US3466806A - Balance structure for windows and the like - Google Patents

Balance structure for windows and the like Download PDF

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US3466806A
US3466806A US3466806DA US3466806A US 3466806 A US3466806 A US 3466806A US 3466806D A US3466806D A US 3466806DA US 3466806 A US3466806 A US 3466806A
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Prior art keywords
window
member
braking
casing
structure
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Claude Teggelaar
William T De Bruyn
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GRAND RAPIDS HARDWARE Mfg CO
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GRAND RAPIDS HARDWARE Mfg CO
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E05LOCKS; KEYS; WINDOW OR DOOR FITTINGS; SAFES
    • E05DHINGES OR OTHER SUSPENSION DEVICES FOR DOORS, WINDOWS OR WINGS
    • E05D13/00Accessories for sliding or lifting wings, e.g. pulleys, safety catches
    • E05D13/04Fasteners specially adapted for holding sliding wings open
    • E05D13/08Fasteners specially adapted for holding sliding wings open acting by friction for vertically sliding wings
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E05LOCKS; KEYS; WINDOW OR DOOR FITTINGS; SAFES
    • E05DHINGES OR OTHER SUSPENSION DEVICES FOR DOORS, WINDOWS OR WINGS
    • E05D13/00Accessories for sliding or lifting wings, e.g. pulleys, safety catches
    • E05D13/10Counterbalance devices
    • E05D13/12Counterbalance devices with springs
    • E05D13/1207Counterbalance devices with springs with tension springs
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E05LOCKS; KEYS; WINDOW OR DOOR FITTINGS; SAFES
    • E05DHINGES OR OTHER SUSPENSION DEVICES FOR DOORS, WINDOWS OR WINGS
    • E05D13/00Accessories for sliding or lifting wings, e.g. pulleys, safety catches
    • E05D13/10Counterbalance devices
    • E05D13/12Counterbalance devices with springs
    • E05D13/1253Counterbalance devices with springs with canted-coil torsion springs
    • E05D13/1269Spring safety devices
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E05LOCKS; KEYS; WINDOW OR DOOR FITTINGS; SAFES
    • E05YINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO HINGES OR OTHER SUSPENSION DEVICES FOR DOORS, WINDOWS OR WINGS AND DEVICES FOR MOVING WINGS INTO OPEN OR CLOSED POSITION, CHECKS FOR WINGS AND WING FITTINGS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR, CONCERNED WITH THE FUNCTIONING OF THE WING
    • E05Y2900/00Application of doors, windows, wings or fittings thereof
    • E05Y2900/10Application of doors, windows, wings or fittings thereof for buildings or parts thereof
    • E05Y2900/13Application of doors, windows, wings or fittings thereof for buildings or parts thereof characterised by the type of wing
    • E05Y2900/148Windows

Description

Sept. 16, 19.69 c, TEGGELAAR ETAL 3,466,806

BALANCE STRUCTURE FOR WINDOWS AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 21, 1966 s sheets-sheet 1 f f h ,E'. :1'

a i n I 1 l I I I Z? Sept. 16, 1969 c, TEGGELAAR ETAL 3,466,806

BALANCE STRUCTURE FOR WINDOWS AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 21, 1966 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS 6141/0! K566224404 M/ll/AM f 05 gpum/ p 15, 1969 c. TEGGELAAR ET AL BALANCE STRUCTURE FOR WINDOWS AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 21, 1966 3 Sheets-Sheet :5

INVENTZJRB 664L876 Quay? United States Patent 3,466,806 BALANCE STRUCTURE FOR WINDOWS AND THE LIKE Claude Teggelaar and William T. De Bruyn, Grand Rapids, Mich., assignors, by mesne assignments, to Grand Rapids Hardware Manufacturing Co., Grand Rapids, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Filed Nov. 21, 1966, Ser. No. 595,804 Int. Cl. E05d 13/10 US. Cl. 49-445 42 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The balance structure is for double-hung windows, and includes a pair of helical tension springs which suspend the window member within opposed tracks of a window casing, with interposition of a braking member to frictionally engage the tracks while the window member is at rest, said engagement being automatically nullified incident to manual raising and lowering of the window member.

This invention relates to vertically movable Windows and mounting structures therefor, and more particularly to a new concept in balance structures for mounting vertically-adjustable windows so that the window may be opened any desired extent and will automatically remain at the adjusted position until intentionally moved to another desired position.

As is well known, early types of vertically-adjustable windows were either mounted in their casings tightly enough to be frictionally held in any given vertical position, or else utilized counterbalance weights connected to the window member by a rope entrained over a pulley mounted at the top of the window casing, so that the window could easily be slid upwardly and downwardly and the counterbalance would serve to hold the window at a desired position. These arrangements are commonly used with window units having wooden frames and casings, but with the advent of aluminum or other metal types of window units, the need for an entirely new type of balance structure became apparent. Such window units generally are made in a series of standard sizes and are purchased as an integral unit. Their movable window members have a relatively low mass when compared to previous wooden sash units and do not require a massive counterweight; also, the vertically slideable Window units are generally desired to be removable from the metal casements in which they are mounted for operation, as for cleaning, replacement, and the like.

As a consequence, balance structures utilizing springs of various types came to be used. In general, such springs were mounted to the metal casing either on the inside or outside thereof, and by various schemes the ends of the springs were attached to the movable window member, with the idea being that as the window was moved either upwardly or downwardly the spring would be resiliently flexed and would serve to hold the window at the adjusted position, as well as to assist in its return to a given nominal position. For example, a spiral type of spring is very often used along the sides of the movable window for urging the window member toward an open position with a generally constant spring force which, when combined with the frictional effects along the edges of the window, is sufiicient to prevent the window from sliding closed of its own weight, but which is less than the force which would be required to open the window merely by the effects of the spring alone.

Such balance structures provide generally acceptable operation, but entail certain limitations which have be- 3,466,806 Patented Sept. 16., 1969 come generally known to those who are familiar with their construction and operation. For example, the constant unreeling and reeling of the spiral springs inevitably exposes a major part of their length to foreign substances including grease, dirt, sawdust, and the like, which eventually foul the spring and cause its malfunction. Also, the ends of the spring which attach to the window member must be disconnected therefrom if the window member is to be removed from the casing, generally by means of a screw or the like. Once released, the tension in the spring naturally tends to draw the unattached end of the spring back into its unflexed position, which frequently is in an inaccessible place. Thus, if the end of the spring which has been detached from the window member is inadvertently released, troublesome problems result which may involve disassembly of the metal casing.

Accordingly, it is a major object of the present invention to provide a new concept for a balance structure which is usable upon either wood or metal window units but which is particularly well adapted for use with metal window units, and which utilizes a form of resilient biasing spring which is unaffected by exposure to grease, dirt, and the like, and which in fact is largely protected from exposure to such.

