US3599524A - Nut-mount for stringed instrument fingerboards - Google Patents

Nut-mount for stringed instrument fingerboards Download PDF

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US3599524A
US3599524A US3599524DA US3599524A US 3599524 A US3599524 A US 3599524A US 3599524D A US3599524D A US 3599524DA US 3599524 A US3599524 A US 3599524A
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nut
string
displacing
strings
bridge
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Ralph S Jones
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Ralph S Jones
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars
    • G10D3/12Anchoring devices for strings, e.g. tail pieces or hitchpins

Abstract

The present invention is applicable to stringed musical instrument having movable bridge, and comprises novel means for achieving intonation selectivity string for string in the tuning of an instrument and to ensure the consistent turning thereof during operation. Essentially the system is a method and apparatus for correcting the tuning of fretted and nonfretted instruments by offsetting longitudinally individual contact ''''nut'''' and bridge supports for preselected strings a variable distance from the 12th fret or center of scale length.

Description

United States Patent 2,800,050 7/1957 Greggetal. 3,181,409 5/1965 Bu 3,237,502

Ralph S. Jones 7884X 699 2223 ////1 444 43 8888/ 4 oo rns et a1. 3/1966 Moseley 5/1969 Richards..... Primary Examiner-Richard B. Wilkinson Assistant Examinr-Lawrence R. Franklin Attorney-J. Gibson Semmes [72] inventor Hyattstown, Md. 20734 [21 Appl. No. 887,437 [22] Filed Dec. 22, 1969 [45] Patented Aug. 17, 1971 3,443,467

Continuation-impart oi application Ser. No. 722,620, Apr. 19, I968.

[54] NUT-MOUNT FOR STRINGED INSTRUMENT FINGERBOARDS 5 Claims, 13 Drawing Figs.

I ABSTRACT: The present invention is applicable to stringed 4121 idge, and comprises selectivity string for d to ensure the conperation. Essentially the system correcting the tuning of fretted gitudinaily infor preselected r center of scale 0 ""9 5 m m m m WW E m2 .MWA. 0 m2 S $mrm c "m A mm rT m m D u "N E n "c l.

m M N w mm U Mn.

84/298 length.

W 383,275 5/1888- Bowers........

PATENTEDAUGIHQYI 3,599,524

SHEET 1 [IF 4 INVENTOR 4' may s .7002? 5;.

BY semmesandsemmes ATTORNEYS PATENTEU AUG] new 3,599 .524

' sum 3 or 4 INVENTOR BY semmesandsemmes ATTORNEYS PATENTEB AUG] 71971 3, 599 ,524

saw u [If 4 INVENTOR ATTORNEY CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This invention is closely related to my US. Pat. No. 3,429,2 I4 issued 25 Feb. 1969, and is a continuation, in part, of my pending Patent Application Ser. No. 722,620 filed Apr. 19, 1968, entitled NUT-MOUNT FOR STRINGED INSTRU- MENT FINGERBOARDS. It will be appreciated that certain elements herein bear close and substantially the same construction as appear in my said copending application, but the present is a substantial improvement thereover with consequent advantages to be hereinafter described.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The field of the invention is such as to encompass any stringed instrument having a fingerboard. In the prior art, in sofar as is known, the nut for a six-stringed instrument, for example, is generally fixed a preset distance from the bridge and at the top of the scale which for a medium gauge six-stringed guitar having a 24 inch'scale would be approximately: l-l 1/32 inch.

This conventional nut, as it is called on fretted and nonfretted instruments, is generally a bar of ivory, wood, or other material, at the top end or neck of the fingerboard, and it is upon this nut that the strings rest in tension to give proper string spacing above the fingerboard. The function of the nut is not only to yield proper spacing between the fingerboard and the strings, but also to prevent the strings from buzzing during operational vibration. Additionally, the strings, are thus maintained close enough to the fingerboard so that minimum pressure is required by the player to depress the string to the frets to produce a clear note. Normally, the nut is provided with plural notches to guide and secure the strings from sidewise movement, the number of notches corresponding to the number of strings. In practice, and in tuning, friction exerted by the strings on the notches wears the notches down excessively, thereby necessitating replacement of the bar forming the nut, a critical precision job requiring a great deal of time, energy, and expense.

