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Opposed blade coater

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US3575134A
US3575134A US3575134DA US3575134A US 3575134 A US3575134 A US 3575134A US 3575134D A US3575134D A US 3575134DA US 3575134 A US3575134 A US 3575134A
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Prior art keywords
web
coating
blades
blade
coated
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Richard J Quint
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Oxford Paper Co
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Oxford Paper Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21HPULP COMPOSITIONS; PREPARATION THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES D21C OR D21D; IMPREGNATING OR COATING OF PAPER; TREATMENT OF FINISHED PAPER NOT COVERED BY CLASS B31 OR SUBCLASS D21G; PAPER NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D21H25/00After-treatment of paper not provided for in groups D21H17/00 - D21H23/00
    • D21H25/08Rearranging applied substances, e.g. metering, smoothing; Removing excess material
    • D21H25/10Rearranging applied substances, e.g. metering, smoothing; Removing excess material with blades
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21HPULP COMPOSITIONS; PREPARATION THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES D21C OR D21D; IMPREGNATING OR COATING OF PAPER; TREATMENT OF FINISHED PAPER NOT COVERED BY CLASS B31 OR SUBCLASS D21G; PAPER NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D21H5/00Special paper or cardboard not otherwise provided for
    • D21H5/0005Processes or apparatus specially adapted for applying liquids or other fluent materials to finished paper or board, e.g. impregnating, coating
    • D21H5/006Controlling or regulating
    • D21H5/0062Regulating the amount or the distribution, e.g. smoothing, of essentially fluent material already applied to the paper; Recirculating excess coating material applied to paper
    • D21H5/0065Regulating the amount or the distribution, e.g. smoothing, of essentially fluent material already applied to the paper; Recirculating excess coating material applied to paper with blades

Abstract

An opposed blade coating system for simultaneously coating the opposite sides of a paper web, the system including an applicator for applying coating material to the opposite sides of the web, a flexible blade unit comprised of a pair of blades having flat beveled working surfaces engaging opposite sides of the coated web in opposed relationship with each other for metering the layer of coating on the opposite sides of the web, and drying mechanism for thereafter drying the coated web.

Description

United States Patent Inventor Appl. No.

Filed Patented Assignee OPPOSED BLADE COATER 11 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl.....

Int. Cl Field of Search 118/122 B05c 11/02 1 18/121, 122, 227, 413, (Digest); 15/2565 References Cited UNYTED STATES PATENTS 4/1930 Seidell et a1.

Primary Examiner.lohn P. McIntosh Attorney-Pennie, Edmonds, Morton, Taylor and Adams ABSTRACT: An opposed blade coating system for simultaneously coating the opposite sides of a paper web, the system including an applicator for applying coating material to the opposite sides of the web, a flexible blade unit comprised of a pair of blades having flat beveled working surfaces engaging opposite sides of the coated web in opposed relationship with each other for metering the layer of coating on the opposite sides of the web, and drying mechanism for thereafter drying the coated web.

Famed April13f1971 1 3,515,134

3 Sheets-Sheet 1 HIIHIII 1 I "mum! I f L I "mm 7 I l 4 INVENTOR.

I Richard J. Quint ATTORNEYS Patented April 13, 1971 s sheets-sheet '2 INVENTOR. Richard J. Quint BY%""*2' 11.."

ATTORNEYS- Patented April 13, 1971 FIG. 6

Increasing Coot Weight 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Increasing Pressure FIG. '5

l8 '7 JNVEN TOR.

BY Richard J. Quint ATTORNEYS I OPPOSED BLADE COATER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field .of the Invention This invention pertains to paper web coating systems and more particularly to a coating system for simultaneously coating the opposite sides of the paper web.

2. Description of the Prior Art 1n the production of paper, it is often desirable to apply a coating to the opposite sides of the paper when it is in web form and before cutting into sheets. Different types of coating apparatus are available for producing such coated web; however, presently available equipment is not altogether satisfactory as far as efficiency and versatility of the machinery and the quality of the coated paper is concerned. A primary source of difficulty in obtaining quality coated paper with presently available equipment resides in the mechanism used for doctoring the layer of coating as applied to the paper. Desirably, the coating on the final product should completely cover the paper fibers on both sides of the web and be uniform in thickness and coat weight throughout. Also, depending on the type of base sheet being run through the coating apparatus and the particular characteristics desired in the final product, different coating materials having varying properties will be required. With presently available coating apparatus, the conventionally constructed doctoring mechanisms impose various limitations on both the operating versatility and efficiency of the equipment and the products which it is capable of producmg.

