US3460532A - Pulmonary therapy respirator - Google Patents

Pulmonary therapy respirator Download PDF

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US3460532A
US3460532A US477814A US3460532DA US3460532A US 3460532 A US3460532 A US 3460532A US 477814 A US477814 A US 477814A US 3460532D A US3460532D A US 3460532DA US 3460532 A US3460532 A US 3460532A
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valve
passage
air
compartment
patient
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US477814A
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Forrest M Bird
Henry L Pohndorf
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Bird F M
Henry L Pohndorf
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Assigned to CITICORP INDUSTRIAL CREDIT, INC., A CORP. OF DE. reassignment CITICORP INDUSTRIAL CREDIT, INC., A CORP. OF DE. SECURITY INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BIRD PRODUCT CORPORATION
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/0057Pumps therefor
    • A61M16/0063Compressors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/021Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes operated by electrical means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/08Bellows; Connecting tubes ; Water traps; Patient circuits
    • A61M16/0816Joints or connectors
    • A61M16/0833T- or Y-type connectors, e.g. Y-piece
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/10Preparation of respiratory gases or vapours
    • A61M16/105Filters
    • A61M16/106Filters in a path
    • A61M16/107Filters in a path in the inspiratory path

Description

12, 1969 F. M. BIRD ETAL 3,460,532

PULMONARY THERAPY RESPIRATOR Filed Aug. 6, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fig.

if 7 INVENTORS 4 Forrest M. Bird M I///// Henry L Pohndorf Arrorngxs w 1969 F. M. BIRD ETAL 3,460,532

PULMONARY THERAPY HESPiRATOR Filed' Aug. 6, 1965 s Sheets-Sheet 2 I I -37 Z7 4! q INVBFNTORS Forrest M. ird iii BY Henry Pamela Attorneys G-7. 5 F. M. BIRD ETAL 3,460,532

PULMONARY THERAPY RESPIRATOR Filed Aug. 6. 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 14 mvsmrons F g 3 Forrest M. Bird W BY Henry L. POhIIdOff Attorneys F. M. BIRD ETAL PULMONARY THERAPY RESPIRATOR Aug. 12, 1969 5 Sheets-Sheet 14 Filed Aug. 6. 1965 INVENTORS r m W n d wm n r m B 0 M L S Y. 8 "WM PMHJ Y B United States Patent M US. Cl. 128--145.6 12 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Respirator for pulmonary therapy having a compressor delivering air to a jet venturi to supply air to a patient through a manually controlled exhalation valve assembly.

This invention relates to a respirator and moreparticularly to a pulmonary therapy respirator.

Pulmonary therapy respirators heretofore available have not been particularly suited for home use. In addition, they have been relatively expensive and heavy. There is, therefore, a need for a new and improved pulmonary therapy respirator and particularly one which can be readily utilized in the home.

In general, it is an object of the present invention to provide a pulmonary therapy respirator which is particularly adapted for home use.

Another object of the invention is to provide a respirator of the above character which is self-contained.

Another object of the invention is to provide a respirator of the above character which is light in weight and which is portable.

Another object of the invention is to provide a respirator of the above character which can be readily and economically manufactured.

Another object of the invention is to provide respirator of the above character which blends in readily with the furniture in a home.

Another object of the invention is to provide a respirator of the above character which can be readily operated by the patient.

Another object of the invention is to provide a respirator of the above character which is capable of producing inspiratory curves which are similar to the inspiratory curves of more elaborate respiratory apparatus.

Another object of the invention is to provide a respirator of the above character which can be readily adjusted by the patient.

Additional features and objects of the invention will appear from the following description in which the preferred embodiment is set forth in detail in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

Referring to the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a front elevational view of a respirator incorporating the present invention with certain parts shown in cross-section and broken away.

FIGURE 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a rear elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged detail view of a portion of the respirator shown in FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 5 is a partial front elevational view showing the manometer utilized in the respirator.

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged detail view of the exhalation valve assembly, the nebulizer and the manually controlled intermittent positive pressure valve utilized in the respirator.