This tuning invention therefore is adapted to provide for change in string size to suit the variant size fingers of the user, to avoid drag on the strings of instruments having vibrato when changing tension on the strings. In practice, it has been found that when a tension greater than that necessary to create normal pitch is applied and then withdrawn to a string, there is a tendency for the string to gradually creep through the fixed nut notch. This objection is another to which the invention is directed, but the overall effect hereby is to achieve greater tuning capacity for all stringed instruments in string open or noted position.

SUMMARY The invention comprises providing an individual nut for each string which said nut is adjustable and adapted to compensate for varying diameter of string providing for said string a different position of support which said relocated position may be based upon the especial diameter of the individual string. Additionally, the adjustable nut for each string is adapted to meet variation in different sets of strings where said strings in each set may vary in composition, emanating from different sources, yielding to said strings different tuning characteristics from those previously used on the instrument in any given set. For example, the weight and diameter .of strings might vary substantially although said strings might be sold as having the same caliber and general characteristics as others.

Thus, the objective herein is to achieve true and accurate tuning of each string in open and/or unnoted position, as well as in the noted position. To obtain perfect tune at all times, one must also employ an adjustable bridge for each string, to vary the support distance thereof from the l2th fret, as will be explained more fully, hereinafter. Up to this point, string tuning error which is brought about by the variant conditions, above mentioned, has always been accepted by accomplished musicians as a natural phenomenon, the correction of which is beyond achievement through known means.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In FIG. 1, there is shown an isometric view of the neck of a fingerboard instrument, illustrating how the nut-mount combination is secured at the end of the fingerboard;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of a portion of the device shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view of said FIG. 2 device taken along the lines 33 thereof;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of modification of invention shown in FIGS. 1 through 3 inclusive;

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view of the modification of FIG. 4 taken along the lines 5-5 thereof;

FIG. 6 is a further modification of invention showing the basic concept in its broadest sense, said fragmentary top plan view being sectioned along the lines 7-7 thereof to form FIG.

FIG. 7 is a sidewise vertical sectional view in fragment of a portion of the device shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an endwise vertical sectional view of the embodiment of FIG. 6, taken along the lines 8-8 thereof;

FIG. 9 illustrates one form of nut used in the FIGS. 6 through 8 embodiment;

FIG. 10 is an alternate form thereof; and

FIG. 11 illustrates in perspective a modification of nut block having fixed displacement nut contacts;

FIG. 12 illustrates in perspective the full complement of adjustable string supports at bridge and nut.

FIG. 13 illustrates the bridge shown in FIG. 12.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to FIG. 1, it will be noted that the neck of the guitar 100 is capped with a fingerboard 112, said fingerboard 112 having first and second frets 114 and I116 respectively. The transverse phantom line illustrates the normal position ofa fixed nut on a conventional instrument and the zero point" of reference for the respective nut assemblies 120. This may also be identified as the locus of a conventional bar string nut. With reference to FIGS. 2 and 3, the transverse phantom line of FIG. 2 and vertical phantom line of FIG. 3 illustrate the center line of a conventional fixed nut. To the right or left of zero thereof, the individual nuts may be relocated as will be described more fully hereinafter.

The construction of FIGS. 2 and 3 comprises as well a plate 122 set at the terminus of the fingerboard 112 and in extension thereof, said plate serving as a fr. d mount for the tension screw 124, which screw threadedly bears in the s ing roller support 126, having roller 128 journaled thereto. The interconnected construction 130 serves as a string transverse guide, said guide extending upwardly of the instrument t. define the yoke 132 and groove 134 in which the respective strings are confined sidewise.

The actual relocation of the nuts may take place by loosening the set screw embedded in the fixed block assembly 1 8 to permit the extension of the guide 130 to move relative to said block, the positioning thereof being stabilized by the assembly 138. With reference to FIG. 2, it will be noted that the E(6) string has been tension adjusted at a plus distance from (to the left of) the phantom centerline of the normal nut; A(5) string is in tension support at a point which is at a minus distance from (to the right of) the centerline of the normal fixed nut relative to the first fret, etc. With reference to FIG. 1, it will be noted that the E(5 and B(2) strings are tension supported in alignment with the normal nut position whereas the A(5) and D( 4) individual nuts are tension supporting the respective strings at a minus distance from the first fret correlative to normal positioning of a fixed nut, etc. In practice, the proposed nut adjustments permit maximum movement from the conventional fixed one-piece nut, providing thereby a new nut position for each string on an individual bases, variable thereafter in tuning to permit for varying string calibre and/or string condition. The essence of invention thereby resides in displacing the location of the individual string nut a shorter or longer nut contact distance for one or more strings to either side of the conventional straight line defined by the conventional fixed nut (which is at a 90 angle from the aligned parallel strings). The adjustment in the example occurs from the normal computed correct position of the conventional fixed nut with respect to the first fret of the instrument, otherwise known as the distance varying from the established straight line of a string with relation to the first fret. In nonfretted instruments, other means of locating the respective nuts for the respective string may be achieved for desired intonation requirement, thus correlative to overall string length.

Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, the modification 200 includes a fingerboard 212 which, similar to the fingerboard 112 of the first modification has been cut out, short of the end of the neck to provide a position for a micronut plate, hereinafter described. In this instance, the assembly 220 includes a U- shaped plate 222, having an horizontal bore extending through its upper end, and a groove 222' extending longitudinally thereof at its lower end, said Ushaped plate being fixed to the neck of the instrument by screw means, shown. Resting upon the plate is the string tension nut yoke 226 having vertical adjusting tension means 224 passing therethrough for guided engagement with the groove 222, said yoke 226 providing axial bearing for the string roller 228 followed upwardly by a corresponding string guide assemb1y 230, consisting of the guide 232 and groove 234. In connection with the set screw 240, the guide contains a depression in its bend 238 to accommodate the end of said set screw. It will be obvious to those skilled that by turning the set screw 240 one may effect adjustment of the assembly 200 toward or away from the first fret of the instrument. For example, in FIG. 4, the 12(6) string has been tension adjusted with the nut roller 228 a greater distance from the first fret than the normal, said normal being represented by the phantom line. The A() string is shown to be at a lesser distance; the D(4) string is also shown to be at the limit of the least distance provided for tension adjustment thereof; the 0(3) string is substantially residing along but slightly greater than the normal fixed nut position, whereas the B(2) string is at a substantially greater distance in tension adjustment from and to the left of the centerline, aforesaid, and the E(l) string is in substantial alignment with the B string aforesaid.

Now, in displacing the location of the respective string nuts a shorter or longer contact distance either side of the conventional straight line of a fixed nut position, one counteracts the ineffectiveness of bridge intonation adjustment. By way of example, on a medium gauge six string guitar having a 24 inch scale, a satisfactory positioning for an E string of .01 1 calibre would be 0-3/16 inches from the fixed nut centerline; the B string being of .014 calibre would be moved in its support 3/16th inches from the fixed nut, whereas the G string being of .024 calibre would be moved inches; the D string of .035 calibre would be moved from O to l/16th inches; the A string of .044 calibre moved a distance of O /a inches; the E string aforesaid of .051 calibre again moved a distance of 0-1/l6th inches. Intonation selectivity string for string must be available through bridge movement. Thus, in effect, one achieves a unique system of tuning whereby instead of loosening the G string, the nut for the G string is moved inches forward, following normal tuning by the conventional means. Where the E" chord is not in tune, due to the G or third string being out of tune, one normally backs the G string down loosening until it notes correctly, but this then becomes out of tune when open" to compensate for this, the bridge adjustment for the G string not being found to correct the problem, instead of loosening the G string, the nut therefor is moved inches forward following normal tuning. Accordingly, the second or B string can be moved five thirty-seconds from the normal nut and the A or fifth string from 0 to A: inches therefrom.

Referring now to the species of FIGS. 6 through 10 inclusive, this is represented in assembly by the numeral 300 and consists in a neck 310 having fingerboard 312 with nut engaging slide 314, said slide being grooved at 316 to accommodate the respective assemblies 320 and/or 320', the nut for each individual string having shoulders 322 adapted to engage the grooves 316 and a groove 324 for the respective strings. The FIG. 10 modification of nut 320' includes a bore for the respective strings 350, said bore being designated by the numeral 324' and said nut being adapted to slide either in the narrow grooves formed by the nut support 314 or on a conventional instrument with the fixed nut being removed, simply sliding on the surface of the neck perse, a portion of the tingerboard having been removed to accommodate plus and minus movement of the respective nuts from the centerline, all as aforesaid and with the same consequent result.