1n the typical size press, for example, the thickness of the coating is controlled by passing the web between a pair of rotating doctor rolls. These rolls, which are relatively large in size so as to withstand the pressure created and to present an even nip for the incoming paper, create certain forces acting on the liquid coating material tending to disrupt the evenness of the final coating on the web. More particularly, the coating tends to neck down and stay with the rolls as the web exits therefrom to produce what is called a film split pattern. This action is more prevalent when higher coat weights are applied to the web; and in order to produce a quality coating of the web, the coat weight of the coating has to be kept relatively low. As a practical matter, these coat weights are not greater than 4 or 5 pounds per ream on each side of the paper; with attempts to attain higher coat weights resulting in unacceptable coatings having uneven thickness and surface patterns. Even with these coat weights of 4 to 5 pounds, some substantial amount of the coating material on the final product will be impregnated into the paper rather than adhered to its surfaces. This is due to the pressure created on the coated paper by the doctor rolls. Because of this, coated paper produced in a size press will not be of the same high quality as would be a coated paper with the same coat weight but with the coating material substantially all adhered to the surfaces of the paper.

Also, because of the large size of the doctor rolls typically employed in a size press, the speed at which these rolls are driven and thus, the speed at which the web can be fed through the machinery is limited. In a conventional size press,

the maximum acceptable speed of the web is about 1,200 ft. per minute. Higher speeds of the web create problems in properly applying the coating to the web, with the doctor rolls tending to cause splattering of the coating material.

In addition to these limitations as to coat weight and web speed, size press units are usually best suited for coating paper webs with coating materials having no more than about 45 percent solids content. With higher solids content, more undesirable coating patterns are produced on the final product. The above-discussed operating characteristics of the conventional size press limit its versatility and thus the variety of coated paper products capable of being produced thereby.

1n the conventional blade coating apparatus employing a steel doctor blade for scraping off excess coating, the coating of the opposite sides of the web is effected in two successive single coating operations. This, in turn, requires that the web that considerable area be provided for installation of the necessary equipment. Also, the operating versatility of such equipment is not completely satisfactory. For example, such equipment is only suited for operating at web speeds above 600 to 800 ft. per minute and usually at speeds above 1,000 ft. per minute. In some coating applications, however, it is desirable to run the web through the coater at speeds below these values. These lower speeds may, for example, be found desirable with certain coating materials in order to produce a quality coating. With the conventional blade coating apparatus using a steel trailing blade, speeds much lower than 1,000 ft. per minute result in lower quality than that obtained at speeds over 1,000 ft. per minute since at these lower speeds, the conventional blade coater cannot effectively control the coat weight of the coating.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the teachings of the present invention, there is provided a coating apparatus having a wider operating range than conventional devices. More particularly, with applicants coating system, web speeds in excess of 1,400 ft. per minute and web speeds below 600 ft. per minute may be used to thus permit the selection of a wider range of base sheets and coating materials. In addition, generally higher coat weights may be applied to opposite sides of the web than with conventional equipment, and coating materials having a wider range of solids content of pigment and adhesive may be used. For example, higher coat weights may be applied at lower solids content than is possible with conventional coating apparatus. By being able to use coating materials having varying characteristics and properties and by being able to selectively change the operating conditions of the coater, a wider range of high quality coated products can be produced.

Generally, the coating apparatus employed with applicants coating system include suitable means for applying a layer of coating to the opposite sides of the web, feeding means for feeding the coated web away from the coating station and through a metering station, and a drying station through which the web is then fed to dry the coating. in the metering station, there is provided a pair of metering blades engaging against the opposite sides of the coated web; and in accordance with the teachings of the present invention, these metering blades are constructed of flexible material and are each provided with a flat beveled working surface for engagement with the coated web. The blades themselves extend freely from a support means on opposite sides of the web and at an acute angle relative to the movement of the web therebetween. This angle of extension or head angle of the blades and the angle of bevel of the individual blades is so chosen that positioning of the blades in opposed relationship with each other will cause their beveled working surfaces to oppose each other and establish at least a partially flush engagement along their beveled surfaces with the opposite sides of the coated web.

As compared to conventional coating apparatus where the doctoring mechanisms have a more or less line contact or at best a very limited area of contact with the coated web, the flat beveled working surfaces of the opposed metering blades of the present invention engage against the opposite sides of the coated paper over a substantial area thus decreasing the pressure needed to effect a proper control of the coating ap plication. Accordingly, the opposed blades of the present invention function to actually meter and smooth the layer of coating applied to the opposite sides of the paper rather than to merely remove excess coating with a scraping action. In addition, the construction and orientation of the opposed blades are such as to minimize wearing thereof and thereby increase their operating life to about four times that of the steel doctor blades used in conventional blade coating apparatus. Also, with the present invention, the coating is advantageously applied to the opposite surfaces of the paper without the undesirable impregnation of the coating material into the paper as occurs with conventional coating apparatus.