-As shown in the drawings, the pulmonary therapy respirator consists of a console 11 which is adapted to 3,460,532 Patented Aug. 12, 1969 be mounted in a carrying case 12 consisting of a cover 13 and a base 14. The cover is adapted to be releasably secured to the base 14 by latches 16 provided on the bottom of the cover which are adapted to engage retaining members 17 carried by the base 14. The base 14 is also provided with rubber feet 18 secured to its bottom side. The cover 13 is provided with a handle 19 to facilitate carrying of the carrying case 12 with the console 11 therein. The cover is provided with a :foam rubber pad 21 mounted on the upper part of the cover 13 which is adapted to yieldably engage the top of the console 11 to hold the console 11 firmly in place within the carrying case 12.

The console 11 consists of a rectangular cabinet 24 having rubber feet 25. The cabinet 24 is formed of a suitable material such as wood and is provided with side walls 26 and 27, top and bottom walls 28 and 2.9, and a rear wall 30. The bottom wall 29 is provided with openings 29a for a purpose hereinafter described.

A substantially U-shaped member 31 is mounted in the upper part of the cabinet 24 and is supported upon mounting blocks 32 secured to the side walls 26 and 27 of the cabinet. The U-shaped member 31 forms a compartment 33 which is open at the forward end and which is substantially closed off by a front panel 34 which is secured to the member 31 by screws 35 and two blocks 36 secured to the side walls 26 and 27 by screws 37.

An air compressor 41 is mounted in the lower compartment 39 of the cabinet 24 and preferably is of the diaphragm type which is capable of delivering at least 22 lbs. per square inch pressure. Suitable means is provided for resiliently mounting the air compressor 41 for quiet operation and consists of a pair of cradles 42 disposed on opposite ends of the air compressor 41 and which have resilient grommets 43 mounted in holes 44 provided in the cradles. Screws 46 extend upwardly through the bottom wall 29 and through the grommets 43. The screws 46 are held in place by nuts 47. Rubber grommets 48 are disposed over the nuts. Ball rubber mounts 49 are mounted on the screws 46 and serve to resiliently support the grommets 43 and the ends of the cradles 42 as shown particularly in FIGURE 2. From the mounting provided for the air compressor 41, it can be seen that there is no metallic connection between the compressor 41 and the cabinet 24. U-bolts 51 extend over the opposite ends of the compressor 41 and are secured to the cradles 42 to firmly secure the compressor 41 Within the cradles 42. Nuts 50 are mounted on the screws 46 and serve to retain the cradles 42 on the screws 46.

The air compressor 41 is provided with a power cord 52 which extends upwardly through a grommet 53 provided in a holder 54 into a back compartment 56 and out through an opening 57 provided in the rear wall 30. The holder 54 is mounted on the block 32. The power cord 52 is adapted to be stored within the compartment 56 and the compartment closed by a hinged door 58.

The compressor 41 is provided with an inlet 61 which has a fitting 62 mounted therein and which is also mounted in the U-shaped member 31 and opens into the compartment 33 (see FIGURE 2). The air compressor 41 is also provided with an outlet which carries a fitting 63 that is connected to a tube 64. The tube 64 extends through a grommet 66 provided in the U-shaped member 31 to the rear entry port 67 of a flow rate valve 68 mounted on the front panel 34. The flow rate valve 68 consists of a valve body 69 having a needle valve 71 threaded therein. The needle valve 71 is adjustable axially of the body by means of a knob 72 secured thereto. The air, after it enters the passage 73, passes into a small chamber 74 provided in the body 69. The body 69 is provided with nipples 76 and 77 having passages 78 therein communieating with the chamber 74. The chamber 74 is also in communication with an orifice 79 which opens to the atmosphere in compartment 33. The body is provided with a valve seat 81 which is adapted to be engaged by the needle valve to control the flow of air from the chamber 74 through the orifice 79. The needle valve 71 is in a partially open position, as shown in FIGURE 4; and in this position, some of the gas from the tube 64 passes through the fittings 76 and 77. When the needle valve '71 is opened still further, the flow of air through the fittings 76 and 77 decreases because additional air passes through the orifice 79 and is exhausted to the atmosphere.

The fitting 76 is connected to a jet venturi assembly 83 mounted in the front panel 34. The jet venturi assembly consists of a body 84 which is provided with a venturilike passage 86 extending longitudinally therethrough having entrance and discharge ends. A cap 87 is threaded on the end of the body 84 having the entrance end and is provided with side openings 88 to permit air from compartment 33 to enter the entrance end of passage 86. The cap 87 has a nozzle 89 which is formed as an integral part of the cap 87. The nozzle 89 is provided with a flow passage 96 which is in axial alignment with and in front of the entrance end of the venturi-like passage 86 provided in the body 84. The jet venturi assembly 83 is mounted on the front panel 34 by a hollow receptaclelike nut 91 which is mounted in the front panel 34 and threaded onto the body 84.

