US3487524A - Locator and holder in a crimping tool for an electrical connector - Google Patents

Locator and holder in a crimping tool for an electrical connector Download PDF

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US3487524A
US3487524A US3487524DA US3487524A US 3487524 A US3487524 A US 3487524A US 3487524D A US3487524D A US 3487524DA US 3487524 A US3487524 A US 3487524A
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Prior art keywords
terminal
tool
jaws
member
locator
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Expired - Lifetime
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George J Filia
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ROSTRA TOOL COMPANY A CORP OF CT
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Sargent Manufacturing Co
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R43/00Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current connectors or for joining electric conductors
    • H01R43/04Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current connectors or for joining electric conductors for forming connections by deformation, e.g. crimping tool
    • H01R43/042Hand tools for crimping
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/53Means to assemble or disassemble
    • Y10T29/5313Means to assemble electrical device
    • Y10T29/532Conductor
    • Y10T29/53209Terminal or connector
    • Y10T29/53213Assembled to wire-type conductor
    • Y10T29/53222Means comprising hand-manipulatable implement
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/53Means to assemble or disassemble
    • Y10T29/5313Means to assemble electrical device
    • Y10T29/532Conductor
    • Y10T29/53209Terminal or connector
    • Y10T29/53213Assembled to wire-type conductor
    • Y10T29/53239Means to fasten by elastic joining
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/53Means to assemble or disassemble
    • Y10T29/53987Tube, sleeve or ferrule

Description

' Jan. 6, 1970 3,487,524

G. J. FILIA LOCATOR AND HOLDER IN A CRIMPING TOOL FOR AN ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR FiledNo v; 16. 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. 65026: J A71. 14

Jan. 6, 1970 G. J. Fl

LOCATOR ANDHOLDER IN A cRIuPING TOOL FOR AN ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Filed Nov. 16, 196'? v 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 25' 1: MORE WELD/981.: r/wwv 2a mmvron 660(61 74 /A LIA 3,487.524

United States Patent 3,487,524 LOCATOR AND HOLDER IN A CRIMPING TOOL FOR AN ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR George J. Filia, Shelton, Co'nn., assignor to Sargent & Company, New Haven, Conn., a corporation of Delaware Filed Nov. 16, 1967, Ser. No. 683,682 Int. Cl. B23p 19/04; H01r 43/00 U.S. Cl. 29---203 12 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This disclosure relates to a work locator and holder in a crimping tool for an electrical connector, which tool is of the hand type having a pair of cooperating crimping dies. The locator and holder comprises two coacting resilient members, one for movement with each die. One of the aforementioned resilient members serves to engage and axially position with reference to the dies a connector or terminal of the ferrule type to be crimped about a wire. The other resilient member serves as a wire stop and also with its companion tends to angularly position the connector with reference to the dies.

This invention relates to a locator and holder for an electrical terminal or connector for'crimping of the latter about a wire by a hand tool with which the locator and holder is associated and supported. Such crimping tools commonly comprise a pair of die-carrying jaws in a pliertype tool, which jaws may either have a pivotal action for cooperation with one another or a parallel action. The tool may have a pair of handle members in pivotal relation to one another which are pivoted by the operator's hands to effect a crimping operation through closing movement of the dies. The handle members are usually spring biased to their open or separated positions and manipulated by the operator to their closed positions against this spring bias. It is through force exerted by the operator on the handle members that a crimping operation is effected.

It is not uncommon in such tools to provide a motioncompelling mechanism for the handle members so that after initial closing movement of the handles they may not be returned to theiropen positions until the. handles have moved sufficiently in a closing direction'to effect a I,

satisfactory crimp. This feature is employed I to insure adequate closing of the crimping dies onthe Work. It will be apparent that if the dies are not closed to this extent, the desired physical and electrical properties in the work may not be obtained. 1

In the use of such tools considerable difficulty has been encountered heretofore in forming by a crimping :operation a satisfactory electricaland mechanical connection between the terminal or connector and the wire owing to improper positioning and/ or holding of the terminal with reference to the crimping diesprior to a crimping operation. The barrel portion of sucha connector, which may be open ended and provided at one end witha tongue, must be properly positioned and held with reference to the dies axially thereof. It is alsonecessary in the use of most, if not all, such tools for crimping such terminals to angularly orientate the terminal vso that the protruding tongue thereof has a particular angular relationship with reference to the dies before a crimping operation.