Generally, a higher quality coated paper can be produced with the coating system of the present invention; and by controlling such variables as the amount of extension and the angle of extension of the blades and by using blades having different flexing characteristics and beveled working surfaces and by varying the pressure urging the blades against the opposite sides of the web, a wide variety of high quality coated paper may be produced under selected operating conditions of the apparatus.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevation of the improved coating system of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the opposed blade doctor mechanism shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of one of the doctor blades shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of a pair of opposed doctor blades of the present invention showing their relative positioning with respect to the coated web; 1.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the blade holder shown in FIG. 2; and

FIG. 6 is a graph representing the affect of certain variables on the coat weight of the coated paper produced with the coating system of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As shown in FIG. 1, the coating apparatus of the present invention generally includes a coating station I having a pair of applicator rolls 2 for applying coating material to opposite sides of the web being fed therebetween. The rolls 2 are rotatably mounted in associated troughs 3 in which the coating material to be applied to the web is contained. The web of paper to be coated, designated at 4, is supplied from a supply roll 5 rotatably mounted on suitable means, not shown. As the web is fed from the supply roll, it is initially directed around a guide roll 6 and fed in an upward, vertical direction through the coating station. A metering station 7 is disposed above the coating station 1; and above this, there is a drying station 8 having suitable drying devices such as infrared burner units 9 and steam can dryers, one of which is shown at 9'. For feeding the web through the coating apparatus, the steam can dryers are advantageously driven by a suitable motor, not shown.

In accordance with the teachings of the present invention, an improved metering mechanism is provided for metering the coating material applied to the web. As most clearly seen from FIG. 2, the improved metering mechanism of the present invention is constructed for operation under various positions of adjustment. More particularly, this mechanism includes a pair of opposed metering blades 10 for engaging against the opposite sides of the coated web, blade holders 11 for clamping the blades at a point rearwardly of their free working ends, slidable carriages 12 for mounting the blade holders in selected angular positions, and pneumatic piston-cylinder units I3 for urging the metering blades into selected opposed engagement with the coated web.

The presently preferred blade holders 1], one of which is shown in FIG. 5, include opposed clamping members 14, I5 extending the length of the blades across the web to be coated. The clamping members provide a hollow interior in which a blade cartridge 16 is removably disposed; and the cartridge itself is constructed of two halves removably connected together by suitable means (not shown) for holding the blade 10 therein. In order to assure an accurate, parallel alignment of the blades 10 with the coated web and to compensate for any irregularities in this alignment that may be caused due to the clamping members. the blades 10 are resiliently rather than rigidly mounted in their associated cartridges and in spaced relationship relative to the walls 14' and 15 of the clamping members I4 and 15. In the presently preferred construction, the resilient mounting of the blade within the clamping members and cartridge is accomplished by providing an insert 17 of the same flexible material as is used for the blade; this insert being positioned on the side of the blade facing the coated web to be metered. Therefore, upon engagement of the blade with the coated side of the web and flexing thereof as more fully described below, the rear end of the blade will tend to become bowed into the flexible insert and the surface of the blade facing away from the coated web will move into nonrigid engagement with the edge of the blade clamping member 15 at the outer extent of its wall surface 15'. With this construction, the opposed blades will present substantially parallel surfaces engaging opposite sides of the coated web and thereby produce an even metering and smoothing of the coating on the paper.

A further advantage of the blade holder as shown in FIG. 5 resides in the construction of the cartridge unit 16. As indicated above, the cartridge is removably positioned in the hollow interior of the clamping members. Thus, the blades may be secured to the cartridge at a point remote from the coating apparatus and be ready for quick placement within the clamping members when it is desired to change blades because of wear or to substitute a blade of different construction for a particular coating operation. In addition, the cartridge is provided with a plurality of shims 18, 18' at the ends of the insert with with the shims 18' supporting the rear end of the blade. With this construction, a blade having a worn working surface may be reground and reinserted into the cartridge with the same length of extension from the blade clamping members as the length of extension of the original, new blade. This is readily effected by removing one or more of the shims l8 and adding a corresponding number of shims 18' of the same thickness. Also, the inclusion of these shims I8, 18' provides a convenient means by which the blade extension of any blade, new or reground, may be adjusted accurately within a limited range.

For permitting adjustment of the angle of extension or head angle of the opposed blades relative to the web passing through the metering station, the base of each blade holder 11 is rotatably secured to a support shaft 19 about which it may be rotated. The angular position of the blade holders is controlled by a pair of adjusting screws 20, each of which is pivoted to an upstanding support assembly 21 of one of the carriages l2 and threadedly received through an ann member 22 fixed to the base of the blade holder associated with the carriage. Accordingly, rotation of the screws will cause an angular adjustment of the blade holders; and for indicating the angle of extension at which the blades are set, suitable scales 23 are provided.

For setting the metering blades in opposed engagement with the coated web, the carriages 12 are moved horizontally along guide tracks 24 on which they are slidably mounted. Movement of the carriages is, in turn, controlled by the pneumatic piston-cylinder units 13 to which they are attached. Adjustable stop members 25 are provided so that once a particular angular setting for the blades has been determined, these stops may be positioned in the appropriate location along the tracks 24 to accurately align the blades relative to the path of movement of the web through the metering station.

