US3452379A - Cleaning apparatus - Google Patents

Cleaning apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
US3452379A
US3452379A US3452379DA US3452379A US 3452379 A US3452379 A US 3452379A US 3452379D A US3452379D A US 3452379DA US 3452379 A US3452379 A US 3452379A
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Prior art keywords
mop
cleaning
pads
pressure plates
plates
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Inventor
Elmer H Bard
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TIERNEY Inc A CORP OF MICHIGAN
Geerpres Inc
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Beatrice Companies Inc
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Assigned to GEERPRES, INC. reassignment GEERPRES, INC. CHANGE OF NAME (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). EFFECTIVE 9/07/83 Assignors: TIERNEY, INC.
Assigned to TIERNEY, INC., A CORP OF MICHIGAN reassignment TIERNEY, INC., A CORP OF MICHIGAN ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. Assignors: BEATRICE FOOD CO.
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L13/00Implements for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L13/10Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing
    • A47L13/50Auxiliary implements
    • A47L13/58Wringers for scouring pads, mops, or the like, combined with buckets
    • A47L13/59Wringers for scouring pads, mops, or the like, combined with buckets with movable squeezing members

Description

July 1, 1969 E. H. BARD 3,452,379

CLEANING APPARATUS Filed June 9, 1966 Sheet of 2 INVENTOR.

if a 4 za E H. BARD July 1, 1969 CLEANING APPARATUS Sheet of2 Filed June 9, 1966 INVENTOR. 77776? f/(Zar/ BY MM,0 gm /7 own 5x9.

3,452,379 CLEANING APPARATUS Elmer H. Bard, Muskegon, Mich., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Beatrice Foods C0,, Chicago, 111., a

corporation of Delaware Filed June 9, 1966, Ser. No. 556,436 Int. Cl. A471 13/14 U.S. Cl. 151 9 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An apparatus for cleaning walls or the like comprising a mop-type cleaning device, a housing adapted to removably receive at least a portion of the mop head, a pair of pressure plates movably disposed within the housing, an actuating assembly adapted to move the plates into compressing engagement with the mop head, whereby to squeeze any liquid therefrom, a pair of resilient pads mounted one on each of the pressure plates adapted to engage the mop head without damaging any portion thereof, and a liquid absorbing bun mounted directly adjacent the mop head for absorbing any residual liquid retained within the mop head.

This invention relates generally to cleaning apparatus and, more particularly, to a new and improved apparatus for washing walls and the like.

It is a general object of the present invention to provide a new and improved apparatus which is adapted to be used in conjunction with a conventional fabric-type dust mop or similar cleaning device and function to remove to a very great degree the Water or other cleaning fluid with which the mop head may be saturated, whereby the mop may be used for Washing walls or for other elevated or over-the-head cleaning applications.

It is a more particular object of the present invention to provide a new and improved apparatus of the above character which is adapted to simultaneously apply a compressive force to the mop head to wring or squeeze the water or cleaning fluid therefrom, and absorb the fluid forced out of the top of the mop head, whereby to minimize to the extreme any cleaning fluid retained within the mop head.

It is still a more partcular object of the present invention to provide a new and improved apparatus of the above character which includes a pair of pressure plates provided With resilient pads adapted to compressingly engage the mop head in a manner so as to wrap around the wire frame of the mop head Without bending the frame, whereby to apply a uniform pressure to all of the mop fabric.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a new and improved apparatus of the above character which includes a fluid absorbent collar or bun adapted to be mounted on the mop handle directly adjacent the mop head. The bun is adapted to absorb any fluid which might be squeezed up onto the top of the pressure plates, and also absorb any fluid which might tend to run down the mop handle from the head thereof as the mop is being used in an elevated or over-the-head application.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a new and improved apparatus of the above character wherein the aforesaid pressure plates and pads mounted thereon are adapted to compressingly engage the fluid absorbent bun, whereby to squeeze cleaning fluid therefrom.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a new and improved apparatus of the above character which may be operatively mounted on a commercial nited States Patent mop wringer of the type described and claimed in United States Patent No. 2,199,906.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a new and improved apparatus, as above described, which is of a relatively simple design, is easy to assemble and economical to commercially manufacture.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the present invention are attained thorugh the provision of a novel apparatus adapted to be used in conjunction with a conventional dust mop or similar type cleaning device so that the mop may be used for washing walls and other over-the-head applications. The apparatus of the present invention includes housing means adapted to removably receive the mop head and comprising a pair of pressure plates adapted to be pivoted or similarly biased toward and away from the mop head. The pressure plates are provided with a pair of resilient pads which, upon movement of the plates toward the mop head, engage the mop head to squeeze cleaning fluid therefrom. Accordingly, during application of the mop, the head thereof will be only moderately moist, thus preventing any streaking of the walls during washing thereof and preventing any excess or residual fluid from running down the mop handle onto the hands of the user.

