US3472218A - Toy gun having a tapered barrel and sponge projectile - Google Patents

Toy gun having a tapered barrel and sponge projectile Download PDF

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Publication number
US3472218A
US3472218A US3472218DA US3472218A US 3472218 A US3472218 A US 3472218A US 3472218D A US3472218D A US 3472218DA US 3472218 A US3472218 A US 3472218A
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Prior art keywords
bore
projectile
gun
sponge
barrel
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Herbert La Mers
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WILLIAM GAMMON
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WILLIAM GAMMON
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F42AMMUNITION; BLASTING
    • F42BEXPLOSIVE CHARGES, e.g. FOR BLASTING, FIREWORKS, AMMUNITION
    • F42B5/00Cartridge ammunition, e.g. separately-loaded propellant charges
    • F42B5/02Cartridges, i.e. cases with charge and missile
    • F42B5/145Cartridges, i.e. cases with charge and missile for dispensing gases, vapours, powders, particles or chemically-reactive substances
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B11/00Compressed-gas guns, e.g. air guns; Steam guns
    • F41B11/60Compressed-gas guns, e.g. air guns; Steam guns characterised by the supply of compressed gas
    • F41B11/64Compressed-gas guns, e.g. air guns; Steam guns characterised by the supply of compressed gas having a piston effecting a compressor stroke during the firing of each shot
    • F41B11/642Compressed-gas guns, e.g. air guns; Steam guns characterised by the supply of compressed gas having a piston effecting a compressor stroke during the firing of each shot the piston being spring operated
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B7/00Spring guns
    • F41B7/08Toy guns, i.e. guns launching objects of the gliding type, e.g. airplanes, parachute missiles
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41CSMALLARMS, e.g. PISTOLS, RIFLES; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • F41C7/00Shoulder-fired smallarms, e.g. rifles, carbines, shotguns
    • F41C7/11Breakdown shotguns or rifles
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F42AMMUNITION; BLASTING
    • F42BEXPLOSIVE CHARGES, e.g. FOR BLASTING, FIREWORKS, AMMUNITION
    • F42B12/00Projectiles, missiles or mines characterised by the warhead, the intended effect, or the material
    • F42B12/02Projectiles, missiles or mines characterised by the warhead, the intended effect, or the material characterised by the warhead or the intended effect
    • F42B12/36Projectiles, missiles or mines characterised by the warhead, the intended effect, or the material characterised by the warhead or the intended effect for dispensing materials; for producing chemical or physical reaction; for signalling ; for transmitting information
    • F42B12/40Projectiles, missiles or mines characterised by the warhead, the intended effect, or the material characterised by the warhead or the intended effect for dispensing materials; for producing chemical or physical reaction; for signalling ; for transmitting information of target-marking, i.e. impact-indicating type
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F42AMMUNITION; BLASTING
    • F42BEXPLOSIVE CHARGES, e.g. FOR BLASTING, FIREWORKS, AMMUNITION
    • F42B8/00Practice or training ammunition
    • F42B8/02Cartridges
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S273/00Amusement devices: games
    • Y10S273/02Styrene

Description

H. LA MERS Oct. 14, 1969 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 16, 1967 ..S .w mmw WNW 3 m? M U O m 7 L U O O a m 5 m A 0 U o O, u x 8 AV E B m U m 3 Q or I! a on 4: m min mm ,4 wT fin fvn. n d fl w mw r J N N\. om/ m OT ,N 9 o w. vw 0v mm 4 m U D H- LA MERS Oct. 14, 1969 TOY GUN HAVING A TAPERED BARREL AND SPONGE PROJECTILE Filed Feb. 16. 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet O. wm

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' A FOR/Vi) United States Patent 3,472,218 TOY GUN HAVING A TAPERED BARREL AND SPONGE PROJECTILE Herbert La Mers, Marina Del Rey, Calif., assignor to David E. Larsen, Los Angeles, and William Gammon,

Granada Hills, Calif.

Filed Feb. 16, 1967, Ser. No. 616,727 Int. Cl. F41b 11/00 U.S. Cl. 124-15 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to a gun for shooting sponge projectiles. The gun bore has a constriction at its breech and is tapered from breech to muzzle, so that once the sponge passes the constriction, it expands as its moves down the barrel. The sponge projectile may be wetted with a disappearing dye to mark the point of impact on the target.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention This invention relates to toy guns of the type which fire actual projectiles.