In accordance with the teachings of the present invention, the metering blades 10 are constructed of flexible material. A material found admirably suited for this purpose is polyurethane such as that manufactured under the trade name ISOTHANE by the Carborundum Company. This material is of medium softness having a durometer hardness of 95 Shore A and a P & J (Pusey and Jones) plastometer value of 20. Other polyurethanes such as the harder polyurethane having a durometer hardness of 70 Shore D and a P & J plastometer value of 4 and the softer polyurethane having a durometer hardness of Shore A and a P & J plastometer value of 27 have also been found suitable especially where one of these blades is used in combination with a polyurethane blade of medium softness. Further properties of these polyurethanes are set out in Table I, below.

of the coated web, there is a component of force produced which is in a direction extending along the path of movement of the web; and therefore, the resultant'forc acting on either side of the coated web is in a direction extending at an acute TABLE l.-SPECIFICATIONS OF POLYURETHANE MATERIAL In addition to these polyurethane materials, such materials as Nylon, Teflon and polyethylene having operating characteristics equivalent to those of the polyurethane, as more fully described below, are suitable for use as metering blades in the present invention. Also, certain rubber materials may be suitable although generally rubber would not have the same long wearing properties as polyurethane.

In constructing the metering blades for use in the coating system of the present invention, different angles of bevel ranging from 30 to 50 and different thicknesses ranging from A to 9% inch have been found suitable. In FIG. 3, the presently preferred construction of a polyurethane blade having a durometer hardness of 95 Shore A is shown. The thicknessof the blade is inch and the angle of bevel of the working surface is 40. In addition, the blade is provided with a back surface 27 adjacent the leading edge of its working surface 26. This back surface has a total area which is a small fraction of the area of the working surface and is formed by tapering back the leading edge of the working surface at an angle of about 90 or 95. An alternative construction of the back surface of the blade is shown in dotted lines in FIG. 3. Here the back surface is divided into two segments 27 and 27". The particular construction chosen will depend mainly on the thickness of the blade. The creation of this back surface increases the thickness of the blade at the leading edge of the working surface, thus lessening imperfection due to wear along this edge and improving the coating characteristics of the web. A blade having a working surface with a thin feathered edge, as opposed to the blunt tip construction shown in FIG. 3, may tend to be too flexible and therefore nonresponsive to pressure variations urging the blades against opposite sides of the web. Also, such thin edges on the working surfaces of. the opposed blades tend to vibrate as the web is fed therebetween and wear rapidly to produce a ragged contour and thus an irregular coating pattern.

In fixing the opposed blades in opposed working operation, the angle of extension of each blade, that is, the angle at which it extends from the blade holder as measured from the vertical path along which the web moves, is set at a value greater than the angle of bevel of its working surface so as to effect an initial toe-to-toe engagement of the blades with opposite sides of the coated web. With the blade construction of FIG. 3, the angles of extension ranging from above 40 to about 60 have been found suitable. Preferably, the amount of extension of the blades is between /1 inch and 1% inches.

As shown in FIG. 4, the blades are urged toward each other with a force sufficient to cause flexing thereof and to thus bring their working surfaces into at least a partially flush engagement with the opposite sides of the coated web. The amount of flexing is controlled by the setting of the stops 25 and the'setting of the pressure exerted by the two pneumatic piston-cylinder devices 13. Suitable pressure settings for producing the desired amount of flush contact of the blades with the coated web have been found to range from about 8 to 3O p.s.i. gauge. The pressure exerted by the pneumatic pistoncylinder devices is in the horizontal direction. Due to the flexing of the blades, however, as they engage the opposite sides,

angle to the path of movement of the web.

In setting the coating apparatus of the present invention for operation, there are two ultimate factors which can be varied by adjustment of the flexible opposed blade unit to vary the coat weight of the final product, these being the area of flush contact of the working surfaces of the blades with the opposite sides of the coated paper and the pressure per unit area exerted by these working surfaces against the opposite sides of the paper. These two ultimate factors are, in turn, dependent on certain secondary characteristics of the blade unit, namely the blade material, blade thickness, amount of blade extension, angle of blade extension and air cylinder pressure provided by the units 13.

Generally, an increase in air cylinder pressure causes the opposed blades to deflect. This deflection brings the blade bevels from toe-to-toe position towards flush position and thus increases the area of blade coming in contact with the web. The increase in air cylinder pressure tends to decrease the coat weight while the simultaneous increase in surface area of the blade contact with the web tends to increase coat weight. The actual coat weight obtained is the resultant of these two effects. When the flush position is reached, further increase in pressure'decreases the area of contact because it moves from flush to a heel-to-heel contact and away from the toe. FIG. 6 shows the affect of area of contact and pressure on the final coat weight of the paper. The line ABC represents the drop in coat weight with increase in air cylinder pressure if the area of blade contact with the web would have remained constant. The graph AEFG shows the increase in coat weight due to increase in area of contact with the web if the air pressure would have remained constant. AHJ K represents the resultant curve representing the resultant coat weight against air pressure.

