US3404920A - Tunneling machine with shield supported traveling excavator - Google Patents

Tunneling machine with shield supported traveling excavator Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3404920A
US3404920A US56484466A US3404920A US 3404920 A US3404920 A US 3404920A US 56484466 A US56484466 A US 56484466A US 3404920 A US3404920 A US 3404920A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
excavator
shield
fig
motor
hydraulic
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
John R Tabor
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
JOHN R TABOR
Original Assignee
John R. Tabor
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21DSHAFTS; TUNNELS; GALLERIES; LARGE UNDERGROUND CHAMBERS
    • E21D9/00Tunnels or galleries, with or without linings; Methods or apparatus for making thereof; Layout of tunnels or galleries
    • E21D9/06Making by using a driving shield, i.e. advanced by pushing means bearing against the already placed lining
    • E21D9/08Making by using a driving shield, i.e. advanced by pushing means bearing against the already placed lining with additional boring or cutting means other than the conventional cutting edge of the shield
    • E21D9/0875Making by using a driving shield, i.e. advanced by pushing means bearing against the already placed lining with additional boring or cutting means other than the conventional cutting edge of the shield with a movable support arm carrying cutting tools for attacking the front face, e.g. a bucket

Description

J. R. TABOR Oct. s, 1968 TUNNELING MACHINE WITH SHIELD SUPPORTED TRAVELING EXCAVATOR Filed July 13, 196e 6 Sheets-Sheet l lauern-ola JOHN E'. THBGQ m, J-Lu AT TQQNEYS Oct. 8, 1968 J. R. TABOR- 3,404,920

TUNNELING MACHINE WITH SHIELD SUPYPOR'ID TRAVELING EXCAVATOR Filed July 1s, 196e e sheets-sheet' m u :N1-an Jol-IN E.' 'maalt J. R. TABOR O'ct. 8, 1968 TUNNELING MACHINE WITH SHIELD SUPPORTED TRAVELING EXCAVATOR 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed July l5, 1966 NEN-ron Jaw/v E maak l MIMM ATTORNY J. R. TABOR 3,404,920

TUNNELING MACHINE WITH SHIELD S-UPPORTED TRVELNG EXCAVATOR Oct. 8, 1968 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed July 13, 1966 AT1-aannam Oct. 8, 1968 J. R. TABOR 3,404,920

TUNNELING MACHINE WITH SHIELD SUPPORTED TRAVELING EXCAVATOR Filed July 13, 1966 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 ATTO RHI-YS J. R. TABOR y' Oct. 8, 1968 TUNNELING MACHINE WITH SHIELD SUPPORTED TRAVELING EXCAVATOR Filed July 15, 196e 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 A INUENToE ../QHN E. Tqaoe ATTO RNEYS QQ am MM ,um IMM-L i' United States Patent O 3,404,920 TUNNELING MACHINE WITH SHIELD SUP- PORTED TRAVELING EXCAVATGR John R. Tabor, 3400 Spruce St., Racine, Wis. 53403 Filed .Iuly 13, 1966, Ser. No. 564,844 18 Claims. (Cl. 299-31) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This disclosure relates to a tunneling machine comprising a tunneling shield, an excavator support mechanism on the shield and conveyed by the shield as it moves forwardly in the tunnel, a power operated excavator mounted on the support mechanism to be carried within the shield and conveyed by the shield, said excavator having a boom, a cutting tool and means for moving the cutting tool in all directions across the tunnel face.

This invention relates to a tunneling machine.

The tunneling machine of the present invention consists of a power operated excavator supported in elevated relation to the tunnel floor on the sides of a tunneling shield modified to bear tracks on its sides to support the excavator for movement with respect to the tunnel face. The machine of the present invention is particularly designed to tunnel through hard ground and ssured or broken rock.

An important feature of the tunneling machine of the present invention is the articulate mounting of the cutting tool by`which it may be swung universally in all directions to cut the spoil from the face of the tunnel. Desirably, the cutting tool incorporates a bucket by which the spoil may be transported between the tunnel face and take out apparatus, such as mine boxes, carts, a belt conveyor or other conveyance apparatus.

By mounting the excavator on the shield, it will be conveyed forwardly in the tunnel automatically when the shield is moved forwardly and by the same apparatus which is used to periodically advance the shield. Moreover, the shield furnishes elevated support for the excavator. In this manner the utility of the shield is greatly enhanced. The shield becomes an integral part of the tunneling machine, while continuing to perform its conventional functions.

