US3489354A - Solid material comminution and disintegration apparatus - Google Patents

Solid material comminution and disintegration apparatus Download PDF

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US3489354A
US3489354A US3489354DA US3489354A US 3489354 A US3489354 A US 3489354A US 3489354D A US3489354D A US 3489354DA US 3489354 A US3489354 A US 3489354A
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rollers
anvil
blades
refuse
roller
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Fred M Harper
John D Amore
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FRED M HARPER
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FRED M HARPER
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B02CRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING; PREPARATORY TREATMENT OF GRAIN FOR MILLING
    • B02CCRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING IN GENERAL; MILLING GRAIN
    • B02C19/00Other disintegrating devices or methods
    • B02C19/0056Other disintegrating devices or methods specially adapted for specific materials not otherwise provided for
    • B02C19/0081Other disintegrating devices or methods specially adapted for specific materials not otherwise provided for specially adapted for breaking-up bottles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B02CRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING; PREPARATORY TREATMENT OF GRAIN FOR MILLING
    • B02CCRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING IN GENERAL; MILLING GRAIN
    • B02C18/00Disintegrating by knives or other cutting or tearing members which chop material into fragments
    • B02C18/0084Disintegrating by knives or other cutting or tearing members which chop material into fragments specially adapted for disintegrating garbage, waste or sewage
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B02CRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING; PREPARATORY TREATMENT OF GRAIN FOR MILLING
    • B02CCRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING IN GENERAL; MILLING GRAIN
    • B02C18/00Disintegrating by knives or other cutting or tearing members which chop material into fragments
    • B02C18/06Disintegrating by knives or other cutting or tearing members which chop material into fragments with rotating knives
    • B02C18/16Details
    • B02C18/18Knives; Mountings thereof
    • B02C2018/188Stationary counter-knives; Mountings thereof

Description

Jan. 13, 1970 F. M. HARPER EFAL, 3,489;354
SOLID MATERIAL COMMINUTION AND DISINTEGRATION APPARATUS Filed Feb. lO, 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FEE@ M. M14
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SOLID MATERIAL COMMINUTION AND DLSINTEGRATION APPARATUS Filed Feb. 10, 1967 Jan. 13, 1970 F M, HARPER yETAL 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FEED M.
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MMM/fa@ United States Patent O U.S. Cl. 241-36 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Mechanism for crushing, breaking and fragmenting, expendable frangible or metallic receptacles to reduce the same to rubble requiring a minimum of temporary storage space prior to ultimate disposition. Disintegrating rollers and crushing rollers are positioned in vertically spaced staggered relation with certain rollers cooperating with anvil means and rotary cutter means positioned beyond the anvil means in the direction of ow of material past the anvil. The arrangement provides passages between the respective parts for the desired discharge of material.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION One of the largest problems today confronting the public is the availability of space. In our modern times, space is rapidly becoming a luxury available only at premium prices, and the conservation thereof is a necessity in most habitated areas.
To obtain the maximum utility of available space, refuse, trash and rubbish must be promptly removed from the premises since no useful function is achieved by permitting the same to accumulate on the premises. To this end garbage receptacles, containers for trash and refuse and similar collecting means for objects no longer having a utilitarian function have been provided, but such containers and receptacles are not generally emptied and returned to the user with satisfactory promptness since the intervals of trash collection may span a rather considerable time period.
Since most trash, rubbish and refuse accumulated in this modern age is in the nature of disposable metallic receptacles and glass or similar frangible containers, the refuse is quite bulky. In view of the fact that the temporary storage of such refuse between collections requires appreciable volumes of space which could be otherwise utilized in more gainful employment, it becomes therefore, one of the primary objects of this invention to provide means for reducing the volume of discarded glass, metal and related containers or receptacles during the temporary storage of the same prior to its collection and ultimate disposition.
Another object of this invention is to provide apparatus including means for comminuting or disintegrating solid materials by passing the same through a plurality of comminuting or disintegrating zones to reduce the volume thereof and wherein the means employed are rotary.
A further object of this invention is to provide apparatus of the type generally referred to above wherein the means includes rotary material strikers and cutters.
A still further object of this invention is to provide apparatus including rotatable material strikers and cutters and wherein all rotatable members cooperate with one another.
Still another object of this invention is to provide suitable support means for the apparatus to which reference has been generally made supra and wherein provision is made to accommodate collector means for the comminuted and disintegrated refuse.
This invention contemplates, as a still further object thereof, the provision of apparatus of the type described, the apparatus being non-complex in construction and assembly, inexpensive to manufacture and maintain, and which is rugged and durable in use.
Other and further objects and advantages of the instant invention will become more evident from a consideration of the following specification when read in conjunction with the annexed drawings.