Referring to FIG. 11, a fixed displacement nut block 400 is illustrated. Here each nut has been preset on or offset from the conventional nut centerline a predetermined distance depending upon the instrument requirements. So then, for a given instrument with strings 450 of known consistent quality and dimension, the fixed displacement system 400 of FIG. 11 will work satisfactorily in achieving the ultimate tuning objective. The elements shown are neck 410, with overlying fingerboard 412 and nut block 414 having the fixed displacement nuts 420 preset relative to the phantom centerline of the conventional system.

The full effect is best achieved by initial individual bridge adjustment, as illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13. Here the guitar included individual nut string system 120, movable bridge system 500. The element 500 comprises vertically adjustable support 520 with adjustment pins 510 engaging the anchor 600. For each string there is provided horizontally adjustable bridge support 530, movable via the loosening of set washer 524 and screw 522.

In actual tuning, the preferred sequence of adjustment of the two supports for each string relative to the 12th fret on the centerline (C/L) is as follows:

BRIDGE A. While noted, adjust horizontally each string supporting bridge until neither is sharp or flat, by lengthening if sharp or shortening if flat, at the 12th fret; properly this will adjust pitch or intonation on the 12th fret, to yield correct noted tune between 12th fret and bridge;

NUT

B. While open, tune each string to correct pitch at the respective string supporting nut; change of location of nut relative to C/L raises or lowers pitch of the string when open, but does not affect the string wln noted. Between steps A and 8 above, the strings when open will always be sharp or flat (out of tune); thus the further adjustment of B is essential to achieve the inventive result of true open or noted pitch for each string. Because of these procedures, tuning for p" formance will not create an imbalance of pitch either open 01 noted.

From the aforementioned, it will be appreciated that these and various modifications to invention may be made without departing from the spirit thereof as depicted in the following claims.

Iclaim:

1. In a stringed musical instrument comprising,

a finger board of fixed scale length, and body in extension thereof, frets fixedly positioned on said finger board, strings overlying said finger board, and at least a portion of said body, a nut adjustable longitudinally on said finger board about the conventional location of a nut on said finger board,

said nut including displacing means for each string for tuning each said string individually, and a bridge mounted upon the body and adjustable longitudinally relative to the conventional location of a bridge on said body, said bridge including adjusting means for each string for tun ing each string individually.

2. The improvement of claim 1 in which the respective displacing means are slidably retained for longitudinal adjustment relative to the centerline, each said displacing means having a channel slide disposed longitudinally of the instrument.

3. The improvement of claim 2 in which the respective displacing means slidably envelope the strings at point of contact 4. The improvement in stringed instruments according to claim 1 wherein each said nut displacing means comprises: a nut assembly located at the upper end of the scale said assembly including: individual string roller supports and corresponding guides therefor, each said support and guide being adjustably fixed to the neck of the instrument and means to vary the vertical disposition of each said roller and guide.

5. The improvement in stringed instruments according to claim 1 wherein each said nut displacing means comprises: a nut assembly located at the upper end of the scale, said assembly including individual string roller supports and guides connected to said supports, anchor means securing each sup port and guide in adjustable sliding relation to the anchor means.

Claims (5)

1. In a stringed musical instrument comprising, a finger board of fixed scale length, and body in extension thereof, frets fixedly positioned on said finger board, strings overlying said finger board, and at least a portion of said body, a nut adjustable longitudinally on said finger board about the conventional location of a nut on said finger board, said nut including displacing means for each string for tuning each said string individually, and a bridge mounted upon the body and adjustable longitudinally relative to the conventional location of a bridge on said body, said bridge including adjusting means for each string for tuning each string individually.
2. The improvement of claim 1 in which the respective displacing means are slidably retained for longitudinal adjustment relative to the centerline, each said displacing means having a channel slide disposed longitudinally of the instrument.
3. The improvement of claim 2 in which the respective displacing means slidably envelope the strings at point of contact.
4. The improvement in stringed instruments according to claim 1 wherein each said nut displacing means comprises: a nut assembly located at the upper end of the scale said assembly including: individual string roller supports and corresponding guides therefor, each said support and guide being adjustably fixed to the neck of the instrument and means to vary the vertical disposition of each said roller and guide.
5. The improvement in stringed instruments according to claim 1 wherein each said nut displacing means comprises: a nut assembly located at the upper end of the scale, said assembly including individual string roller supports and guides connected to said supports, anchor means securing each support and guide in adjustable sliding relation to the anchor means.
US3599524D 1969-12-22 1969-12-22 Nut-mount for stringed instrument fingerboards Expired - Lifetime US3599524A (en)

