrell Atlorney- Pearce and Schaeperklaus 7 ABSTRACT: An outboard motor including a hollow casing assembly for mounting on a boat. A upstanding tubular shaft is rotatably mounted in the casing assembly. A hollow pinion is mounted on the shaft and a rack meshes with the pinion. The rack is coupled to a steering control pedal and is mounted for movement in the casing transversely of the shaft. An electric motor is mounted on a lower end of the shaft, and a propeller is driven by the motor and directed transversely of the shaft.

I The rack is moved transversely of the shaft for turning the direction of the propeller for steering the boat. Leads to the motor extend through the hollow pinion and along the shaft. A second pinion which meshes with the rack, carries a direction indicating pointer.

FIG. 4

INVENTOR. GARRETT H. HARRIS mm? 1], i1

Attorneys PATENIED Aussl um SHEET l BF 4 INVENTOR.

. GARRETT H- HARRIS Aftornevs Briefly, this invention provides an electrically operated outboard motor including a hollow mounting assembly which can be mounted ona boat and an upright shaft rotatably mounted in the mounting assembly. The shaft carries a motor at a lower 4 end thereof having a propeller arranged to drive the boat in a direction transverse of the shaft. A pinionis mounted on an upper end of the shaft and is engaged by a rack which is mounted for reciprocating movement with relation to the mounting assembly while in mesh with the pinion. A spring urges the shafi to turn in one direction. A rack operator connected to the rack turns the pinion and the shaft in the opposite direction. The rack operator can be connected to a foot pedal whichoperates the rack. The pinion can .be hollow to receive motor leads which extend down the shaft.

A further-object of this invention .is to provide a propeller drive direction indicator rotatable with .a direction indicator pinion turned by the rack in synchronism with the motor turning pinion.

The above and other objects and features of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains from the following detailed description and the drawings, in which:

FIG. I is a fragmentary view in lengthwise section of a boat equipped with an outboard motor constructed in accordance with an embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary view in rear elevation of the motor shown in FIG. I;

FIG. 3 is a view in section taken on the line 3'--3in FIG. 2,.

electrical wiring being omitted;

FIG. 4 is a view in front elevation of the motor illustrated in FIGS. I-3 inclusive;

FIG. 5 is a view in side elevation of the motor, a fragmentary portion of the boat being shown in section in association therewith;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of an operating pedal of themotor, part thereof being broken away to reveal internal construction;

FIG. 7 is a view in section taken generally on the line 7-7 in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary view in section taken on the line 8 8 in FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a top plan view of the hollow mounting assembly of the motor with a cover plate and indicator thereof removed;

FIG. 10 is a view insection taken on the line 10-l0 in FIG.

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary view in section taken on the line 11-11 in FIG. 6; and

FIG. 12 is a schematic circuit diagram of the motor.

In the following detailed description and the drawings like reference characters indicate like parts.

In FIG. I is shown a fragmentary portion of a boat 10 having a transom board 12, a bottom panel 13, a floor panel 14 sup ported above the bottom panel'l3 and side panels 15, only one of which is shown. An outboard motor assembly 16 is removably mounted on the transom board 12. A control pedal assembly I7 can rest on the floor panel 14.