In the disclosed embodiment of the invention, the shield is provided with longitudinal tracks along its sides and about midway between its roof and iioor. The excavator consists of a central rigid tubular frame or backbone having Outrigger arms or beams with end carriages which ride on the shield tracks. Mechanism is provided to advance and retract the excavator on said tracks to and from the face of the tunnel, whereby to facilitate transfer of cut debris from the face to the take out apparatus.

The excavator of the present invention is power operated. It is adapted to be made in dilferent sizes to operate in tunnels of various sizes. The excavator must cut and remove large amounts of heavy material. For this service, the machine has a heavy demand for power. The motors for tunneling machines embodying the invention, and adapted to work in tunnels from 12 to 24 feet in diameter, typically have an aggregate power requirement in the range of 350 yH.P. Accordingly, all of the mechanismv must be strong enough to transmit this much power. In a practical embodiment of the invention, the 'excavator weighs about 50 tons. Notwithstanding the high weight,

strength and capacity of this device, its power transmission mechanism is concentrated into a relatively compact assembly within the tubular frame aforesaid. This frame is desirably disposed substantially at the central axis of ice the tunnel. Accordingly, there is ample clearance beneath the excavator for the take out apparatus and ample space about the central tubular frame for Workmen. This structure also advantageously locates the boom and the cutting tool for easily reaching all areas of the tunnel face.

In preferred embodiments of the invention, the various working motors, such as rams, jacks and rotary motors, are hydraulically operated. Pressurized hydraulic fluid for these motors is provided by one or more hydraulic pumps actuated by one or more electric motors. This provides a convenient, simple and easily controlled power transmission for energizing the various parts of the mechanism. The electric motors are energized by a power cable extending to an energy source remote from the tunnel.

An advantageous feature of the hydraulically operated embodiments resides in the ducting of the hydraulic lines within the Wall or body parts of the pistons, cylinders, etc., thus to eliminate as much as possible exposed hydraulic hoses and protect the lines from breakage hazards.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will appear from the following disclosure in which:

FIG. 1 is a View partially in vertical axial section and partially in side elevation of a tunnel showing a tunneling machine embodying the present invention in position for use.

FIG. 2 is another view of the apparatus of FIG. 1, par tially in horizontal axial section and partially in plan. Various positions of the cutting tool, its support boom and its rotatable head are illustrated in this figure.

FIG. 3 is a lateral cross section taken along the line 3 3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal cross section, as along the line 4 4 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a cross section taken through one of the chain housings of the boom, substantially along the line 5 5 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a cross section taken along the line 6 6 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 7 is a cross section taken along the line 7 7 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 8 is a cross section taken along the line 8 8 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 9 is a detailed view, partly in cross section and partly in elevation, showing the power transmission arrangement of hydraulic motors, gear reducers and feed pinions by which the head sleeve or neck within the frame tube is rotated.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary, greatly enlarged view similar to FIG. 8.

FIG. 11 is an enlarged cross section taken along the line 11 11 of FIG. 7, showing details of the gear reduction mechanism between the hydraulic motors for the rotating head sleeve and the drive pinions therefor.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of one of the end carriages on which the excavator is supported from a track `on the tunneling shield.

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary vertical cross section taken :along the line 13 13 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 14 is an enlarged perspective view of one of the wheels in the carriage and the fluid actuated piston on which it is mounted.

FIG. 15 is an enlarged cross section taken through the carriage and showing the pressure system for maintaining pressure on the carriage wheels.

FIG. 16 is an enlarged cross section taken through the hydraulic motor or ram which swings the boom.

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary cross section taken along the line 17-17 of FIG. 16.

FIG. 18 is an enlarged cross section taken through one of the hydraulic motors in the chain case of FIG. 5.

Although the disclosure hereof is detailed and exact to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention, the physical embodiments herein disclosed merely exemplify the invention which may be embodied in other specific structure. The scope of the invention is defined in the claims hereto.

As shown in FIG. 1, excavation of the tunnel is facilitated by a conventional shield which is periodically shoved forwardly toward the tunnel face 19 by hydraulic motor rams 21. As the shield 20 is moved forwardly through the tunnel, the excavated part of the tunnel behind the shield is supported by curved ribs or beams 22 and wooden or steel lagging or plates 23. This is conventional in the tunneling art. The rams 21 react against the most recently emplaced rib 22 in thrusting the shield 20 forwardly. The excavated spoil or earth debris is moved rearwardly through the shield on mine cars 0r other means of conveyance.

The tunneling machine of the present invention comprises an excavator 18 mounted on channel-shaped tracks 24 which face inwardly toward the center axis of the shield and which are mounted on brackets 25 to ribs 26 within the shield 20. The excavator 18 is novel in construction and comprises a tubular frame 27 which functions as a rigid backbone or body for the excavator.