Means is provided for measuring the pressure of the gases produced by the jet venturi assembly 83 and consists of a manometer 92 which is also mounted on the front panel 34 by a bracket 93 and is provided with an inlet nipple 94. The manometer 92 includes a scale 95 and a pointer 96 (see FIGURES 1 and Another nipple 97 is mounted on the nipple 94 and is connected to a tube 98 which has its other end connected to a nipple 99 threaded onto the body 84 and communicating with a passage 101 provided in the body 84. The fitting 77 of the fiow rate valve 68 is connected by a tube 102 to a fitting 183 and mounted in the front panel 34.

A plurality of openings 186 are provided in the front panel 34 and are arranged in a suitable manner such as in a circular pattern shown in FIGURE 1. These openings 106 are provided to permit atmospheric air to enter the compartment 33. Suitable means is provided for filtering the air entering the holes 106 and consists of a disc 107 formed of a suitable material such as a porous ceramic and which is secured to the front panel by suitable means such as a bolt 108. Thus, it can be seen that the compartment 33 is a closed compartment and that all air entering the compartment must pass through the openings 106 and through the filter disc 107.

The cabinet 24 is also provided with a utility compartment 111 above the U-shaped member 31 and above a plate 112 (see FIGURE 2) which has one end secured to the U-shaped member 31 by screws 113 and the other end secured to the rear wall 57 of the cabinet by screws 114. A breathing unit assembly 116 and other apparatus which is used as part of the pulmonary therapy respirator is normally stored in the utility compartment 111. This breathing unit assembly consists of a large main airway tube 117 which is provided with a right angle fitting 118 which is adapted to be placed in the receptacle 92 of the jet venturi assembly 93 mounted on the front panel 34 as shown in broken lines in FIGURE 4. The other end of the tube 117 is connected to one end of a rigid curved metal tube 119 by a fitting 115 and the other end of the tube 119 is connected to the inlet of a nebulizer 120 of a type described in US. Letters Patent 3,172,406. The outlet of the nebulizer 120 is connected to an exhalation valve assembly 121.

The exhalation valve assembly 121 is similar to those described in US. Letters Patent 3,191,596 and includes a valve body 122 having inlet passage 123, outlet passage 124, and a discharge passage 126 in communication with each other. The outlet passage 124 is connected to a suitable patient adaptor such as a mouthpiece 127. The valve body 122 is formed with a valve seat 125 between the inlet and discharge passages 123 and 126. Flow through the discharge passage 126 is controlled by a valve member 128 which is slidably mounted on a valve stem 129 for movement between open and closed positions with respect to the valve seat 125. The valve stem 129 is slidably mounted in a valve guiding member 131 disposed within the valve body 122. The lower extremity of the valve stem 129 is carried by a flexible diaphragm 132 which has its outer annular margin disposed between the lower extremity of the valve guiding member 131 and a cap 133 which is threaded into the valve body as shown in FIGURE 6. The valve guiding member 131 is provided with wells 134 and 136 in which are disposed springs 137 and 138, respectively, mounted coaxially of the valve stem 129. The cap 133 is provided with a fitting 139 formed integral therewith which leads to one side of the diaphragm 132 so that air under pressure can be supplied to the diaphragm to urge the valve stem 129 and the valve member 128 in a forward direction to retain the valve member 128 in a closed position on the seat 125 in the valve body 122 to prevent the passage of air through the discharge passage 126.