When the bevels of the blades approach a full flush position, the rate of increase in area of contact with the web increases at a higher rate than a unit increase in air pressure and thus the curve AEFG is shallower first and it becomes increasingly steep. When the full flush position is reached, the further increase in air pressure causes the blades to ride on the heel only with subsequent reduction in contact area with the web and thus the graph FG is shown dropping back. The rate of decrease in coat weight due to increase in pressure remains constant while the rate of change in coat weigh due to the change in contact area of bevels does not remain constant,

and thus the resultant curve AHJK.

Thick blades or lower blade extension or higher head angles (i.e. angle between the head and the vertical web) or combinations of all three gives lower blade flexibility and the shape of the curve AEFG will be replaced by curve ALMN, which is shallower for a wide range of air pressures and thus the new resultant coat weight decreases for a wider range of pressures. Thinner blades, higher extensions and lower head angles tend to give the curve APQR in place of curve AEFG. In this case, the area of contact with paper increases very rapidly and the heels are reached at lower air pressures. In a coating operation, the blades may be set anywhere between toe-totoe and heel-to-heel relationship. Generally, with coatthe final product can be varied by changing the solids content of the coating material and the speed at which the web is run through the opposed metering blades.

Representative results of tests run under various operating conditions of the coating apparatus of the present invention are set out in Table ll and Table III below. The coat weights are a measurement of the coating on both sides of the paper and are given in pounds per book paper ream of 500 sheets of inches X 38 inches. Also, the blade materials in Table III are designated by letters S. M, H and PE; with S representing the soft polyurethane 9O Shore A, M representing the medium soft polyurethane 95 Shore A, H representing the hard polyurethane 70 Shore D, and PE representing polyethylene.

ing materials having higher solids content. less area of contact is required to produce a given coat weight. Here, the blades would be near a toe-totoe relationship. Conversely. with coatings having lower solids content. the opposed blades would be set nearer a full flush engagement with the opposite sides of the coated paper to produce a given coat weight.

By selecting blades having particular physical characteristics and by selecting different operating conditions for the m blade unit, a wide range of coated products having coat weight characteristics superior to the products of conventional coating apparatus can be produced. in addition, the coat weight of TABLE II.EFFECT OF DIFFERENT VARIABLES ON COAT WEIGHT WITH TWO POLY- URETHANE BLADES HAVING SAME DUROMETER HARDNESS (95 SHORE A) Blade pres- Coat Weight sure (Air cylinder in number] Blade pressure) in p.s.i.g.

Percent Web speed solid content ream Variable Pressure................

Pressure........

739 2&7 1

Angle of extension.

Angle of extension.

Blade thickness Angle of extension.

Angle of extension.

Web speed.

ONS OF 54 BLADE TABLE III.EFFECT OF DIFFERENT VARIABLES ON cgATRlll EiGHT WITH DIFFERENT COMBINATI M TE A S Blade pressure (air Coat cylinder weight in pressure) in p.s.i.g.

Web speed in number ream Percent Blade solid ft. per Blade extension, Angle of content min. material in. extension,

Variable Angle ofextension Length of extension and angle of extension..

Length of extension and angle of extension.

Length of extension, angle of extension and pressure Percent solidcontent andweb Length of extension, angle of extension..

As is seen from examination of the Tables ll and Ill, above, higher coat weights are obtained where a pair of polyurethane blades having a durometer hardness of 95 Shore A are used. Also, with such blades, the higher coat weights are obtained by using the thicker %-inch blades with a blade extension of inch; the lower blade pressures and the smaller angles of extension.

As is seen from Table lll, other blade combinations may also be used although the coat weights of the final product are not as high. Generally, the control over the coat weight is affected by the flexibility of the blade unit. If the unit becomes too flexible, the pressure acting on opposite sides of the web cannot be properly regulated. If, on the other hand, the blade unit becomes too stiff, it will tend to produce an irregular coating because the loss of flexibility results in a loss in the metering and smoothing action of the blades on the coating. As indicated above, however, flexibility of any particular blade is dependent on the thickness of the blade, the amount of blade extension and the head angle of the blade. Accordingly, in choosing the particular materials for the blades, these factors are to be considered in setting the blade unit so as to provide the necessary flexibility for producing acceptable coated paper.

With the construction of the coating apparatus of the present invention, the quality of the coated paper for a given coat weight and solids content is generally higher than that obtainable with presently available, conventional coating apparatus. The higher quality for a given coat weight as obtainable with the opposed blade construction of the present invention has special significance, for example, in high opacity light weight grades of paper where the highest ratio of base sheet weight to coating is desired so as to maintain the highest possible sheet strength and opacity.

With the flexible blade unit of the present invention, it is also possible to obtain higher and a greater range of coat weights for a coating material having a given solids content than with conventional coating methods. Not only may a wide variety of coating materials be satisfactorily used by the opposed blade construction of the present invention but also the flexible blade unit enables the apparatus to be run over a range of web speeds greater than is possible with conventional coaters while still maintaininga high q uality coating. Also, the coating profile of the final product is enhanced due to the nonrigid mounting of the blades in the blade holders.

