US3467944A - Interconnection system with precision terminal alignment - Google Patents

Interconnection system with precision terminal alignment Download PDF

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US3467944A
US3467944A US3467944DA US3467944A US 3467944 A US3467944 A US 3467944A US 3467944D A US3467944D A US 3467944DA US 3467944 A US3467944 A US 3467944A
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Prior art keywords
header
panel
connector
terminal
mounting
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Kemper Martel Hammell
Kenneth Leon Whitmoyer
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AMP Inc
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AMP Inc
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R13/00Details of coupling devices of the kinds covered by groups H01R12/70 or H01R24/00-H01R33/00
    • H01R13/40Securing contact members in or to a base or case; Insulating of contact members
    • H01R13/42Securing in a demountable manner
    • H01R13/428Securing in a demountable manner by resilient locking means on the contact members; by locking means on resilient contact members
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R12/00Structural associations of a plurality of mutually-insulated electrical connecting elements, specially adapted for printed circuits, e.g. printed circuit boards [PCBs], flat or ribbon cables, or like generally planar structures, e.g. terminal strips, terminal blocks; Coupling devices specially adapted for printed circuits, flat or ribbon cables, or like generally planar structures; Terminals specially adapted for contact with, or insertion into, printed circuits, flat or ribbon cables, or like generally planar structures
    • H01R12/70Coupling devices
    • H01R12/71Coupling devices for rigid printing circuits or like structures
    • H01R12/712Coupling devices for rigid printing circuits or like structures co-operating with the surface of the printed circuit or with a coupling device exclusively provided on the surface of the printed circuit
    • H01R12/716Coupling device provided on the PCB
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K7/00Constructional details common to different types of electric apparatus
    • H05K7/02Arrangements of circuit components or wiring on supporting structure
    • H05K7/10Plug-in assemblages of components, e.g. IC sockets
    • H05K7/1015Plug-in assemblages of components, e.g. IC sockets having exterior leads
    • H05K7/103Plug-in assemblages of components, e.g. IC sockets having exterior leads co-operating by sliding, e.g. DIP carriers
    • H05K7/1038Plug-in assemblages of components, e.g. IC sockets having exterior leads co-operating by sliding, e.g. DIP carriers with spring contact pieces

Description

Sept. 16, 1969 M, AMME ET AL 3,467,44

INTERCONNECTION SYSTEM WITH PRECISION TERMINAL ALIGNMENT Filed March 4, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR KEMPER MARTEL HAMMELL KENNETH LEON WHITHOYER Sept. 16, 1969 HAMMELL ET'AL 3,467,944

INTERCONNECTION SYSTEM wmx PRECISION TERMINAL ALIGNMENT Filed March 4, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 H" A A I 000 0 0000000 0Z 000 00000 0 000000 0 O O O O 0 0 O O 0 0 O 0 O 0 0 000 0 0000000 OOOOOOQiOOOOOOO {0000000 0 00000 0000000 0000000 0000000 0000000 00000 0000000 0000000 0000000 0000000 E3 E2 52E E3 M in. 2 A5 INVENTOR KEIPER MARTEL nmncu.

Sept. 16, 1969 M MME ET Al. 3,467,944

INTERCONNECTION SYSTEM WITH PRECISION TERMINAL ALIGNMENT Filed March 4, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 I NVENTO R KEMPER HARTEL HAMHELL narmnn LEON wmmovsn BYMM Sept. 16,1969 K. M. HAMMELL ETAL 3,467,944

INTERCONNEGTION SYSTEM WITH PRECISION TERMINAL ALIGNMENT Filed March 4, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 4.

INVENTOR KEMPER MARTEL HAHMELL KENNETH LEON wun'movsn United States Patent O 3,467,944 INTERCONNECTION SYSTEM WITH PRECISION TERMINAL ALIGNMENT Kemper Martel Hammell, Harrisburg, and Kenneth Leon Whitmoyer, Camp Hill, Pa., assignors to AMP Incorporated, Harrisburg, Pa.