One feature of the apparatus of the present invention resides in the provision of a fluid absorbent collar or bun which is adapted to be mounted on the mop handle directly adjacent the head thereof. The bun functions to absorb any cleaning fluid which is forced onto the top of the pressure plates and also any residual fluid remaining in the mop head to prevent the same from running down the mop handle. Upon actuation of the pressure plates, the aforesaid pads will compressingly engage the bun and wring or squeeze any cleaning fluid therefrom.

Another feature of the present invention will be seen from the fact that the pressure pads are adapted to be operatively mounted on a commercial mop Wringer of the type described in the aforementioned United States patent, whereby the wringer, together With being used for its intended purpose of wringing floor mops and the like, may be used additionally for removing water from dust mops and the like utilized in washing walls.

A more complete understanding of the present invention, along with other advantages and features thereof, will be obtained from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view, partially broken away, of an exemplary embodiment of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational View, partially broken away, of the structure illustrated in FIGURE 1, shown with the pressure plates thereof disposed in actuated position and in operative association with a mop-type cleaning apparatus and fluid container;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the portion of the structure illustrated in the circle 3 of FIG- URE 2;

FIGURE 4 is an elevated perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of the present invention shown in operative association with a commercial mop wringer;

FIGURE 5 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the structure illustrated in FIGURE 4, as taken substantially along the line 5-5 thereof;

FIGURE 6 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the structure illustrated in FIGURE 4, as taken substantially along the line 66 thereof;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional view taken along the line 7-7 of FIGURE 6, and

FIGURE 8 is a top cross-sectional view of the structure illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2.

Referring now to FIGURES 1 through 3 of the drawing, a new and improved cleaning apparatus, in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention, is shown as comprising a semi-enclosed housing means which may be formed with an outwardly extending peripheral flange portion 12 adapted to bear upon the upper edge of an associated liquid receptacle 14, such as a conventional tub, pail or the like. The housing means 10 is formed with an opening 16 on the top thereof adapted to removably receive the head portion 18 of a conventional dust mop or similar type cleaning apparatus 20. The mop head 18 is shown mounted on the lower end of a suitable manipulating handle 22 in the conventional manner and usually comprises a fabric portion mounted on a wire or similar type frame. The housing means 10 includes a bottom plate 24 which is formed with a plurality of perforations 26 opening into the interior of the receptacle 14.

In accordance with the principles of the present invention, the housing means '10 is provided with a pair of pressure plates 28 and 30 which are pivotably mounted upon a pair of spaced parallel shafts 32 and 34, respectively, which extend transversely of the housing means 10. As illustrated in FIGURE 2, the pressure plates 28 and 30 are provided with a pair of resilient pads 36 and 38, respectively, which may be attached to the plates 28 and 30 by any suitable means, for example, suitable bolts, rivets, or the like, illustrated in FIGURE 3 and generally designated by the numeral 40. The pads 36, 38 may be constructed of any suitable resilient material but are preferably constructed of closed cellular sponge rubber.

The pressure plates 28, 30, together with the pads 36, 38 disposed on the lower sides thereof, are normally oriented in the position indicated by the phantom lines in FIGURE 2, whereby the mop head 18 may be inserted into the housing means 10 through the opening 16 and bear upon the bottom plate 24. The pressure plates 28 and 30 are then adapted to be pivoted downwardly toward one another to the position indicated by the solid lines in FIGURE 2, whereby to compressingly engage the upper surface of the mop head 18. It will be seen that the mop head 18 will be squeezed between the upper surface of the bottom plate 24 and the lower surface of the pressure plates 28 and 30 or, more particularly, between the bottom plate 24 and the pads 36 and 38. Accordingly, any fluid within the mop head 18 will be forced therefrom and will be communicated through the perforations 26 in the bottom plate 24 into the receptacle 14. The pads 36 and 38 are adapted to provide resilient surfaces on the pressure plates 28, 30 and thereby wrap around the wire frame of the mop head 18 to apply a compressive force to as much of the mop fabric as is possible without bending or similarly damaging the frame. The pads 36, 38 are preferably somewhat larger than the pressure plates 28, 30 and are made of a resilient material so that the plates 28, 30 do not engage or bottom on the wire frame within the rnop head when said plates are moved toward the solid line position in FIGURE 2. If the pads 36, 38 were constructed of a non-resilent material, movement of the pressure plates 28, 30 toward the mop head would be limited since the pads would firmly engage the wire frame of the mop, with the result that no further pressure could be applied to the mop fabric.