In placing the terminal intermediate the open dies, it is important that that portion of the barrel from which the tongue protrudes is backed by one ofthe dies so as to give it a solid support, and it is desirable to, hold the terminal in these axial and angular positions prior to a crimping operation. It is also desirablefto provide in the locator and holder meansto-stop a wire' inserted into the Open-ended terminal so that the wire will be extended sufficiently into the terminal, but not too far, to insure best electrical results in the crimped product.

Many such tools provided with work locators have in the past been subject to a variety of shortcomings when employed for crimping terminals of the type described above. For example, such locators have failed to effectively inhibit the improper positioning by an operator of such a terminal between jaws of a crimping tool. In at least some instances it has been found that in the use of such locators it has been somewhat difficult for the operator to position the terminal in the jaws for a crimping operation. Some tools equipped with locators have lacked simple effective means to axially and angularly orientate a terminal with reference to the crimping dies and axially orientate a wire inserted in a terminal, and some have lacked effective means to hold a terminal in properly orientated position prior to a crimping operation. Some devices of the prior art, such as described above, have moreover inadequately provided for elongation of such a terminal upon compression of the side wall structure thereof during a crimping operation.

One object of the invention is to provide a terminal or connector locator which inhibits improper positioning by an operator of a terminal such as described between the jaws of such a crimping tool.

A further object is to provide a Work locator which axially orientates such a terminal and tends to angularly orientate it.

Yet another object is to provide a work locator for a tool such as described having a motion-compelling mechanism for the dies thereof, which very effectively holds the terminal in proper position for a crimping operation.

A further object is to provide a locator and holder such as described above which is of simplified construction and dependable in operation, which also serves as a wire stop and which readily permits elongation of the barrel portion of such a terminal for crimping of the latter between dies of a tool.

Further objects of the invention will be apparent from the. following detailed description of one form of the terminal locator and holder.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational, fragmentary view illustrating a hand tool equipped with a locator and holder for an electrical connector, embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is an end elevational view of the tool;

FIG. 3 is a view on a somewhat smaller scale similar to FIG. 1 but illustrating additional details of the tool showing the same side of the tool as viewed in FIG. 1, showing parts thereof in different positions;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 3 but illustrating the reverse side of the tool, showing parts thereof in different positions;

FIG. 6 is a view of the end of the tool similar to FIG. 2 but showing the parts thereof in the positions of FIG. 5; and

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary bottom view of the tool in the condition of FIG. 5.

In the drawings there is illustrated by way of example a crimping tool provided with dies of the pivotal type and having handles 10 and 11 (FIG. 3) which may be covered throughout a po tion of their length with an insulating material formed of plastic to be gripped by the operator. The handles 10 and 11 are pivotally connected as at 12 by a pin which extends through a portionof the handle 11 receiving a portion of the handle 10. The handles 10 and 11 at their ends remote from the portions thereof gripped by the operator are provided with pivot pinsl3.

A pair of jaws 14 are provided for pivotal support, one

on each pin 13. Each pin 13 extends through one end of the corresponding jaw. The jaws 14 are pivotally interconnected through a pair of plates 15 supporting a pair of pivots 16 therebetween. The last-mentioned pivots support the respective jaws by extending therethrough, the jaws being pivotally mounted in the aforesaid manner for conventional toggle-like action on swinging movement of the handles 10 and 11 relatively to one another. The jaws carry therebetween a pin 17 on which they have rocking movement for proper positioning of the jaws relatively to one another, the pin 17 being held captive between the plates 15. One jaw 14 carries in fixed relation thereto a crimping die indicated generally at 18, while the other jaw carries in a similar manner a cooperating crimping die indicated generally at 19.

The tool is provided with a motion-compelling mechanism for the purpose previously described comprising, generally speaking, a toothed element 20 pivoted to the handle 10 at 21 and a toothed element 22 secured to the handle 11 for cooperation with the first-mentioned toothed element of the motion-compelling mechanism. The teeth of these elements are not shown.

The tool elements previously referred to, including the motion-compelling mechanism, need not be described in further detail as these parts of the tool are well disclosed and described in U.S. Patent No. 3,277,751, issued Oct. 11, 1966, and their details form no part of the present invention.