SPECIFICATION In the drawings:
FIGURE l is an end elevational view of solid material comminution and disintegration apparatus constructed according to this invention;
FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view thereof;
FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary elevational view, partly broken away, of the opposed end of the apparatus shown in FIGURE l;
FIGURE 4 is an enlarged fragmentary detail crosssectional view, FIGURE 4 being taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 4 4 of FIGURE 2, looking in the direction of the arrows;
FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary detail cross-sectional view similar to FIGURE 4, FIGURE 5 illustrating a second embodiment of this invention; and
FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevational view, partly in cross-section, FIGURE 46 being taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 6-6 of FIGURE 5, looking in the direction of the arrows.
Referring now more specically to the drawings, reference numeral 10 designates, in general, refuse comminuting and disintegrating apparatus constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention. The apparatus 10 is seen to comprise support means 12 which, in the illustrated embodiment of this invention, includes a pair of identically constructed, vertically elongated laterally spaced and substantially parallel rectangular sidewalls 14, 16. Spanning the upper ends of the sidewalls 14, 16 and xedly secured thereto by conventional means (not shown) is a normally horizontal, elongated and substantially rectangular platform 18. The sidewalls 14, 16 and platform 18 taken together with a oor or foundation designated by reference letter F dene a vertically elongated substantially rectangular compartment 20 having a pair of opposed open ends 22, 24.
The platform 18 is formed with a transversely extending centrally located opening 26 to the marginal edge of which at the underside thereof is xedly secured, by conventional means, an endless flange 28, the latter being integrally formed with and projecting laterally and outwardly from the upper end of the substantially hollow downwardly tapering sleeve 30. The ange 28 and its associated sleeve 30 are preferably integrally formed with one another and may be constructed of any suitable exible plastic material. Also xedly secured to the underside of the platform 18 and depending therefrom adjacent the end 24 of the support means 12 are a pair of trapezoidal stops or abutment means 32, the stops 32 each being spaced from one another and being located, respectively, adjacent one of the sidewalls 14, 16.
Reference numeral 34 denotes temporary refuse storage means adapted for selective movement into and out of the compartment 20. The temporary refuse storage means 34 is seen to include a dolly 36 having a normally horizontal bed 38 from which depends caster supporting wheels 40 for engagement with the floor F or other foundation. Projecting upwardly from the bed 38 at peripherally spaced intervals are a plurality of lugs 42 which are designed to guide the lower end of a refuse receiving receptacle 44 into seating engagement with the bed 38. The lugs 42 also serve to prevent inadvertent or accidental llateral displacement of the refuse receiving receptacle 44 from its associated dolly 36.
The lower end of the receptacle 44 is provided with a closure wall 46 normally juxtaposed relative to the bed 38, and the opposed upper end of the receptacle 44 is open as at 50 to receive therethrough and to circum- :scribe the lower end of the sleeve 30. The dolly 36 and the receptacle 44 are wheeled into and out of the cornj-partment 20 through its open end 22, the degree of entry being limited by the abutment means 32 against Which the open upper end of the receptacle 44 will abut, this limitation in travel serving, additionally, to center the receptacle 44 below the opening 26 and establishing refuse receiving communication between the lower end of the sleeve 30 and the upper end of the receptacle 44.
Reference numerals 52, 54 each designate, respectively, an upright sidewall, the sidewalls 52, 54 being disposed in laterally spaced and substantially parallel relationship relative to one another. Each of the sidewalls, adjacent the upper ends thereof, are integrally formed with upwardly extending identically constructed bosses 56, each of the bosses 56 being adapted to threadedly receive therethrough an adjustment screw 58 which is held in its selected adjusted position by means of lock nuts 60', all in the conventional manner.
Extending between the sidewalls 52, 54 and fixedly secured thereto adjacent the upper ends thereof and below the bosses 56 is an elongated normally horizontal substantially rectangular base plate 62, an elongated substantially rectangular motor mounting plate 64 is slidably engaged with the base plate 62 for adjustment relative thereto, the mounting plate being secured in its adjusted position by means of securing means 66 of a conventional type. As is seen in FIGURES l, 2 and 4 of the drawings, the motor mounting plate 64 is provided with an edge which confronts and is engaged by the adjacent ends of the adjustment screws 58.
Reference numeral 68 indicates conventional motor means, the motor means 68 in this instance having a drive shaft including a pair of projecting drive shaft ends 70, 72. The motor means 68 is xedly secured on the motor mounting plate 64 as is an adjacent speed reducer device, also of conventional design, and designated by reference numeral 74. The speed reducer device 74 includes an input shaft 76 and an output shaft 78, and conventional coupler means .80 is utilized to connect the drive shaft 72 with the input shaft 76.