Filed Mar. 4, 1968, Ser. No. 710,308 Int. Cl. H02b 1/02; H01r 33/76, 9/12 U.S. Cl. 339125 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An interconnection system is disclosed which features an assembly comprised of a panel having a series of headers mounted thereon each adapted to receive a component plugged into header terminals which are extended through the panel in a manner suitable to permit automatic machine wiring. Header terminal position is controlled relative to header apertures which each include intersecting surfaces positioned relative to a header master mounting hole. The header apertures are oversize relative to the cross-sectional area of the terminals and the terminals include spring elements biasing the terminals into the corner defined by the intersecting surfaces of the header apertures. The panel includes a series of terminal holes which are oversized to provide clearance around each terminal to thus make terminal placement dependent upon header placement. The panel further includes a series of header mounting holes positioned relative to a panel master hole to thus provide a control of header placement and thereby control of terminal placement. The header terminals each include post portions at one end and at the other end spring contact portions adapted to receive the leads of components which may be plugged into the headers or removable therefrom.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Automatic machine wiring of arrays of terminals is typically accomplished through an XY coordinate control which dimensionally locates each terminal to a given tolerance. In a typical application terminals are defined by rigid posts extended from a mounting panel on centers which may range from 0.150 down to 0.075 of an inch. A given terminal array may include numbers of posts ranging from several dozen to several thousand with a required post tip tolerance ranging between 0.025 to 0.020 of an inch diameter, true dimension, relative to a panel master reference hole. In a typical application interconnections between posts are made by connecting insulated leads from post to post and these interconnections usually define most of the conductive paths for a given circuit. These connections may be made by automatic machines through techniques including the tension wrapping of the stripped leads of a wire about a post or by forcing the conductive strands of a wire against a post through the application of a clip type connector. In many applications the various terminal posts are extended through the mounting panels and connected to components or to some means carrying components such as printed circuit cards, connector blocks or the like. Frequently these connections must be made to include spring portions so that components or component cards may be plugged into and removed from contact with panel carried terminals. In one type of assembly all terminal elements are fixed to a panel with component connectors separately mounted thereon and joined to the terminal elements. Several problems arise with this kind of assembly construction. First, if the terminals are forced into preformed apertures in the panel, the stress 3,467,944 Patented Sept. 16, 1969 loading of the panel by each terminal element may accumulate to cause the panel to become bowed or curved, throwing the terminals out of proper alignment and out of proper center spacing for automatic machine wiring. Second, unless great care is exercised and extremely close tolerances are carried in forming the panel holes and forming the terminal elements the terminal element spacing will require a separate assembly step including straightening each individual terminal element after it has been affixed into a panel. With the kind of assembly construction wherein terminal elements are fixedly mounted in a board there is the additional problem of connecting the terminal elements to component receiving connectors.

An alternative assembly sometimes used features a terminal element mounting in a connector bloc or body which has been attached to a panel with the terminals being forced through holes in the panel and with some separate means utilized to secure the connector block to the panel. With an assembly construction of this type problems have been experienced not only in maintaining proper center spacing of terminal elements for automatic machine wiring, but in fitting the connectors carrying the terminal elements into the panel; tolerance variations in either the connector, the connector terminals or in the panel combining to cause an improper fit between the various parts. In both of the abovementioned examples the general approach is to make all interfitting parts to tolerances which will provide a proper matching of centers. For example, circular mounting holes in a connector block are made to have dimensions and tolerances so as to be precisely aligned with circular mounting holes in a panel. As a further example, circular mounting apertures or holes in a connector are made and dimensioned to receive circular terminals and position such elements on predetermined centers. This provides a theoretically sound approach to the assembly of numerous elements. With very small parts and with assemblies having large numbers of very small parts, however, the approach usually results in assembly difficulties because the parts fit tightly and individual loads developed in the parts accumulate to cause warpage or distortion of connector blocks, panels and terminals. For example, with a connector having fourteen projecting elements such as terminals which must be fitted into fourteen holes precisely dimensioned relative to the terminal elements, exact tolerancing will result in a tight interference fit of each of the fourteen elements into assorted connector holes. The sum of fourteen stresses may readily warp the connector to preclude installation onto a panel, the terminals being canted so as to not align with panel holes. If the panel holes are large enough to permit insertion, the terminals will still be out of alignment relative to machine wiring. On the otherhand, if the dimensions of elements are arranged so as to provide an easy fitting together, it becomes very difficult to maintain the required post tip center spacing when large numbers of elements must be combined together in an assembly.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an interconnection system for mounting and connecting electrical and/or electronic components in an assembly having a relatively large number of relatively small elements.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an interconnection system wherein numbers of electrical and/or electronic components are mounted and connected into a circuit of use in a manner facilitating component installation and replacement. It is a further object to provide an interconnection system which accommodates automatic wiring of arrays of terminals to define circuit connections for numbers of circuit components. It is yet another object to provide a technique which facilitates assembly of component carrying headers each including a number of terminals onto a common panel to form an array of terminal posts adapted for automatic machine wiring. It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved component header which can be readily made with existing manufacturing techniques to yield a precise displacement of terminal elements carried therein. It is yet another object of the invention to provide an assembly of component carrying headers and a panel which provides a precise alignment of terminal elements for automatic machine wiring.