As shown in FIG. 3, the motor assembly 16 includes a mounting block 18 which is integrally formed with a split sleeve 19 (FIG. 2). The split sleeve 19 fits around and is releasably clamped to a main body sleeve 21 by means of a bolt 21 which extends through openings in flanges 21 on on the bolt 21'. The'mounting block 18 is pivotally mounted on a bolt 23 between inverted U-shaped brackets 24 and 25 which fit over the upper edge of the transom board 12. Clamping screws 26 and 27 threaded in arms of the brackets 24 and 25, respectively, engage the transom board, as shown in FIGS. I and 5, to support the motor assembly. The block 18 and the main body sleeve 21 can be held in position by a clamp nut 28 mounted on the bolt 23. A locking pin 29 (FIG. 3) can be inserted in openings 30 in the block 18 and 30' in the bracket 25 (FIG. 5) to lock the motor assembly in operative position as shown. As shown in FIGS. 3 and 10, a hollow head casing 31 is mounted at an upper end of the body sleeve 21. Screws 31', one of which is shown in FIG. 2, hold the head casing 31 and the main body sleeve 21 in assembled relation to form a hollow casing assembly. A tubular shaft 32 is rotatably mounted in bearings 34 and 36 (FIG. 3) mounted in the head casing 31 and the main body sleeve 21 respectively. A pinion 37 (FIGS. 9 and 10) is fixedly mounted on an upper end of the shaft 32 for rotation in unison therewith. A coil spring 38 (FIG. 3) mounted inside the main body sleeve 21 and surrounding the tubular shaft 32 urges the shaft 32 and the pinion 37 in a clockwise direction as shown in FIG. 9. One end of the spring 38 is anchored to the bushing 33 by lug 35, as shown in FIG. 3, and the other end of the spring 38 is anchored in a radial bore 41 in the tubular shaft 32. As shown in FIG. 3, bushing 33 is locked in fixed relation to main body sleeve 21 by setscrew 39. By rotating bushing 33 in relation to main body sleeve 21 while spring 38 is anchored in bore 41 and to the bushing 33 by lug 35 the spring can be placed under preload as desired and that load fixed by locking of bushing 33 to main body sleeve 21 through setting of setscrew 39. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 5, a motor housing 42 is mounted on the lower end of the tubular shaft 32. An appropriate electric motor (not shown in detail) inside the motor housing 42 drives a propeller shaft 42' on which is mounted a propeller 43 which is directed transversely of the shaft 32.

The pinion 37 meshes with a sliding rack 46 (FIGS. 9 and 10). The rack 46 is mounted for sliding lengthwise of a rack guide 46'. The rack is attached to an actuator bowden wire 47 which runs in a flexible sleeve 48, one end of which is attached to the head casing 31 by a clamp screw 49. Movement of the actuator wire 47 accompanies sliding movement of the rack to the left or right as shown in FIG. 9 to turn the pinion 37, the tubular shaft 32, and the motor housing 42 for steering the boat. A second pinion 51, of the same size as the first'pinion, rotatably mounted in the head casing 31 meshes with the rack 46 and is turned thereby. A pointer 52 (FIG. 10) mounted on an upwardly extending shaft 53 carried by the pinion 51 swings in synchronism with motor 42 and gives an indication of the direction in which the motor is disposed. The pointer 52 is carried above a top cover 53' of the head casing, the shaft 53 extending through an opening 56 in the top cover. A stop member 54 mounted on the rack guide limits leftward movement of the rack as shown in FIGS. 9 and I0. A stop member 55 may be mounted on the actuator wire 47 to limit rack movement in the opposite direction.

The actuator wire 47 and the flexible sleeve 48 extend from the head casing 31 through a protective sleeve 58 toward the control pedal assembly 17, as shown in FIGI, the lower end of the sleeve 48 being connected to a tubular guide 62 which is attached to a lower or floor plate 59 of the control pedal assembly I7 by a clamp 61 as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7. The lower plate 59 is provided with hemispherical legs 61' which rest on the floor panel 14 (FIG. I). A left-hand end portion of an actuator rod 63 (FIGS. 6, 7, and 8) is slidably mounted inside the tubular guide 62. A plug 63 mounted on the lower end of the actuator wire 47 also is slidably mounted in the tubular guide 62. A socket 65 in the actuator rod 63 releasably receives a head 66 of the plug 63'. The right-hand end portion of the actuator rod 63 is threaded in a pivot plug 67 (FIGS. 6 and 7), which is rotatably mounted in an arm 68 attached to a pedal supporting body 69.