Tracks 24 are desirably further supported near their rear ends by struts 29 which are disposed obliquely as shown in FIG. 1. The ends of struts 29 remote from tracks 24 are supported on brackets 30 attached to the ribs 26 near their foot ends. Tracks 24 are desirably disposed somewhat above the center axis of the tunnel shield, to clear as much working space therebelow as possible.

Tubular frame 27 is elevated above the shield floor by Outrigger beams or arms 28 which extend laterally toward the tracks 24. Arms 28 have coupling plates 31 removably attached by bolts 32 or the like to complementary plates 33 on stub beams or arms 34 which carry at their ends carriages 35 from which project a plurality of wheels 36 in pressure contact with the side iianges 37 and connecting web 38 of the track 24. See FIG. 13.

Each wheel 36 is mounted `for rotation on its motor piston 42. The respective motor pistons 42 are movable in respective cylinders 43 within the carriage 35. The several cylinders 43 are connected by ducts 44 with a hydraulic fluid chamber 45 having a free piston 46 subject to the pressure of nitrogen gas or the -like in piston cylinder chamber 47. The nitrogen gas is under pressure of about 2000 p.s.i. The gas is furnished under pressure through valve 49. Accordingly, the respective wheels 36 are biased under considerable pressure against the channel track 24 to take up any slack between the track walls and the carriage.

Within its tubular backbone 27, the excavator 18 is provided with a rotatable sleeve 48 journaled for rotation on the anti-friction bearings 50, 51. Front end bearing 50 is supported on annular ring 39 which aligns laterally with the forward set of Outrigger beams 28, to receive direct bracing support therefrom. Rear end bearing 51 receives support from tail block 99 mounted within the tube 27 on support ring 100 which aligns with the rearward set of Outrigger beams 28 to receive direct support therefrom.

' The end of sleeve 48 projecting frontally beyond front bearing 50 is provided with a rotary head 53. Two sets of paired ears 54 project forwardly from the head 53 and at one side of the -axis of head rotation. An excavator boom 55 is pivotally connected on the ears 54 by pins 56. The boom has two housing portions 57, 58 which respectively contain bucket drive chains 61, as shown in FIG. 5. At the end of the boom 55 is mounted a bucket 62 which has earth cutting teeth 63. The bucket and teeth are typical of a cutting tool with which the boom can be provided. The toothed bucket will not only cut into the tunnel face 19 to remove earth and debris therefrom,

but will convey rearwardly the cut material in the bucket as will hereinafter be described.

Bucket 62 is rotatable on bearing 64, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 4, in the direction of arrows 65, through about 340. The bucket 62 has a shaft 66 which extends rear wardly from the bucket into bracket 67 by which the bucket is mounted on the boom 55, and which also provides an internal cylindrical chamber 68 for a hydraulic motor. See FIG. 6. The bucket shaft 66 has a vane 71 projecting across the chamber 68. The chamber has a fixed vane or partition 72 to either side of which hydraulic uid may be admitted through the hydraulic lines 73, 74 through the ducts 75, 76.

Body bracket 67 is mountedto the boom 55 on transverse stub pintles 77, 79 which project into the boom chain housings 57, 58, and which turn in the direction of arrows 78 in FIG. 2, through about 180. The pintles 77, 79 are rotated by respective sets of hydraulic motors 81, 82 in the chain cases 57, 58, as shown in FIG. 5. The pistons of the motors 81, 82 are connected to the chains 61 which respectively are connected to the coupling rings 83 respectively fastened to the pintles 77, 79. The chain links are fastened to end pins 84 in ears 85 projecting -laterally from the rings 83.

There is chain 61 in each housing 57, 58 with corresponding hydraulic cylinders 81, 82. Hydraulic uid under pressure is communicated to the cylinders 81, 82 through piping 97.

The boom 55 may be swung about the axis of its support pintles 56 by the hydraulic motor ram 86 which is connected to the boom 55 on pin 87, and by pin 89 to ears 88 which extend laterally from head 53. Jack 86 is provided with hydraulic fluid through piping 90, 93, 97. Accordingly, the boom 55 may be rotated about the pins 56 as indicated by the arrows 92 in FIG. 2, through about 120.

The rotatable sleeve 48 in the fixed tube 27 is rotated by a plurality of hydraulic rotary motors 94, shown in FIGS. 7 through 11. In a practical embodiment of the invention, there are some fifty-two of these motors 94 clustered about a central tube which is fast to the stationary tail block 99, and thence to tube 27 through ring 100, and is shouldered at 91 to bear on rotary sleeve 48. Stationary tube 95 has a hollow interior 96 which provides a conduit for the hydraulic lines 97, 98, etc.