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Cited By (48)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4031799A (en) * 1976-01-26 1977-06-28 Fender C Leo Bridge for stringed instruments
US4506585A (en) * 1983-03-23 1985-03-26 Desmond Jean Luc Stringed instrument
US4549461A (en) * 1982-03-15 1985-10-29 Rose Floyd D Apparatus for restraining and fine tuning the strings of a musical instrument, particularly guitars
DE3417721A1 (en) * 1984-05-12 1985-11-14 Walter J Vogt Fingerboard for plucking instruments
US4669350A (en) * 1985-01-31 1987-06-02 Gressett Jr Charles A Clamping nut and method
US4798119A (en) * 1987-10-27 1989-01-17 Leifheit Eric S Fixed fingering device for fretted stringed musical instrument
USRE32863E (en) * 1983-10-21 1989-02-14 Locking nut assembly for a guitar
US5056397A (en) * 1989-12-04 1991-10-15 Leifheit Eric S Fixed fingering device for fretted stringed musical instrument
US5260504A (en) * 1992-07-06 1993-11-09 Turner William T String support for stringed instrument
US5404783A (en) * 1992-06-10 1995-04-11 Feiten; Howard B. Method and apparatus for fully adjusting and intonating an acoustic guitar
US5481956A (en) * 1994-03-07 1996-01-09 Francis X. LoJacono, Sr. Apparatus and method of tuning guitars and the like
US5522299A (en) * 1995-06-07 1996-06-04 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5539143A (en) * 1995-06-07 1996-07-23 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5537907A (en) * 1995-06-07 1996-07-23 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5542330A (en) * 1992-01-14 1996-08-06 Borisoff; David J. Multi-tuner bridge for stringed musical instruments
US5589653A (en) * 1995-06-07 1996-12-31 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5684256A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-11-04 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5689075A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-11-18 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5696335A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-12-09 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5700965A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-12-23 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5705760A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-01-06 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5717150A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-02-10 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5750910A (en) * 1994-03-07 1998-05-12 Francis X. LoJacono, Sr. Apparatus and method for tuning guitars
US5814745A (en) * 1992-06-10 1998-09-29 Feiten; Howard B. Method and apparatus for fully adjusting and intonating stringed, fretted musical instruments, and making adjustments to the rule of 18
US5955689A (en) * 1996-08-15 1999-09-21 Feiten; Howard B. Method and apparatus for fully adjusting and providing tempered intonation for stringed, fretted musical instruments, and making adjustments to the rule of 18
US6069306A (en) * 1999-03-01 2000-05-30 Gibson Guitar Corp. Stringed musical instrument and methods of manufacturing same
US6184450B1 (en) 1998-09-02 2001-02-06 Leblanc Curtis Robert Universal, multi-position, tuning mechanism and bridge for stringed musical instruments
WO2001080216A1 (en) * 2000-04-13 2001-10-25 Bre Produktion Ab Device for string instruments
US20030177883A1 (en) * 2002-01-11 2003-09-25 Rose Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed musical instruments
US20040159204A1 (en) * 2002-01-11 2004-08-19 Rose Floyd D. Removable nut assembly, methods and kits for stringed musical instruments
US20050155479A1 (en) * 1996-08-15 2005-07-21 Feiten Howard B. Method and apparatus for fully adjusting and providing tempered intonation for stringed, fretted musical instruments, and making adjustments to the rule of 18
US20080011147A1 (en) * 2005-06-28 2008-01-17 Caldwell Marcus Guitar bridge apparatus
US20100175534A1 (en) * 2009-01-14 2010-07-15 Mccabe Geoffrey L Fine tuning means for fulcrum tremolo
US20100236376A1 (en) * 2008-09-02 2010-09-23 Decker Gregory S Intonated nut with locking mechanism for musical instruments and methods of use
US8294012B1 (en) 2009-03-23 2012-10-23 Walter Neil Garrick Method and apparatus for adjusting nut of stringed instrument
US20140216230A1 (en) * 2012-11-29 2014-08-07 Gibson Brands, Inc. Adjustable Zero Fret and Method of Use on a Stringed Instrument
US9123312B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2015-09-01 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tuning mechanisms
US20150248875A1 (en) * 2013-11-27 2015-09-03 Gibson Brands, Inc. Adjustable Zero Fret and Method of Use on a Stringed Instrument
US20160063970A1 (en) * 2011-07-18 2016-03-03 Modern Vintage Technology, LLC Stringed Instrument System
US9484007B1 (en) 2015-11-18 2016-11-01 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tremolo stop tuner and tremolo stabilizer
US9595245B2 (en) 2015-04-28 2017-03-14 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Locking bearing mechanisms for fulcrum tremolo
USD788211S1 (en) * 2014-06-05 2017-05-30 Stonefield International Limited Stringed instrument tailpiece tuner
US9734804B1 (en) 2015-10-11 2017-08-15 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Drop tuner for fulcrum tremolo
US9847076B1 (en) 2016-10-18 2017-12-19 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tremolo spring and stabilizer tuner
US9959845B2 (en) 2014-10-07 2018-05-01 Gregory Scott Decker Locking intonated string nut with tuner mount for stringed musical instruments and methods of use
US10586517B2 (en) * 2018-05-25 2020-03-10 Jay S. DICKINSON Intonation system for stringed instruments
US10607580B2 (en) * 2018-05-25 2020-03-31 Jay S. Dicksinson Intonation system for stringed instruments
US10643587B1 (en) 2019-06-24 2020-05-05 Mccormick Lance Fulcrum tremolo claw lock resonator