The body 69 is pivotally mounted on a pivot pin 70 carried by upwardly extending lugs 71 and 72 which in turn are mounted on the lower plate 59 so that swinging of the body 69 around the pivot pin 70 causes reciprocation of the actuator rod 63 inside the tubular guide sleeve 62. A stop 73 topped by cushion bumper 73', is mounted on the lower plate 59 and limits downward swinging of the body 69 when the body reaches the dot-dash line position indicated at 69 in FIG. 7. Actuator rod 63 may be rotated in threaded engagement with pivot plug 67 to alter the effective length of rod 63 between pivot plug 67 and plug 63'. Nut 64 may be rotated on rod 63 to secure same in locked relation to pivot plug 67. By adjustment of the effective length of rod 63 between pivot plug 67 and plug 63', a limit on movement of rack 46 away from stop member 54 may be established, corresponding to the position in which pedal support body 69 comes to rest against bumper 73' on stop 73.

A foot plate 74 is pivotally mounted for limited swinging on pivot pins 76 and 76' mounted in the body 69.

As shown most clearly in FIG. 1 1, the plate 74 can engage a switch operating button 77 so that when the plate 74 is rocked clockwise as shown in FIG. 11, the button 77' is depressed to actuate a switch 77. Electric connections of the motor are shown in FIG. 12. Power is supplied by a battery 78. When the switch 77 is closed, power is supplied to a three position switch 79. When the switch 79 is in the 79h position as shown in FIG. 12, power can be supplied through wire 83 to a high speed winding 81 of the motor. When the switch 79 is in the 79! position as shown in FIG. 12, power can be supplied through wire 84 to a low speed winding 82 of the motor. Thus, by selecting the position of the switch 79, the speed of the .motor can be selected. At a central position 790 of the switch 79 (FIG. 6), the motor is turned off. From switch 77 lead 88' extends to switch 79, from which leads 83 and 84 extend through a cable 86 (FIG. which is housed in the sleeve 58, and extend through the head casing 31 down the center of the tubularshaft 32, as shown in FIG. 10, to the motor in the motor casing 42 (FIG. 1). As shown in FIG. 6, battery leads 88 and 89 can be provided with clips 91 and 92, respectively, which can be attached to terminals of a battery (not shown in detail). As shown in FIG. 9, the battery lead 89 is attached to the head casing 31 as a ground wire. The common or ground lead 89' of the motor is attached to the motor housing and grounds same to structure through which a conductive path exists to the lead 89. The pinion 37, as shown in FIG. 10, has an axial opening 91 in which an insulating sleeve 92 is mounted. The axial opening 91 communicates with the interior of the tubular shaft 32. The leads 83 and 84 extend through the sleeve 92 and downwardly along the tubular shaft 32 to the motor windings 81 and 82 (FIG. 12).

When the motor is to be used, the switch 79 (FIG. 12) is moved to either its high or low position (FIG. 6) to connect one of the windings 81 or 82 in series with the battery 78 and the switch 77. Rocking of the plate 74 about the axis of pivot pin 76 (FIG. 11) in a clockwise direction to close the switch 77 places the motor in operation. Further rocking of the plate 74 with the body 69 about the pivot pin 70 (FIGS. 6 and 7) causes movement of the actuator wire 47 accompanied by sliding of the rack 46 (FIGS. 9 and 10) back and forth for turning the pinion 37 and the tubular shaft 32 (FIG. 1) to position the motor housing 42 so that thrust produced by the motor driven propeller 43 may be directed to steer the boat.

The outboard motor construction illustrated in the drawings and described above is subject to structural modification without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by letters patent is:

1. An outboard motor which comprises a hollow casing assembly, means for mounting the casing assembly in selected fixed position on a board outboard thereof, an upstanding tubular shaft rotatably mounted in the casing assembly, an annular gear w heel tfiinion fixedly mounted on the shaft substantially coaxially erewith, a rack continuously in mesh with the pinion and mounted for movement in the casing transversely of the shaft to rotate the pinion and shaft, a motor mounted on a lower end of the shaft, power lead means connected to the motor and extending from the motor through the tubular shaft and the opening in the pinion, a propeller driven by the motor and directed transversely of the shaft, and means for moving the rack transversely of the shaft for continuous controlled orientation of the propeller axis of rotation in relation to the fixedly positioned casing.

2. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein the means for moving the rack includes a wire attached to the rack, a sleeve surrounding the wire and attached to the casing assembly, and means for moving the wire with respect to the sleeve.

3. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein the means for moving the rack includes a spring coupling the casing assembly and said shaft and urging the shaft to rotate to advance the rack in one direction, a wire attached to the rack, a sleeve surrounding ,the wire and attached to the casing assembly, and means for moving the wire with respect to the sleeve to shift the rack in a direction opposite to that in which the spring urges it.

4. An outboard motor as in claim I wherein the means for moving the rack includes a wire attached to the rack, a sleeve surrounding a portion of the wire and attached to the casing assembly, a floor plate attached to the sleeve remote from the casing assembly, a foot pedal pivotally connected to the floor plate, a crank mounted on the foot pedal, and an actuator rod connected to the crank, movable lengthwise of the sleeve and cooperating with the wire to advance the rack for turning the shaft as desired.

5. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein the means for moving the rack includes a wire attached to the rack, a sleeve surrounding a portion of the wire and attached to the casing assembly, a floor plate attached to the sleeve remote from the casing assembly, a foot pedal pivotally connected to the floor plate, means coupled to the casing assembly and the shaft for resiliently urging the shaft to turn in one direction and to advance the rack in corresponding direction, a crank mounted on the foot pedal, and an actuator rod connected to the crank, movable lengthwise of the sleeve and cooperating with the wire as it is shifted lengthwise relative to the sleeve to advance the rack for turning the shaft to place the propeller in desired attitude to propel the boat in the direction desired.

6. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein stops are associated with the rack and rack moving means to limit movement of the rack so that the rack and pinion are maintained in mesh.

7. An outboard motor as in claim 4 wherein stops are associated with the rack and the foot pedal to limit movement of the rack so that the rack and pinion are maintained in mesh.

8. An outboard motor as in claim 5 wherein stops are associated with the rack and the foot pedal to limit movement of the rack so that the rack andpinion are maintained in mesh.

9. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein a second pinion meshes with the rack and a pointer is mounted on the second pinion to indicated the line along which propeller produced thrust is directed.

10. An outboard motor as in claim 9 wherein the pinions are of equal size. 7

11. An outboard motor as in claim 1, wherein a second pinion meshes with the rack and a pointer is mounted on the second pinion to indicated the direction of the propeller.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 02 I 131 Dated August 3 91 Inventor (5) GARRETT H HARRIS It is certified that error appears in the aboveidentified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 4, line 3, "board" should be boat Column 4, line 62, "indicated" should be indicate Column 4, line 68, "indicated" should be indicate Signed and sealed this 25th day of January 1972.

Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER, JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Aliiiesting Officer Commissioner of Patents ORM PO-IOSO (10-69) USCOMM-DC scam-P69 U 5 GOVERNMENT PRINYINO OFFICE I969 0-366-334

Claims (11)