A small tube 144 is connected to the fitting 103 provided on the front panel 34 and is also connected to a fitting 146 provided on a manually operated plunger-type intermittent positive pressure breathing valve 147 mounted in the rigid tube 119. The valve 147 consists of a valve body 148 which extends diametrically through the tube 119. The body is provided with a cylindrical bore 149 which has side opening orifices 151 and 152 which communicate with the main flow passage 153 provided in the rigid tube 119. The body 148 is provided with a valve seat 154 which is adapted to be engaged by an O-ring 157 carried by a valve plunger 158 to form a sealing arrangement between the valve plunger 158 and the valve seat 154. Means is provided for yieldably urging the plunger 158 to move the O-ring 157 out of sealing engagement with the valve seat 154 and consists of a spring 159 which has one end engaging the body 148 and has the other end disposed in a well 161 within the valve stem 158 and extending longitudinally thereof. Means is provided for retaining the plunger 158 within the bore 149 and consists of an O-ring 162 disposed in an annular groove 163 provided in the plunger. The upper portion of the body 148 is necked slightly inwardly as shown in the drawing so that the O-ring engages the necked portion and serves to retain the plunger 158 within the bore. The plunger 158 is provided with a mushroom-like head portion 158a which is adapted to be engaged by the hand. The O-ring 162 also serves as an upper seal to prevent gases from escaping to the atmosphere.

The nipple 146 is provided with a passage (not shown) which communicates with a small chamber 166 provided in the lower portion of the valve body 148 and which is adapted to communicate with the bore 149 provided in the valve body when the valve plunger 158 is out of engagement with the valve seat 154. The chamber 166 also communicates with a passage (not shown) and a nipple 167 threaded into the body. A tube 168 has one end connected to the nipple 167 and has the other end connected to a T-shaped fitting 169. The fitting 169 is mounted on an inlet 171 of the nebulizer 120. The other leg of the T-shaped fitting 169 is connected by a tube 172 to the nipple 139 provided as a part of the exhalation valve assembly 121.

Operation and use of the pulmonary therapy respirator may now be briefly described as follows. Let it be assumed that the console 11 is disposed within the carrying case 12. To place the respirator in operation, it is merely necessary to open the latches 16 and to remove the cover 13 by utilizing the handle 19. Then, if desired, the console 11 can be lifted out of the base 14. The console 11 is then placed in the desired position. The

rear door 58 is opened and the electrical cord 52 is removed and plugged into a suitable outlet to start the compressor 41 in operation. The patient desiring to use the respirator then takes the breathing unit assembly 116 out of the utility compartment 111 and plugs the fitting 118 into the receptacle 93 and connects the hose 144 to the nipple or fitting 103 provided on the front panel 34. The patient then grasps the rigid member 119 which serves as a handle for the breathing unit assembly and places the mouthpiece 127 in his mouth and operates the valve 147 to close it.

The amount of air which is supplied to the patient for ventilating the lungs of the patient is controlled by the flow rate valve 68. Air under pressure supplied by the air compressor 41 to the tube 64 is normally split up into three parts. One part is delivered through the nipple 77, to the tube 102, to the tube 144, to the fitting 146, through the chamber 166, through the nipple 167, through the tube 168, to the T-shaped fitting 169, where again this flow is divided into two parts with one part being supplied to the nebulizer 120 to nebulize the bronchial dilator carried by the nebulizer 120 and the other part is supplied by a tube 172 to the exhalation valve 121 to hold the exhalation valve 121 in a closed position.

Another part of the air delivered by the tube 64 passes through the nipple 76, through the tube 82, to the jet nozzle 89, to deliver a high velocity jet of air into the venturi-like passage 86. The passage of the jet of air through the venturi-like passage 86 causes additional air molecules to be aspirated or entrained from within the compartment 35 and to be carried through the venturi-like passage 86 so that air under pressure is delivered to the main airway tube 117 through the rigid tube 119 to the nebulizer 120 where liquid particles of the bronchial dilator are picked up by the mainstream and carried into the exhalation valve 123. The mainstream gases with the bronchial dilator therein are delivered through the mouthpiece 127 to the lungs of the patient.

The flow of the other part of the gas delivered by the tube 64 is adjustable and is delivered to the atmosphere though the orifice 81 provided in the body 69. The rate of flow of this third part is adjusted by the positioning of the needle valve 71. When the needle valve 71 is in a closed position, the maximum amount of air is delivered to the jet nozle 89. This rate of flow can be decreased by gradually opening the needle valve 71 until the desired positive pressure is being supplied to the main tube 117.