The central, fixed tube 95 is coaxial with and is radially spaced from rotatable Sleeve 48 so that there is an annular space or chamber 103 therebetween. The motors 94 and the associated transmission mechanism are mounted in said annular space 103.

In the disclosed embodiment, fixed central tube 95 is provided with two axially spaced annular channels 102 respectively having axially spaced flanges 104 which have sleeve bearings 101 (FIG. 9) for the respective shafts 106 of an annular series of toothed pinions 107. Each annular series of pinions 107 mesh as with a ring gear 108 which is fast by locking keys 109 to inside of sleeve 48.

There are speed reducing gear transmission sets 112 between each motor 94 and its driven pinion 107, as best shown in FIGS. 9 and 11. The details of each transmission gear set 112 is broadly immaterial, the structure herein shown being for exemplication only. Each hydraulic motor 94 has a shaft 113 and pinion 114 fixed thereon. Pinion 114 meshes with a series of arcuately disposed pinions 115, each having a shaft 116 mounted on a cage having an axially extending gear 118. Each pinion also meshes with the teeth on a ring gear 117 on the inside of housing 112. Pinions 115 walk around the ring gear 117 and rotate the cage 110, thus to turn its gear 118.

There is a second cage 125 with a set of pinions 119 which walk around the inside of another ring gear 120 on the inside of housing 112, as pinions 119 are turned on their shafts 123 by gear 118. Cage 125 has an output shaft 106 keyed to a drive pinion 107. Accordingly, the

hydraulic motors 94 can be driven at relatively high speed, the speed being greatly reduced at the output pinions 107. As isshown in FIG. 4, there may be several circular rows of motors 94 clustered about the central, fixed tube 95, four rows being shown in FIG. 4. The motors 94 and transmission 112 are staggered at opposite sides of the channels 102. Accordingly, power is transmitted from the hydraulic motors 94 smoothly to many points of power transmitting thrust contact with the sleeve 48.1

Hydraulic uid for pressurizing the various hydraulic motors derives from one or more pumps 126 driven by one or more electric motors 127. Pump output goes through a control valve console 128 by which the uid is directed and controlled for each of the hydraulic motors above referred to, as through lines 97, 98, etc.

- As shown in FIGS. l and 3, the excavator is elevated from floor 131 of the tunnel. This places it substantially on the center axis of the tunnel so that the toothed bucket 62 can most conveniently reach all parts of the tunnel face 19. Tunnel oor 131 may be provided with tracks 132 for mine cars 133 by which earth and other debris removed from the tunnel face 19 can be taken out of the tunnel and disposed of. Alternatively, a conveyor belt or the like may function as take out apparatus as a substitute for the tracks 132 and mine cars 133. In any event, the tubular frame 27 of the machine is desirably elevated clear of the floor and is disposed in compact array near the axis of the tunnel so as to leave room therebeneath for the mine cars or the belt conveyor, and toprovide ample room about the machine for movement of operation personnel.

The excavator 18 may be advanced and retracted longitudinally of the tunnel on the channel tracks 24. This movement is also desirably powered hydraulically. For this purpose, hydraulic rams 134 are provided at each side of the machine. For each ram 134 there is a bracket 136 attached to the tail end of corresponding track 24. Bracketv136 has a coupling 138, such as a ball joint, to the end of piston rod 139 of the jack 134. Each jack 134 desirably has a piston 142 movable in jack cylinder 143. Cylinder 143 has hydraulic fluid at both sides of piston 142, under control of the valve console 128. Cylinders 143 are attached to the excavator arms 34 bybrackets 145.

Accordingly, the excavator 18 maybe moved longitudinally of the shield. In a practical embodiment, the range of movement is twelve feet and six inches.

In operation, the excavator bucket 36 is'manipulated by an operator at console 128 to excavate the tunnel face. The boom 55 can swing laterally about pivot pins 54. The boom may also rotate about the axis of rotation of the sleeve 48. The bucket 62 is not only rotatable on its ring bearing 64, but can be swung about the` axis of pintles 77. Accordingly, the cutting tool is subject to universal movement for good control of excavating motions thereof. A full bucket can be retracted by the hydraulic motors 134 to deposit the bucket load in a mine car 133 or on a conveyor belt or the like. Advance of the shield under pressure of hydraulic jacks 21 concurrently advances the excavator 18.

The excavator 18 could be supported on mechanism other than the tracks 24, for example, on a conventional jumbo or on tracks laid on the tunnel oor. However, the disclosed embodiment in which the excavator is mounted from tracks on theV side of the shield 20 has the advantages aforest'ated which make the disclosed embodiment greatly preferred.