Reference numeral 82 denotes a horizontally elongated substantially hollow rigid housing disposed between the sidewalls 52, 54 and having its opposed ends fixedly secured thereto. The housing 82 includes a lower sidewall 84 which is downwardly inclined in the direction of the platform 18 forming an acute angle with respect thereto. Oppositely disposed with respect to the lower sidewall 84 and in vertically spaced relation relative thereto is an upper sidewall 86 which is downwardly inclined towards the platform 18 to also define an acute angle therebetween. The adjacent ends of the sidewalls 84, 86 (see FIGURE 4 of the drawings) are connected, integrally, by an end wall 88 which is formed with a transversely extending aperture 90 to serve a function to be described.
The housing 82 is further seen to include a normally horizontal substantially rectangular and upright jamb 92 which is xedly secured to the platform 18 adjacent one marginal edge of the opening 26. The lower ends of the sidewalls 52, 54 and of the lower sidewall 84 complete the circumscription of the opening 26.
To complete the housing 82, hinge means 94 swingably connect one longitudinally extending marginal edge of a closure member 96 with the lower end of the upper sidewall 86. The opposed longitudinally extending edge of the closure member 96 releasably engages the adjacent upper end of the jamb 92 and may be releasably secured thereto by conventional means here assigned the general reference numeral 98.
Extending transversely between the sidewalls 52, 54 and having opposed ends fixedly secured or integrally formed with the platform 18 is an elongated substantially flat rectangular support bar 1-00. As is seen in FIGURE 4 of the drawings, the support bar 100, to serve functions to be described infra, is laterally spaced from adjacent edges of the opening 26. Fixedly secured to the support bar 100 and projecting thereabove is a horizontally elongated substantially rectangular anvil 102. As is seen in FIGURE 4, the anvil 102 at its upper end and at that side thereof confronting the closure member 96 is provided with a horizontally elongated substantially rectangular knife or cutting blade 104.
An elongated substantially cylindrical shaft 106 (see FIGURE 3) extends transversely between the sidewalls 52, 54 and is journalled at 108 on the last mentioned wall at one of its respective ends. The other end of the shaft 106 projects through and beyond the sidewall 52 and has a belt driven flywheel 110 (see FIGURE l) fixedly secured thereto for rotation therewith. The shaft 106, intermediate its ends, is flattened and enlarged to form the integrally connected substantially rectangular cutter bar to the diagonally opposed corners of which is ixedly secured, respectively, an elongated substantially rectangular cutter blade 114. The arrangement and disposition of the cutter bar 112 and its blades 114 is such that as the same is rotated, the blades 114 make tangential cutting or slicing engagement with the xed knife or cutting blade 104.
The cutter bar 112 is driven through its rotary movement by means of a V-belt drive 116 (see FIGURES 1 and 2) which is trained about the flywheel 110 and a belt sheave 118 fixedly secured to the drive shaft end 70 of the motor means 68. The driving means to which reference has just been made may be suitably enclosed within a conventional guard shield or casing designated by reference numeral 120.
Reference numerals 122, 124 each denote one of a pair of elongated substantially cylindrical metallic receptacle crushing rollers. The rollers 122, 124 are integrally formed with their respective shafts 126, 128 having their respective opposed ends suitably supported and journalled in the sidewalls 52, 54. Those ends of the shafts 125, 128 which are journalled on the end wall 54 project outwardly therebeyond and have fixedly secured thereto for rotation therewith, respectively, the meshed spur gears 130, 132. Also affixed to the shaft 126 for rotation therewith is a sprocket wheel 134 to which further reference will be made below.
Those ends of the shafts 126, 128 journalled for rotation on the sidewall 52 project therebeyond and have affixed thereto sprocket wheels 131, 133, respectively, to which further reference will be made below.
From FIGURE 4 of the drawings it is seen that the cutter bar 112 together with its cutter blades 114 is journalled for rotation about its longitudinal axis adjacent the side 136 of the anvil 102. The crusher roller 122 has its longitudinal axis extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cutter bar 112, but the roller 122 is disposed in vertically spaced and overhanging relationship relative to the upper end 138 of the anvil 102 and its other side 140. This spacing is required in order to afford appreciable clearance between the axially extending circumferentially spaced substantially rectangular crusher blades 142 embedded in the roller 122 and the upper end 138 of the anvil 102.
The crusher roller 124 is disposed in laterally spaced relationship relative to the side of the anvil 102, and the longitudinal axis of this roller also extends parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cutter bar 112 and that of the crusher roller 122. The crusher roller 124 is provided with a plurality of circumferentially spaced axially extending substantially rectangular Crusher blades 144 similar to the Crusher blades 142, and as is seen in FIG- URE' 4 of the drawings, clearance is provided between the sidewall 140 and the adjacent sides of the Crusher blades 144. It should be here noted, however, that while the two Crusher rollers 122, 124 are similar in most respects, they dilfer between one another in that the diameter of the crusher roller 124 is larger than the diameter of the crusher roller 122, and that the arrangement and disposition of crusher roller 124 is such that an arcuate portion thereof projects above the plane of the upper end 138 and that while the two rollers 122, 124 are proximate one another a clearance is provided therebetween in order that their respective crusher blades 142, 144 will not engage with one another.