The work locator and holder of the invention is positioned on the left side of the tool as viewed in FIG. 2 and is indicated generally at 24. It comprises a member 25 of resilient rubber-like material associated with one of the jaws 14 and a similar member 26 associated with the other jaw. As seen in the last-mentioned view, each member 25, 26 has a dimension which is greater in a plane parallel to the plane of the corresponding jaw than in a plane transverse thereto and, as indicated in FIG. 1, each is of substantial length generally lengthwise of the jaw with which it is associated in the die region thereof. In the form shown, the dies 18 and 19 each have two die cavities, each die cavity of one pair corresponding with one of the other pair. The two pairs of die cavities are provided for terminals or connectors of diiferent sizes. The dimension of each resilient member 25, 26 is sufficient to extend beyond the die cavities of the corresponding die in both directions lengthwise of the jaw.

To support the resilient member 25 from the jaw 14 in proper position, there is provided a metal back-up plate 27 through which suitable headed fasteners 28 extend. These fasteners also extend through the resilient member 25 and are threaded into suitable sockets in the corresponding jaw 14. The heads of these fasteners may be socketed to receive a hex wrench. The member 25 is spaced laterally outwardly from the jaw 14 to which it is secured by a metal spacer 29. It will be seen that, as shown in FIG. 2, the resilient member 25 extends below the lowermost extremities of the plate 27 and the spacer 29. The lowermost extremity 30 of the resilient member 25 is planar, and this edge or surface of the member also extends a distance below or beyond the bottoms of the die cavities formed in the die 18.

The resilient member 26 is similarly arranged'with reference to the other jaw 14, having similar dimensions with respect thereto and to the die 19 with some notable exceptions. However, it is supported in like manner through a plate 31 similar to the above-described plate 27, in turn supported by fasteners 32, similar to previously described fasteners 28, secured to the last-mentioned jaw. However, the member 26, as viewed in FIG. 2, is laterally offset with reference to the member 25. It is not spaced from the jaw which carries it as by the above-described spacer 29 associated with the other jaw. One side face of the resilient member 26 is held in abutting relationship to the near side face of the jaw 14 which carries the member 26 and is laterally ffset in the tool inwardly toward the cen- 4 ter line of the tool with reference to the equivalent face of the resilient member 25.

As viewed in FIG. 2, the resilient member 26 extends above or beyond the supporting plate 31 and extends as well above the bottoms of. the die cavities in the die 19. The upper surface or edge 33 of the resilient member 26 is planar. However, the last-mentioned member extends past the bottoms of the die cavities to a lesser extent than the resilient member 25 extends beyond the die cavities of the jaw 14 with which the member 25 is associated. A further difference between the members 25 and 26 is that the member 25 is more yieldable or softer than the member 26. The purpose of these differences between the members 25 and 26 in their construction and arrangement will become apparent hereinafter.

An electrical terminal or connector of one type adapted to be crimped in the tool is indicated generally at 34 and is best shown in FIG. 2. It comprises a ferrule-like body part 35 serving as an electrical conductor which has an outer tubular covering fixed thereto of insulating material and which conductor has extending from one end thereof a tongue 36 adapted to be secured to another conductor such as a binding post. It will be noted that the tongue 36 projects from one side wall portion of the ferruleor barrel-like part 35 of the electrical connector. For crimping purposes the last-named portion of the terminal should be strongly backed by the die 19, that is, angularly arranged with reference to the dies 18 and 19 as shown in FIG. 2.

- The tool may be employed to crimp a terminal on either an insulated or uninsulated wire, and it should be under stood from the foregoing that the tube-covered ferrulelike part 35 at the end from which the tongue projects provides an edge or end surface of the tube creating an abutment for a purpose to be described hereinafter in connection with an alignment function of the work locator and holder. For the purpose of claiming the invention the insulating tube may be considered an integral part of the conductor body which form together the ferrule-like part 35. In other words, the ferrule-like part 35 may be considered as having as a part thereof the aforementioned surface providing an abutment. In the drawings the wire shown inserted (FIG. 2) in the terminal is of the insulated type and is indicated generally at 37. The insulation is stripped back from an end portion of the wire conductor which is inserted in the terminal.