The foregoing objects are attained and the foregoing problems are overcome by a component mounting assembly including component headers having terminals atfixed therein, which are mounted onto a panel with the header terminals forming an array for automatic ma.- chine wiring. The invention contemplates an arrangement of elements and a control of element dimension and tolerance which facilitates assembly of numerous small parts to provide a precise center-to-center spacing of terminals. The assembly panel includes a master hole with a series of header mounting holes positioned relative to such master hole and with terminal holes oversize to avoid any criticality of terminal placement in the panel by reason of engagement with the panel. Headers are provided with mounting holes, one of which is master hole for the header and the other of which is oversized in the length dimension of the header to permit the header to be precisely mounted onto the panel without being forced. Apertures in the header are made oversized relative to connectors mounted therein and include intersecting surfaces defining a corner with such surfaces being positioned relative to the header master hole and with the connectors including spring elements biasing the connectors into the corner defined by such intersecting surfaces.

The headers of the invention include a disposition of mounting holes interiorly of the header body to permit terminal post portions of the header connectors to be disposed on standard centers in a configuration to facilitate header insertion and removal from a panel. The headers further incorporate features which facilitate orientation and identification on a panel.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view showing a panel having a number of component headers secured thereon with terminal posts of header connectors extended through the panel and interconnected by wires to form a component circuit;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of a header in accordance with the invention, considerably larger than actual size;

FIGURE 3 is a side and sectional view of the header shown in FIGURE 1, as mounted on a panel;

FIGURES 4 and 5 are plan views of a panel and header lay-out included to support an explanation of the arrangement and control of panel and header dimensions;

FIGURE 6 is a plan view of a corner of the header shown in FIGURES 1-3 and 5;

FIGURE 7 is a sectional elvation of the corner of the header taken along lines 77 of FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 8 is a plan view from the bottom of the corner of the header as depicted in FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 9 is a sectional elevation view of the corner of the header taken along 99 of FIGURE 7;

FIGURE 10 is a sectional view similar to FIGURE 9 with a component lead shown inserted in a connector mounted in the header;

FIGURES 11 and 12 are side and sectional views showing the engagement of a component lead between 4 spring contacts of the connector of the header shown in FIGURE 10;

FIGURE 13 is a cross-sectional view of the corner of the header showing the engagement of the connector with the aperture formed in the header material;

FIGURE 14 is a perspective view, considerably enlarged, of the connector of the invention;

FIGURES 15, 16, 17 and 18 are cross-sctional views of different portions of the connectors shown in FIGURE 14;

FIGURE 19 is a perspective view, considerably enlarged, of one embodiment of a commoning element for use with a connector of the invention FIGUURE 20 is a perspective of an alternative commoning element for use with a connector of the invention;

FIGURE 21 is a plan view showing the commoning element of FIGURE 19 installed on a connector post;

FIGURE 22 is a side and sectional view of the commoning element of FIGURE 19 mounted on a connector and installed on a panel; and

FIGURE 23 is a side and sectional view of the commoning element of FIGURE 20 engaging a connector and installed on a panel.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to FIGURE 1, an end portion of a panel P is shown to contain a number of headers H which are adapted to receive electronic or electrical components such as integrated circuit components, shown as IC. The object of the assembly shown in FIGURE 1 is to form a circuit comprised of components IC and the necessary interconnections between the leads thereof for a given circuit function. Panels like P are typically comprised of printed circuit board material including a sheet of thermosetting plastic material such as a glass-filled phenolic resin having on one or both sides a thin foil of copper which in many applications is plated with a precious metal finish. The foil is used as a ground plane and/or a shielding. In some applications panels may be formed of sheet metal with or without insulating inserts therein. The panels P are typically mounted in racks or frames and the circuits carried thereby are interconnected to provide a complete system circuit. The circuit connections for a given panel are evidenced in FIGURE 1 by wires W terminated to terminal posts TP extended through P from the headers H. The wires W thus interconnect different leads from the components IC extended into the headers and into engagement with connectors contained therein. Considering that FIGURE 1 is somewhat abbreviated showing of a panel and the number of headers and components carried thereon, one of the problems previously mentioned is to maintain a proper center-to-center spacing between terminal posts TP to accommodate automatic machine wiring. The problem is, of course, greatest with respect to the longest axis of terminal posts because of tolerance accumulation.