Reference numerals 146, 148 each denote one of a pair of guide and striker or disintegrator rollers. The rollers 146, 148 are substantially cylindrical in configuration and are carried on shafts 150, 152, the opposed ends of the latter being journalled, as at 154, for rotation on the end walls 52, 54. The longitudinal axes of the rollers 146, 148 extend parallel to one another and are in parallel relationship relative to the axes of the rollers 122, 124 and bar 112. The longitudinal axis of the roller 146 is positioned above the longitudinal axes of the rollers 122, 124 and is positioned intermediate the same. The longitudinal axis of the roller 148 is the most remote thereof with respect to the side 140 of the anvil 102 and is located intermediate the same of the rollers 122, 124. The rollers 146, 148 are of the same diameter, and each has embedded in the exterior side thereof a plurality of elongated axially extending substantially rectangular circumferentially spaced striker blades 156. The relative positions of the roller 122 and roller 146 is such that their respective blades 142, 156 have clearance to pass one another, but this clearance is relatively small. The relative positions of the rollers 124 and 148 are such, on the other hand, that the clearance between their respective juxtaposed blades is rather appreciable. Likewise, the clearance of the blades 156 on each of the rollers 146, 148 is substantial, all to serve a function to be described infra.
The ends of the shafts 150, 152 joumalled for rotation on the wall 52 have sprocket wheels 150', 152 xedly connected thereon, and sprocket chains 157, 158 are trained about the pairs of sprocket wheels 131, 152 and 133, 150', respectively.
The drive means for the rollers 122, 124, 146 and 148 includes the sprocket wheel 134 and sprocket chain 159 which is trained thereabout and around a sprocket wheel 161 fixedly secured to the output shaft 78 of the speed reducer 74, the drive means being enclosed in a conventional shield 162.
It should here be noted that While the diameters of the rollers 124, 146 and 148 may be substantially equal, it is preferable that the diameter of the roller 122 be smaller than any one thereof. Under this given set of conditions, and assuming that the spur gears 130i, 132 have a one to one ratio, the circumferential speed of the roller 122 will be less than the driven circumferential speed of the roller 124.
Further, it should also be noted that the crusher blades 144 of the roller 124 are more numerous than the striker blades 156 and that the latter are of greater size than the former.
The housing 82 in extending between the sidewalls 52, 54 completely encloses the rollers 122, 124, 146 and 148 as well as the striker bar 112. The aperture 90` formed in the upper end wall 88 receives therethrough and has fixedly secured therein the lower end of an elongated substantially hollow rectangular refuse delivering conduit 162, the upper end of the conduit 162 being closed by a closure member 164 hingedly connected to the upper end of the conduit 162 as at 166. The closure member 164 is swingable from its full line position shown in FIGURE 4 to the dotted line position illustrated in the same figure, and the hinge means 166 also includes spring biasing means 168 which constantly tends to bias the closure member 164 for movement towards its closed full line position of FIGURE 4.
Intermediate the ends of the conduit 162 is disposed a conventional transition member 170 which changes the contour of the lower end of the conduit 162 from rectangular to cylindrical, and interposed between the throat 170 and the inner or lower end of the conduit 162 is located a flexible resilient object sensing switch arm 172 which extends transversely across the conduit 162 and which controls the electric switch 174. The switch 174 and switch arm 172 are conventional in the art, the switch 174 being open `when the arm 172 is in its full line position of FIGURE 4 and closed when the arm 172 is moved to its dotted line position of this ligure as refuse is passed thereby. The switch 174 is connected in any suitable electric circuit (not shown) and controls the energization of the motor means 68.
While the function and purpose of the apparatus above described is deemed to be self-evident from the foregoing description, a brief summary thereof is offered below.
SUMMARY The refuse to be reduced in volume is introduced into the conduit 162 through the closure member 164, the closure member 164 swinging from its full line position of FIGURE 4 to the dotted line position illustrated therein. As the refuse descends throu-gh the conduit 162 under the force of gravity it passes under the flexible switch arm 172 controlling the switch 174. The flexing movement of the switch arm 172 whereby the same is moved from its full line position shown in FIGURE 4 toits dotted line position of that figure, closes the switch 174 and thereby causes the energization of the motor 68. With the motor 68 energized the drive shaft thereof is rotated which effects the rotation of the belt pulley and the sprocket 118, 161 and the rotation of these drives the belt and the chain 116, 159, respectively. The belt 116 drives the ywheel 110 which, in turn, forces the rotation of the rotary cutter bar 112 in the direction of the arrow shown in association therewith. The driving of the chain 159 causes the sprocket wheel 134 to turn and drive the shaft 126. The rotary movement of the shaft 126 drives the spur gear 130, and consequently, the spur gear 132 to which the shaft 128 is connected. With the shafts 126, 128 rotating, their respective rollers 122, 124 will rotate in the direction of the arrows shown in FIGURE 4, that is, in contra-direction relative to one another, and the rollers 146, 148 are similarly driven through their associated sprocket wheels 131, 152 and 133, and connecting sprocket chains 157, 158.