A further important object of the present invention is to provide a new form of balance structure for windows which includes a novel friction braking and holding means, carried by the window and located between the side edges thereof and the jamb in which the window is mounted, by which any selected position of the movable window member is retained until a new such position is selected and the window is intentionally moved.

A still further important object of the present invention is to provide a balance structure of the foregoing character which greatly facilitates removal of the window member from the casing.

A still further major object of the invention is to provide a construction for window units which utilizes a balance structure of the foregoing nature and which also includes a novel means for spacing the window member within its casing while at the same time establishing an adjustable friction engagement between the window member and casing.

The foregoing major objects of the invention and the advantages thereof, together with numerous other objects and advantages equally a part thereof, will become increasingly apparent to those skilled in the pertinent arts upon a further consideration of the ensuing specification and its appended claims, particularly when taken in conjunction with the accompanying illustrative drawings depicting a preferred embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary lateral perspective view of an exemplary window casing having a first form of the balance structure of the invention installed therein;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged side elevation of the balance structure of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a front elevation of the structure shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary sectional elevation taken through the plane IVIV of FIG. 3, showing portions of the balance structure in a first operating condition;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary sectional elevation similar to FIG. 4 but showing the balance structure thereof in a second operational position;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary, lateral perspective showing portions of a preferred window member with the spacing and friction engagement means of the balance structure of FIGS. 1 thru 6 installed thereupon;

FIG. 7 is an end elevation of the structure shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged, fragmentary, overhead plan view showing the window member of the previous figures installed in the window casing and showing the operative relationship of the window unit and balance structure;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary lateral perspective view of a second form of a Window casing or jamb liner particularly useful with a second form of the balance structure of the invention, shown engaged with the said casing;

FIG. 10 is a side elevation of the form of balance structure shown in FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary front elevation of the balance structure of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a side elevation of a second embodiment of the form of balance structure shown in FIGS. 9-11;

FIG. 13 is a front elevation of the balance structure shown in FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary, front elevation of a third embodiment of the form of balance structure shown in FIGS. 9-11; and

FIG. 15 is a side elevation of the embodiment of FIG. 14.

Briefly stated, the present invention provides a balance structure for mounting vertically adjustable windows, which structure includes a braking unit having a portion for engaging the window member and for supporting at least a part of the weight thereof. Means are provided for movably suspending the said braking unit from a portion of the window casing, with the braking unit being located adjacent the window member and carried vertically thereby. The operation of such a structure is such that the weight of the window member is borne upon the said window-engaging portions of the braking unit, and the latter acts in concert with its suspension apparatus to move vertically with the window when the latter is intentionally moved but to firmly hold the window against undesired vertical movements by frictionally engaging the window casing.

The balance structure is preferably used with window casings of the type having at least one generally channellike vertical side, i.e., a casing having a pair of spaced channel legs directed toward the window opening, and with a window member which is located in the window opening and mounted with a side edge of the window fitting between the legs of the channel-shaped casing side. In such a configuration, a novel spacing apparatus is provided which is securable to the said edge of the Window member for the purpose of spacing the window between the sides of the casing while at the same time bearing against the inside edges of the casing channel legs to create a frictional engagement between the window member and the window casing.

Referring now in more detail to the drawings, a portion of a first preferred form of window casing 10 is seen in FIGS. 1 and 4 to include upper and lower end members 12 and 14, respectively, and a vertically oriented channel-shaped side 16, which has a pair of inwardlydirected spaced channel legs 16a and 16b interconnected by a web 16c. The balance structure 20 of the invention is mounted within the channel-shaped casing side 16, with the uppermost extremities of the balance spaced somewhat from the upper casing end member 12 and with the lower extremities of the balance nominally positioned slightly below the central horizontally-positioned casing member 18.

A first form of the balance structure 20 is seen in more detail in FIGS. 2 and 3. This structure has an elongate, vertically-oriented tube 22 which houses an elongate coil spring 24 extending the length thereof. A cap 26 closes the top of the tubular housing 22 by frictionally fitting thereinto. Cap 26 is a generally cylindrical plug-like member having a diametrally enlarged top which seats atop the housing 22, an upper angularly beveled surface 26a, and a generally fiat stem 28 depending downwardly within tubular housing 22. Stem 28 has a series of transverse grooves or corrugations at its lowermost end, such that when the stem is inserted into the top of coil spring 24 each such groove or corrugation receives an individual coil of the spring in a tight frictional grip. This serves to mount the spring 24 to the cap 26, and also to the tube 22, since the cap 26 snugly fits into the upper end thereof.

At the lower extremity of the tubular housing 22, a braking unit 30 is attached to the lower end of the coil spring 24, as by a braking member 31 forming a part of the braking unit. Braking member 31 has an aperture formed in its upper extremity, through which one end of the spring 24 may be entrained. The overall length of spring 24 is preferably somewhat less than that of its housing 22. Thus, the spring is normally under a slight degree of tension which serves to hold the braking member 31 snugly against the bottom extremities of the tubular housing 22, with the bottom of the tubular housing engaged within a vertical notch 32 formed in the top of the braking member. As may be observed, cap 26 preferably has a countersunk horizontal aperture 27 formed therethrough, by which the top end of the balance structure 20 is mounted to the channel-shaped side 16 of the casing.

Braking member 31 of the braking unit 30 is an elongated, generally rectangular component which is preferably m'ade from a somewhat lubricious material such as nylon or the like. When attached to the coil spring 24, the braking member 31 extends longitudinally downward from the tubular housing 22, with a projecting portion 23 of the housing lying along the outward side of the member (FIG. 2). As seen in more detail in FIGS. 4 and 5, braking member 31 has a pair of parallel vertically angular slots 34 and 36 formed therethrough. A shoe element 40 forming a second component of the braking unit 30 is coupled to the braking member 31 by means of a pair of pin members 42 and 44, which extend through the slots 34 and 36, respectively, so as to be slideable therewithin. Shoe element 40 is preferably a metal struc ture having a pair of spaced upright sides 46 and 48 (FIG. 3) which flank the sides of the braking member 31 and through which the pins 42 and 44 extend to secure the shoe to the braking member. Sides 46 and 48 of the shoe element are interconnected at the bottom thereof by a horizontally-projecting foot portion 50, which preferably is integral with the upright sides 46 and 48. Each of the upright sides has a laterally-protruding ear 46a and 48a, respectively, located near the top of the shoe element, and each such upright side also has a lateral Wall 4612 and 48b, respectively, located near the bottom of the shoe and arranged in vertical alignment 'with the respective ears of that side. These ears and walls are for the purpose of contacting the side edge of a Window member 60 to position the shoe 40 with respect thereto.