In accordance with the invention concept, the panel P is made to include a master hole PM, which is a reference for each of the number of other holes in P. FIGURE 1 shows a set of holes for each header position to include two header mounting holes HM and HA and fourteen terminal holes TH arranged in two rows to correspond to two rows of terminals of each header. FIGURES 4 and 5 show in greater detail the disposition of holes in P. In accordance with the invention concept as evidenced in FIGURE 4, the header mounting holes HM and HA are arranged along rows and columns centered on lines referenced to PM. The master reference lines for PM are shown as A and B with header mounting hole reference lines for hole columns shown as A A A A etc. across the panel. The mounting holes are arranged in rows along reference lines B B etc., which are positioned relative to B. The header mounting holes HM and HA are carried to a relatively close tolerance to be centered rather precisely on the reference center lines relative to the panel master hole. The terminal holes may be carried to rather wide tolerance due to the larger diameter which precludes interference with the terminal posts inserted therein. In accordance with the invention concept evidenced in FIGURE 5, each header includes a header master hole hm and a header auxiliary mounting hole ha. The header master hole hm is of the same diameter as the header master hole HM in the panel and both holes are adapted to provide an interference fit with the mounting member used to mount the header to the panel. The auxiliary mounting hole HA has a generally oblong shape along the B axis with the width dimension along the A axis being made equal to the diameter of the mounting hole in the panel. By making the auxiliary mounting hole oblong tolerance variations in either the panel or the header itself are accommodated along the length axis of the header to assure that the header may be easily mounted on the panel by mounting elements fitted through the header holes and through the panel holes. At the same time the configuration of the mounting holes in the header assures a precise location of the header on the panel related to the panel master hole and to the reference center lines A and B associated with a given header position. FIGURE 3 depicts a header as mounted utilizing screws fitted through the panel and through the header mounting holes with nuts captivated within the header. Referring back to FIGURE 5, each header includes a series of connector apertures (shown in detail as 34 in FIGURES 6-10 and 13), which are of a generally square cross-sectional configuration, somewhat larger than the cross-section of the connector fitted therein. In accordance with the invention concept, each of the header apertures include intersecting wall surfaces which define corners. The upper row of header apertures have the left wall surfaces positioned along center lines a which are referenced to the header master hole hm in turn referenced to the center line reference A The position of the walls along lines a is carried to a relatively close tolerance. The upper row of apertures include transverse and interior wall surfaces which are disposed along a line reference b in turn referenced to the header master hole hm which is disposed along B This dimension is also carried to a close tolerance. The lower row of apertures is similarly made with intersecting wall surfaces disposed along reference lines a and b in turn referenced to hm and the reference lines A and B The lower row of apertures have these reference surfaces oppositely oriented relative to the upper row of apertures in the manner shown in FIGURE 5.

The dimensions establishing the distances of the reference lines a and b for the upper and lower rows of apertures from the reference lines A and B are com pensated relative to each other so that connectors fitted into the header in the manner shown in FIGURE 5 will have longitudinal centers disposed along common center lines. This is indicated in FIGURE 5 by the small xs evidencing the centers of the connectors. Each of the connectors includes spring elements to be described in detail hereinafter which bias the connectors into a corner of a header aperture in the manner shown in FIGURES 5 and 13, so that each connector position is referenced to a fixed and toleranced interior corner in the header, in turn referenced to the header master hole tied to the dimensioning scheme of the panel. The use of an interior corner as in the header better assures that a close tolerance can be maintained. The remaining surfaces of the header for the opposing and somewhat more flexible walls are carried to a somewhat lesser tolerance. The arrangement depicted in FIGURE 5 contrasts materially with the common practice of attempting to center connectors, terminals or the like within the center of a round aperture by trying to hold all the surfaces of the apertures on a given center line. The arrangement and dimensioning of panel, header and connector elements of the assembly in accordance with the foregoing teaching have been found to substantially ease manufacture and assembly of elements and to better assure the small tolerance maintenance of terminal post centers for automatic machine wiring.