The refuse, after striking the switch arm 172 causing energization of the motor 68 and the consequent rotation of the rollers 122, 124 and 146, 148, will descend downwardly to enter the passage 176 dened therebetween (see FIGURE 4). Here the refuse is struck by the blades 156 of the rollers 146, 148 and is broken up and partially compressed as it descends through the passage 176. The direction of the rotation of the rollers 146, 148 forces the refuse to move in the direction of the rollers 122, 124.
Now if it be assumed that the rst of the refuse or rubbish to enter the passage 176 is a deformable substantially rigid container or receptacle, commonly known as a can, the can (not shown) is struck by the blades 156 on each of the rollers 146, 148 and is crushed and deformed thereby to materially reduce its volume.
As the deformed can exits from the passage 176 it is engaged by either the blades 142 or 144 of the rollers 122, 124, respectively, and enters the upper end of the passage 178 which extends between the rollers 122, 124.
As the blades 142, 144 of these rollers 122, 124, respectively, engage the partially collapsed or compressed can, the can is further compressed and reduced in volume during its course of movement through the passageway 178 which extends between the rollers 122, 124.
Due to the difference in the diameters of the rollers 122 and 124, the peripheral speed thereof differs, one 'from the other, and the now substantially fully compressed and `deformed can is guided, due to the curvature of the rollers and the peripheral speed thereof, to pass over the upper end 138 of the anvil 102.
As has been stated above, the cutter bar 112 is substantially rectangular in configuration and is therefore formed with the opposed ends 112A, 112C and opposed sides 112B and 112D, respectively. The ends 112A, 112C are arcuate while the sides 112B, 112D are substantially at and parallel relative to one another.
Thus, and with reference to FIGURE 4 of the drawings, if it be assumed that the now substantially fully compressed or collapsed can has passed over the upper end 138 of the anvil 102 it will engage the arcuate end 112A of the bar 112. Further movement of the substantially totally collapsed or compressed can is limited by this arcuate end 112A until the bar 112 rotates, clockwise, in the direction of its associated arrow, to present the side 112B to the adjacent end of the totally compressed and deformed can portion overlying the upper end 138 of the anvil 102. During this temporary restraint in the movement of the deformed can, the power driven rollers 122, 124 will continue to rotate, but the blades 142, 144 thereof will merely skid across the adjacent portions of the can until the cutter bar 112 moves towards its second position immediately described above.
The rollers 122, 124 now drive the totally compressed can to cause a portion thereof to overlie the blade 104 and to become positioned in the path of the travel of the blade 114, and as the bar 112 continues its rotation, the two blades 104, 114 will cooperate to effect a shearing action on the projecting end of the compressed can to cut a strip therefrom which is delivered, under the force of gravity, downwardly below the bar 112 and through the passage 180 and the opening 26. The strip now passes downwardly through the sleeve 30 and is deposited for temporary collection and storage in the refuse receiving receptacle 44.
This series of operations is continued until each and every one of the metallic receptacles fed into the housing 82 are cut into relatively small strips which occupy, of course, a minimum of volume.
Glass and other types of frangiible refuse, when passed downwardly through the conduit 162 are subjected to substantially the same roller operation as that described above in conjunction with the deformation and compression of metallic containers. However, in this case, the glass containers or receptacles, as the same are fed downwardly through the passage 176 are struck by the blades 156 of the rollers 146, 148, respectively, to effect their disintegration. The broken fragments of the .glass containers or receptacles drop, under the force of gravity, to pass downwardly through the passage 182 defined between the rollers 124, 148` and their respective blades 144, 156, and as this rubble passes through the passage 182 it is further reduced in size.
Such portions of the broken container which do not pass through the passage 182 are fed to the passage 176 for further crushing and fragmenting between the rollers 122, 124 and their associated blades 142, 144, respectively. Here the fragments are further crushed and are passed on by the rollers 122, 124 to the upper end of the passage 184 which is defined by the sidewall 140 and the adjacent side of the roller 124. This further crushing and the particular position of the passage 184 prevents any sizable fragments of glass to pass across the upper end 138 of the anvil 102 to cause damage tothe cutting blades 104, 114. The fragments of glass or other similar materials are discharged from their respective passages 182, 184 and are collected in the common passage 186 which is in communication with the opening 26, The glass rubble now descends through the sleeve 30 for collection in the refus@ I el/.inlg receptacle 44, all as before described.