A small coil-type torsion spring 52 is fitted into an appropriate recess formed in the rear side of the braking member 31 (FIGS. 2, 3, 4, and 5). Spring 52 has the two ends of its coil extended, so that one such end (having an offset tip) may be hooked around the side of the braking member opposite the coil of the spring, while the other extended end bears upwardly against the pin 44 which joins the shoe element 40 to the braking member 31. In this manner, a nominal amount of spring force is always exerted against the said pin and, consequently, against the shoe element. This spring force tends to hold the shoe in the position seen in FIGS. 2 and 4, i.e., with the pins 42 and 44 at the uppermost extremity of the slots 34 and 36, respectively. As 'will be apparent, without taking other factors into consideration, a downward force applied to the shoe element 40 which exceeds the spring tension provided by spring 52 will cause the shoe element to move downwardly and to the left relative to the braking member 31, so that the pins 42 and 44 are moved within their respective slots, toward the lowermost end thereof.

Details of a preferred form of movable window member 60 are illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7, and the manner in which this window member is mounted in the channelshaped sides 16 of the casing is seen in FIGS. 7 and 8. Basically, window member 60 is of a typical type having a peripheral framework mounting one or more panes of glass 62. The said framework includes vertically-oriented side edges having a pair of parallel, spaced flanges 64 and 66 defining a channel-shaped passage therebetween. At the top of this passage is mounted a spacing means 70, which is basically a T-shaped member made of a lubricious plastic material such as nylon. The upright portion of the T-shaped member 70 fits between the flanges 64 and 66 of the window member frame, with the crossbar extending over the top thereof and slightly beyond each such flange. This is best seen in FIG. 7, where the end extremities 70a and 70b of the said cross-bar are shown engaging the inner surfaces of the leg portions 16a and 16b of the channel-shaped side 16 of the window casing. Spacing means 70 is mounted in this position by a screw 72 which extends into the central portion of the frame of window member 60.

As will be noted, the lower extremity of means 70 has a downwardly and inwardly angled surface 74. Also, a vertically-extending slot 76 extending transversely across the width of the member 70 is formed downwardly therein from the top thereof, and a tapered screw member 78 having at least a portion of its diameter larger than the nominal width of the slot 76 is threaded downwardly hereinto. By means of the slot 76 and the screw 78 which is threaded thereinto, the distance between the laterallyextending ends 70a and 70b of the member 70 may be increased from the nominal or unstressed dimension. Thus, if the latter is made to be slightly smaller than the distance between the inside surfaces of channel legs 16a and 16b of the casing, ends 70a and 70b may be adjusted outwardly by turning screw member 78 further into slot 76, to thereby establish and maintain a desired frictional engagement between member 70 and the surfaces of channel legs 16a and 16b. Insasmuch as member 70 is rigidly mounted to the window member 60, this frictional engagement may be said to exist between the said window member and the channel-shaped side of the window casing.

ASSEMBLY In the assembly of a complete window having a window casing and a movable window member, of the type which has been described, one of the spacing means 70 is installed on each side of the window member 60 in the manner already indicated. One of the balance structures 20 is then installed on each of the spaced, generally parallel channel-shaped sides 16 and 16 (FIG. 8) of the preferred casing 10. Such balance structures are secured to the casing at two points. Firstly, a screw is inserted through the aperture 27 in the cap 26 at the top of the tubular housing 22 and into the web portion 16c of the channel-shaped sides. Also, the vertically-depending tang 23 (FIG. 2) comprising an extending portion of the tubular housing 22 is bent to extend through an appropriate slot formed in the said web portion 160, as illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. Thus, the tubular housing 22 is securely mounted to the web 160, with the spring 24 within the housing freely resiliently extendable downwardly from the cap 26. The braking unit of each balance structure is thus suspended within the oppositely-located channelshaped sides of the window casing, with the foot portion 50 of the two balance structures pointed inwardly of the casing, i.e., towards each other.

With a pair of balance structures 20 installed in the window casing, the movable window member 60 is inserted into the casing, between the two oppositely-disposed balance structures. To accomplish this, the window member 60 is placed parallel to the casing with the top edge of the window member immediately below the upper end member 12 of the casing, and then first inserting one side edge of the window member between the channel legs such as 16a and 16b at the corresponding side of the casing. The window member is then slid toward that particular side of the casing until the spaced flanges 64 and 66 of the window member are moved beyond the balance structure 20 and contact the Web portion 160 of the side of the channel being engaged. This moves the window member laterally a sufiicient amount to permit its opposite side edge to be moved into alignment between the channel legs of the remaining casing side. The window member is then moved toward this remaining side to place the extending flanges 64 and 66 on each side edge of the window member between the channel legs 16a and 16b on each vertical channel side, in the position shown in FIG. 8.

This installation is permitted by the relative placement of the balance structures upon the window casing and the spacing member 70 upon the side edges of the window member, i.e., the balance structures are mounted with their caps 26 spaced somewhat below the upper end member 12 of the casing, to permit the laterally-extending spacing members 70 to be positioned above the caps 26 of the balance structures. This allows room for the window member to be moved back and forth laterally between the casing sides 16 and 16. As will be recognized, a movable window member such as 60 normally has a height of approximately one-half of the inside height of the casing. Since, as has been stated, the balance structures are mounted so that the braking units 30 thereof have their shoe elements 40 positioned beneath the central casing member or crossbar 18 (FIG. 1), the bottom extremity of the window member is in lateral alignment with the lower portion of the tubular housing 22 when the window member is first inserted into the casing, i.e., the bottom of the window is spaced above the shoe elements.

Once the window member is in position between the channel legs on each Side of the casing, it may he slid downwardly so that its lower extremity will engage the foot portion 50 of each of the shoe elements 40. In slid ing the window member downward, the lower extremity of the window member moves past the laterally-projecting ears 46a and 48a of the shoe elements and between the walls 461) and 48b thereof. This tends to center the window member between the two shoe elements. Also, the spacing members 70 move downwardly over the caps 26 of the balance structures, so that the spacing means and balance structures come into lateral alignment, as shown in FIG. 8. As this occurs, the angular surface 74 of the spacing means 70 moves downward past the angularlybeveled surfaces 26a of the caps 26, which causes the window member to smoothly and automatically become centered between the two balance structures. A resilient sheet metal spring element (FIG. 4) which is secured to each of the side edges of the window member by a screw or the like also serves to keep the window member centered between the balance structures, by means of an outwardly-projecting V-shaped portion which contacts the tubular housings 22 of the balance structures. As will be recognized, the entire assembly which has now been described is very readily accomplished, and may be completed in only a matter of a few minutes.