In the operation of the tool provided with the work locator and holder, the terminal 34 is inserted in the tool when the jaws are in the open condition of FIG. 3. The resilient member 26 acts as an axial stop engageable with the 'end of the barrel-like part 35 of the terminal from which the tongue 36 projects, that is, with the aforementioned edge or terminal surface which provides an abutment. When the terminalis' inserted in the selected die cavity in the die 19 the barrel-like part 35 is stopped by the opposing side face of the resilient member 26. The tongue 36 of the terminal extends over the edge 33 of the resilient member 26, as shown'in-FIG. 2, and is partially or fully eng'ag'ed'by the last-mentioned edge. The engagement is sueh that the terminal tends to lie in fiatwise relationship acrossthe edge 33 of the member 26 which is the proper angular relationship of the terminal with reference to the nal may be grasped between the resilient members 25 and 26; In'this position of the members, the member 25 overlaps the'near end of the terminal body 35 to a greater extent than"thef'memberf26, as shown in FIG. 2. During this movementof themembers 25 and 26 with the jaws of the tool any angular misalignment of the terminal tends to be corrected thro'ugh engagement of the aforementioned planar edges with the flat sides of the tongue 36. The re silient members 25 and 26 of the work holder are so constructed and arranged with reference to the jaws of the tool that they tend .to grip and support the tongue of the connector before any crimping of the terminal takes place, at which time the jaws of the tool may lightly engage the barrel-like portion of the terminal to lightly grip it.

Prior to firm engagement of the dies on the jaws of the tool with the terminal, the tongue of the terminal maybe grasped by the operator and, if the terminal is not properly axially aligned, that is, in the previously described position with reference to the dies, the terminal may be pulled to the left as viewed in FIG. 2 until it is so positioned. When the terminal is properly oriented both angularly and axially as aforesaid and the dies on the jaws lightly grip the terminal to give it support but prior to crimping of the terminal, the aforementioned elements and 22 of themotion-compelling mechanism are engaged with one another so that the handles of the tool may not reopen to permit the terminal to drop out of the tool. The handles of the tool may not be reopened until after the completion of the crimping operation due to the action of the motioncompelling mechanism.

Therefore, it is not necessary when inserting the wire 37 in the terminal for the operator to manually grasp the terminal. During the insertion of the wire into the terminal the tool may be supported in only one hand of the operator, leaving the operators other hand free to insert the wire into the tool-held terminal. These relative positions of the jaws of the tool and the elements of the work locator and holder with reference to the terminal are shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings. In these positions the resilient element 25 acts as a stop for the wire inserted in the terminal which is engaged with the near face of the resilient member 25 providing a wire abutment. The lateral offset of the member 25 with reference to the member 26 (FIG. 2) permits the wire to extend through the barrel of the terminal. However, note that as shown, the wire-stopping face of the member 25 is approximately in the median plane (FIG. 2) of the member 26. In other words, the members 25 and 26 overlap vertically to a substantial extent so as to be in opposing relation to one another.

Upon further closing movement of the handles of the tool to the positions shown in FIG. 5, crimping of the terminal body 35 is effected between the dies 18 and 19, as indicated in FIGS. 4 and 6. This closing movement of the dies effects compression of the resilient members 25 and 26 by the tongue 36 of the terminals. The forces exerted on the tongue 36 by the resilient members 25 and 26 tend to be equalized during this movement owing to the fact that the member 25 is more yieldable than the member 26. Hence there is little tendency for the tongue to bend angularly, that is, out of the plane of the terminal body during the crimping operation.

As previously indicated, crimping forces on the terminal tend to elongate the body of the terminal. This elongation of the body is permitted by lateral deflection of the resilient member 26 as shown in FIG. 4. When the handles of the tool are swung together to an extent sufficient to fully crimp the terminal with reference to the wire, the motioncompelling mechanism is released to thereafter permit the handles of the tool to be swung to their Open positions and enable the operator to remove the work from the tool. As the dies are opened, the work locator and holder releases the work.

It will thus be seen that the terminal locator and holder attains the stated objects. It is very efficient and reliable in operation. Reference has been made to the fact that the resilient member 25 thereof is constructed of a more yieldable material than the resilient member 26 for the purpose previously indicated. By way of example, only the material of the member 25 may have a durometer of 50 while the material of the member 26 may have a durometer of 70.