FIG. 16 shows details of the double-acting multi-stage hydraulic motor or ramY 86 for actuating the excavator boom 55. This figure illustrates an important feature of the invention in which the hydraulic lines from the pump 126 are protected from injury by ducting the lines within the walls of the hydraulic motor parts, such as the cylinder, piston, etc.

Motor 86 comprises a base cylinder 150 which is pivotally mounted on the support ears 88 on pintles 89. Within cylinder 150 is an annular piston 153 which supports one end of a sleeve cylinder 151 which is slidable in ring bearing 160 at the end of cylinder 150. Within the sleeve 151 there is another piston 154 which supports one end of piston rod 152 which is slidable in ring bearing 161 at the end of sleeve cylinder 151. The end of rod 152 carries the pintle 87 which is connected to suitable bearings on the boom 55.

Hydraulic fluid is supplied from pumps 126 to the chamber l155 within cylinder 150 through the fluid line 93 through a rotary bearing 156 in pintle 89, and through ducts 157, 158, 159 formed in the wall of the cylinder 150. Pressure within chamber 155 is exerted on both the annular piston 153 for sleeve cylinder 151 and on the piston 154 for the rod 152, whereby to extend the ram 86 and swing boom 55.

Means are provided for retraction of the motor 86 in two stages and at selected different speeds. For one stage hydraulic fluid is furnished from pipe through the rotary bearing 162 in the other pintle 89 :and through the ducts 163 and 164 to an annular space or chamber 165 between cylinders and 151. Pressure in chamber 165 will move the sleeve cylinder 151 to the left in FIG. 16. Fluid trapped in chamber will be exhausted through line 93.

For another stage of motor retraction fluid pressure is derived through line 97 which is coupled to the pintle 87 on the rotatable coupling 166 and through the internal ducts 167, 168, 169 into a chamber 172 formed between the piston rod 152 and the sleeve cylinder 151. Pressure in chamber 172 will be exerted on piston 154 to move the rod 152 to the left in FIG. 16 for additional retractive movement of the motor 86. If the pipes 90, 97 are pressurized independently, the motor 86 will retract slowly. If pipes 90, 97 are pressurized concurrently, motor 86 will retract rapidly.

An important feature of the invention resides in the internal ducting, yas abovedescribed, within the Walls or bodies of the various cylinders and pistons, thus to protect these ducts from injury or damage. Accordingly, hydraulic hoses which might otherwise be exposed to breakage and injury are eliminated.

FIG. 18 illustrates one of the two hydraulic motors 81, 82 incorporated in the respective chain cases 57, 58, as shown in FIG. 5. Motor 81 is illustrated. It is connected at one end to a link of the chain 61, and at its other end to an end wall 173 of the chain case.

Means are provided producing selected multiple force motor action. For this purpose, motor 81 comprises a base cylinder 174 having therewithin a piston 175 which carriesone end of a sleeve 176 which functions as a piston rod, which slides in bearing at the other end of cylinder 174. The exposed end of rod 176 carries yan end head 177 which is coupled to the chain 61 on pin 178. Fixed within the motor 81 is a hydraulic iluid tube 181 which carries at its end a xed position piston 182 which is within the chamber 183 of sleeve 176. One stage of hydraulic uid is admitted to the motor through the tube 181 and is ported into a chamber 184 at one side of the fixed pis- -ton 182 through end ducts 185, thus to exert pressure on movable piston and pull the chain to the left, as shown in FIG. 18.

Additional pressure can be supplied through pipe 186 to chamber 187 between cylinders 174, 176, thus to exert further pressure on the piston 175 to move it to the left. Controls are provided to pressurize chambers 187 and 184 independently or concurrently to vary the total force exerted by the motor 81 on the chain 61.

The respective motors 81, 82 are single acting and have a Working stroke in one direction only to pull on the chain 61. When one motor pulls the other is de-actuated, and it is pulled along with the chain. Accordingly, the chain will travel in the direction in which it is pulled by one or the other of the motors 81, 82, thus to turn post 79 and swing the bucket 62.

The ends of the several internal ducts 157, 158, 159, 163, 164 in FIG. 16 are closed by threaded plugs 190, the ends of which are desirably ush with the outer wall of the part to which they are attached.

What is claimed is:

1. A tunneling machine comprising:

a tunneling shield disposed on a substantially horizontal axis and having a roof for supporting earth over an excavated part of the tunnel,

excavator support mechanism on said shield and conveyed by said shield as the shield moves forward in the tunnel,

a power operated excavator mounted on said support mechanism to be carried Within the shield and conveyed by the shield,

said excavator comprising a frame, a bottom extending forwardly of the frame, a cutting tool on the boom to remove spoil from the tunnel face, and

means for moving the cutting tool in all directions across the tunnel face.