OPERATION In operation, a complete window unit having the structure set forth previously and assembled in the foregoing manner provides an easily adjustable structure in which the braking units are carried vertically with the window member to immediately automatically retain the latter at any desired vertical position, and in which the window member may readily be removed from the casing whenever desired in a simple and uncomplicated manner.

As the window member is moved upwardly from the botom 14 of the casing to open the window, the weight of the window member is in effect removed from the feet 50 and shoe elements 40. Consequently the elfect of the coiled torsion spring 52 is to push pin 44 upwardly within slot 36 and toward the upper end extremity thereof, thereby simultaneously bringing pin 42 toward the upper extremity of its slot 34. As seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, this serves to move the braking member 31 toward the left and the shoe element 40 toward the right, into greater longitudinal coincidence with each other. Inasmuch as the coil spring 24 always exerts at least some tension upon the braking member 31 when the latter is positioned and held below the end of the tubular housing 22, the braking member 31 will always be urged upwardly at least to some extent relative to the shoe. Consequently the pins 42 and 44 will rarely actually be seated at the upper end extremities of their respective slots 34 and 36, but when the window member is moved upward within the casing the weight of the window is removed from the shoe and the action of the torsion spring 52 will position the pins 42 and 44 in the upward portions of their respective slots 34 and 36, if not at the very extremity thereof.

When the window 60 is moved upward and the pins 42 and 44 ride upwardly in their respective slots in the braking member 31, the lengthwise coincidence of the braking member and shoe element is such that, as seen in FIG. 4, a clearance 82 is established between the rightward edge of the braking member and the web 160 of the channel-shaped casing side. When the window reaches the desired position and is released, however, its weight is immediately applied to the shoe elements 40 by their respective feet 50. The force of this weight is thus applied in opposition to the upward force resulting from the tension in coil spring 24, which is applied to the braking member 31. This causes a vertical displacement of the braking member and shoe element relative to each other, such that the pins 42 and 44 move downwardly in their slots 34 and 36, respectively. This moves the braking member 31 toward the right, inasmuch as the shoe element cannot move to the left, due to its extending ear portions 46a and 48a and walls 46b and 48b, which are in direct contact against the side edge of the window member 60.

In this manner, the braking member 31 is moved to the position seen in FIG. 5, in which its right side acts as a bearing surface which is forced into frictional braking engagement with the web 16c by the action of the pins 42 and 44 within their angular slots 34 and 36, which thus act as cam and follower structures. With the bearing surface of the braking member thus in effect wedged against the web 160, the window becomes locked into the selected position, since it can neither travel upward nor downward without actuation from an external source.

If the window now is moved upwardly once again, the braking member 31 will once again move leftward in the same manner as described previously to release its frictional engagement with the web 160. This permits easy continued raising of the window member, which may be moved upward in this manner until the lower extremities of the tubular housing 22 engage and seat within the notch 32 in the top of the braking member, thereby preventing any further upward movement thereof. At this point, if the window member be raised any further Vertically, it will be separated from the feet 50 of the shoe elements 40. Also, when the window is raised enough to lift the spacing means 70 at its top above the caps 26 at the top of the balance structures 20, the window member may be removed from the casing if this is desired.

If the window is to be moved downward from any elevated position in which the braking member 31 is in frictional engagement with the channel 16c, a firm downward force against the window member is all that is required to overcome the said frictional engagement and cause the bearing surface of the braking member 31 to merely slide upon the web 160 of the channel to any desired new position. When such downward force ceases, the frictional engagement of the braking member and web will again be sufficient to hold the window firmly in place. It is for this purpose that the braking member is preferably formed from nylon or other similar lubricious plastic material, as has previously been specified, since this has been found to provide an adequate coeflicient of friction between the braking member and the said web while at the same time permitting the frictional engagement therebetween to be overcome when the window is desired to be moved downwardly.

The spacing means 70 described previously plays an integral part in the vertical adjustability of the present balance structure, due to its constant frictional engagement with the inner sides of the channel legs 16a and 16b. While it is not desirable to have a constant frictional engagement such as is provided by this spacing means as the sole and only means serving to retain the window member at its various adjusted vertical positions, due to the excessive frictional drag between the window and casing produced by such a means and the relative difliculty of operating a window so equipped, a lesser but still significant degree of frictional engagement may nonetheless be of considerable use, as in the present case. That is, while at least some range of dilferent types of springs may be used to suspend the braking unit 30, the preferred coil spring which is illustrated will exert a varying degree of lifting force upon the braking unit at diflerent points in the possible range of vertical window positions, depending upon the extent to which the spring is stressed at a particular position. Due to the differences so produced, the braking action against the channel web 16 will not be precisely the same at all vertically-adjusted positions, and for this reason a device adding a constant degree of friction between the window and the casing is to be desired, since it will augment the certainty and the smoothness with which the window unit operates over the range of possible adjustment. Such a device is admirably provided by the spacing means 70, since by a simple adjustment of the screw 70 in the vertical slot 76 therein, the frictional engagement of the window with the casing may be varied to readily achieve an amount of friction which is considerably less than what would be required to hold the window in and of itself, but which is nonetheless sufficient to smooth and augment the braking action provided by the balance structure 20 alone.

MODIFICATION A second form of the balance structure of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 9 through 15, which show three exemplary embodiments of such second form. Referring first to FIG. 9, a braking unit means is shown suspended within a generally channel-shaped vertical portion 116 of what is referred to herein as a window casing, but which may also be a jamb liner, of a general nature which has come to be well known in the art. As will be understood, this window casing defines a window opening having a window mounted therein whose vertical position is to be regulated and adjustable by the braking unit 130 of the balance structure.

As in the case of the channel-shaped casing member 16 of the previous figures, the casing member 116 includes a pair of spaced leg portions 116a and 116b, and a web portion 116:: which interconnects the said legs. Also, each of the legs 116a and 11Gb of the channel-shaped casing has at its outer end extremities opposite the Web portion 116e, a right-angled flange extremity 116d and 1162, respectively. As illustrated, these flange extremities are arranged to terminate in the same vertical plane, which is positioned substantially parallel to the web 1160. As will be seen, the flange extremities 116a and 1162 serve, among other things, to retatin the braking unit 130 inside the channel-shaped casing 116, so that the braking unit can move only vertically within the channel and cannot possibly be slid laterally out from between the oppositelydisposed legs of the channel.