Referring back to FIGURES l, 2 and 3, a more detailed description of the header and header connectors will now be given. The header H includes a body 10 preferably molded of a relatively hard thermoplastic material or of a thermosetting plastic material in a. generally rectangular configuration. At the left end as shown in FIGURE 2 is a keying and orienting projection 12. Viewing FIGURES 2 and 3, shows body 10 to include in the top portion a pair of rectangular apertures 14 which provide access to mounting holes previously identified as hm and ha through which are fitted mounting elements such as screws, rivets or the like to mount the headers to a panel. The upper portion of each hole is enlarged as at 16 shown in FIGURE 3 to accommodate a nut which is made to receive a mounting member shown as 20. In FIGURE 3 the master mounting hole is shown as 18 and the auxiliary mounting hole is shown as 19. There is a central interior relief shown as 22 within the body 10 with a stabilizing central web which permits more uniform cooling during molding and thereby improved dimensional control. At each end of the body 10 toward the lower portion thereof are recesses shown as 24 and 26 in FIGURE 3, which facilitate removal of a header by permitting the ends of a suitable tool to grip the header as mounted on a panel without requiring appreciable lateral access. As can be seen from FIGURE 1, one or both ends of a header may be restricted by adjacent headers.

As shown in FIGURES 2 and 3, the access holes 14 each include at the end surfaces thereof, projections shown as 28 and 30, which are spaced apart to support and secure covers shown as 32. The covers 32 are typically formed of thin sheet thermoplastic material such as nylon, capable of being deformed to be snapped within holes 14 and latched therein against the surfaces of projections 28 and under the surfaces of projections 30. Each of the covers includes a hole shown as 33 which can be used to remove the cover from the hole 14. By inserting a pin or the like into 33 the cover can be deformed along its length to clear the projections 30 and be removed. The covers can be given different markings or colorings to identify different headers on a panel and can also serve the functions of preventing loss of the nuts in the event that the screw is accidentally left out of the assembly. This latter feature is of some importance in airborne applications wherein there is a need to avoid loose particles.

Referring now to FIGURES 2 and 610, the body 10 of each header may be seen to include two rows of header apertures 34 which accommodate connectors 50. Each header aperture includes at the top surface of the header a beveled portion shown as 35 which serves to guide a component lead into the header aperture through a narrowed cylindrical portion 36 which centers the header lead for insertion within a connector 50. As shown in FIGURES 7, 8, 9 and 10, the header aperture within the body 10 is somewhat enlarged from the diameter 36 to include a recess shown as 38 which is shaped to receive contact portions of a connector 50. A transverse surface 40 is provided within 38 to engage a connector 50 and limit axial displacement therein in an upward sense relative to the header body. A transverse surface 42 is provided opposite 40 and spaced axially along 38 a slight distance from the plane of 40 for the same purpose. As shown in FIGURE 7, the outside wall of the header for each header aperture is relieved as at 44 to permit an external access to the connector within the header. FIGURE 2 shows the disposition of 44 for one row of connectors for a header body. The wall opposite 44 is beveled as at 46 to assure clearance of the edge of the body from a connector inserted therein. Extending 7 along a portion of 38 in the lower part of the body is a projection shown as 48, shown in FIGURES 7 and 13. This projection provides a somewhat resilient engagement with a connector and in particular with a spring portion thereof to bias the connector toward the opposite wall of the aperture 38.

The connectors for the header are shown in FIGURES 14-18 to be comprised of a one-piece sheet metal stamping including a terminal post portion 52 extending along the substantial portion of the connector length and ending in an inwardly deformed poition 53. The post portion 52 includes in the illustrative embodiment a cross-sectional configuration as shown in FIGURE 17 with sharp corners 54 and a channel 56 to provide a structure suitable for wire wrapping. The post portion 52 is joined through a transition portion 58 to a connector body and support portion 60. Support portion 60 includes independent spring systems provided by small struck-out elements shown as 62 on the side wall of 60 and portions of the walls along the seam of the material shown as 63. FIG- URE 18 shows these elements undeformed and FIGURE 13 shows the elements deformed and in engagement with the wall surface of a header aperture. The upper end of each connector support portion is formed inwardly as at 64 in order to preclude edges of the connector from cutting into projection 48 during insertion and interfering with operation of spring elements 63. A tab 61 is provided opposite 63 to engage the surface 40 in the manner shown in FIGURES 7-10. Extending from the upper end of the portion 60 are a pair of contact spring arms 66 inwardly embossed as at 68, as shown in FIGURE 16, for strength and flared outwardly as at 70 to guide insertion of a component lead. The ends of the contact spring arms are further outwardly embossed as at 72, as shown by FIGURE 15, to assure a substantially greater contact arm between each contact surface and the engaged component lead. FIGURES 11 and 12 show engagement of a component lead L with spring arms 66.