In addition to the versatility of the coating apparatus of the present invention and the variety of the quality coated products which it is capable of handling, the construction and physical properties of the opposed blades and the manner in which they are oriented relative to each other as a working flexible unit, contribute to increasing the life of the individual blades over that of steel blades used in conventional coating systems. Also, the overall construction of the system provides an apparatus which is compact in size and efficient in operation.

The above description of the present invention has been made with particular reference to the presently preferred embodiment; however, it is to be understood that various changes thereto may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as set forth in the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a paper web coating apparatus having means for directing the web along a predetermined path, means for applying a layer of coating material to both sides of said web as it moves along said predetermined path, and metering means for metering the layer of coating on said web as it progresses through a metering station located along a straight portion of said predetermined path, the improvement wherein said metering means comprises:

a. a flexible blade unit having opposed elongated flexible blades located on opposite sides of said web in said metering station, each of said blades having a base portion and a flat beveled working surface along one elongated edge thereof facing one side of said web;

ill

b. clamping means for clamping said blades at the base portion thereof and at a location spaced from said working surface with said blades extending at an acute angle relative to the path of movement of said web through said metering station and with the working surfaces thereof in opposed relationship; and

c. means for urging said blades in a direction toward each other with a force sufficient to establish at least a partially flush engagement of said working surfaces with the opposite sides of the coated web.

2. In a paper web coating apparatus having means for directing the web along a predetermined path, means for applying a layer of coating material to both sides of said web as'it moves along said predetermined path, and metering means for metering the layers of coating on said web as it progresses upwardly through a metering station located along a vertical portion of said predetermined path, the improvement wherein said metering means comprises:

a. a pair of elongated opposed flexible blades located on opposite sides of said web in said metering station, each of said blades having a base portion and a flat beveled working surface along one elongated edge thereof facing one side of said web;

. clamping means for clamping said blades at the base portion thereof and at a location spaced from said working surface with said blades extending upwardly at an acute angle relative to the path of movement of said web through said metering station and with the working surfaces thereof in horizontally opposed relationship; and

c. means for urging said blades in a horizontal direction toward each other with a force sufficient to establish at least a partially flush engagement of said working surfaces with the opposite sides of the coated web.

3. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 2 further including:

a. slidable carriages for supporting said blade clamping means, said carriages being mounted for movement relative to each other along a horizontal path to move said blades horizontally toward each other;

b. adjusting means for adjusting the angle of extension of said blades; and

c. selectively operable control means for positioning said carriages in adjusted locations along said horizontal path with said blades engaging the opposite sides of the coated web under selected amounts of pressure.

4. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 2 wherein:

a. the angle of bevel of the working surface of each blade is less than the acute angle of extension of said blades relative to the path of movement of the web through said metering station.

5. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 4 wherein:

a. the angle of bevel of the working surface of each blade is between about 50; and

b. the angle of extension of said blades is between about and 55.

6. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set rth in claim 5 wherein:

a. blades are constructed of plastic material having a P & J

plastometer value of between about 4 and 27.

7. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 6 wherein:

a. said blades are constructed of polyurethane having a durometer hardness of about 95 Shore A.

8. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 7 wherein:

a. the thickness of said blades is between about %-/a the length of extension of said blades from said clamping means. 5' u n "MM" 9. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 8 wherein: 75 a. the angle of bevel of the working surfaces of each blade is about 40;

b. the angle of extension of each blade is about 55; and c. the blades each have a P & J plastometer value of about 10. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 9 wherein:

a. each of said blades is tapered back at the leading edge of said working surface at an angle to form a back surface of an area equal to a small fraction of the area of said working surface.

11. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set PC4050 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,575,134 Dated April 13, 1971 Inventor(s) Richard J. Quint It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 5, line 63, "1/4 inch" should read 3/4 inch-- Column 6, line 62, "weigh" should read -weight Column 10, line 62, "blades" should read said blades Signed and sealed this 26th day of October 1971.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. ROBfiRT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Acting Commissioner of Faten

Claims (10)