The braking unit 130 seen in FIGS. 9, 10 and 11 is a partially hollow, generally rectangularly shaped object which is substantially open at the sides and which has a front wall portion 132 and a rear wall portion 134, both of which serve to frictionally engage opposite side surfaces of the channel-shaped casing 116, and both of which consequently might be described as being a braking member, in the sense that term is used in connection with the previous figures. The front wall portion 132' slopes angularly upwardly and rearwardly at its top, where it connects to the rear wall 134. A downwardlypointed hook structure 136 is formed at this point of interconnection, to define a recess 138 between the bottom of the hook and the angularly sloping portion of the front wall 132. A coil spring 124 may be connected to the braking unit 130 by engaging an end of the spring in the recess 138, to thereby resiliently and movably suspend the braking unit within the casing 116, with the upper extremities of the coil spring being connectable to the inside of the casing in any desired manner.

The rear wall 134 of braking unit 130 defines an inwardly-projecting bridge member 14, and the upper and lower points of interconnection of the front and rear walls 132 and 134 provide shoulder portions 142 and 144, respectively (FIG. 10). A resilient biasing element 146 which may be a relatively long, narrow, thin leaf spring of resilient metal or the like, mounts in the interior of the braking unit, with the upper and lower ends of the biasing element engaging the upper and lower shoulders 142 and 144, respectively, and the center portion of the biasing element being bowed over the aforesaid bridge 140. The biasing element 146 is a relatively stiff member, having sufiicient spring force to bow the rear wall 134 outwardly (FIG. 10) when mounted in the position just described. The mounted position of the biasing element 146 is preferably maintained by an upper and lower lateral flange portion 148 and 159 formed at the sides of the shoulders 142 and 144, respectively (FIGS. 10 and 11), together with a similar flange portion 152 (FIG. 11) formed on the end extremity of the bridge 140 and located on the side of the braking unit opposite the two lateral flanges 148 and 150.

The braking unit 130 is preferably integrally molded of a hard, stiflly-resilient, and somewhat lubricious plastic material such as nylon or Delrin. As seen in FIGS. 9 and 10, the front wall 132 of the braking unit preferably has vertically aligned, centrally located indexing or guiding portions 154 and 156, which protrude outwardly at least slightly from the plane of the front wall 132. These guiding portions extend through the opening between the flange extremities 1160! and 116e of the window casing when the braking unit 130 is located therein, in the manner shown in FIG. 9, so that the rear wall 134 bears frictionally against the web portion 116c of the casing, the lateral portions of the front wall 132 bear frictionally against the inner surfaces of the said flange extremities, and the presence of the guide portions 154 and 156 within the said said space between the flange extremities serves to locate or index the braking unit 130 centrally of the casing 116 and guide its vertical movements therewithin.

A cylindrical aperture 158 is formed into the lower front of the braking unit to communicate with an interior chamber 159 having upper and lower side walls which diverge in the manner seen in FIG. 9. A shoe element or foot 160 (FIG. 10) in the form of a screw or lug having a cylindrical outer end is insertable into the chamber 159 through the passage 158, such that the threaded portion of the lug protrudes outwardly (FIG. 10). This protruding threaded portion is screwed or threaded into the side of the window with which the braking unit will be used. It is to be noted that the shoe 160 and the aperture 158 into which it fits are both cylindrical, so that the window may be pivoted upon the shoe without completely removing it from the aperture. Further, the diverging sides of the chamber 159 permit the window to be tilted with respect to the casing, as in installing or removing the window, by pivoting the shoe 160 upon the edges of the aperture 158. As will be apparent from the preferred shape of the casing 116 shown in FIG. 9, the window member used therewith should have a vertically-oriented recess or groove formed along its side edges, so that the flange extremities 116d and 1166 of the casing 116, and portions of the legs 116a and 11612 thereof, may be received in the said vertical recess or groove at the side edges of the Window. Thus, the shoe element 160 supports the weight of the window and transfers this weight to the braking unit 130, whose resilient and movable suspension within the channel-shaped casing 116, balanced with the frictional engagement by the walls 132 and 134 of the inner surfaces of the casing, serves to hold the window at any desired vertical position. Adjustment of the window is achieved simply by applying suflicient manual opening or closing force to the window to overcome the frictional engagement of the braking unit with the casing, thereby causing the braking unit to be slid vertically within the casing to a new position where, when the said opening or closing force is removed, the braking unit will firmly hold the window in place.

A simplified form of braking unit 230 is shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, which represents a second embodiment of the form of balance structure shown in FIGS. 9, 10, and 11, and just described. Braking unit 230 has a substantially flat braking member 231 comparable to the walls of the braking unit 130. A curved structure 246 is attached to or preferably formed integrally with the said braking member 231, and this curved structure provides a resilient biasing element for the braking unit 230. That is, when braking unit 230 is slid inside a channel-shaped window casing portion such as that shown at 116 in FIG. 9, the diverging end extremities of the curved structure are resiliently forced apart a small amount, thereby urging the braking surface or portion 231 in an opposite direction, against an interior surface of the casing, whereby surface 231 frictionally engages such interior surface.

A braking unit having the configuration of unit 230 may readily be integrally formed from such materials as the plastic synthetics indicated in connection with braking unit 130, inasmuch as a biasing element of the type shown at 246 formed of such material will have ample resiliency to provide the desired frictional engagement necessary to hold a window at any given position. As illustrated, braking unit 230 has an upwardly-extending studlike projection 270 at its top. This projection is preferably formed so as to have laterally-protruding ridges 272, by which the member 270 may engage the inside of a coil spring such as 124 seen in FIG. 9, to thereby resiliently and movably suspend braking unit 230 in fundamentally the same manner as previous braking units 30 and 130. Also, braking unit 230 has a recessed area 258 at its lower extremity, which is defined by a laterallyprojecting foot 260. Thus, a desired window may be connected to braking unit 230 by engaging the foot 260, or by a desired form of shoe element engageable within the recess 258, in much the same manner as discussed in connection with FIGS. 9 through 11.

A somewhat different third embodiment 330 of a braking unit for the type of balance structure seen in FIGS. 9 through 13 is illustrated in FIGS. 14 and 15. The close resemblance between the braking unit 330 and the one seen in FIGS. 9 through 11 will be apparent. That is, the braking units 330 of FIGS. 14 and 15 similarly includes opposite Walls 332 and 334 which are resiliently bowed apart due to the presence of an internal biasing element or spring member 346, whose center is arched over a central bridge 340. Braking unit 330 further includes a pair of braking member projections 331 and 333 at the top and bottom of wall 332 as Well as a similar projection 335 near the center of wall 334, so that it is these projections and not the walls themselves which contact the sides of the casing to act as braking members and provide a frictional engagement with the casing. Further, braking unit 330 has its frictional engagement with the side walls 316a and 316b of the casing or jamb liner, rather than with the front and rear walls thereof, as was true of braking units and 230.