1. An outboard motor which comprises a hollow casing assembly, means for mounting the casing assembly in selected fixed position on a board outboard thereof, an upstanding tubular shaft rotatably mounted in the casing assembly, an annular gear wheel pinion fixedly mounted on the shaft substantially coaxially therewith, a rack continuously in mesh with the pinion and mounted for movement in the casing transversely of the shaft to rotate the pinion and shaft, a motor mounted on a lower end of the shaft, power lead means connected to the motor and extending from the motor through the tubular shaft and the opening in the pinion, a propeller driven by the motor and directed transversely of the shaft, and means for moving the rack transversely of the shaft for continuous controlled orientation of the propeller axis of rotation in relation to the fixedly positioned casing.
2. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein the means for moving the rack includes a wire attached to the rack, a sleeve surrounding the wire and attached to the casing assembly, and means for moving the wire with respect to the sleeve.
3. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein the means for moving the rack includes a spring coupling the casing assembly and said shaft and urging the shaft to rotate to advance the rack in one direction, a wire attached to the rack, a sleeve surrounding the wire and attached to the casing assembly, and means for moving the wire with respect to the sleeve to shift the rack in a direction opposite to that in which the spring urges it.
4. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein the means for moving the rack includes a wire attached to the rack, a sleeve surrounding a portion of the wire and attached to the casing assembly, a floor plate attached to the sleeve remote from the casing assembly, a foot pedal pivotally connected to the floor plate, a crank mounted on the foot pedal, and an actuator rod connected to the crank, movable lengthwise of the sleeve and cooperating with the wire to advance the rack for turning the shaft as desired.
5. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein the means for moving the rack includes a wire attached to the rack, a sleeve surrounding a portion of the wire and attached to the casing assembly, a floor plate attached to the sleeve remote from the casing assembly, a foot pedal pivotally connected to the floor plate, means coupled to the casing assembly and the shaft for resiliently urging the shaft to turn in one direction and to advance the rack in corresponding direction, a crank mounted on the foot pedal, and an actuator rod connected to the crank, movable lengthwise of the sleeve and cooperatinG with the wire as it is shifted lengthwise relative to the sleeve to advance the rack for turning the shaft to place the propeller in desired attitude to propel the boat in the direction desired.
6. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein stops are associated with the rack and rack moving means to limit movement of the rack so that the rack and pinion are maintained in mesh.
7. An outboard motor as in claim 4 wherein stops are associated with the rack and the foot pedal to limit movement of the rack so that the rack and pinion are maintained in mesh.
8. An outboard motor as in claim 5 wherein stops are associated with the rack and the foot pedal to limit movement of the rack so that the rack and pinion are maintained in mesh.
9. An outboard motor as in claim 1 wherein a second pinion meshes with the rack and a pointer is mounted on the second pinion to indicated the line along which propeller produced thrust is directed.
10. An outboard motor as in claim 9 wherein the pinions are of equal size.
11. An outboard motor as in claim 1, wherein a second pinion meshes with the rack and a pointer is mounted on the second pinion to indicated the direction of the propeller.
US3602181A 1969-06-20 1969-06-20 Outboard motor steering control Expired - Lifetime US3602181A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US83516869 true 1969-06-20 1969-06-20

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3602181A true US3602181A (en) 1971-08-31

Family

ID=25268790

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3602181A Expired - Lifetime US3602181A (en) 1969-06-20 1969-06-20 Outboard motor steering control

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3602181A (en)