  1. 2. In a paper web coating apparatus having means for directing the web along a predetermined path, means for applying a layer of coating material to both sides of said web as it moves along said predetermined path, and metering means for metering the layers of coating on said web as it progresses upwardly through a metering station located along a vertical portion of said predetermined path, the improvement wherein said metering means comprises: a. a pair of elongated opposed flexIble blades located on opposite sides of said web in said metering station, each of said blades having a base portion and a flat beveled working surface along one elongated edge thereof facing one side of said web; b. clamping means for clamping said blades at the base portion thereof and at a location spaced from said working surface with said blades extending upwardly at an acute angle relative to the path of movement of said web through said metering station and with the working surfaces thereof in horizontally opposed relationship; and c. means for urging said blades in a horizontal direction toward each other with a force sufficient to establish at least a partially flush engagement of said working surfaces with the opposite sides of the coated web.
  2. 3. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 2 further including: a. slidable carriages for supporting said blade clamping means, said carriages being mounted for movement relative to each other along a horizontal path to move said blades horizontally toward each other; b. adjusting means for adjusting the angle of extension of said blades; and c. selectively operable control means for positioning said carriages in adjusted locations along said horizontal path with said blades engaging the opposite sides of the coated web under selected amounts of pressure.
  3. 4. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 2 wherein: a. the angle of bevel of the working surface of each blade is less than the acute angle of extension of said blades relative to the path of movement of the web through said metering station.
  4. 5. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 4 wherein: a. the angle of bevel of the working surface of each blade is between about 30*-50*; and b. the angle of extension of said blades is between about 35* and 55*.
  5. 6. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 5 wherein: a. blades are constructed of plastic material having a P & J plastometer value of between about 4 and 27.
  6. 7. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 6 wherein: a. said blades are constructed of polyurethane having a durometer hardness of about 95 Shore A.
  7. 8. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 7 wherein: a. the thickness of said blades is between about 1/4 - 1/3 the length of extension of said blades from said clamping means.
  8. 9. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 8 wherein: a. the angle of bevel of the working surfaces of each blade is about 40*; b. the angle of extension of each blade is about 55*; and c. the blades each have a P & J plastometer value of about 20.
  9. 10. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 9 wherein: a. each of said blades is tapered back at the leading edge of said working surface at an angle to form a back surface of an area equal to a small fraction of the area of said working surface.
  10. 11. The improvement in the web coating apparatus as set forth in claim 10 further including: a. slidable carriages for supporting said blade clamping means, said carriages being mounted for movement relative to each other along a horizontal path to move said blades horizontally toward each other; b. adjusting means for adjusting the angle of extension of said blades; and c. selectively operable control means for positioning said carriages in adjusted locations along said horizontal path with said blades engaging the opposite sides of the coated web under selected amounts of pressure.
US3575134A 1968-02-08 1968-02-08 Opposed blade coater Expired - Lifetime US3575134A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

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US70392468 true 1968-02-08 1968-02-08

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US3575134A true US3575134A (en) 1971-04-13

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US3575134A Expired - Lifetime US3575134A (en) 1968-02-08 1968-02-08 Opposed blade coater

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US (1) US3575134A (en)
DE (1) DE1906113C3 (en)
FI (1) FI51847C (en)
FR (1) FR2001560A1 (en)
GB (3) GB1262703A (en)

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3851621A (en) * 1972-02-09 1974-12-03 D Shepard Apparatus for etch resist coating of plated holes in printed circuit boards
US3889018A (en) * 1973-03-16 1975-06-10 Ethyl Corp Method of simultaneously coating the opposite sides of a paper web
US3930464A (en) * 1971-01-27 1976-01-06 Ab Inventing Apparatus for applying a coating composition onto a web
US4063531A (en) * 1976-02-03 1977-12-20 Beloit Corporation Coater for both sides of traveling web
US4231318A (en) * 1978-07-03 1980-11-04 The Black Clawson Company Dual blade coater
US4327130A (en) * 1978-02-23 1982-04-27 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for forming a coating on both sides of a substrate
US4340623A (en) * 1980-12-08 1982-07-20 Beloit Corporation High speed size press
US4345543A (en) * 1978-02-23 1982-08-24 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus for forming a coating on a substrate
US4458376A (en) * 1982-09-03 1984-07-10 Allied Tube & Conduit Corporation Apparatus for wiping continuously moving strip
DE9006418U1 (en) * 1990-06-07 1990-08-09 Fa. Joh. Clouth, 5630 Remscheid, De
US5727604A (en) * 1994-07-28 1998-03-17 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Apparatus for coating pasty mixture and method for coating the pasty mixture
US5849358A (en) * 1994-08-17 1998-12-15 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US5885722A (en) * 1994-02-15 1999-03-23 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Method for applying coating materials to overlapped individuals sheets
US6254678B1 (en) 1993-02-19 2001-07-03 Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company Apparatus for applying coating materials to overlapped individual sheets
US6312520B1 (en) * 1996-12-19 2001-11-06 Btg Källe Inventing Ab Coating blade having a wear-resistant edge
US20050129854A1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2005-06-16 Stora Enso North America Corp. Film coater apparatus
US20060216405A1 (en) * 2002-03-22 2006-09-28 Lee Jong-Hak Bio-sheet material and its manufacturing method and apparatus
WO2009008820A1 (en) * 2007-07-09 2009-01-15 Mattssonföretagen I Uddevalla Aktiebolag Coating device for two-sided coating of paper or paperboard
WO2015133642A1 (en) * 2014-03-07 2015-09-11 日東電工株式会社 Device for removing droplets from optical film

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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JPS5116143B2 (en) * 1972-03-18 1976-05-21
CA1054873A (en) * 1974-02-11 1979-05-22 Ab Inventing Coating method and apparatus therefor
DE2637827C2 (en) * 1975-08-26 1987-10-29 Inventing S.A., Lausanne, Ch
FR2451418B1 (en) * 1979-03-14 1983-02-04 Centre Tech Ind Papier
US4569304A (en) * 1983-08-09 1986-02-11 Aeci Limited Coating apparatus
DE3444461A1 (en) * 1984-12-06 1986-06-12 Voith Gmbh J M Coating device