It will be apparent that any one of a wide variety of means may be used to simultaneously bias the pressure plates 28, 30 and pads 36, 38 from the positions indicated by the phantom lines in FIGURE 2 to the position indicated by the solid lines in this figure. By way of example, the mechanism in the exemplary embodiment of the present invention illustrated in FIGURES 1 through 3 is shown as comprising a pair of meshing gears 42 and 44, the latter of which is fixedly secured at one end of the shaft 34 and the former of which is rigidly secured to another shaft 46 that extends transversely of the housing means 10 parallel to the shafts 34, 36 and spaced slightly thereabove. An actuating handle 48 is secured to one end of the shaft 46 and is adapted to be biased to and from the positions illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2. As the handle 48 is biased downwardly, the gear 42 will rotate in a clockwise direction in FIGURE 1, thereby causing the associated gear 44 to rotate in a counterclockwise direction, resulting in the shaft 34 rotating counterclockwise, with the further result that the pressure plate 30 will be biased from the phantom position in FIGURE 2 to the solid line position. The gear 44 is connected by suitable linkage means, representatively illustrated in FIGURE 1 and designated by the numeral 50, to a disk 52 that is fixedly secured to the shaft 32. The linkage 50 is of such a size and is connected to the gear 44 and disk 52 in a manner such that as the gear 44 rotates in a counterclockwise direction upon downward movement of the handle 48, the disk 52 will rotate in a clockwise direction, thereby rotating the shaft 32 clockwise, resulting in the pressure plate 28 being biased from the phantom position in FIGURE 2 to the solid line position. It will be seen therefore, that upon downward movement of the handle 48, the pressure plates 28 and 30, along with the pads 36 and 38, will be biased downwardly into engagement with the mop head, thereby squeezing any cleaning fluid therefrom. Upon movement of the handle 48 from the position indicated in FIGURE 2 to the position illustrated in FIGURE 1, the plates 28, 30 and pads 36, 38 will be biased from the solid line position back to the phantom positions, as will be apparent, to facilitate removal of the mop head 18 from within the housing means 10.

As best illustrated in FIGURE 1, the mop or the like 20 is provided with an absorbent bun, generally designated 54, which is preferably fabricated of poly-urethane and formed with a central annular opening 56 through which the mop handle 22 coaxially extends, the bun 54 being disposed directly adjacent the upper surface of the mop head 18. The bun 54 is of a size such that when the mop head 18 is being squeezed between the pressure plates 28, 30 and the bottom plate 24, the mutually confronting edges of the plates 28, 30 compressingly engage the bun 54, thereby squeezing out any cleaning fluid which has been absorbed thereby simultaneously with the squeezing of cleaning fluid from the mop head 18.

It will be noted that during the fluid wringing or squeezing process, a certain amount of fiuid is forced up onto the top of the pressure plates 28, 30 and the mop head 18. This fluid would normally remain in these places and would be subsequently reabsorbed into the mop fabric if it were not for the provision of the bun 54 which immediately absorbs this excess fluid the moment the pressure on the plates 28, 30 is released. Since the poly-urethane bun can retain as much as 20 or 30 times its weight in fluid, it will not drip when the mop is raised overhead and used in cleaning walls. The bun 54 is also adapted to absorb any residual cleaning fluid which might tend to run down the mop handle 22 from the mop head 18 when the mop 20 is being used in an over-the-head application.