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3797448A (en) * 1972-03-27 1974-03-19 Lowrance Electronics Mfg Trolling motor with steering means
US3807345A (en) * 1972-01-20 1974-04-30 Magalectric Corp Trolling motor steering and speed control means
US3889625A (en) * 1973-10-01 1975-06-17 William G Roller Control cable connection for an electric trolling motor
US4051802A (en) * 1975-09-04 1977-10-04 Brunswick Corporation Operating handle for pivotally mounted trolling motor
US4130079A (en) * 1977-06-13 1978-12-19 Rhorer William F Auxiliary steering control for electric trolling motor
US4195588A (en) * 1978-07-17 1980-04-01 Hudson Donald E Remote steering control for electric outboard motors
US4527983A (en) * 1983-07-27 1985-07-09 Booth Jerry N Trolling control for boats
US4565529A (en) * 1983-08-17 1986-01-21 Aertker Walter P Remotely controlled steering apparatus for outboard trolling motors
US4587388A (en) * 1984-08-20 1986-05-06 Cavin Eugene F Remote switching device for electric trolling motor
US4597356A (en) * 1985-02-07 1986-07-01 Mccaghren Charles P Boat motor control platform for use with fisherman's chair
US4631033A (en) * 1984-04-23 1986-12-23 Johnson Fishing, Inc. Outboard motor foot control with adjustable cables
US4631034A (en) * 1984-04-23 1986-12-23 Johnson Fishing, Inc. Outboard motor foot control
US4700648A (en) * 1981-03-05 1987-10-20 Trefethern George M Propelled pontoon chair
US4820208A (en) * 1988-02-12 1989-04-11 Phillips Sr Walter A Directional control mechanism for a trolling motor
GB2235519A (en) * 1989-08-21 1991-03-06 Outboard Marine Corp Apparatus for assisting transmission shifting in a marine propulsion device
US5112256A (en) * 1990-07-24 1992-05-12 Zebco Corporation Gear train of a servo-controlled trolling motor
US5171173A (en) * 1990-07-24 1992-12-15 Zebco Corporation Trolling motor steering and speed control
US5465633A (en) * 1994-02-07 1995-11-14 Johnson Fishing, Inc. Foot actuated trolling motor control
GB2293805A (en) * 1994-10-04 1996-04-10 Carl Guy Dugdale Marine steering system.
US5507242A (en) * 1995-03-10 1996-04-16 Leblanc; Brad J. Hand operated trolling motor control station
US5582526A (en) * 1995-06-15 1996-12-10 Brunswick Corporation Trolling motor direction indicator assembly system
US5606930A (en) * 1995-03-10 1997-03-04 Leblanc; Garry R. Hand operated trolling motor control station
US5797339A (en) * 1996-12-12 1998-08-25 Brunswick Corporation Optical remote control for trolling motors and method of control
US6364047B1 (en) 2000-09-27 2002-04-02 Teleflex Incorporated Adjustable pedal assembly—floating floor
US6758705B1 (en) 2003-03-28 2004-07-06 Keith D. Bechtel Foot pedal kit for trolling motor
US6962094B2 (en) 2001-01-24 2005-11-08 Orscheln Products Llc Adjustable pedal assembly
US20090042465A1 (en) * 2006-12-11 2009-02-12 John Preston Zimmerlee Dual propulsion steering and control system for watercraft
US20100273367A1 (en) * 2009-04-23 2010-10-28 Rm Industries, Inc. Trolling Motor Steering System
US20110076903A1 (en) * 2009-09-25 2011-03-31 Laabs Edward Anthony Tension sleeve system for electric trolling motors

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2545086A (en) * 1947-04-11 1951-03-13 Garrett H Harris Motor guide
US3091977A (en) * 1959-10-21 1963-06-04 Kiekhaefer Corp Outboard motor remote steering control

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2545086A (en) * 1947-04-11 1951-03-13 Garrett H Harris Motor guide
US3091977A (en) * 1959-10-21 1963-06-04 Kiekhaefer Corp Outboard motor remote steering control