Description of the prior art Present day toys which simulate grown up devices are usually made as similar to the grown up device as possible, due consideration being given to making the toy as safe and foolproof as possible. This has proved rather troublesome in case of toy guns since, in order to add to realism a gun should be capable of shooting a harmless projectile with substantial range and accuracy. It is also desirable that the projectiles provide an indication of its point of impact on the target area so that the user can determine his shooting accuracy. This has proved problematical since, toy guns which shoot solid objects, such as corks or darts with suction cup tips, can provide a reasonable range and accuracy, and which sometimes provide an indication of point of impact as when the darts stick to the target. However, these are hard objects which can cause injuries. A further problem is that the soft cup tips can be removed or broken off and the hard stick projectiles can still be fired from the gun. Also the stick or cork projectiles can be replaced by pellets, such as marbles which render guns such as these dangerous.

Toy guns which shook soft projectiles such as corks or felt pellets do not provide a reasonable range or accuracy. Here again however, these guns may be misused to shoot hard objects as well as soft ones, and they are not safe in the hands of children. A further disadvantage of many soft projectile-firing guns has been that the projectile does not impact with sufficient force to knock over small targets, and it has heretofore, proved difiicult to provide other accuracy indicating means which could be used with a wide variety of targets.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, one object of the present invention is to provide a toy gun and projectile therefor, which are safer than toy guns and projectiles available heretofore.

Another object of the present invention is to provide toy guns which fire soft projectiles with greater range and accuracy than toy guns available heretofore, and which cannot be readily misused to fire hard objects.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide soft projectiles for toy guns, which indicate their point of impact on a large variety of targets.

These and other objects are realized in an embodiment of the invention which includes a toy gun and a projectile of wet sponge. The gun barrel has a bore that is tapered so that the muzzle area has a greater cross-section than the breech area, and which has a constriction at the breech. The sponge projectile is loaded into the gun behind the constriction and is driven by compressed air through the constricted portion and down the tapered bore, toward the target.

The spone is larger than the constriction and thus the compressed air must first deform the sponge to enable it to pass through the constriction. As a result, the air pressure builds up to an optimum value at which time the sponse is sulficiently deformed to pass through the constriction and be moved by the compressed air through the gun barrel and out with an extremely high velocity. This high velocity provides the sponge projectile with a large trajectory as well as great accuracy. However, because of the soft nature of the sponge it is harmless.

A liquid disappearing dye may be used to wet the sponge. The dye leaves a temporary mark at the point of impact on the target area, thereby enabling accuracy to be checked. The wet sponge projectile may be placed in containers to facilitate general handling and to facilitate loading into the gun. The containers may be bulletshaped to simulate ordinary gunpowder cartridges and thereby add realism.

The novel features that are considered characteristic of this invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The invention itself both as to its organization and method of operation, as well as additional objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGURE 1 is a side elevation view, partially in section, of a toy gun and projectile constructed in accordance with the invention, shown immediately prior to firing;

FIGURES 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d and 26, indicate the cross sections at various points along the bore of the gun of FIGURE 1;

FIGURES 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d and 3e, indicate the cross sections at various points along another bore constructed in accordance with the invention which could be used in place of the bore of FIGURE 1;

FIGURES 3'a, 3'b, 3'0, 3'd, 3'e indicate the cross-sections at various points along still another bore con- 'structed in accordance with the invention which could be used in place of the bore of FIGURE 1;

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIGURE 1 illustrates one embodiment of a toy gun constructed in accordance with the invention. The gun comprises a frame 10, which encloses the firing mechanism, a barrel 12, and a gun handle 14. The firing mechanism includes a cylinder 16, a piston or plunger 18 within the cylinder for compressing air which moves the sponge projectiles, a plunger spring 20, for driving the plunger forward to compress the air, and a cocking ring 22 for drawing back the plunger to compress the spring and ready the mechanism for firing. The barrel 12 is connected to the frame by arm 24 which is pivotally joined to the frame at 26. The barrel is locked in position during firing by latch 28, which is constructed of a length of spring steel fixed to the frame, the latch 28 engaging a keeper 30 formed on the barrel.