Referring now to FIGURES 4 through 7, the improved cleaning apparatus of the present invention is adapted to be operatively associated with a commercial mop wringing apparatus of the type described and claimed in United States Patent No. 2,199,906, for Wringer, issued May 7, 1940, which apparatus is incorporated in the descriptive portion of the instant specification but constitutes no material part of the present invention. The mop wringer is generally designated by the numeral 58 and comprises right and left hand side plates 60 and 62 and a perforate receptacle 64 disposed therebetween. Each of the side plates is provided with a pair of slots 66 through which stub shafts 68 of a pair of pressure plates 70 and 72 project. The plates 70 and 72 are adapted to operate in a manner similar to the aforedescribed pressure plates 28 and 30, as will later be apparent. The outer ends of the stub shafts 68 are received within slots 74 provided in outwardly extending arms 76 and 78 of a pair of vertically movable racks 78 located one on the outboard side of each of the side plates 60 and 62, as best illustrated in FIG- URE 5. A shaft 80 extends through the side plates 60, 62 having keyed, welded or otherwise secured at each end, a pair of gear sectors, one of which is illustrated in FIG- URE 5 and designated by the numeral 82. A handle 84 is secured to the shaft 80 intermediate the side plates 60, and 62. The slots 66 are curved outwardly, as seen at 86 in FIGURE 6, to cause the separation of the pressure plates 70, 72 at the upper end of the movement of the racks 78. The side plates 60 and 62 are provided with projections 88 which are adapted to extend over the side of a pail or similar receptacle and thereby support the entire mop wringer structure within the receptacle.

It will be seen that the lower sides of the pressure plates 70 and 72 are provided with a pair of resilient pads 90 and 92, respectively (see FIGURE 6), which are preferably fabricated of cellular sponge rubber and are adapted to function in substantially the same manner as the aforedescribed pads 36 and 38 upon actuation of the wringer apparatus 58. The pads 90 and 92 may be 'affixed to the pressure plates 70 and 72 by any suitable means; however, in order to enable the mop wringer to be used in wringing convention-a1 mops and also mops such as the above described mop 20, the pads 90 and 92 are detachably secured to the pressure plates 70 and 72 so that the pads 90, 92 may be easily removed when desired. By way of example, the pads 90, 92 are affixed as by gluing or the like to a pair of mounting plates 94 and 96, respectively, which are complementary in shape with respect to the pads 90 and 92 and are preferably constructed of plastic or the like. As best seen in FIGURE 7, each of the mounting plates 94, 96 has a plurality of permanent magnets 98 attached thereto, which magnets 98 function to detachably secure the pads 90, 92 to the undersides of the pressure plates 70 and 72, as above described. It will be apparent, of course, that the pads 90, and 92 may be secured to the pressure plates 70, 72 in a variety of different ways, such as by suitable retaining brackets, screws, bolts or the like.

In order to adapt the above described wringer apparatus for use with a cleaning device such as the mop 20, a removable bottom insert is preferably disposed within the lower end of the receptacle 64. Such an insert is illustrated in FIGURE 6 as comprising a generally horizontally extending perforate plate 100 which may, if necessary, be provided with legs on the opposite ends thereof so as to \be spaced a predetermined distance above the bottom of the receptacle 64.

In operation of the apparatus 58, as adapted for use in wringing out mops such as the mop 20*, the insert plate 100 is initially placed within the bottom of the receptacle 64 and the absorbent pads 90 and 92 are secured to the undersides of the pressure plates 70 and 72, as by the aforedescribed magnets 98. The mop head 18 is then disposed within the receptacle 64 and through movement of the handle 84, the pressure plates 70 and 72 are moved in and downwardly to squeeze the mop head 18 between the resilient pads 90, 92 and the plate 100. As above described, the pads 90 and 92 will apply a uniform compressive force to the mop fabric without damaging the mop frame, of the mop head 18, thus minimizing to the extreme any fluid retained. It will be noted that the resilient pads 90 and 92 are arranged so as to compressingly engage the absorbent bun 54 mounted on the mop handle 22. Accordingly, the pads 90, 92 will function to squeeze any cleaning fluid out of the bun 54 in the same manner as described in connection with the apparatus illustrated in FIGURES 1 through 3.

While it will be apparent that the exemplary embodiments herein illustrated are well calculated to fulfill the objects above stated, it will be appreciated that the present invention is susceptible to modification, variation and 6 change without departing from the proper scope or fair meaning of the subjoined claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination with an apparatus for cleaning walls or the like and comprising cleaning means comprising a substantially rigid frame portion and handle means for manipulating said cleaning means,

housing means adapted to removably receive at least a portion of said cleaning means, at least one pressure plate,

a resilient deformable pad on said pressure plate and compressingly engageable with said cleaning means, whereby to squeeze liquid from said cleaning means and deform sufliciently upon engagement with said frame portion so as to not damage the same,

actuating means including interengageable gear means for moving said pressure plate toward and away from said cleaning means when the same is disposed within said housing means, and

means including said pad for absorbing liquid forced out of said cleaning means by said pressure plate.