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US1753447A (en) * 1925-06-10 1930-04-08 Jaton Mfg Corp Treating fabrics
US2326249A (en) * 1940-09-26 1943-08-10 United Shoe Machinery Corp Cementing machine
US2754796A (en) * 1953-09-10 1956-07-17 Rock Hill Printing & Finishing Design coloring means for fabric material
US3119138A (en) * 1962-01-11 1964-01-28 Earl K Davis Spreader for viscous materials
US3230928A (en) * 1961-02-02 1966-01-25 Oxford Paper Co Blade coater

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1753447A (en) * 1925-06-10 1930-04-08 Jaton Mfg Corp Treating fabrics
US2326249A (en) * 1940-09-26 1943-08-10 United Shoe Machinery Corp Cementing machine
US2754796A (en) * 1953-09-10 1956-07-17 Rock Hill Printing & Finishing Design coloring means for fabric material
US3230928A (en) * 1961-02-02 1966-01-25 Oxford Paper Co Blade coater
US3119138A (en) * 1962-01-11 1964-01-28 Earl K Davis Spreader for viscous materials

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3930464A (en) * 1971-01-27 1976-01-06 Ab Inventing Apparatus for applying a coating composition onto a web
US3851621A (en) * 1972-02-09 1974-12-03 D Shepard Apparatus for etch resist coating of plated holes in printed circuit boards
US3889018A (en) * 1973-03-16 1975-06-10 Ethyl Corp Method of simultaneously coating the opposite sides of a paper web
US4063531A (en) * 1976-02-03 1977-12-20 Beloit Corporation Coater for both sides of traveling web
US4327130A (en) * 1978-02-23 1982-04-27 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for forming a coating on both sides of a substrate
US4345543A (en) * 1978-02-23 1982-08-24 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus for forming a coating on a substrate
US4231318A (en) * 1978-07-03 1980-11-04 The Black Clawson Company Dual blade coater
US4340623A (en) * 1980-12-08 1982-07-20 Beloit Corporation High speed size press
US4458376A (en) * 1982-09-03 1984-07-10 Allied Tube & Conduit Corporation Apparatus for wiping continuously moving strip
DE9006418U1 (en) * 1990-06-07 1990-08-09 Fa. Joh. Clouth, 5630 Remscheid, De
US6500260B2 (en) * 1993-02-19 2002-12-31 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Apparatus for applying a coating material to sheets
US6254678B1 (en) 1993-02-19 2001-07-03 Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company Apparatus for applying coating materials to overlapped individual sheets
US5885722A (en) * 1994-02-15 1999-03-23 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Method for applying coating materials to overlapped individuals sheets
US5727604A (en) * 1994-07-28 1998-03-17 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Apparatus for coating pasty mixture and method for coating the pasty mixture
US6551654B1 (en) 1994-08-17 2003-04-22 3M Innovative Properties Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US5868838A (en) * 1994-08-17 1999-02-09 Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US5851592A (en) * 1994-08-17 1998-12-22 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US5916630A (en) * 1994-08-17 1999-06-29 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US5972113A (en) * 1994-08-17 1999-10-26 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US6040006A (en) * 1994-08-17 2000-03-21 3M Innovative Properties Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US6074704A (en) * 1994-08-17 2000-06-13 3M Innovative Properties Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US5849358A (en) * 1994-08-17 1998-12-15 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US5863330A (en) * 1994-08-17 1999-01-26 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet meters
US5958135A (en) * 1994-08-17 1999-09-28 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US6517900B1 (en) 1994-08-17 2003-02-11 3M Innovative Properties Company Apparatus and method for applying coating materials to individual sheet members
US6312520B1 (en) * 1996-12-19 2001-11-06 Btg Källe Inventing Ab Coating blade having a wear-resistant edge
US20060216405A1 (en) * 2002-03-22 2006-09-28 Lee Jong-Hak Bio-sheet material and its manufacturing method and apparatus
US7449211B2 (en) * 2002-03-22 2008-11-11 Lee Jong-Hak Bio-sheet material and its manufacturing method and apparatus
US20050129854A1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2005-06-16 Stora Enso North America Corp. Film coater apparatus
WO2009008820A1 (en) * 2007-07-09 2009-01-15 Mattssonföretagen I Uddevalla Aktiebolag Coating device for two-sided coating of paper or paperboard
WO2015133642A1 (en) * 2014-03-07 2015-09-11 日東電工株式会社 Device for removing droplets from optical film

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DE1906113C3 (en) 1975-04-10 grant
DE1906113B2 (en) 1974-08-15 application
FI51847C (en) 1977-04-12 grant
FR2001560A1 (en) 1969-09-26 application
GB1262702A (en) 1972-02-02 application
DE1906113A1 (en) 1969-11-13 application
FI51847B (en) 1976-12-31 application
GB1262703A (en) 1972-02-02 application
GB1262701A (en) 1972-02-02 application

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