While only one form of the locator and holder in a crimping tool for an electrical connector has been illustrated and described, it will be apparent to those versed in the art that the invention may take other forms and is susceptible of various changes in details without departing from the principles of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination with a hand tool for crimping to a wire a terminal having an open-ended barrel part and an axial tongue projecting from a portion of the side 'wall structure of the barrel at one end of the latter, which tool has a pair of handle-operated jaws for opening and closing movements, which jaws are provided with complemental dies fixed thereto having opposing die cavities, a terminal locator and holder comprising a pair of resilient rubberlike terminal-gripping members, one mounted on each jaw at one end of the corresponding die and in generally opposing but somewhat laterally offset relation to the other member, at the same side of the tool, each resilient member projecting in a direction past the bottom of the corresponding die cavity toward the other member and one of the members projecting in this direction to a lesser extent than the other, the last-mentioned one of said members having a side face thereof serving as an abutment engageable by said end of the terminal barrel near said tongue which extends over the member, to axially orientate the terminal when inserted between the open dies, said projecting portions of the resilient members being engageable with the terminal tongue to grip it therebetween and angularly orientate the terminal as the jaws are closed somewhat, the farthest projecting resilient member, in the last-mentioned condition of the jaws, presenting a side face engageable by the wire when inserted through the terminal barrel part to act as a wire abutment, said resilient members being compressible by the terminal tongue on further closing movement of the jaws, the last-mentioned one of said members being formed of material more yieldable than the material of the other of said members, the last-mentioned member being yieldable laterally on elongation of the terminal barrel during crimpmg.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said resilient members of the terminal locator and holder comprise narrow blocks lying in planes parallel to the longitudinal median planes of the jaws.

3. The combination of claim 1 wherein the projecting portions of said resilient members of the terminal locator and holder are provided with substantially planar surfaces which engage the terminal tongue.

4. The combination of claim 1 wherein handles are provided for operating said jaws and there is provided a motion-compelling mechanism comprising an element on each handle coacting with the element on the other handle to prevent the jaws from reopening after initial closing movement of the jaws until the terminal has been crimped, to thereby inhibit dislocation of said terminal with reference to the jaws when the latter are in said somewhat closed condition.

5. The combination of claim 1 wherein said resilient members of the terminal locator and holder comprise narrow blocks lying in planes parallel to the longitudinal median planes of the jaws and wherein the projecting portions of said resilient members are provided with substantially planar surfaces which engage the terminal tongue.

6. The combination of claim 4 wherein said resilient members of the terminal locator and holder comprise narrow blocks lying in planes parallel to the longitudinal median planes of the jaws and wherein the projecting portions of said resilient members of the terminal locator and holder are provided with substantially planar surfaces which engage the terminal tongue.

7. The combination of claim wherein each die has a plurality of die cavities therein and each of said narrow blocks projects in the aforesaid manner beyond the bottom of each die cavity.

8. The combination of claim 5 wherein a pair of backup plates are provided to support the respective resilient block members, the plates being secured to the respective jaws by fasteners extending therethrough and into the respective jaws and passing through the respective resilient block members.

9. In combination with a hand tool for crimping to a wire a terminal having a barrel part and an axial tongue projecting from the barrel part at one end and one side of the latter, which tool has a pair of handle-operated jaws for opening and closing movements, which jaws are provided with complemental dies fixed thereto having opposing die cavities, a terminal locator and holder comprising a pair of resilient rubberlike terminal-gripping members, one mounted on each jaw at one end of the corresponding die and at least in generally opposing relation to the other member, at the same side of the tool, each resilient member projecting in a direction past the bottom of the corresponding die cavity toward the other member and one of the members projecting in this direction to a lesser extent than the other, the last-mentioned one of said members having a side face thereof serving as an abutment engageable by said end of the terminal barrel near said tongue which extends over the member, to axially orientate the terminal when inserted between the open dies, said projecting portions of the resilient members being-engageable with the terminal tongue to grip it therebetween and angula'rly orientate the terminal as the jaws are closed somewhat, the farthest projecting resilient member in the last-mentioned condition of the jaws extending to a greater extent over said end of the terminal barrel, said resilient members being compressible by the terminal tongue on further closing movement of the jaws, the last-mentioned of said members being formed of material more yieldable than the material of the other member, the lastrnentioned member being yieldable laterally on elongation of the terminal barrel during crimping, handles for operating said jaws, and a motion-compelling mechanism comprising an element on each handle coacting with the element on the other handle to prevent the jaws from reopening after initial closing movement of the jaws until the terminal has been crimped, to thereby inhibit dislocation of said terminal with reference to the jaws when the latter are in said somewhat closed condition.