2. The tunneling machine of claim 1 in which the tool comprises a bucket, said support mechanism comprising a track longitudinal of the shield and on which the excavator is retractable from the tunnel face to deposit a bucket load on take out apparatus spaced rearwardly from the tunnel face.

3. The tunneling machine of claim 1 in which the excavator frame comprises a central rotor on which the boom is mounted and a bearing on which the rotor turns on an axis longitudinal of the tunnel.

4. The machine of claim 1 in which the excavator frame comprises a rigid tube, Outrigger arms supporting said tube from said support mechanism substantially at the center of the shield, a rotor journaled on said tube, a motor to turn the rotor, and a coupling between the rotor and the boom.

5. The machine of claim 1 in which said support mechanism comprises a track longitudinal of the shield, said frame having wheeled support means movable along said track, and a motor reacting between the shield and frame for advancing and retracting said frame on said track with respect to the tunnel face.

6. The tunneling machine of claim 1 in combination with ya hydraulically powered motor to swing the boom, a pump for hydraulic uid and a hydraulic line from the pump to the motor, said motor comprising a cylinder having a wall, said line comprising a duct within said wall whereby the wall shields the line duct from injury.

7. The machine of claim 1 in which the said support mechanism comprises tracks mounted on the sides of the shield, the excavator being disposed substantially at the center of the shield in the space between said tracks and having laterally projecting outrigger arms with wheeled carriages movable along said tracks.

8. The machine of claim 7 in which said wheels are provided with means for pressing them against their respective tracks.

9. A tunneling machine excavator comprising:

a tube,

a support to hold the tube on a substantially horizontal taxis,

a rotor journaled in the tube for rotation on said substantially horizontal axis,

motor means to turn the rotor,

a boom pivotally connected to the rotor,

a cutting tool pivotally connected to the end of the boom,

a motor for pivotally lmoving the boom about its connection to the rotor,

and ya motor for pivotally moving the tool about its connection to the boom.

10. The excavator of claim 9 in which the support for the tube comprises laterally extending Outrigger arms, carriages at the ends of said arms, wheels on the carriages and motors to project the wheels from thecarriages for pressure contact with a track.

l11. The excavator of claim 9 in which the support for the tube comprises front and rear sets of paired, laterally extending Outrigger arms, and front and rear journals for said rotor respectively proximate said sets of arms to receive loading support therefrom.

12. The excavator of claim 8 in combination with a tunneling shield, tracks spaced at the sides 0f the shield, the support for the tube comprising laterally projecting Outrigger ar-ms to support the tube in the space between said tracks, said arms having end carriages carried on said tracks and a motor for moving said excavator along said tracks.

13. The combination of claim 12 in which the tracks comprise inwardly facing channels in which the carriages fit. l

14. The combination of claim 12 in which said motor comprises a jack between said track and said excavator.

15. A tunneling machine excavator comprising a tube, a support for the tube, a rotor journaled in the tube, motor means to turn the rotor, a boom pivotally connected to the rotor, a cutting tool pivotally connected to the end yof the boom, a motor for pivotally moving the boom about its connection to the rotor, and a motor for pivotally moving the tool about its connection to the boom, a sleeve coaxially within the tube, another tube coaxial with said tube and sleeve and spaced radially inwardly with respect to said sleeve to leave an lannular space therebetween, said motor means comprising a plurality of motors distributed annularly in said space about said other tube.

16. A tunneling machine comprising a shield, an excavator in the shield, said excavator having a boom and a cutting tool at the end of the boom, a hydraulically powered motor to swing the boom, said motor comprising a ram having multiple telescopically retractable sections and a multiple of fluid chambers corresponding to the number of telescopically retractable sections and means for independently or concurrently pressurizing said chambers for selected multiple speed ram action.

17. A tunneling machine comprising a shield, an excavator in the shield, Said excavator having a boom, a cutting tool at the end of the boom, and hydraulically powered motor means to swing the cutting tool at the end of the boom, said motor means having multiple telescopically related sections and a multiple of uid chambers corresponding to the number of telescopically Irelated sections and means for independently or concurrently pressurizing said chambers Ifor selected multiple force motor action.

18. The tunneling machine of claim 17 in which the cutting tool is mounted on the boom on a pintle, a chain about said pintle, said motor means comprising two hydraulic motors, one at each end of the chain, each said motor having multiple telescopically -related sections and multiple fluid chambers.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,987,982 1/1935 Wheeler 299-56 2,111,405 3/1938A Parker 61-84 2,587,844 3/1952 Harrison 214-133 2,593,693 4/1952 Osgood.

3,042,234 7/1962 Davis 214-141 ERNEST R. PURSER, Primary Examiner.'