The general use and operation of braking unit 330 is, quite apparently, substantially the same as that of similar structures 130 and 230 described above. Thus, braking unit 330 includes a downwardly-pointed hook structure 336 at its top, to which a vertically oriented coil spring 324 is connected to resiliently and movably suspend the braking unit within the casing, Further, a removable shoe element 360 is provided for engaging the window, in the form of a thin elongated bar member which is slidably received into an appropriate passage formed in the bottom of the braking unit. As will be understood, the shoe element 360 receives the weight of and supports a window unit mounted within the casing.

In most other respects, braking unit 330 is much the same as unit 130 described previously, both as to structure and operation. The braking unit itself is preferably also made of stifiiy resilient lubricious plastic material, and the resilient element 346 is preferably of metal spring stock. As may be determined from examining FIGS. 14 and l in detail, the resilient biasing element 346 is held in place within the plastic body of the braking unit in the same manner as described in connection with braking member 130 so that, like the biasing element 146, biasing element 346 may also be removed from the braking member if desired, or replaced with a stronger or weaker such biasing element if the circumstances indicate this to be desirable or needed.

It will be entirely apparent to those skilled in the art that the embodiments 130, 230 and 330 of a braking unit for a balance structure provide a novel expression of the basic concept also illustrated by braking unit 30, i.e., a member carried vertically with the Window unit but also resiliently mounted to the window casing, which member provides a frictional engagament between the window and the casing sufi'icient to hold the Window in place relative thereto when no opening or closing forces are applied to the window. Embodiments 130, 230 and 330 provide very desirable manufacturing features, in that they lend themselves to rapid and economical production through the injection molding of plastic substances. All of the braking units are readily installed and maintenancefree in operation. Also, they are completely unlikely to suffer breakdown during usage.

It is entirely conceivable that after having become familiar with the preferred embodiments of the concept underlying the present invention illustrated and described herein, and after having gained an appreciation of the many advantages and benefits provided thereby, those skilled in the pertinent arts may devise certain other embodiments of this concept or make certain changes in the specific structural elements shown herein, which other embodiments or changed structures nonetheless utilize the advances contributed by the present inventors and are fully based thereupon for inspiration. Consequently, such embodiments and varied or altered structures are to be considered as within the scope of the claims appended hcrebelow, unless these claims by their language specifically state otherwise.

We claim:

1. A balance structure for mounting vertically-adjustable windows and the like within a laterally enclosing window casing, comprising: a laterally shiftable frictional braking member having a surface to frictionally engage a portion of a window casing; a separate shoe element for operatively connecting said braking member and said window, such that said shoe element supports at least a part of the weight of the window and said braking member is carried with said window upon vertical movement thereof; said window when supported by said shoe element being retained in a given vertical position by said braking member, due to the said frictional engagement of its said surface with the window casing; and said frictional engagement being such as to be overcome by manually exerted opening or closing forces applied to said window, such that said braking member slides relative to said window casing to provide for vertical movements of said window.

2. The balance structure of claim 1, further including resilient suspension means for suspending said braking member from said window casing and between said casing and said window.

3. The balance structure of claim 1, wherein said braking unit means structure for frictionally engaging said window casing includes a braking member for frictionally contacting said window casing, and means for acting against said braking member to urge the same relatively tightly against said casing to create said frictional engagement.

4. The balance structure of claim 3, wherein said means for acting against said braking member includes a camming structure acting upon said shoe element to push said window and said braking member apart relative to each other, thereby pushing said braking member member frictionally against said window casing.

5. The balance structure of claim 4, wherein said camming structure is actuated by the weight of said window bearing downwardly upon said shoe element.

6. The balance structure of claim 5, wherein said camming structure includes at least one vertically angular cam surface formed in one of said shoe and braking members, and cam follower means secured to the other one thereof and engaging said cam surface for movement thereupon.

7. The balance structure of claim 6, wherein said shoe is movable with such window, said camming structure mechanically couples said braking member to said shoe, and said braking member suspending means provides for movement thereof with said shoe relative to said window casing.

8. The balance structure of claim 7, wherein said cam surface is formed by a slot in said braking member and said follower means comprises a pin member extending from said shoe through said slot to thereby couple the shoe and braking member.

9. The balance structure of claim 8, wherein said braking member suspending means includes an elongate spring element securable to a window casing in vertical orientation to suspend said braking member along one side thereof in a manner providing resiliently biased vertical movement of said member along such side.

10. The balance structure of claim 8, wherein said camming structure further includes means biasing said pin member toward a predetermined position with respect to said slot, such that said pin member tends to occupy said position when the weight of said window is lifted from said shoe.

11. The balance structure of claim 3, where said means for acting against said braking member comprises a resilient biasing element.

12. The balance structure of claim 11, wherein said biasing element is arranged to continuously act against said braking member, such that said frictional engagement is of a substantially constant value.

13. The balance structure of claim 12, wherein said braking unit means is especially adapted for use in connection with window casings of the type having generally channel-shaped side extremities, and has said resilient biasing element arranged to push said braking member laterally against one side portion of said generally channel-shaped window casing by acting between said braking member and other portions of said braking unit, which other portions are thereby pushed in an opposite lateral direction against portions of said window casing located opposite said one side portion.

14. The balance structure of claim 13, further including resilient suspension means for suspending said braking unit means from said window casing and between said casing and said window.

15. The balance structure of claim 12, wherein said braking unit means is especially adapted for use in connection with window casings of the type having generally channel-shaped side extremities, and has said resilient biasing element arranged to push said braking member laterally against one side portion of said generally channel-shaped window casing by acting directly between said braking member and portions of said window casing located opposite said one side portion.

16. The balance structure of claim 15, wherein said braking member and said resilient biasing element are integrally formed of the same substance.

17. The balance structure of claim 16, wherein said substance is a lubricious plastic.

18. The balance structure of claim 17, further including resilent suspension means for suspending said braking unit means from said window casing and between said casing and said window.

19. The balance structure of claim 13, wherein said braking member and said other portions of said braking unit comprise an integral member, and wherein said integral member supports said resilient biasing element.

20. The balance structure of claim 19, wherein said braking member comprises a leg portion which is flexibly connected to the remainder of said integral member so as to be laterally movable with respect thereto under the urgings of said resilient element.

21. A vertically-adjustable window construction, comprising in combination: a window casing defining a window opening and having at least one generally channelshaped vertical side, said side having a pair of spaced channel legs directed toward said window opening and a web interconnecting said legs; a window member located in said window opening and having a side edge fitting between said channel legs and being vertically slidable therebetween; a shoe element for supporting at least a part of the weight of said window member; a braking member separate from said shoe element, and being bodily shiftable laterally of said window member; means for movably suspending said braking member from said window casing between said channel legs of the said vertical side thereof; and a camming structure connecting said shoe element and said braking member for bodily shifting said braking member toward and from said side edge of the window member; the weight of said window member when placed upon said shoe element acting against the suspension of said braking member to actuate said camming structure to thereby move said braking member when so moved operating to engage portions of said channel-shaped window casing side to thereby hold the window member against vertical movement within said Window opening and relative to said window casing.

22. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 21, wherein said shoe is movable with such window member, said camming structure couples said braking member to said shoe, and said braking member suspending means provides for movement thereof with said shoe relative to said window casing.

23. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 22, wherein said cam surface is formed by a slot in said braking member and said follower means comprises a pin member extending from said shoe through said slot to thereby couple the shoe and braking member.

24. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 23, further including means securable to said side edge of said window member for bearing against the inside surfaces of said channel legs to create a frictional engagement between said window member and said window casing.

25. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 24, wherein said means for bearing against said channel leg surfaces includes bearing surfaces of a lubricious plastic material, and wherein at least one of said surfaces is adjustable inwardly and outwardly relative to said channel legs to vary said frictioal engagement as desired.

26. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 24, wherein said braking member suspending means includes an elongate spring element securable within said channel-shaped window casing side in vertical orientation to suspend said braking member within said channel in a manner providing resiliently biased vertical movement of said member therewithin.

27. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 26, wherein said spring element is an elongate coil spring, and wherein said suspending means further includes a tube providing a housing for at least part of said coil spring, said tube having a cap which closes the top end thereof, and said cap arranged to be attached to said channel-shaped window casing side to mount the said tube relative thereto.

28. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 27, wherein said cap has a depending stem located within said tube and insertable into the top of said coil spring, said stern having grooves located transversely thereof for frictionally engaging the coils of said spring at the top thereof, to thereby suspend said spring within said tube.

29. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 28, wherein said tube is additionally retained within said window casing side by a tang extending from the tube through an opening formed in said channel-shaped casing side.

30. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 21, further including spacing means located between said side edge of said window member and said vertical side of said casing to limit lateral movement of said window edge relative to said casing side over a major portion of said vertically-slideable window movement, to thereby retain said window edge between said channel legs; said spacing means having a size such as to permit a greater degree of such lateral movement over a minor portion of said vertical window movement, whereby said window edge may be removed from between said channel legs and the window member removed from said casing.

31. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 30, wherein said spacing mean includes apparatus securable to and extending outwardly from said side edge of said window member between the legs of said channel casing side; said apparatus also arranged to bear against the inside surfaces of said channel legs to create a frictional engagement between said window member and said window casing.

32. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 31, wherein said apparatus includes bearing surfaces of a lubricious plastic material for contacting the inside of said channel legs, and wherein at least one of said surfaces is adjustable inwardly and outwardly relative to said channel leg surfaces to vary said frictional engagement as desired.

33. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 31, wherein said braking member suspending means includes an elongate spring element securable within said channel-shaped window casing side in vertical orientation to suspend said braking member within said channel in a manner providing resiliently biased vertical movement of said member therewithin, said outwardly-extending portion of said spacing means apparatus and said spring element arranged in lateral alignment between said window member side edge and the web of said channel-shaped window casing to space the two apart and maintain said side edge between said channel legs.

34. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 33, wherein said spring element is an elongate coil spring, and wherein said suspending means further includes a tube providing a housing for at least part of said coil spring, said tube having a cap which closes the top end thereof, and said cap being attached to the web of said channel at least slightly below the top extremity thereof to mount the said tube within said channel, said window when raised to the top of said casing raising said outwardly-extending portion of said spacing means apparatus above said cap and tube and permitting sufficient lateral movement of said window member relative to said casing to remove said window edge from between said channel legs, whereby said window member may itself be removed from said casing.

35. A vertically-adjustable window construction, com prising in combination: a window casing defining a window opening and having at least one generally channelshaped vertical side, said side having a pair of spaced channel legs directed toward said window opening and a web interconnecting said legs; a window member located in said window opening and having a side edge located adjacent the end extremities of said channnel legs, opposite said Web, said window member being vertically movable with respect to said channel; a shoe element to underlie the window member for supporting at least a part of the weight of said window member; a braking member separate from said shoe element; means for movably Suspending said braking member from said window casing between said channel legs of the said vertical side thereof; a resilient biasing element carried with said braking member and arranged to urge said braking member into frictional engagement with an interior surface of said channel-shaped window casing side; and means on the shoe element supporting said braking member for shifting movement relative to said shoe element; said frictional engagement of said braking member and interior surfaces thereby at least partially holding said window against vertical movement with respect to said window casing.

36. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 35, wherein said generally channel-shaped window casing side includes a tip flange portion attached to at least one of said channel leg end extremities and oriented generally parallel to said web, for preventing inadvertent lateral movement of said braking member from between said channel legs.

37. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 35, wherein said resilient biasing element acts between said braking member and a structure carried therewith, such that said braking member and structure are pushed laterally apart by said biasing element, with said braking member engaging a first interior surface of said window casing side and said structure engaging a second such interior surface located opposite the first such surface.

38. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 37, wherein said braking member and said structure carried therewith are flexibly interconnected and comprise an integrally formed member, and wherein said integrally formed member supports said resilient biasing element.

39. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 35, wherein said biasing element acts directly between said braking member and a second interior surface of said window casing located generally opposite the said surface engaged by said braking member, such that said braking member is pushed laterally away from said second surface and directly against the said engaged surface.

40. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 39, wherein said braking member and said resilient biasing element are integrallyfonned of the same substance.

41. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 38, wherein said generally channel-shaped window casing side includes a tip flange portion attached to at least one of said channel leg end extremities and oriented generally parallel to said web, for preventing inadvertent lateral movement of said braking member from between said channel legs.

42. The vertically-adjustable window construction of claim 40, wherein said generally channel-shaped window casing side includes a tip flange portion attached to at least one of said channel leg end extremities and oriented generally parallel to said web, for preventing inadvertent lateral movement of said braking member from between said channel legs.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 854,988 5/ 1907 Edwards 49-445 X 2,101,577 12/1937 Gossen 49-42-9 2,613,093 10/1952 Foresman 49-429 X 3,116,520 1/ 1964 MacGregor 49-446 X FOREIGN PATENTS 658,465 2/ 1963 Canada.