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US3181409A (en) * 1961-12-06 1965-05-04 Ormston Burns Ltd Bridges for stringed instruments such as for guitars
US3237502A (en) * 1964-05-11 1966-03-01 Semie A Moseley Stringed musical instrument
US3429214A (en) * 1966-06-02 1969-02-25 Micro Frets Corp Nut-mount for fingerboards
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Cited By (64)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4031799A (en) * 1976-01-26 1977-06-28 Fender C Leo Bridge for stringed instruments
US4549461A (en) * 1982-03-15 1985-10-29 Rose Floyd D Apparatus for restraining and fine tuning the strings of a musical instrument, particularly guitars
US4506585A (en) * 1983-03-23 1985-03-26 Desmond Jean Luc Stringed instrument
USRE32863E (en) * 1983-10-21 1989-02-14 Locking nut assembly for a guitar
DE3417721A1 (en) * 1984-05-12 1985-11-14 Walter J Vogt Fingerboard for plucking instruments
US4620470A (en) * 1984-05-12 1986-11-04 Vogt Walter J Fingerboard for stringed instruments
US4669350A (en) * 1985-01-31 1987-06-02 Gressett Jr Charles A Clamping nut and method
US4798119A (en) * 1987-10-27 1989-01-17 Leifheit Eric S Fixed fingering device for fretted stringed musical instrument
US5056397A (en) * 1989-12-04 1991-10-15 Leifheit Eric S Fixed fingering device for fretted stringed musical instrument
US5542330A (en) * 1992-01-14 1996-08-06 Borisoff; David J. Multi-tuner bridge for stringed musical instruments
US5404783A (en) * 1992-06-10 1995-04-11 Feiten; Howard B. Method and apparatus for fully adjusting and intonating an acoustic guitar
US5600079A (en) * 1992-06-10 1997-02-04 Feiten; Howard B. Method and apparatus for fully adjusting and intonating an acoustic guitar
US5814745A (en) * 1992-06-10 1998-09-29 Feiten; Howard B. Method and apparatus for fully adjusting and intonating stringed, fretted musical instruments, and making adjustments to the rule of 18
US5728956A (en) * 1992-06-10 1998-03-17 Feiten; Howard B. Method and apparatus for fully adjusting and intonating an acoustic guitar
USRE36484E (en) * 1992-07-06 2000-01-11 Intertune, Inc. String support for stringed instrument
US5260504A (en) * 1992-07-06 1993-11-09 Turner William T String support for stringed instrument
US5750910A (en) * 1994-03-07 1998-05-12 Francis X. LoJacono, Sr. Apparatus and method for tuning guitars
US5481956A (en) * 1994-03-07 1996-01-09 Francis X. LoJacono, Sr. Apparatus and method of tuning guitars and the like
US5696335A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-12-09 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5689075A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-11-18 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
US5684256A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-11-04 Rose; Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed instruments
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