The fiow of the mainstream gases to the patient continues only so long as the manually operated valve 147 is held in a closed position. As soon as the plunger 158 is released by the hand of the patient which is holding the rigid tube 119, the spring 159 urges the plunger 158 to an open position to permit the air being supplied from the tube 144 to exhaust through the orifices 151 and 152 into the mainstream passage 153. This causes the pressure in the line 172 also to be reduced and the spring 138 moves the valve stem away from the exhalation valve member 128 to permit the exhalation valve member 128 to open and to thereby permit the patient to exhale through the mouthpiece and through the discharge opening 126 to the atmosphere. As soon as the patient has completed exhaling, the patient again operates the plunger 158 to move it to a closed position which again closes the exhalation valve 121 so that the mainstream gases will again be delivered to the lungs of the patient. The same sequence of operation continues under the control of the patient as the patient operates the plunger 158 of the manally operated valve 147.

It should be pointed out that the compressor 41 is isolated or sealed off from the compartment 33 so that all of the air which enters the compressor must come into the compartment 33 through the filter 107 and is supplied by the tube 64 to the jet nozzle 39 as hereinbefore described. The additional atmospheric air which is entrained by the jet passing from the nozzle 89 also must 6 come from the compartment 35 and must pass through the filter 107.

As pointed out previously, the pressure of the gas supplied to the patient is controlled by the flow rate valve 68. In one embodiment of the invention, the air compressor 41 delivered at a constant pressure of approximately 24 psi. to the flow rate control valve 68. When the knob 72 of the flow rate valve was in a position so that the dot shown on the knob is in alignment with the pointer shown on the front panel 34 (see FIGURE 1), the flow rate valve permitted air to be delivered to the main flow tube 117 at a pressure which increased as indicated by the manometer 92 until a predetermined pressure of 17 cm. of water was reached as shown by the pointer 96 in FIGURE 5. By adjusting the knob 72, this pressure was increased or decreased as shown from approximately 10 cm. of Water pressure up to approximately 24 cm. of water pressure.

The flow rate valve 68, in addition to determining the rate of flow of air to the patient, also determines the peak inspiratory pressure attainable. The velocity of the air passing from the jet nozzle 39 determines the number of molecules which are entrained from the atmosphere within the compartment 33 and driven down the venturi-like passage 86.

If, by chance, there should be changes in lung compliance of the patient or in airway resistances or mechanical resistances during inspiration, the jet venturi assembly 83 acts as a pneumatic clutch and changes flow into pressure to overcome these resistances or obstructions, and when they disappear, the pneumtaic clutch changes pressure into how again to ventilate the lungs of the patient.

The jet venturi assembly 33 also acts as a safety device to prevent pressure from accumulating in the main breathing tube 117 beyond a predetermined pressure as, for example, 24 cm. of water pressure. For example, if 'it is assumed that the flow rate is adjusted for maximum delivery of air molecules to the tube 144, and to the venturi jet nozzle 8%, the nozzle 89 produces a jet which sets up a molecule wall or barrier that moves towards the patients airway. Should pressures develop in the lung or airway of the patient to equal this pressure, a retrogression of pressure waves causes a stationary barrier of air molecules at the throat of the venturi-like passage 86 so that any additional air molecules above this pressure escape to the atmosphere through the openings 88 provided in the jet venturi assembly 83.. Thus, it can be seen that the airway of the patient is always connected to the atmosphere through the entrainment apertures 86 at the entrance of the venturi-like passage 86. The jet venturi assembly 83, therefore, serves to provide a flexible pneumatic connection between the respirator and the patient. Thus, the maximum pressures which can be developed by the respirator are well within the safe physiological limits of the lungs of the patient. This is true because it has been established that a cough can develop pressures which are even higher than cm. of water.

The air compressor 41 is cooled by air which enters the large holes 29a provided in the bottom wall 29 of the cabinet 24. Additional air also enters the cabinet below the front panel 33 as shown by the arrows indicated in FIGURE 2. This air then enters the compressor compartment 39, then passes upwardly and exits through the opening 57 in the rear wall 30. The rear door 5% cannot inadvertently be closed because before the compressor 41 can be placed in operation, the power cord 52 must pass through the opening 54.

The large rigid tube 119 serves as a handle for the breathing unit assembly which is relatively large and convenient to hold especially by the geriatiric patient who possibly may have an arthritic hand. The manually operated value 147 is positioned in the handle itself so that it can be readily depressed by such a patient merely by the palm of the hand.

In addition to the mode of operation hereinbefore described in which the flow control valve is utilized for controlling the flow rate and also the peak inspiratory pressure available, the patient can utilize the flow control valve 68 for delivering the gases at a higher flow rate and then watching the manometer 92 to determine the peak inspiratory pressure desired and then releasing the manually operated intermittent positive pressure valve 68.