When the last of the. refuse has been fed into the conduit 162, the closure member 164 returns from its dotted line position shown in FIGURE 4 to its full line position, and
e sensing switch arm 172 will move from its dotted line position to its full line position shown in this figure, and with this movement of the switch arm 172 the switch 174 opens to break the electrical circuit to the motor 68 causing its deenergization through a conventional timing device (not shown) which allows sufficient time for the machine to clear and, halting the rotation of all driven rollers.
FIGURES 5 and 6 relate to second embodiment of this invention which serves the same objects as has been stated above and utilizes much of the apparatus heretofore described. Thus, elements of this second embodiment of the invention shown in FIGURES 5 and 6 finding their counterparts in the elements of an embodiment of the invention shown in FIGURES 1 to 4 inclusive, bear the same reference numerals but have a prime mark added thereto to effect a differentiation therefrom.
Essentially, the basic distinction which may be made between the inventions of the first embodiment of this invention and the second one thereof illustrated in FIG- URES 5 and 6 resides in the removal of the cutter bar 112 and the anvil 102, there lbeing substituted for the cutter bar 112 a bank of cutter blades which bear the general reference numeral 200 and a modified anvil carrying reference numeral 202.
The bank of' cutting knives 200 is seen to comprise a pair of substantially cylindrical shafts 204, 206 supported and journalled for rotation by conventional means (not shown) on the sidewalls 52', 54. Each of the shafts 204, 206 has fixedly secured thereon a plurality of substantially flat cylindrical cutter discs which are held in axially spaced relationship on their respective shafts by means of a plurality of annular spacer members 210'. The discs 208 and spacer members 210 alternate with one another and are clamped to their associated shafts between their respective abutment flanges 212 and washers 214 which are jammed by take-up nuts 216 threaded, respectively, on the shafts 204, 206 at a pair of adjacent ends thereof. As is seen in FIGURE 6 of the drawings, the cutting discs 208 of the shaft 204 are staggered with respect to the cutting discs 208 carried on the shaft 206. In this embodiment of the invention,the shaft 204 becomes substituted for the shaft 106 to take power from a flywheel (not shown) similar to the fiywheel 110'.
The anvil 202 is, in this case, substantially hollow, but the exterior con-figuration thereof is substantially the same as the anvil 102. To that end it will be noted that the anvil 202 is formed with opposed substantially parallel and upright sides 136', 140' and an upper end 13S'. The anvil 202 omits, however, the blade 104 carried Iby the anvil 102, and substituted in its place is an outwardly turned lip 218. As is seen in FIGURE 5,- the upper edge of the lip 218 is substantially coplanar with the upper end 138 of the anvil 202, and this common plane intersects a line drawn between the centers of the two shafts 204, 206 substantially at the center point thereof.
In the operation of the apparatus disclosed and described in this second embodiment of the invention, the crushed, deformed and compressed can or receptacle which feeds over the upper end 138' of the anvil 202 is passed over the upper edge of the lip 218 for engagement between the cooperating cutter blades 208 on the adjacent shafts 204, 206. In this embodiment, the metallic can is reduced to shredded strips as it passes through the bank of cutting blades. The shredded metallic strips now pass downwardly, under the force of gravity, through the passage 220 and exit through the opening 26 into the sleeve 30 for subsequent collection, for but a limited time, in the receptacle 44.
In all other respects the construction and apparatus of this second embodiment of the invention is identical t0 the first one thereof heretofore described.
What is claimed is:
1. Apparatus for fragmenting frangible containers and for compressing and cutting into strip material deformable normally rigid receptacles, and for separating the fragmented and strip materials, said apparatus comprislng:
(a) support means;
(b) a plurality of vertically staggered elongated rollers journalled for rotation on said support means and disposed in spaced confronting and parallel relationship relative to one another, each of said rollers having a plurality of crcumferentially spaced axially extending cooperating blades projecting therefrom;
(c) a substantially upright anvil iixedly secured on said support means, said anvil having a pair of opposed sides and an upper end with one of said rollers overhanging said upper end in vertically spaced relation relative thereto, and a second one of said rollers being disposed in laterally spaced and confronting relationship relative to one of said sides of said anvil;
(d) said rollers, and said second roller at said one side of said anvil cooperating to form a plurality of passages therebetween;
(e) cutter means mounted for rotation on said support means and being disposed in spaced relation with respect to the other side of said anvil to form a passage therebetween, said cutter means including a plurality of blades xedly connected thereon for rotation therewith;
(f) means connected in driving relationship with said rollers and said cutter means to effect rotation thereof;
(g) said rollers receiving said frangible containers and rigid deformable receptacles therebetween to fragment the former and to compress the latter, the fragmented material passing downwardly through said plurality of passages, for delivery externally of said apparatus;
(h) said overhanging roller and said roller adjacent said one side of said anvil cooperating to feed said deformed receptacles across said upper end of said anvil and into the path of travel of said cutter means for severance into strips to be delivered through said passage externally of said apparatus.