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PATENT OFFICE Washington, D C. 20231 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,404,920 October 8, 1968 John R. Tabor It is certified that error appears in the above identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 7, line 18, "bottom" should read boom Signed and sealed this 3rd day of March 1970.

(SEAL) Attest:

Edward M. Fletcher, Ir.

Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, JR.

US3404920A 1966-07-13 1966-07-13 Tunneling machine with shield supported traveling excavator Expired - Lifetime US3404920A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3404920A US3404920A (en) 1966-07-13 1966-07-13 Tunneling machine with shield supported traveling excavator

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3404920A US3404920A (en) 1966-07-13 1966-07-13 Tunneling machine with shield supported traveling excavator

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3404920A true US3404920A (en) 1968-10-08

Family

ID=24256128

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3404920A Expired - Lifetime US3404920A (en) 1966-07-13 1966-07-13 Tunneling machine with shield supported traveling excavator

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3404920A (en)

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3506310A (en) * 1966-12-02 1970-04-14 Charles Gruere Boring machine
US3510170A (en) * 1968-07-10 1970-05-05 Smith International Power unit for oscillating tunneling machine
US3578809A (en) * 1969-05-09 1971-05-18 Vernon Cunningham Method and apparatus for forming subterranean structures
US3612609A (en) * 1968-07-09 1971-10-12 Hydrel Ag Maschf Device for the demolishing and removal of earthwork
US3656810A (en) * 1969-02-08 1972-04-18 Vladimir Alexandrovich Khodosh Tunneling shield
US3712071A (en) * 1970-05-05 1973-01-23 V Cunningham Method and apparatus for forming subterranean structures
US3763657A (en) * 1972-01-26 1973-10-09 Eng Field Services Means for eliminating roll of tunneling shield
DE2547715A1 (en) * 1974-10-30 1976-05-06 Coal Industry Patents Ltd Boring machine, in particular stretch boring machine for the mining
US4043137A (en) * 1975-07-02 1977-08-23 Gewerkschaft Eisenhutte Westfalia Apparatus for and a method of constructing a tunnel
US4190294A (en) * 1978-08-17 1980-02-26 The Robbins Company Excavator for use in a tunneling shield
US4203626A (en) * 1979-02-21 1980-05-20 Zokor Corporation Articulated boom-dipper-bucket assembly for a tunnel boring machine
DE2948942A1 (en) * 1978-12-15 1980-07-03 Coal Industry Patents Ltd Schraemeinheitanordnung for a boring machine for stretch in mining and for tunnels and boring machine
DE2948991A1 (en) * 1978-12-15 1980-07-03 Coal Industry Patents Ltd Gleitbahneinrichtung and boring machine to propel stretch of the mining and tunnel
US4260297A (en) * 1978-09-26 1981-04-07 Edbro Limited Machines for positioning roof supports in a tunnel
US4298230A (en) * 1979-06-25 1981-11-03 Philipp Holzmann Aktiengesellschaft Tunnelling apparatus
US4349230A (en) * 1979-08-10 1982-09-14 Zokor Corporation Tunnel boring machine
US4387928A (en) * 1981-03-27 1983-06-14 Milwaukee Boiler Manufacturing Co. Tunnel excavator
US4396313A (en) * 1980-07-18 1983-08-02 Guy F. Atkinson Company Method of forming flooring in tunnels
US4501448A (en) * 1983-01-03 1985-02-26 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Interior Universal ripper miner
EP0372605A2 (en) * 1988-12-03 1990-06-13 METALLGESELLSCHAFT Aktiengesellschaft Corrosion protection for flue gas desulfurization installations

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1987982A (en) * 1932-09-13 1935-01-15 Porter H Forsythe Shoveling, digging, and boring machine
US2111405A (en) * 1937-08-10 1938-03-15 Laurie F Parker Power-mucking shield
US2587844A (en) * 1949-05-19 1952-03-04 Harrison Patrick Cage and operating mechanism for shaft shovels
US2593693A (en) * 1946-02-18 1952-04-22 Joy Mfg Co Mine shaft mucking apparatus
US3042234A (en) * 1960-08-04 1962-07-03 Davis Engineering Inc Material moving and placing apparatus

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1987982A (en) * 1932-09-13 1935-01-15 Porter H Forsythe Shoveling, digging, and boring machine
US2111405A (en) * 1937-08-10 1938-03-15 Laurie F Parker Power-mucking shield
US2593693A (en) * 1946-02-18 1952-04-22 Joy Mfg Co Mine shaft mucking apparatus
US2587844A (en) * 1949-05-19 1952-03-04 Harrison Patrick Cage and operating mechanism for shaft shovels
US3042234A (en) * 1960-08-04 1962-07-03 Davis Engineering Inc Material moving and placing apparatus