The barrel 12, has a bore 34 formed along its axis, and the barrel includes a breech end 35 and a muzzle end 36. A chamber 38 is formed at the breech for holding a cartridge assembly 39. A constriction 40 exists at the intersection of the chamber and the bore, and the projectile must pass through this constriction. The bore has a long flare or taper between the constriction 40 and the muzzle end 36. The chamber 38 of the barrel connects to the cylinder 16 in the frame by an air passageway 44 formed in the frame, and a rubber gasket 46 on the frame provides a seal to prevent the escape of air as it passes to the barrel. A spronge projectile 48 is contained in a cartridge case 50, which is held in the chamber 38 of the barrel, the projectile and case being referred to the cartridge assembly 39. The sponge may be wetted for target impact indication, if desired.

In order to prepare the gun for firing, the barrel must be swung down to expose the chamber 38. The barrel is released by lifting up on the latch 28 to allow the barrel to swing down to the position shown in FIGURE 5. The cartridge assembly 39, is then inserted into the chamber 38. The gun is normally cocked while the barrel is in a swung-down position because the passageway 44 is then uncovered and air can flow into the cylinder. Cooking is accomplished by pulling on the cocking ring 22 to draw back the plunger 18 until it is locked in a rearward or arming position, as shown in FIGURE 5, the plunger being held by a pawl (not shown) of the trigger mechanism. The cocking ring 22 and plunger rod 19 are moved forward to their original position after cocking by a re turn mechanism (not shown). Trigger and return mechanisms for holding and releasing cylinders and for returning the cocking ring are well known in the art, and therefore, are not illustrated or described in detail. After loading and cocking the gun, the barrel is swung back to the position shown in FIGURE 1 and the gun is ready for firing.

The gun is fired by pulling the trigger 52 to operate the trigger mechanism that releases the plunger 18. The plunger moves forward under the force of the compressed spring 20, and causes a sudden compression of air in the forward part of the cylinder 16. The compressed air passes through the passageway 44 to the chamber 38 of the barrel, and through an aperture 54 formed in the base of the cartridge case 50. The compressed air pressure builds up because the sponge projectile is larger than the constriction. The air pressure pushes against the rearward portion of the sponge projectile 48 until it is squeezed down to a size to pass through the constriction 40. When this happen the projectile is projected therethrough quickly with a high velocity and thereafter moves down the tapered bore toward the muzzle 36 and flies toward the target.

The breech and tapered bore of the barrel have cross sections at the points A, B, C, D and E, indicated in FIG- URE 1, which, when viewed along arrow 2-2 appear as shown in FIGURES 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d and 22, respectively. As shown by the figures, the expansion from constriction B to muzzle E is essentially one-dimensional, from a slot to a circle, rather than two-dimensional as from a small circle to a large one. As the sponge passes through it, a slot-shaped constriction applies pressure on the sponge from top and bottom, but not from the sides, and reduces the possibility of the development of folds in the sponge. Any folds would, of course, have a deleterious eifect because the compressed air could pass around them. Other shapes for one-dimensional expansion may be used for the bore, such as the rectangular shapes of FIGURES 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d and 3e, which correspond to the shape 2A through 2E respectively. However, it should be noted that two-dimensional changes in shape (e.g. from a small to a large circle) can be used to obtain many of the advantages of the invention. It may also be noted that the crosssectional area of the chamber 38, illustrated in FIGURE 2a, is several times greater than the cross-sectional area at the constriction shown in FIGURE 2b. This difference exists because the sponge projectile has a cross-sectional area, when it is uncompressed, which is several times as great as the cross-sectional area at the constriction.

One of the advantages of the invention is that the gun can almost never be used to shoot hard objects which can cause injury. Large objects loaded into the chamber 38 will not pass through the constriction 40, and any small objects which pass through will not travel far, because most of the compressed air will pass around the object, especially as it reaches portions of the bore with a greater area. Large objects can be inserted through the muzzle 36, but even if the objects do not fall out they will not emerge with great force, since the compressed air will tend to flow around the object instead of propelling it, the taper of the bore assures that the objects will not provide an airtight fit with the walls of the bore for an appreciable length of the bore.