Cited By (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3807345A (en) * 1972-01-20 1974-04-30 Magalectric Corp Trolling motor steering and speed control means
US3797448A (en) * 1972-03-27 1974-03-19 Lowrance Electronics Mfg Trolling motor with steering means
US3889625A (en) * 1973-10-01 1975-06-17 William G Roller Control cable connection for an electric trolling motor
US4051802A (en) * 1975-09-04 1977-10-04 Brunswick Corporation Operating handle for pivotally mounted trolling motor
US4130079A (en) * 1977-06-13 1978-12-19 Rhorer William F Auxiliary steering control for electric trolling motor
US4195588A (en) * 1978-07-17 1980-04-01 Hudson Donald E Remote steering control for electric outboard motors
US4700648A (en) * 1981-03-05 1987-10-20 Trefethern George M Propelled pontoon chair
US4527983A (en) * 1983-07-27 1985-07-09 Booth Jerry N Trolling control for boats
US4565529A (en) * 1983-08-17 1986-01-21 Aertker Walter P Remotely controlled steering apparatus for outboard trolling motors
US4631033A (en) * 1984-04-23 1986-12-23 Johnson Fishing, Inc. Outboard motor foot control with adjustable cables
US4631034A (en) * 1984-04-23 1986-12-23 Johnson Fishing, Inc. Outboard motor foot control
US4587388A (en) * 1984-08-20 1986-05-06 Cavin Eugene F Remote switching device for electric trolling motor
US4597356A (en) * 1985-02-07 1986-07-01 Mccaghren Charles P Boat motor control platform for use with fisherman's chair
US4820208A (en) * 1988-02-12 1989-04-11 Phillips Sr Walter A Directional control mechanism for a trolling motor
GB2235519A (en) * 1989-08-21 1991-03-06 Outboard Marine Corp Apparatus for assisting transmission shifting in a marine propulsion device
US5122084A (en) * 1989-08-21 1992-06-16 Outboard Marine Corporation Apparatus for assisting transmission shifting in a marine propulsion device
GB2235519B (en) * 1989-08-21 1993-09-01 Outboard Marine Corp Apparatus for assisting transmission shifting in a marine propulsion device
US5112256A (en) * 1990-07-24 1992-05-12 Zebco Corporation Gear train of a servo-controlled trolling motor
US5171173A (en) * 1990-07-24 1992-12-15 Zebco Corporation Trolling motor steering and speed control
US5465633A (en) * 1994-02-07 1995-11-14 Johnson Fishing, Inc. Foot actuated trolling motor control
GB2293805A (en) * 1994-10-04 1996-04-10 Carl Guy Dugdale Marine steering system.
US5507242A (en) * 1995-03-10 1996-04-16 Leblanc; Brad J. Hand operated trolling motor control station
US5606930A (en) * 1995-03-10 1997-03-04 Leblanc; Garry R. Hand operated trolling motor control station
US5582526A (en) * 1995-06-15 1996-12-10 Brunswick Corporation Trolling motor direction indicator assembly system
US5797339A (en) * 1996-12-12 1998-08-25 Brunswick Corporation Optical remote control for trolling motors and method of control
US6364047B1 (en) 2000-09-27 2002-04-02 Teleflex Incorporated Adjustable pedal assembly—floating floor
US6962094B2 (en) 2001-01-24 2005-11-08 Orscheln Products Llc Adjustable pedal assembly
US6758705B1 (en) 2003-03-28 2004-07-06 Keith D. Bechtel Foot pedal kit for trolling motor
US20090042465A1 (en) * 2006-12-11 2009-02-12 John Preston Zimmerlee Dual propulsion steering and control system for watercraft
US7556544B2 (en) * 2006-12-11 2009-07-07 John Preston Zimmerlee Dual propulsion steering and control system for watercraft
US20100273367A1 (en) * 2009-04-23 2010-10-28 Rm Industries, Inc. Trolling Motor Steering System
US8221175B2 (en) * 2009-04-23 2012-07-17 Rm Industries, Inc. Trolling motor steering system
US20110076903A1 (en) * 2009-09-25 2011-03-31 Laabs Edward Anthony Tension sleeve system for electric trolling motors
US7967650B2 (en) 2009-09-25 2011-06-28 Perfect Outdoor Products, Llc Tension sleeve system for electric trolling motors

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3100547A (en) Electric driving apparatus for a wheel chair
US3164838A (en) Panning and tilting mount for a camera
US5203147A (en) Lawn mower activation switch
US5361024A (en) Remote, electrical steering system with fault protection
US2235181A (en) Traffic signal
US3899852A (en) Spindle drive assembly for a surface-treating machine
US4870758A (en) Portable circular saw
US4795952A (en) Joystick for three axis control of a powered element
US3771037A (en) Solid state controller three-axes controller
US3691866A (en) Tilt steering wheel mechanism
US4752085A (en) Powered tilt steering arrangement
US3493214A (en) Electric blender
US4804809A (en) Motor operator for padmount switchgear
US4540252A (en) Side-mirror driving apparatus
US2741503A (en) Motorized locking means
US2443040A (en) Electrical duck decoy
US4654626A (en) Dimmer switch
US4005674A (en) Pivot position sensing apparatus
US4691587A (en) Steering column with selectively adjustable and preset preferred positions
US4154417A (en) Adjustable mount for trolling motor
US2586273A (en) Electrically driven hospital chair
US3598947A (en) Pedal operated control for electric fishing motors
US6468117B1 (en) Trolling motor foot control with detent
US3995579A (en) Dual motor propulsion and steering control system
US2456362A (en) Remote-control adjustable mirror