10. The combination of claim 9 wherein said resilient members of the terminal locator and holder comprise narrow blocks lying in planes parallel to the longitudinal median planes of the jaws and wherein the projecting portions of said resilient members are provided with substantially planar surfaces to engage the terminal tongue.

11. Thecombination of claim 10 wherein each die has a plurality of die cavities therein and each of said narrow blocks projects in the aforesaid manner beyond the bottom of each die cavity.

12. The combination of claim 11 wherein a pair of back-up plates are provided to support the respective resilient block members, the plates being secured to the respective jaws by fasteners extending therethrough and into the respective jaws and passing through the resilient block members.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,519,225 12/1924 Townsend 269-275 X 2,086,400 7/1937 Brenizer 72-410 2,359,083 9/1944 Carlson 72-465 X 2,375,574 5/1945 Metheny 29-282 2,411,838 11/1946 Swengel.

2,488,484 11/ 1949 Van der Clute 81-421 2,953,185 9/1960 Lazar.

3,126,772 3/1964 Hancke 81-313 X 3,262,342 7/1966 Filia 81-313 3,277,751 10/1966 Filia 81-313 3,281,926 11/1966 Frastaci.

3,314,135 4/1967 Smith.

3,322,008 5/1967 Filia 81-313 WAYNE A. MORSE, JR., Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

US3487524A 1967-11-16 1967-11-16 Locator and holder in a crimping tool for an electrical connector Expired - Lifetime US3487524A (en)

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US4206539A (en) * 1977-05-17 1980-06-10 Thomas Weresch Device for bending, crimping, and trimming leads of transistors or similar components
US4227299A (en) * 1978-12-11 1980-10-14 Bunker Ramo Corporation Hand tool for terminal connection of electrical cable to an electrical connector
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EP0613220A1 (en) * 1993-02-24 1994-08-31 Lien-Huang Liu Crimping tool having terminal locating device
US5584200A (en) * 1994-11-08 1996-12-17 Grumman Aerospace Corporation Universal crimping tool locator
US6125682A (en) * 1998-01-26 2000-10-03 Framatome Connectors Usa, Inc. Hydraulic tool alignment guard
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US20060213248A1 (en) * 2005-03-25 2006-09-28 Mil3, Inc. Two-stroke tool
US7210378B1 (en) * 2006-07-24 2007-05-01 Lawrence Bibi Chain pliers with wire stripper
US20080115556A1 (en) * 2006-11-22 2008-05-22 Thomas Hughes Emergency Flow Stoppage Tool
US20110277530A1 (en) * 2010-05-12 2011-11-17 Haase Reinhold A Fence Clip Installation Tool
US20120272531A1 (en) * 2011-04-28 2012-11-01 Jordon David S Tool accommodating replaceable blade
US8739594B2 (en) 2011-09-15 2014-06-03 Danny Anderson Electrical connector crimping plier tool
US9089958B2 (en) 2011-07-01 2015-07-28 Mil3 Inc. Multi-functional tool for flexible pipe and related methods
US9413129B2 (en) 2012-11-01 2016-08-09 Pressmaster Ab Locator and wire stop device, hand operated crimping tool, and system