If the bore were circular throughout its length, (i.e. expanded from a small circle to a large one) instead of having a one-dimensional taper, then many common objects, such as marbles, ball hearings, or even peas, would form a tight fit at some depth in the bore, when muzzle-loaded into the gun. Such objects could then be shot with appreciable force, although the force would be much less than if the bore were not tapered. However, the bore of the embodiment of FIGURE 1 has an oval cross-section throughout most of its length, and oval objects which would provide a tight fit at some point along the bore are not common. While the bore is almost circular near the muzzle, a large round object inserted there will travel only a short distance down the bore, will be driven by air which has already expanded appreciably, and therefore will not be propelled with appreciable force.

In the case of a bore with a one-dimensional taper which generally varies only in height, as from an oval slot to nearly a circle, it is possible to prevent the insertion of any hard object through the muzzle end by slightly narrowing the width (not height) of the extreme muzzle end; the muzzle end then has the smallest width (though it has the greatest height).

The construction and taper of the bore not only prevent the firing of solid objects in most instances, but also aid in the attainment of distance and accuracy when a sponge-like projectile is fired. This will be appreciated from a description of the projectile and the manner in which it is propelled.

The projectile 48 is a pellet of cylindrical shape, constructed of elastic (at least when wet) sponge material, such as natural sponge, or an elastic form of polystyrene foam. The cartridge case 50 may be constructed of plastic, metal, or other structural material, and has a bullet shape to add realism. The base or rear portion of the cartridge case has a large hole 54 through which air enters during firing of the gun to drive out the projectile. The front or nose portion 58 of the case narrows to aid in directing the projectile through the constriction in the bore.

The sponge projectile is wetted, either before or after insertion in the cartridge case. It is believed that the wetting combined with the constriction and expansion during passage through the bore are what enables the attainment of relatively great accuracy and range. Because of the taper of the bore, the aft part of the projectile is always compressed more than the fore part, particularly when the projectile has just passed the constriction 40 and the aft part is under maximum compression. The fluid in the sponge projectile moves toward the section of least compression, which is the fore part, and therefore the projectile is heavier fore than aft as it leaves the barrel. The heavier fore section stabilizes the projectile in flight and increases both range and accuracy.

Heretofore it has been generally believed that a light projectile could not be made to travel an appreciable distance with repeatable trajectory (i.e. accuracy). Guns and projectiles have been constructed in accordance with the invention and tested, and they have been found to exhibit substantial range and accuracy.

A toy gun constructed in accordance with the present invention having a barrel with a bore tapered along its 3 inch length, and having a minimum bore height of approximately A; inch and maximum bore height of approximately inch has been found to function satisfactorily, both in providing accuracy and range and in preventing the shooting of hard objects. Thus, a bore having a narrowest dimension at the point of greatest cross-sectional area (eg the muzzle), which is at least about 200% greater than the narrowest dimension at the point of smallest cross-sectional area (e.g. the constriction at the beginning of the taper), functions well.

The wetting agent applied to the sponge projectile may be water or a variety of other liquids. The enjoyment obtained from play with the gun can be greatly increased by using a disappearing dye. When a dye is used, the projectile leaves a small mark on the target at the point of impact. This enables a determination of the accuracy of shooting. Various dyes can be used to wet the projectile for example, thymolphthalein, used as a pH indicator, can be used to obtain a blue stain which soon disappears. Other hydrogen ion concentration indicators are suitable for obtaining impact markings of other colors.

Toy guns constucted in accordance with the foregoing principles can have a variety of forms. For example, a gun having a curved barrel as shown in the top view of FIGURE 6, can be constructed with a tapered bore. The gain of FIGURE 6 is designed to shoot around corners or over objects, and includes a small mirror 70, mounted on the curved barrel 72, has a tapered bore and functions similarly to the gun of FIGURE 1. Another form of the invention is similar to a revolver-type hand gun, with several chambers formed in a cylinder, the cylinder being rotatable to bring any one chamber into alignment with the bore of the barrel.