FIGURE 13 depicts the action of spring elements 62 and 63 in biasing the connector into a corner of the header aperture. The spring elements 63 engage the projection 48 and are deflected inwardly pushing the connector to the left as evidenced and the elements 62 bite into the material of the header body and bias the connector upwardly against the header aperture. The biting action of element 62 serves to prevent the connectors from being displaced downwardly relative to the header aperture. Penetration of elements 62 is limited so as to permit a connector to be removed from a header if such becomes necessary.

In brief summary, each header shown includes fourteen connectors 50, with each connector including an upper contact spring structure and a lower terminal post structure. The number fourteen is illustrative only of a typical IC package configuration which contains fourteen comi ponent leads. Headers having fewer or greater numbers of connectors are, of course, contemplated.

As a further aspect of the invention, many interconnection systems require that certain of the circuit paths be grounded by being connected to the ground plane of the panel. FIGURES: 19-23 relate to structures which facilitate selective grounding of circuit paths through a connection between any individual connector 50 and a panel ground or power plane. FIGURES 22 and 23 show a panel P having conductive paths in the form of foils F1 or F2 on each side of the panel. FIGURE 19 shows one version of a bridging clip 74 comprised of a piece of sheet metal stamped into a configuration to include base portion 76 joined by a U-shaped portion 78 containing in the center thereof a pair of spring contacts 80. The ends of the spring contacts 80 are spaced apart to engage a terminal post portion 52. FIGURE 22 shows bridging clip 74 mounted on a post to common a connector 50 to the lower ground plane F2 of a panel. The bridging clip would usually be soldered as at S to the foil F2 at one or both of the portions 76. The bridging clip 74 permits a grounding of selected terminal posts without precluding removal of a header from a panel. The clip 74 would be utilized when it is feasible to provide grounding connections prior to wiring of the posts when clear access to the rear of the panel is possible.

FIGURE 20 shows an alternative version of a bridging clip comprised of a piece of stamped and formed sheet metal 82 having a base portion 84 joined by a pair of upstanding contact spring arms 86 separated by a slot 88. FIGURE 23 shows the alternative bridging clip 82 in position to provide a commoning connection between the upper power plane F1 of a panel and a connector 50. The slot 88 is dimensioned to accommodate the projection 48 shown in FIGURES 7-9 and 13 with the contact spring arms in engagement with portion 63 of the connector. The contact spring arms are bowed as shown in FIGURE 23 to provide a forced engagement with connector 50. The relief 44 for each header aperture as shown in FIGURE 2 permits the flange portions 84 to pass out of the header with the header mounted flush against the upper surface of panel P. As in the previous embodiment of the bridging clip, the clip would be usually soldered as at S to the grounding plane through solder applied to portions 84 along the edge thereof.

Having now disclosed the invention in terms intended to enable a preferred practice thereof in its various modes, claims are appended which are believed to define what is inventive.

What is claimed is:

1. An assembly for interconnecting the leads of electrical and/or electronic components into a functional circuit including a panel and a plurality of headers each including a plurality of component connectors, said panel including a plurality of header mounting holes referenced to a panel master hole and dimensioned to provide an interference fit with a header mounting element extended therethrough, said panel further including a plurality of connector terminal holes for each header positioned on the panel with each connector terminal hole being dimensioned to be appreciably greater in cross-section than the connector terminal inserted therethrough so as to preclude engagement with aconnector terminal inserted therethrough, each header including a pair of mounting holes spaced apart to be aligned with the pair of mounting holes for a header on said panel, one of said header mounting holes being dimensioned to provide the aforesaid interference fit with a header mounting element with respect to intersecting axes through the center of the header mounting hole and the other said mounting holes having a length dimension considerably greater than the width dimension of the panel mounting hole associated therewith and of the header mounting element whereby to facilitate mounting of a header carrying connector terminal elements extended through the terminal holes in the panel.

2. The assembly of claim 1 wherein said headers are rectangular with the header mounting hole having the additional length dimension lying along the greatest length of the header.

3. The assembly of claim 1 wherein each header includes a plurality of connector mounting apertures each having intersecting surfaces positioned relative to one of the mounting holes in the header.

4. The assembly of claim 3 wherein each header contains a connector for each aperture adapted to receive a component lead, the connectors of a header connecting and mounting a component on said header.

5. The assembly of claim 4 wherein each connector includes a contact spring at one end to receive the component lead and a terminal post at the other end, said post being extended through said panel with the several posts of the assembly being interconnected to form a component circuit.