Z. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein:
(a) said support means includes a platform having an opening formed therein spaced below and communicating with said passages,
(b) a pair of opposed upright sidewalls journalling said rollers for rotation therebetween,
(c) said apparatus further comprising a housing encompassing said rollers, cutter means and anvil, said housing including an upper wall having an opening extending transversely therethrough in confronting relation relative to said rollers,
(d) 1an upright hollow refuse receiving conduit having one of its ends connected, on said housing and in open communication with the interior thereof through said opening,
(e) said driving means comprising an electric motor and an electrical circuit for connecting to a source of electrical energy, and
(f) a normally open electric switch connected in said circuit to control said motor, said switch including a switch arm disposed in said conduit intermediate its ends and located in the path of travel of said refuse tol sense its passage therethrough and to close said switch thereupon.
3. Apparatus as defined in claim 2 and (a) a closure member normally extending transversely across the upper end of said conduit when said closure member is disposed in its closed position,
(b) hinge means swingably connecting said closure member on said conduit, and
(c) means constantly biasing said closure member for swinging movement to its closed position.
4. Apparatus as defined in claim 3 and (a) a hollow flexible sleeve connected on said platform and depending therefrom in circumscribing relation relative to said platform opening and depending into a receptacle.
5. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein (a) said cutter means includes a bank of slitting discs with adjacent discs being staggered relative to one another.
6. Apparatus as defined in claim 5 wherein (a) said discs are mounted on, respectively, a pair of spaced and parallel rotatable shafts.
References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 821,447 5/ 1906 Albrecht 241-242 X 1,477,502 12/1923 Killick 241-236 X 1,776,593 9/1930 Meyer.
2,558,255 6/1951 Johnson 241-100 X ROBERT C. RIORDON, Primary Examiner M. G. RASKIN, Assistant Examiner U.S. C1. X.R.
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Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3643591A (en) * 1970-03-30 1972-02-22 Charles Gail Bragg Cutting device
US3687062A (en) * 1970-03-13 1972-08-29 William J Frank Apparatus for crushing and disposing of cans and glass containers
US3814332A (en) * 1972-08-21 1974-06-04 K Nakao Apparatus for crushing fragile material
US3889886A (en) * 1973-10-10 1975-06-17 Jene D Spivey Portable waste glass bottle and container crushing device
US4324325A (en) * 1979-12-21 1982-04-13 Dewoolfson Bruce H Apparatus for collection of metallic containers and method therefor
US4345679A (en) * 1980-05-09 1982-08-24 Dewoolfson Bruce H Container collection apparatus with electromagnetic sensor and method
US4440284A (en) * 1980-05-09 1984-04-03 Environmental Products Corporation Automated aluminum can redemption center for direct return deposit payout
US4469212A (en) * 1982-04-20 1984-09-04 Environmental Products Corporation Container collection apparatus with piston-actuated crusher
US4492295A (en) * 1982-03-05 1985-01-08 Environmental Products Corporation Automated redemption center for metal containers
US4510860A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-04-16 Aluminum Company Of America Latching mechanism for manually rotatable carrier in apparatus for processing recyclable containers
US4510857A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-04-16 Aluminum Company Of America Container recycling apparatus having shock mounted manually rotatable carrier
US4512253A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-04-23 Aluminum Company Of America Apparatus for processing recyclable containers
US4519306A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-05-28 Aluminum Company Of America Process for recycling containers
US4519307A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-05-28 Aluminum Company Of America Container recycling apparatus using scanning means to read code markings on containers
US4526096A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-07-02 Aluminum Company Of America Apparatus for processing used containers having improved crusher means
US4558775A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-12-17 Aluminum Company Of America Apparatus for passive analysis of containers to determine acceptability for recycling
US4729515A (en) * 1984-09-04 1988-03-08 Wagner John W Machine for cutting disposable containers
US4750678A (en) * 1984-09-04 1988-06-14 John W. Wagner Method and apparatus for cutting disposable containers
US4776135A (en) * 1987-01-15 1988-10-11 Elwood F. Thum, III System for deburring of articles
US5054696A (en) * 1990-01-29 1991-10-08 Medical Safetec, Inc. Medical waste disposal system
US5215265A (en) * 1992-05-04 1993-06-01 Allegheny Paper Shredders, Inc. Glass bottle breaking apparatus
US5452860A (en) * 1993-01-19 1995-09-26 Williams; Robert M. Material reducing and shredding apparatus
US5746378A (en) * 1995-06-23 1998-05-05 Marathon Equipment Company Volume reduction machine
US5758573A (en) * 1996-06-13 1998-06-02 International Paper Company Paperboard carton piercing, crushing and recycling system
US6131509A (en) * 1999-02-12 2000-10-17 Cp Manufacturing, Inc. Method and apparatus for perforating and crushing containers
FR2949081A1 (en) * 2009-08-14 2011-02-18 Jean-Francois Roux Apparatus for reducing plastic bottles in small pieces i.e. small plastic squares, has set of horizontal knives cutting out straps in small pieces of few millimeters on side, and set of gears driving rollers at same speed from crank

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US821447A (en) * 1904-10-10 1906-05-22 Herman S Albrecht Fiber-reducing machine.