It is apparent from the foregoing that there has been provided a new and improved pulmonary therapy respirator which has many advantageous features. As pointed out previously, the console 11 can be readily placed in a carrying case so that it is readily portable. In addition, the operation of the respirator is relatively simple so that it requires a minimum of teaching for plumonary therapy. It is also relatively simple in construction facilitating manufacture, maintenance and servicing. The carrying case 12 and the console 11 are constructed in such a manner and can be formed of material so that they will readily fit into the decor of a patients home.

Although the respirator has herein been described as merely delivering atmospheric air to the patient, it should be appreciated that this same apparatus can be utilized for delivering oxygen-enriched air to the patient if so desired. This can be accomplished by utilizing a T connection at the point at which the fitting 118 is mounted on the front panel and supplying the oxygen to one leg of the T.

We claim:

1. In a respirator, a cabinet, a closed compartment formed in said cabinet, said compartment having an inlet opening to permit atmospheric air to enter the compartment, filter means disposed over the inlet opening in said compartment so that the atmospheric air entering the compartment is filtered, a compressor mounted in said cabinet outside of said compartment and having an inlet and an outlet, means connecting the inlet of the compressor to the compartment for receiving air from the compartment, a body carried by said cabinet and mounted in said compartment having a venturi-like passage therein with an entrance end and a discharge end, means adapted to connect the discharge end of the venturi-like passage to the patient, a nozzle mounted on said body in substantial alignment with said venturi-like passage and adjacent the entrance end of the venturi-like passage, the entrance end of said venturi-like passage opening into said compartment, and means for supplying air from the outlet of said air compressor to said nozzle whereby said nozzle directs a jet of air through said venturi-like passage and causes air from the compartment to be carried through the venturi-like passage to supply air under pressure to the patient.

2. A respirator as in claim 1 together with a flow rate control valve carried by the cabinet and extending into the compartment, and means connecting said flow rate control valve to said means for supplying air from the outlet of said air compressor to said nozzle to adjust the rate of flow of air through said nozzle.

3. A respirator as in claim 1 wherein said compressor is mounted in the lower portion of said cabinet and wherein said compartment is disposed above the compressor, and means disposed in the cabinet for storing the means for connecting the outlet of the venturi-like passage to the patient.

4. A respirator as in claim 1 wherein said cabinet has a box-like configuration together with a carrying case adapted to receive said cabinet, said carrying case being formed in two removable parts, at least one of which slips over the cabinet, said one of said parts having a carrying handle and means detachably connecting the two parts to form a unitary carrying case.

5. In a respirator, a cabinet, a closed compartment formed in said cabinet, said compartment having an inlet opening to permit atmospheric air to enter the compartment, a compressor mounted in said cabinet and having an inlet and an outlet, means connecting the inlet of the compressor to the compartment for receiving air from the compartment, a body carried by said cabinet having a venturi-like passage therein with an entrance end and a discharge end, means adapted to connect the discharge end to the venturi-like passage to the patient, a nozzle mounted on said body in substantial alignment with said venturi-like passage and adjacent the entrance end of the venturi-like passage, the entrance end of said venturi-like passage opening into said compartment, and means for supplying air from the outlet of said air compressor to said nozzle whereby said nozzle directs a jet of air through said venturi-like passage and causes air from the compartment to be carried through the venturi-like passage to supply air under pressure to the patient, said means adapted to connect the discharge end of the venturi-like passage to the patient including a valve body having an inlet passage, an outlet passage, and a discharge passage in communication with each other, said valve body being formed with a valve seat between said inlet passage and said discharge passage, an exhalation valve member mounted in said valve body and adapted to engage said valve seat to prevent the flow of air through said discharge passage, a patient adapter connected to the outlet passage of said valve body, main airway tube means connecting the discharge end of said venturi-like passage to said inlet passage of said valve body, diaphragm-operated means mounted in said valve body and adapted to urge said valve member into a closed position, and a manually-operated valve movable between open and closed positions, said manually-operated valve being connected to said valve body and to the outlet of said air compressor and in one position supplying air from the compressor to said disphragm-operated means to retain said exhalation valve in a closed position and in a second position permitting the exhalation valve member to open.