2. In a mop wringer comprising a wringer housing, a pair of pressure plates for compressing a rigid frame supported mop head within the housing, and actuating means for biasing said pressure plates toward and away from the mop head when the same is disposed within the housing, the improvement comprising,

resilient deformable pad means on the pressure plates and compressingly engageable with a mop head disposed within the wringer housing upon actuation of the actuation means whereby to squeeze liquid from the mop head and deform sufficiently upon engagement with the frame of the mop head so as not to damage said frame as the mop head is compressed by said pressure plates, and means for absorbing at least a portion of any liquid forced out of the top of the mop head by said pressure plates.

3. The invention as set forth in claim 2 wherein said resilient means comprises at least one rubber pad and means for detachably securing said pad to one of said pressure plates.

4. The invention as set forth in claim 3 wherein said means for detachably securing said pad comprises magnet means.

5. The invention as set forth in claim 2 wherein said last mentioned means comprises a liquid absorbent bun disposed directly adjacent a portion of the mop received within the wringer housing.

6. The invention as set forth in claim 2 which includes insert means disposed within the wringer housing and adapted to coact with said pressure plates to squeeze a portion of the mop therebetween.

7. The invention as set forth in claim 2 wherein said resilient means comprises a pair of liquid absorbent, resilient pads, which includes means for detachably securing said pads to the pressure plates, and which includes insert means in the wringer housing cooperable with said pads for compressing a portion of the mop therebetween.

8. In combination with an apparatus for cleaning walls or the like and comprising cleaning means comprising a substantially rigid frame portion and handle means for manipulating said cleaning means,

housing means adapted to removably receive at least a portion of said cleaning means,

resilient means compressingly engageable with said cleaning means without damaging said frame portion thereof,

actuating means including interengageable gear means for moving said resilient means into engagement with said cleaning means when the same is disposed within said housing means,

wherein said actuating means comprises plate means and means for selectively biasing said plate means toward and away from the cleaning means when the same is disposed within said housing means, and

7 which includes liquid absorbent means disposed on the handle means and adapted to be selectively engaged by said plate means upon actuation of said last mentioned means whereby to squeeze any liquid from said liquid absorbent means.

9. In combination with an apparatus for cleaning walls or the like and comprising cleaning means comprising a substantially rigid frame portion and handle means for manipulating said cleaning means,

housing means adapted to removably receive at least a portion of said cleaning means,

resilient means compressingly engageable with said cleaning means without damaging said frame portion thereof,

actuating means including interengageable gear means for moving said resilient means into engagement with said cleaning means when the same is disposed within said housing means,

which includes liquid absorbent bun means disposed on 8. the handle of the cleaning means for absorbing any residual liquid retained within said cleaning means when the same is disposed in an elevated or overthe-head application, and said bun means being oriented on said cleaning means whereby said bun means will be at least partially compressed and have any liquid contained therein squeezed therefrom concomitantly with said resilient means being moved into engagement with said clean- 10 ing means.

References Cited FOREIGN PATENTS 83,406 3/1954 Norway.

DANIEL BLUM, Primary Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R. 15248, 261

US3452379D 1966-06-09 1966-06-09 Cleaning apparatus Expired - Lifetime US3452379A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4528717A (en) * 1983-05-05 1985-07-16 Floordress-Reinigungsgerate GmbH Flat press
US4663798A (en) * 1984-11-17 1987-05-12 Interpat Limited Apparatus for wringing the strands of mops
WO1997003599A1 (en) * 1995-07-21 1997-02-06 Hugh Rogers Mclaughlin Apparatus for removing a liquid from a hard surface
US5720073A (en) * 1995-03-03 1998-02-24 Yugengaisha Access Mop thread-squeezing apparatus

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4528717A (en) * 1983-05-05 1985-07-16 Floordress-Reinigungsgerate GmbH Flat press
US4663798A (en) * 1984-11-17 1987-05-12 Interpat Limited Apparatus for wringing the strands of mops
US5720073A (en) * 1995-03-03 1998-02-24 Yugengaisha Access Mop thread-squeezing apparatus
WO1997003599A1 (en) * 1995-07-21 1997-02-06 Hugh Rogers Mclaughlin Apparatus for removing a liquid from a hard surface

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Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: GEERPRES, INC.

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:TIERNEY, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004297/0485

Owner name: TIERNEY, INC., 1780 HARVEY STREET, MUSKEGON MICHIG

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BEATRICE FOOD CO.;REEL/FRAME:004297/0481

Effective date: 19830822