US1477502A (en) * 1923-07-10 1923-12-11 Sprout Waldron & Co Ear-corn crusher
US1776593A (en) * 1928-09-04 1930-09-23 I B Rowell Co Combination feed cutter and hammer mill
US2558255A (en) * 1948-07-03 1951-06-26 Johnson & Welch Mfg Co Inc Remote-controlled and fed bottle smasher

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US821447A (en) * 1904-10-10 1906-05-22 Herman S Albrecht Fiber-reducing machine.
US1477502A (en) * 1923-07-10 1923-12-11 Sprout Waldron & Co Ear-corn crusher
US1776593A (en) * 1928-09-04 1930-09-23 I B Rowell Co Combination feed cutter and hammer mill
US2558255A (en) * 1948-07-03 1951-06-26 Johnson & Welch Mfg Co Inc Remote-controlled and fed bottle smasher

Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3687062A (en) * 1970-03-13 1972-08-29 William J Frank Apparatus for crushing and disposing of cans and glass containers
US3643591A (en) * 1970-03-30 1972-02-22 Charles Gail Bragg Cutting device
US3814332A (en) * 1972-08-21 1974-06-04 K Nakao Apparatus for crushing fragile material
US3889886A (en) * 1973-10-10 1975-06-17 Jene D Spivey Portable waste glass bottle and container crushing device
US4324325A (en) * 1979-12-21 1982-04-13 Dewoolfson Bruce H Apparatus for collection of metallic containers and method therefor
US4345679A (en) * 1980-05-09 1982-08-24 Dewoolfson Bruce H Container collection apparatus with electromagnetic sensor and method
US4440284A (en) * 1980-05-09 1984-04-03 Environmental Products Corporation Automated aluminum can redemption center for direct return deposit payout
US4492295A (en) * 1982-03-05 1985-01-08 Environmental Products Corporation Automated redemption center for metal containers
US4469212A (en) * 1982-04-20 1984-09-04 Environmental Products Corporation Container collection apparatus with piston-actuated crusher
US4558775A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-12-17 Aluminum Company Of America Apparatus for passive analysis of containers to determine acceptability for recycling
US4510857A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-04-16 Aluminum Company Of America Container recycling apparatus having shock mounted manually rotatable carrier
US4512253A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-04-23 Aluminum Company Of America Apparatus for processing recyclable containers
US4519306A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-05-28 Aluminum Company Of America Process for recycling containers
US4510860A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-04-16 Aluminum Company Of America Latching mechanism for manually rotatable carrier in apparatus for processing recyclable containers
US4526096A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-07-02 Aluminum Company Of America Apparatus for processing used containers having improved crusher means
US4519307A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-05-28 Aluminum Company Of America Container recycling apparatus using scanning means to read code markings on containers
US4729515A (en) * 1984-09-04 1988-03-08 Wagner John W Machine for cutting disposable containers
US4750678A (en) * 1984-09-04 1988-06-14 John W. Wagner Method and apparatus for cutting disposable containers
US4776135A (en) * 1987-01-15 1988-10-11 Elwood F. Thum, III System for deburring of articles
US5054696A (en) * 1990-01-29 1991-10-08 Medical Safetec, Inc. Medical waste disposal system
US5215265A (en) * 1992-05-04 1993-06-01 Allegheny Paper Shredders, Inc. Glass bottle breaking apparatus
US5452860A (en) * 1993-01-19 1995-09-26 Williams; Robert M. Material reducing and shredding apparatus
US5746378A (en) * 1995-06-23 1998-05-05 Marathon Equipment Company Volume reduction machine
US5758573A (en) * 1996-06-13 1998-06-02 International Paper Company Paperboard carton piercing, crushing and recycling system
US6131509A (en) * 1999-02-12 2000-10-17 Cp Manufacturing, Inc. Method and apparatus for perforating and crushing containers
FR2949081A1 (en) * 2009-08-14 2011-02-18 Jean-Francois Roux Apparatus for reducing plastic bottles in small pieces i.e. small plastic squares, has set of horizontal knives cutting out straps in small pieces of few millimeters on side, and set of gears driving rollers at same speed from crank

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