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3506310A (en) * 1966-12-02 1970-04-14 Charles Gruere Boring machine
US3612609A (en) * 1968-07-09 1971-10-12 Hydrel Ag Maschf Device for the demolishing and removal of earthwork
US3510170A (en) * 1968-07-10 1970-05-05 Smith International Power unit for oscillating tunneling machine
US3656810A (en) * 1969-02-08 1972-04-18 Vladimir Alexandrovich Khodosh Tunneling shield
US3578809A (en) * 1969-05-09 1971-05-18 Vernon Cunningham Method and apparatus for forming subterranean structures
US3712071A (en) * 1970-05-05 1973-01-23 V Cunningham Method and apparatus for forming subterranean structures
US3763657A (en) * 1972-01-26 1973-10-09 Eng Field Services Means for eliminating roll of tunneling shield
DE2547715A1 (en) * 1974-10-30 1976-05-06 Coal Industry Patents Ltd Boring machine, in particular stretch boring machine for the mining
US4136910A (en) * 1974-10-30 1979-01-30 Coal Industry (Patents) Limited Excavating machines
US4043137A (en) * 1975-07-02 1977-08-23 Gewerkschaft Eisenhutte Westfalia Apparatus for and a method of constructing a tunnel
US4190294A (en) * 1978-08-17 1980-02-26 The Robbins Company Excavator for use in a tunneling shield
US4260297A (en) * 1978-09-26 1981-04-07 Edbro Limited Machines for positioning roof supports in a tunnel
DE2948942A1 (en) * 1978-12-15 1980-07-03 Coal Industry Patents Ltd Schraemeinheitanordnung for a boring machine for stretch in mining and for tunnels and boring machine
DE2948991A1 (en) * 1978-12-15 1980-07-03 Coal Industry Patents Ltd Gleitbahneinrichtung and boring machine to propel stretch of the mining and tunnel
US4302054A (en) * 1978-12-15 1981-11-24 Coal Industry (Patents) Limited Cutter unit assemblies for excavating machines and to excavating machines including cutter unit assemblies
US4203626A (en) * 1979-02-21 1980-05-20 Zokor Corporation Articulated boom-dipper-bucket assembly for a tunnel boring machine
US4298230A (en) * 1979-06-25 1981-11-03 Philipp Holzmann Aktiengesellschaft Tunnelling apparatus
US4349230A (en) * 1979-08-10 1982-09-14 Zokor Corporation Tunnel boring machine
US4396313A (en) * 1980-07-18 1983-08-02 Guy F. Atkinson Company Method of forming flooring in tunnels
US4387928A (en) * 1981-03-27 1983-06-14 Milwaukee Boiler Manufacturing Co. Tunnel excavator
US4501448A (en) * 1983-01-03 1985-02-26 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Interior Universal ripper miner
EP0372605A2 (en) * 1988-12-03 1990-06-13 METALLGESELLSCHAFT Aktiengesellschaft Corrosion protection for flue gas desulfurization installations
EP0372605A3 (en) * 1988-12-03 1991-04-03 METALLGESELLSCHAFT Aktiengesellschaft Corrosion protection for flue gas desulfurization installations

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3561223A (en) Tunneling machine with concrete wall forming mechanism
US3354969A (en) Self-propelled drilling machine
US3454114A (en) Drilling machine
US4494799A (en) Tunnel boring machine
US4035024A (en) Hard rock trench cutting machine
US3493165A (en) Continuous tunnel borer
US4646906A (en) Apparatus for continuously conveying coal from a continuous miner to a remote floor conveyor
US4169338A (en) Telescopic boom
US3346300A (en) Blast furnace lining removing machine
US4646853A (en) Shaft boring machine and method
US2833422A (en) Telescopic boom
US3598445A (en) Tunnel-boring machine
US2919121A (en) Mining and excavating machine of the rotary type
US2796999A (en) Tunneling apparatus
US3266257A (en) Shield tunneling method and mechanism
US4869358A (en) Conveyor belt system for a continuous mining machine
US2734731A (en) Mining machine
US4079792A (en) Mine roof support for a mobile drilling machine
US5192116A (en) Gantry-type mobile mining machine
US4548443A (en) Tunnel boring machine
US2920879A (en) Mining apparatus utilizing two side cutting augers
US4637657A (en) Tunnel boring machine
US4790395A (en) Pipe-driving apparatus
US4226476A (en) Continuous miner with improved roof-to-floor anchoring canopy units for advancing and turning machine and installing roof bolts
US3325217A (en) Tunneling and excavation through rock by core forming and removal