While a limited number of embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, a large variety of other embodiments and many variations and modifications in those described will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

For example, to lend further realism to the gun a suitable noisemaker may be attached, without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention. Accordingly, the scope of the invention is not limited to the part cular embodiments described herein, but only by a ust interpretation of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A gun comprising:

a frame including means for delivering compresed gas; and

a barrel connected to said frame, said barrel having a bore which is tapered along a majority of its effective length so that portions closer to the muzzle have a larger cross-sectional area than portions further from the muzzle, said bore having an end opposite the muzzle which connects to said means for delivering compressed gas,

a sponge means having an uncompressed maximum cross-sectional area at least several times greater than the cross-sectional area of said bore at its point of smallest cross-sectional area; and

means for installing said sponge means between said means for delivering compressed gas and narrow portions of said bore, whereby to enable compressed gas to drive said sponge means down the tapered bore towards the muzzle and thence towards a target.

2. A gun as defined in claim 1 wherein said sponge means carries a wetting agent of said sponge means, said wetting agent being colored, for making the point of impact of said sponge means on the target.

3. A gun comprising:

a frame including means for delivering compressed gas; and

a barrel connected to said frame, said barrel having a bore which is tapered along a majority of its effective length so that portions closer to the muzzle have a larger cross-sectional area than portions further from the muzzle, said bore having an end opposite the muzzle which connects to said means for delivering compresed gas,

said barrel further having a breach end opposite the muzzle and a chamber disposed at said breech end, said chamber having across-sectional area several times greater than the point along said bore having the minimum cross-sectional area, and including a cartridge assembly adapted for insertion into said chamber, said cartridge assembly including a cartridge case having apertures at opposite ends and a sponge disposed within the case.

4. A projectile for shooting at targets comprising:

a pellet of sponge-like material wetted with a dye of the type which readily disappears, whereby to enable the marking of the point of impact of the projectile on a target;

said projectile further including a cartridge case disposed about said pellet for facilitating the insertion of the pellet in a gun chamber, said cartridge having a base portion with a hole for admitting pressure gas and a nose portion with a hole for enabling the ejection of the pellet from the case;

a gun for shooting said pellet including a barrel having a tapered bore which is widest near the muzzle and narrowest near the end opposite the muzzle, and having a chamber adjacent to the bore end opposite muzzle for holding said cartridge case; and

means for delivering pressured gas to said chamber to drive said pellet out of said case and through said bore.

5. A gun apparatus comprising:

a barrel having a breech. end and a muzzle end, and

including a bore tapered from a narrowest configuration near the breech end to a widest configuration near the muzzle end;

chamber means disposed adjacent to said breech end .of said barrel for holding a projecticle, said chamber 1 means having a cross-sectional area substantially greater than that of the narrowest portion of said bore.

a projectile constructed of flexibly compressible material, for disposal in said chamber; and

pressure mean connected to said chamber for providing pressure gas for driving said projectile into said tapered bore.

6. A gun as defined in claim 5 including:

a cartridge case of bullet shape disposed about said projectile, said case having a base with a hole for admitting gas and a nose with a hole for allowing the passage of said projectie into said bore; and wherein the cross-section of said bore at the end opposite the muzzle is a slot and near the muzzle end is substantially circular.

7 8 7. A gun as defined in claim 5 wherein said projectile 2,828,579 4/1958 schwerbel 124--13 has pores filled with a liquid. 3,379,176 4/ 1968 Propst 10292 8. A gun as defined in claim 7 wherein said liquid is a dye. RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner References Clted 5 R. W. DIAZ, Assistant Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,266,533 5/1918 Beck 124 13 2,149,799 3/1939 Savage 124-13 124-30, 41; 273106 2,725,868 12/1955 Foster "124-430