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US3710611A (en) * 1970-12-08 1973-01-16 Sargent & Co Terminal locator for crimping tool
US3824669A (en) * 1972-03-09 1974-07-23 Plessey Handel Investment Ag Hand-operated crimping tool
US4022051A (en) * 1975-05-08 1977-05-10 Seiichi Ichikawa Feeding apparatus of members to be crimped in crimping tools
US4206539A (en) * 1977-05-17 1980-06-10 Thomas Weresch Device for bending, crimping, and trimming leads of transistors or similar components
US4227299A (en) * 1978-12-11 1980-10-14 Bunker Ramo Corporation Hand tool for terminal connection of electrical cable to an electrical connector
US4353240A (en) * 1980-01-15 1982-10-12 Toolema Ab Crimping tool
FR2478516A1 (en) * 1980-03-19 1981-09-25 Toolema Ab Tool having two integral jaw of two jaws and a drive device connected to at least one of these jaws
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US4602536A (en) * 1980-08-25 1986-07-29 Fish Gerald N Hand tool for opening split rings
US4330936A (en) * 1981-02-23 1982-05-25 Swarth Oscar S Compressed tablet-splitting holder
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US4558584A (en) * 1983-03-14 1985-12-17 Paul Brong Machine Works, Inc. Combination cable crimper and cutter
US4635838A (en) * 1984-01-16 1987-01-13 Peter Urban Bonder for lead frames
EP0188018A2 (en) * 1985-01-03 1986-07-23 C.A. Weidmüller GmbH & Co. Pliers-like device for crimping cable shoes
EP0188018A3 (en) * 1985-01-03 1989-02-01 C.A. Weidmuller Gmbh & Co. Pliers-like device for crimping cable shoes
US4726266A (en) * 1985-02-06 1988-02-23 C. A. Weidmuller Gmbh & Co. Pair of pliers
EP0218376A2 (en) * 1985-09-10 1987-04-15 THOMAS & BETTS CORPORATION (a New Jersey Corporation) Connector support for crimping tool
EP0218376A3 (en) * 1985-09-10 1989-02-01 Thomas & Betts Corporation Connector support for crimping tool
WO1988000516A2 (en) * 1986-07-16 1988-01-28 Amphenol Corporation Crimp tool and dies therefor for use in attaching fiber optic cable to fiber optic connectors
WO1988000516A3 (en) * 1986-07-16 1988-02-11 Amphenol Corp Crimp tool and dies therefor for use in attaching fiber optic cable to fiber optic connectors
EP0344826A3 (en) * 1988-05-09 1990-09-26 C.A. WEIDMÜLLER GMBH & CO. Hand tool
EP0344826A2 (en) * 1988-05-09 1989-12-06 C.A. WEIDMÜLLER GMBH & CO. Hand tool
US5050421A (en) * 1990-02-08 1991-09-24 Adams Industries, Inc. Hand tool for fastening a terminal in an insulator
US5084963A (en) * 1990-09-28 1992-02-04 Burndy Corporation Preconnection deforming die and method of connecting a grounding rod with an electrical cable
US5138864A (en) * 1990-12-28 1992-08-18 Ripley Company, Inc. Crimping tool
EP0613220A1 (en) * 1993-02-24 1994-08-31 Lien-Huang Liu Crimping tool having terminal locating device
US5584200A (en) * 1994-11-08 1996-12-17 Grumman Aerospace Corporation Universal crimping tool locator
US6125682A (en) * 1998-01-26 2000-10-03 Framatome Connectors Usa, Inc. Hydraulic tool alignment guard
US6725546B1 (en) 1999-08-05 2004-04-27 Alterra Holdings Corporation Hardened insert for cutting tools
US20060213248A1 (en) * 2005-03-25 2006-09-28 Mil3, Inc. Two-stroke tool
US7886570B2 (en) 2005-03-25 2011-02-15 Mil3, Inc. Two-stroke tool
US7503201B2 (en) 2005-03-25 2009-03-17 Mil3, Inc. Two-stroke tool
US7210378B1 (en) * 2006-07-24 2007-05-01 Lawrence Bibi Chain pliers with wire stripper
US20080115556A1 (en) * 2006-11-22 2008-05-22 Thomas Hughes Emergency Flow Stoppage Tool
US20110277530A1 (en) * 2010-05-12 2011-11-17 Haase Reinhold A Fence Clip Installation Tool
US8327682B2 (en) * 2010-05-12 2012-12-11 Dutton-Lainson Company Fence clip installation tool
US8898911B2 (en) * 2011-04-28 2014-12-02 Itool Equipment Holding Llc Tool accommodating replaceable blade
US20120272531A1 (en) * 2011-04-28 2012-11-01 Jordon David S Tool accommodating replaceable blade
US9950413B2 (en) 2011-07-01 2018-04-24 Mil3 Inc. Multi-functional tool for flexible pipe and related methods
US9089958B2 (en) 2011-07-01 2015-07-28 Mil3 Inc. Multi-functional tool for flexible pipe and related methods
US8739594B2 (en) 2011-09-15 2014-06-03 Danny Anderson Electrical connector crimping plier tool
US9413129B2 (en) 2012-11-01 2016-08-09 Pressmaster Ab Locator and wire stop device, hand operated crimping tool, and system

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