6. The assembly of claim 1 wherein each header includes two rows of connector mounting apertures with each aperture including intersecting surfaces forming a corner referenced to one of the mounting holes of the header and each connector includes means biasing said connector into said corner.

7. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the said corners are disposed inwardly of the header.

8. A component header for mounting and connecting an electrical or electronic component having a plurality of leads including a header body of insulating material having a plurality of connector mounting apertures therein with each aperture including intersecting surfaces and having a cross-sectional configuration substantially larger than a corresponding cross-sectional configuration of a connector to be fitted therein, a plurality of connectors each including spring means positioned to engage portions of the connector apertures in the header body to bias the connector into a corner defined by said intersecting surfaces, the said intersecting surfaces being referenced to a common reference point in the header body whereby to provide an improved alignment of connectors mounted in a header.

9. The header of claim 8 wherein the said body includes a master mounting hole adapted to receive a mounting element to mount said header on a panel and the reference point of said header is the center of said hole.

10. The header of claim 8 wherein said connectors each include a terminal post and the said apertures include surfaces engaging said connector to position said terminal posts substantially parallel to each other.

11. The header of claim 10 wherein the said apertures are arranged in two rows with the intersecting surfaces of the apertures of one row in a position relative to the intersecting surfaces of the other row whereby to maintain the terminal posts of the connectors in one row aligned and parallel to the terminal posts of the connectors of another row.

12. The header of claim 6 wherein for each said aperture there is a projection extending along the length of the aperture to engage a portion of the connector therein and bias such toward one of said intersecting surfaces.

13. The header of claim 12 wherein each of said apertures is defined by inside and outside walls of body material and the said projections are located in an outside wall of the body of the header.

14. The header of claim 8 wherein each header body includes, adjacent a lower surface thereof which is adapted to be fitted against a mounting panel, a relief in the side wall of the header body to facilitate the insertion of a bridging clip into the apertures of the header body to common the connector therein to a conductive path on a mounting panel.

15. In an assembly for interconnecting electrical and/or electronic components of the type having a plurality of leads, a mounting panel having an array of mounting holes thereon and an array of terminal holes therein, each positioned relative to a panel master reference point, a plurality of headers each including a header body of insulating material, mounting holes and a plurality of connector apertures therein with said apertures positioned relative to one header mounting hole, each aperture containing a connector element with each connector element including spring means engaging a portion of said header body in said aperture to position the connector therein and including contact means to contact a lead of a component, the connectors further including terminal portions extending from said body, the said headers being mounted on said panel by means extending through the panel and header body mounting holes with the said terminal portions extending through said panel terminal holes, the terminal portions of the several headers thus forming an array of terminals for automatic machine wiring with the position of each terminal portion being tied to the position of the header apertures which are in turn tied to the position of a header mounting hole, a corresponding mounting hole in a panel and the panel master reference point.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,215,975 11/1965 'Kinkaid 339-17 X 3,300,686 l/1967 Johnson et al 33917 X 3,323,099 5/1967 Spera 339-126 X RICHARD E. MOORE, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3622950A (en) * 1968-06-26 1971-11-23 Amp Inc Electrical connector assemblies
US3629807A (en) * 1969-10-21 1971-12-21 Gen Electric Universal printed circuit card edge connector
US3671917A (en) * 1970-05-20 1972-06-20 Ammon & Champion Co Inc Printed circuit board connector
US3685001A (en) * 1970-09-29 1972-08-15 Molex Inc Electrical terminator assembly and method of making components of the same
US3696323A (en) * 1970-02-27 1972-10-03 Amp Inc Dip header
US3721941A (en) * 1971-11-03 1973-03-20 Narco Scientific Ind Multiple socket connector apparatus
US3783433A (en) * 1971-01-18 1974-01-01 Litton Systems Inc Solderless electrical connection system
US3787801A (en) * 1971-02-24 1974-01-22 Amp Inc Double thickness p.c.b. flag terminal
WO1979000635A1 (en) * 1978-02-17 1979-09-06 Cdm Connectors Dev & Mfg Ag Electric connector and process for producing such
US4215326A (en) * 1978-01-16 1980-07-29 Amp Incorporated Filtered adapter
US4222626A (en) * 1978-01-16 1980-09-16 Amp Incorporated Filtered dip header assembly
US4353614A (en) * 1980-03-14 1982-10-12 Western Electric Company, Inc. Unitary molded plastic connector plug support member
US4359258A (en) * 1980-01-14 1982-11-16 Trw Inc. Electrical connector
EP0068656A1 (en) * 1981-06-17 1983-01-05 AMP INCORPORATED (a New Jersey corporation) Electrical terminal with cavity compensator
US4453797A (en) * 1981-04-09 1984-06-12 Hollingsead International Inc. Avionic electrical connector mounting apparatus
FR2587847A1 (en) * 1985-09-26 1987-03-27 Thomas & Betts Corp Modular device for holding, positioning and protecting female contacts to be soldered or brazed onto a printed-circuit board
US20030186596A1 (en) * 2002-04-02 2003-10-02 Marconi Communications, Inc. Electrical terminal for surge protection cartridge
US20140287627A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-25 Amphenol Corporation Mating interfaces for high speed high density electrical connectors
US9136652B2 (en) 2012-02-07 2015-09-15 Fci Americas Technology Llc Electrical connector assembly