DAVID J. WILLIAMOWSKY, Primary Examiner J. K. BELL, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 49-430, 451

US3466806A 1966-11-21 1966-11-21 Balance structure for windows and the like Expired - Lifetime US3466806A (en)

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US4027431A (en) * 1975-11-10 1977-06-07 National Gypsum Company Single hung window with removable fixed lite
US4078336A (en) * 1975-10-23 1978-03-14 Prosser Dwight M Window and sash balance
US4517766A (en) * 1983-11-10 1985-05-21 Caldwell Manufacturing Company Adjustable friction sash holder
US4551881A (en) * 1984-04-23 1985-11-12 Plastic Profiles, Inc. Friction brake for a vertical sliding window
US4571887A (en) * 1984-03-26 1986-02-25 Caldwell Manufacturing Company Automatic friction sash holder
US4685175A (en) * 1985-08-30 1987-08-11 Caldwell Manufacturing Company Spring system for double-hung window sash
US4724577A (en) * 1986-10-17 1988-02-16 Langley Lawrence W Spring force compensator for sash balances
US5033235A (en) * 1990-04-27 1991-07-23 Newell Manufacturing Company Window jamb liner with concealed spring pocket and friction slide
US5036622A (en) * 1990-04-17 1991-08-06 Newell Manufacturing Company Frictional sash balance and jamb liner
US5117586A (en) * 1990-04-17 1992-06-02 Newell Manufacturing Company Frictional sash balance and jamb liner
US5174064A (en) * 1990-04-17 1992-12-29 Newell Manufacturing Company Frictional sash balance and jamb liner
US5207025A (en) * 1992-09-24 1993-05-04 Caldwell Manufacturing Company Automatic friction shoe
US5331765A (en) * 1992-11-02 1994-07-26 Les Produits Abp, Inc. Adjusting device for a double-hung sash assembly, improved assembly so obtained and method of use
US5440888A (en) * 1993-06-08 1995-08-15 Gec Alsthom Electromecanique Sa Apparatus for transferring liquid helium between two devices at different potentials
US5649389A (en) * 1993-08-09 1997-07-22 Therm-O-Lite, Inc. Supplemental window arrangement
US5737877A (en) * 1996-07-26 1998-04-14 Amesbury Group, Inc. Block and tackle balance with integral, non-rotating pulley system
US5784840A (en) * 1996-12-23 1998-07-28 Lineal Technologies, Inc. Adjustable window construction
US20040011476A1 (en) * 2002-07-22 2004-01-22 Schroder Paul D. One-way drive for window coverings
US20050188620A1 (en) * 2004-02-27 2005-09-01 Neeman Malek Clip-on high load balance shoe for tilt window
US20050283944A1 (en) * 2004-06-24 2005-12-29 Mingze Wu Discretionarily adjustable friction block and tackle balance system and uses thereof
US20050284584A1 (en) * 2002-07-22 2005-12-29 Pella Corporation One-way drive for window coverings
US20060130980A1 (en) * 2002-07-22 2006-06-22 Pella Corporation Window covering leveling mechanism
US20060169418A1 (en) * 2002-07-22 2006-08-03 Pella Corporation Window covering leveling method
US7174939B1 (en) 2004-05-21 2007-02-13 Spencer John M Window
US20120272476A1 (en) * 2011-04-26 2012-11-01 Chad Swier Ramped sash cam for side load windows
US20140259944A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Pella Corporation Fenestration unit with sash retention

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US2101577A (en) * 1936-05-09 1937-12-07 Martin J Gossen Window sash balance
US2613093A (en) * 1948-08-23 1952-10-07 Harry B Foresman Window sash balance
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Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4078336A (en) * 1975-10-23 1978-03-14 Prosser Dwight M Window and sash balance
US4027431A (en) * 1975-11-10 1977-06-07 National Gypsum Company Single hung window with removable fixed lite
US4517766A (en) * 1983-11-10 1985-05-21 Caldwell Manufacturing Company Adjustable friction sash holder
US4571887A (en) * 1984-03-26 1986-02-25 Caldwell Manufacturing Company Automatic friction sash holder
US4551881A (en) * 1984-04-23 1985-11-12 Plastic Profiles, Inc. Friction brake for a vertical sliding window
US4685175A (en) * 1985-08-30 1987-08-11 Caldwell Manufacturing Company Spring system for double-hung window sash
US4724577A (en) * 1986-10-17 1988-02-16 Langley Lawrence W Spring force compensator for sash balances
US5174064A (en) * 1990-04-17 1992-12-29 Newell Manufacturing Company Frictional sash balance and jamb liner
US5036622A (en) * 1990-04-17 1991-08-06 Newell Manufacturing Company Frictional sash balance and jamb liner
US5117586A (en) * 1990-04-17 1992-06-02 Newell Manufacturing Company Frictional sash balance and jamb liner
US5033235A (en) * 1990-04-27 1991-07-23 Newell Manufacturing Company Window jamb liner with concealed spring pocket and friction slide
US5207025A (en) * 1992-09-24 1993-05-04 Caldwell Manufacturing Company Automatic friction shoe
US5331765A (en) * 1992-11-02 1994-07-26 Les Produits Abp, Inc. Adjusting device for a double-hung sash assembly, improved assembly so obtained and method of use
US5440888A (en) * 1993-06-08 1995-08-15 Gec Alsthom Electromecanique Sa Apparatus for transferring liquid helium between two devices at different potentials
US5649389A (en) * 1993-08-09 1997-07-22 Therm-O-Lite, Inc. Supplemental window arrangement
US5737877A (en) * 1996-07-26 1998-04-14 Amesbury Group, Inc. Block and tackle balance with integral, non-rotating pulley system
US5784840A (en) * 1996-12-23 1998-07-28 Lineal Technologies, Inc. Adjustable window construction
US20060130980A1 (en) * 2002-07-22 2006-06-22 Pella Corporation Window covering leveling mechanism
US20040011476A1 (en) * 2002-07-22 2004-01-22 Schroder Paul D. One-way drive for window coverings
US7174941B2 (en) 2002-07-22 2007-02-13 Pella Corporation One-way drive for window coverings
US20050284584A1 (en) * 2002-07-22 2005-12-29 Pella Corporation One-way drive for window coverings
US7021360B2 (en) 2002-07-22 2006-04-04 Pella Corporation One-way drive for window coverings
US20060169418A1 (en) * 2002-07-22 2006-08-03 Pella Corporation Window covering leveling method
US20050188620A1 (en) * 2004-02-27 2005-09-01 Neeman Malek Clip-on high load balance shoe for tilt window
US7174939B1 (en) 2004-05-21 2007-02-13 Spencer John M Window
US20050283944A1 (en) * 2004-06-24 2005-12-29 Mingze Wu Discretionarily adjustable friction block and tackle balance system and uses thereof
US7568260B2 (en) * 2004-06-24 2009-08-04 Mingze Wu Discretionarily adjustable friction block and tackle balance system and uses thereof
US20120272476A1 (en) * 2011-04-26 2012-11-01 Chad Swier Ramped sash cam for side load windows
US20140259944A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Pella Corporation Fenestration unit with sash retention
US9650822B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2017-05-16 Pella Corporation Fenestration unit with sash retention

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