6. A respirator as in claim 5 wherein said main airway tube means includes a rigid tube having a flow passage therein and wherein said manually-operated valve is mounted on said rigid tube.

7. A respirator as in claim 6 wherein said manuallyoperated valve includes a valve body having an orifice therein communicating with the passage in said rigid tube, a flow passage connecting the outlet of said compressor to said disphragm-operated means of the exhalation valve and a plunger slidably mounted in said last named valve body for movement between open and closed positions to permit the air from said compressor to either pass to said diaphragm-operated valve or to said orifice in said last named valve body.

8. In a respirator, a cabinet, a closed compartment formed in said cabinet, said compartment having an inlet opening to permit atmospheric air to enter the compartment, a compressor mounted in said cabinet and having an inlet and an outlet, means connecting the inlet of the compressor to the compartment for receiving air from the compartment, a body carried by said cabinet having a venturi-like passage therein with an entrance end and a discharge end, means adapted to connect the dis charge end of the venturi-like passage to the patient, a nozzle mounted on said body in substantial alignment with said venturi-like passage and adjacent the entrance end of the venturi-like passage, the entrance end of said venturi-like passage opening into said compartment, and means for supplying air from the outlet of said air compressor to said nozzle whereby said nozzle directs a jet of air through said venturi-like passage and causes air from the compartment to be carried through the venturilike passage to supply air under pressure to the patient, said means for connecting the discharge end of the venturi-like passage to the patient including a flexible main air tube connected to the discharge end of the venturilike passage, a rigid tube connected to the flexible tube, an exhalation valve assembly connected to the rigid tube, said exhalation valve assembly including a valve body having inlet, outlet and discharge passages in communication with each other, said valve body being formed with a valve seat disposed between the inlet passage and the discharge passage, a valve member mounted in the valve body movable between open and closed positions with respect to the valve seat to control the flow of air through said discharge passage, diaphragm-operated means for moving and retaining said valve member in a closed position in engagement with said seat, a patient adapter mounted in said outlet passage, means connecting the inlet of the valve body to the rigid tube, said rigid tube having a passage therethrough, a manually-operated valve mounted in said rigid tube and having a flow passage therein, means connecting the flow passage to the outlet of the compressor, means connecting the flow passage to the exhalation valve assembly to supply air under pressure to the diaphragm-operated valve means to retain the valve member in a closed position, said manually-operated valve including valve means for permitting air in said flow passage to escape to the atmosphere to permit said exhalation valve member to move to an open position.

9. A respirator as in claim 8 wherein said manuallyoperated valve includes a valve body disposed in the rigid tube and having at least one orifice therein communicating with the passage in said rigid tube and a valve memher in said last named valve body being movable between open and closed positions, said last named valve memher in an open position permitting the air from said flow passage to pass through said orifice into the passage in said tube and in a closed position preventing the flow of air through said orifice.

10. A respirator as in claim 8 together with a flow control valve carried by the cabinet, said flow control valve including means connected to said means for supplying air from the outlet of the air compressor to the nozzle for adjusting the rate of flow of air to the nozzle.

11. In a respirator, a cabinet, a compressor mounted in said cabinet and having an inlet and an outlet, means connecting the inlet of the compressor to the atmosphere, a body having a venturi-like passage therein with entrance and discharge ends, a nozzle mounted on said body in substantial alignment with said venturi-like passage, the entrance end of said venturi-like passage opening into the atmosphere, means for supplying air from the outlet of the air compressor to said nozzle whereby said nozzle directs a jet of air into the entrance end of said venturilike passage and causes additional atmospheric air to be entrained therein to be discharged from the discharge end of the body, means adapted to connect the outlet in the venturi-like passage to the patient, and means for controlling the rate of :flow of air from the air compressor to the nozzle, said means for connecting the outlet end of the venturi-like passage to the patient including a main flexible air tube connected to said air compressor, a rigid tube having a flow passage therein connected to said main air tube, exhalation valve means connected to said rigid tube, a valve body, said valve body having an inlet passage, an outlet passage and a discharge passage in communication with each other, means connecting the inlet passage to the rigid tube, a patient adapter connecting the outlet passage to the patient, said valve body being formed with a valve seat between said inlet passage and said discharge passage, an exhalation valve member movable between open and closed positions with respect to the valve seat, diaphragm-operated means for moving the valve member toward a closed position, a manuallyoperated valve carried by said rigid tube, said manuallyoperated valve including a valve body extending diametrically through said rigid tube, said last named valve body having an orifice therein in communication with the passage in said rigid tube, said last named valve body being formed with a flow passage therein. in communication with said orifice in said last named valve body, said last named valve body being formed with a valve seat between said flow passage and said orifice, a plunger removable between open and closed positions with respect to said last named valve seat, means connecting said flow passage to the outlet of said air compressor, means connecting said flow passage to the diaphragm-operated means of the exhalation valve assembly whereby when said plunger of said manually-operated valve is in a closed position, air under pressure is supplied to said diaphragmoperated means to retain said exhalation valve member in a closed position, and when said valve member of said manually-operated valve is in a closed position, air in the flow passage coming from the air compressor is permitted to pass through said orifice itno the passage in said rigid tube to thereby permit said exhalation valve member to move into an open position.