Citations (3)

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US3215975A (en) * 1961-11-27 1965-11-02 Amp Inc Connector block assembly
US3300686A (en) * 1963-07-30 1967-01-24 Ibm Compatible packaging of miniaturized circuit modules
US3323099A (en) * 1965-07-14 1967-05-30 Philco Corp Electrical apparatus

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US3215975A (en) * 1961-11-27 1965-11-02 Amp Inc Connector block assembly
US3300686A (en) * 1963-07-30 1967-01-24 Ibm Compatible packaging of miniaturized circuit modules
US3323099A (en) * 1965-07-14 1967-05-30 Philco Corp Electrical apparatus

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3622950A (en) * 1968-06-26 1971-11-23 Amp Inc Electrical connector assemblies
US3629807A (en) * 1969-10-21 1971-12-21 Gen Electric Universal printed circuit card edge connector
US3696323A (en) * 1970-02-27 1972-10-03 Amp Inc Dip header
US3671917A (en) * 1970-05-20 1972-06-20 Ammon & Champion Co Inc Printed circuit board connector
US3685001A (en) * 1970-09-29 1972-08-15 Molex Inc Electrical terminator assembly and method of making components of the same
US3783433A (en) * 1971-01-18 1974-01-01 Litton Systems Inc Solderless electrical connection system
US3787801A (en) * 1971-02-24 1974-01-22 Amp Inc Double thickness p.c.b. flag terminal
US3721941A (en) * 1971-11-03 1973-03-20 Narco Scientific Ind Multiple socket connector apparatus
US4215326A (en) * 1978-01-16 1980-07-29 Amp Incorporated Filtered adapter
US4222626A (en) * 1978-01-16 1980-09-16 Amp Incorporated Filtered dip header assembly
US4412718A (en) * 1978-02-17 1983-11-01 Cdm Connectors Development & Mfg. Ag Electric plug contact and method for its manufacture
WO1979000635A1 (en) * 1978-02-17 1979-09-06 Cdm Connectors Dev & Mfg Ag Electric connector and process for producing such
US4341434A (en) * 1978-02-17 1982-07-27 Cdm Connectors Development & Mfg. Ag Electric plug contact
US4359258A (en) * 1980-01-14 1982-11-16 Trw Inc. Electrical connector
US4353614A (en) * 1980-03-14 1982-10-12 Western Electric Company, Inc. Unitary molded plastic connector plug support member
US4453797A (en) * 1981-04-09 1984-06-12 Hollingsead International Inc. Avionic electrical connector mounting apparatus
EP0068656A1 (en) * 1981-06-17 1983-01-05 AMP INCORPORATED (a New Jersey corporation) Electrical terminal with cavity compensator
FR2587847A1 (en) * 1985-09-26 1987-03-27 Thomas & Betts Corp Modular device for holding, positioning and protecting female contacts to be soldered or brazed onto a printed-circuit board
US20030186596A1 (en) * 2002-04-02 2003-10-02 Marconi Communications, Inc. Electrical terminal for surge protection cartridge
US6814631B2 (en) * 2002-04-02 2004-11-09 Marconi Intellectual Property (Ringfence) Inc. Electrical terminal for surge protection cartridge
US9136652B2 (en) 2012-02-07 2015-09-15 Fci Americas Technology Llc Electrical connector assembly
US20140287627A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-25 Amphenol Corporation Mating interfaces for high speed high density electrical connectors
US9419360B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2016-08-16 Amphenol Corporation Mating interfaces for high speed high density electrical connectors

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