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Cited By (26)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3729848A (en) * 1970-09-17 1973-05-01 G Wilhelm Hand gun and ammunition therefor
US3766902A (en) * 1971-06-14 1973-10-23 R Repinski Projectile type toy for projecting electrostatically charged projectiles
FR2416444A1 (en) * 1978-01-31 1979-08-31 Placo Prod Co Fleche and gun to launch
US4686904A (en) * 1986-06-02 1987-08-18 Stafford Gilbert A Shell having pyramid shaped shot
US4781645A (en) * 1985-05-24 1988-11-01 Tadashi Sakuma Inflatable bag with inner and intermediate containers and gas generation substances within inner container
US4932329A (en) * 1989-08-11 1990-06-12 Logie Glenn S Simulated hand grenade with marking means
WO1993014848A1 (en) * 1992-01-29 1993-08-05 Mattel, Inc. Adaptable toy launcher
US5303496A (en) * 1993-01-19 1994-04-19 David Kowalkowski Scent distributing method for hunters
WO1995014207A1 (en) * 1993-11-13 1995-05-26 Richmond Electronics And Engineering Limited Liquid containing projectile made of plastics foam and gun for firing such a projectile
US5575270A (en) * 1993-09-21 1996-11-19 Industrias El Gamo, S.A. Air guns
US5655509A (en) * 1995-01-18 1997-08-12 Industrias El Gamo, S.A. Air guns of the rifle or pistol type
FR2753079A1 (en) * 1996-09-11 1998-03-13 John D Register Veterinary medicament administration pistol
US6192612B1 (en) * 1998-03-02 2001-02-27 Oblon, Spivak, Mcclelland, Maier & Neustadt, P.C. Propulsion device
US20040066072A1 (en) * 2002-10-01 2004-04-08 Trippensee Darin J. Load-assist actuator
US20060260597A1 (en) * 2005-05-23 2006-11-23 Anderson Kenneth K Barrel system for a paintball marker
US20100154764A1 (en) * 2008-12-24 2010-06-24 Sheng-Jen Liao Barrel for prohibiting paintball from dropping therefrom
US20110005120A1 (en) * 2009-07-13 2011-01-13 Spin Master Ltd. Bow Fishing Rod
US20110168150A1 (en) * 2009-06-01 2011-07-14 Peter Kit Chuen Fan Reconfigurable Toy Gun
US20110271941A1 (en) * 2010-05-10 2011-11-10 Hobbeezone, Inc. Soft-projectile launching device
US20110271940A1 (en) * 2010-05-10 2011-11-10 Meggs Keith G Soft-projectile launching device
US20120152221A1 (en) * 2010-12-20 2012-06-21 Hobbeezone, Inc. Soft- projectile magazine refill apparatus and methods
US20130067787A1 (en) * 2011-09-16 2013-03-21 Raymond Aaron Mead Cocking system for dart launcher
US8776771B1 (en) * 2013-02-27 2014-07-15 Green Science Laboratory Inc. Pneumatic gun and extension barrel
US20140238373A1 (en) * 2013-02-26 2014-08-28 Green Science Laboratory Inc. Pneumatic gun
USD739468S1 (en) 2014-06-19 2015-09-22 MerchSource, LLC Floating target game
US9982976B1 (en) 2016-11-27 2018-05-29 Luke Alexander Van Valin Paint arrow and game

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US1266533A (en) * 1917-11-05 1918-05-14 Heinrich Beck Toy gun.
US2149799A (en) * 1935-12-31 1939-03-07 Gen Motors Corp Refrigerating apparatus
US2725868A (en) * 1951-10-31 1955-12-06 Don O Scott Air gun
US2828579A (en) * 1957-05-27 1958-04-01 George N Schwerbel Bubble gun
US3379176A (en) * 1965-10-20 1968-04-23 Miller Herman Inc Livestock identification method and apparatus

Patent Citations (5)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1266533A (en) * 1917-11-05 1918-05-14 Heinrich Beck Toy gun.
US2149799A (en) * 1935-12-31 1939-03-07 Gen Motors Corp Refrigerating apparatus
US2725868A (en) * 1951-10-31 1955-12-06 Don O Scott Air gun
US2828579A (en) * 1957-05-27 1958-04-01 George N Schwerbel Bubble gun
US3379176A (en) * 1965-10-20 1968-04-23 Miller Herman Inc Livestock identification method and apparatus

Cited By (38)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3729848A (en) * 1970-09-17 1973-05-01 G Wilhelm Hand gun and ammunition therefor
US3766902A (en) * 1971-06-14 1973-10-23 R Repinski Projectile type toy for projecting electrostatically charged projectiles
FR2416444A1 (en) * 1978-01-31 1979-08-31 Placo Prod Co Fleche and gun to launch
US4212285A (en) * 1978-01-31 1980-07-15 Placo Products Company Dart gun and dart therefor
US4781645A (en) * 1985-05-24 1988-11-01 Tadashi Sakuma Inflatable bag with inner and intermediate containers and gas generation substances within inner container
US4686904A (en) * 1986-06-02 1987-08-18 Stafford Gilbert A Shell having pyramid shaped shot
US4932329A (en) * 1989-08-11 1990-06-12 Logie Glenn S Simulated hand grenade with marking means
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