12. A respirator as in claim 11 wherein said plunger of said manually-operated valve extends outside of the rigid tube to permit the same to be engaged by the hand of the patient, together with means yieldably urging said plunger to an open position.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,063,043 12/1936 McKesson 128145.8 2,408,136 9/1946 Fox 128--145.8 2,547,458 4/ 1951 Goodner 128-1458 X 2,831,607 4/1958 Berndt 128185 X 2,881,757 4/1959 Haverland 128-145.8 3,068,856 12/1962 Bird et a1 128-145.5 3,083,707 4/1963 Seeler 128145.8 3,221,733 12/1965 Beasley 128-145.6 3,267,935 8/1966 Andreasen et a1. 128-1455 RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner K. L. HOWELL, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 128-486

US477814A 1965-08-06 1965-08-06 Pulmonary therapy respirator Expired - Lifetime US3460532A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3863630A (en) * 1971-11-10 1975-02-04 Synthelabo Respiratory apparatus
US6595203B1 (en) * 2000-11-28 2003-07-22 Forrest M. Bird Apparatus for administering intermittent percussive ventilation and unitary breathing head assembly for use therein

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2063043A (en) * 1933-11-06 1936-12-08 Martha F Mckesson Respiration method and apparatus
US2408136A (en) * 1942-12-07 1946-09-24 E & J Mfg Company Resuscitator insufflator aspirator
US2547458A (en) * 1947-06-25 1951-04-03 Stephenson Corp Resuscitator
US2831607A (en) * 1955-04-29 1958-04-22 Walter W Stillman Inhalation apparatus
US2881757A (en) * 1956-01-03 1959-04-14 J J Monaghan Company Inc Respirator control systems
US3068856A (en) * 1958-02-14 1962-12-18 Forrest M Bird Fluid control device
US3083707A (en) * 1956-02-13 1963-04-02 Henry W Seeler Device for treatment of pulmonary diseases
US3221733A (en) * 1961-10-02 1965-12-07 Bennett Respiration Products I Pressure breathing therapy unit
US3267935A (en) * 1961-05-04 1966-08-23 Air Shield Inc Respiratory assister

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2063043A (en) * 1933-11-06 1936-12-08 Martha F Mckesson Respiration method and apparatus
US2408136A (en) * 1942-12-07 1946-09-24 E & J Mfg Company Resuscitator insufflator aspirator
US2547458A (en) * 1947-06-25 1951-04-03 Stephenson Corp Resuscitator
US2831607A (en) * 1955-04-29 1958-04-22 Walter W Stillman Inhalation apparatus
US2881757A (en) * 1956-01-03 1959-04-14 J J Monaghan Company Inc Respirator control systems
US3083707A (en) * 1956-02-13 1963-04-02 Henry W Seeler Device for treatment of pulmonary diseases
US3068856A (en) * 1958-02-14 1962-12-18 Forrest M Bird Fluid control device
US3267935A (en) * 1961-05-04 1966-08-23 Air Shield Inc Respiratory assister
US3221733A (en) * 1961-10-02 1965-12-07 Bennett Respiration Products I Pressure breathing therapy unit

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3863630A (en) * 1971-11-10 1975-02-04 Synthelabo Respiratory apparatus
US6595203B1 (en) * 2000-11-28 2003-07-22 Forrest M. Bird Apparatus for administering intermittent percussive ventilation and unitary breathing head assembly for use therein

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