US3397720A - Multiple layer insulation for a cryogenic structure - Google Patents

Multiple layer insulation for a cryogenic structure Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3397720A
US3397720A US40592964A US3397720A US 3397720 A US3397720 A US 3397720A US 40592964 A US40592964 A US 40592964A US 3397720 A US3397720 A US 3397720A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
insulation
sheets
cryogenic
conduit
spaced
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Jones Peter
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Goodrich Corp
Original Assignee
BP Chemicals (Hitco) Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by BP Chemicals (Hitco) Inc filed Critical BP Chemicals (Hitco) Inc
Priority to US40592964 priority Critical patent/US3397720A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3397720A publication Critical patent/US3397720A/en
Assigned to B.F. GOODRICH COMPANY THE, A CORP. OF NY. reassignment B.F. GOODRICH COMPANY THE, A CORP. OF NY. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. Assignors: DUCOMMUN INCORPORATED
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16LPIPES; JOINTS OR FITTINGS FOR PIPES; SUPPORTS FOR PIPES, CABLES OR PROTECTIVE TUBING; MEANS FOR THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16L59/00Thermal insulation in general
    • F16L59/06Arrangements using an air layer or vacuum
    • F16L59/065Arrangements using an air layer or vacuum using vacuum
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16LPIPES; JOINTS OR FITTINGS FOR PIPES; SUPPORTS FOR PIPES, CABLES OR PROTECTIVE TUBING; MEANS FOR THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16L59/00Thermal insulation in general
    • F16L59/02Shape or form of insulating materials, with or without coverings integral with the insulating materials
    • F16L59/029Shape or form of insulating materials, with or without coverings integral with the insulating materials layered
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16LPIPES; JOINTS OR FITTINGS FOR PIPES; SUPPORTS FOR PIPES, CABLES OR PROTECTIVE TUBING; MEANS FOR THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16L59/00Thermal insulation in general
    • F16L59/12Arrangements for supporting insulation from the wall or body insulated, e.g. by means of spacers between pipe and heat-insulating material; Arrangements specially adapted for supporting insulated bodies
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16LPIPES; JOINTS OR FITTINGS FOR PIPES; SUPPORTS FOR PIPES, CABLES OR PROTECTIVE TUBING; MEANS FOR THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16L59/00Thermal insulation in general
    • F16L59/14Arrangements for the insulation of pipes or pipe systems
    • F16L59/141Arrangements for the insulation of pipes or pipe systems in which the temperature of the medium is below that of the ambient temperature
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F17STORING OR DISTRIBUTING GASES OR LIQUIDS
    • F17CVESSELS FOR CONTAINING OR STORING COMPRESSED, LIQUEFIED OR SOLIDIFIED GASES; FIXED-CAPACITY GAS-HOLDERS; FILLING VESSELS WITH, OR DISCHARGING FROM VESSELS, COMPRESSED, LIQUEFIED, OR SOLIDIFIED GASES
    • F17C13/00Details of vessels or of the filling or discharging of vessels
    • F17C13/001Thermal insulation specially adapted for cryogenic vessels
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F17STORING OR DISTRIBUTING GASES OR LIQUIDS
    • F17CVESSELS FOR CONTAINING OR STORING COMPRESSED, LIQUEFIED OR SOLIDIFIED GASES; FIXED-CAPACITY GAS-HOLDERS; FILLING VESSELS WITH, OR DISCHARGING FROM VESSELS, COMPRESSED, LIQUEFIED, OR SOLIDIFIED GASES
    • F17C2203/00Vessel construction, in particular walls or details thereof
    • F17C2203/01Reinforcing or suspension means
    • F17C2203/014Suspension means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S220/00Receptacles
    • Y10S220/901Liquified gas content, cryogenic

Description

P. JONES Aug. 20, 1968 MULTIPLE LAYER INSULATION FOR A CRYOGENIC STRUCTURE Filed OCt. 23, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

PE re-e J'o/vas P. JONES Aug. 20, 1968 MULTIPLE LAYER INSULATION FOR A CRYOGENIC STRUCTURE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 23, 1964 INVENTOR.

P5 7222 J'o/vss BY I I United States Patent 3,397,720 MULTIPLE LAYER INSULATION FOR A CRYOGENIC STRUCTURE Peter Jones, Los Angeles, Calif., assignor, by mesne assignments to Hitco, Gardena, Califl, a corporation of California Filed Oct. 23, 1964, Ser. No. 405,929 7 Claims. (Cl. 138149) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A thermal insulation of alternating plain reflective plastic sheets and dimpled plastic sheets, the dimples being spaced apart along two directions substantially at right angles to each other. Support means at each end of an insulation pack are provided to prevent contact of the insulation with inner or outer walls of an insulated container.

This invention relates to a multiple layer insulation for a cryogenic pipe line, and particularly to the means to effectively prevent excessive heat transfer from the external atmosphere or room temperature to the cryogenic material which is flowing within a spaced inner pipe or conduit. The cryogenic material referred to in this application may be liquid hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, or the like, all of which have a very low temperature while in a liquid state.

My invention provides an effective means of insulating an inner conduit carrying cryogenic material from an outer pipe or jacket which surround-s the conduit to prevent heat from being transferred from the outside, or the atmosphere, to the cryogenic material whereby that material may be caused to vaporize. This means includes alternate layers of flat sunfaced reflective sheets, such as polyester film, separated by corrugated or dimpled sheets of the same reflective polyester film.

Another object of my invention is to provide a novel insulation means of the character stated, whereby a plurality of superposed sheets are supported at their ends by pads formed of glass fibers or other insulating material.

Another object of my invention is to provide an effective means to keep the flat reflector sheets separated, so that the reflector layers do not transmit heat by means of direct contact with each other.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a novel insulation means which is relatively inexpensive, and which requires a minimum of labor to install. Furthermore, my insulation means provides sufiicient strength and excellent resistance to external dynamic effects and damaging vibrations. The entire assembly of the reflector sheets is totally separated from contact with either cold or warm surfaces. This is accomplished by the end supports which are formed of strong material of low heat conductivity.

Other objects, advantages and features of invention may appear :from the accompanying drawings, the subjoined detailed description and the appended claims.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of one pair of superposed insulation sheets.

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary view of an insulated pipe line embodying my invention and with parts broken away to show interior construction.

FIGURE 3 is a transverse sectional view taken on line 3-3 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line 4-4 of FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view taken on line 55 of FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged transverse sectional View of the insulation within the area indicated by 6 in FIG- URE 5.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of a modified form of insulation sheet support.

Referring more particularly to the. drawing, the numeral 1 indicates an inner conduit which will be termed the cryogenic conduit. This conduit carries the cryogenic material, such as liquid hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, or the like. An outer jacket 2 is spaced from the conduit 1 and is concentric with that conduit. The conduit 1 and the jacket 2 are both metallic pipes and of suflicient strength and thickness to carry the particular load which is required. An annular space 3 is thus formed between the conduit 1 and the jacket 2 and this space is normally evacuated to assist in the heat insulation of the inner conduit 1. Evacuation of the space 3 occurs after the insulation units (to be subsequently described) are in place and after all, or a substantial part, of the entire conduit has been layed.

At intervals throughout the length of the conduit 1, I provide supporting annular rings 4, which are preferably formed of glass fibers or other similar somewhat porous material, but which has sufficient compressive strength to support the conduit 1 'within the pipe or jacket 2. The ring 4 is sufficiently porous so that air can readily pass through it when the space 3 is being evacuated. A sleeve 5 is concentric with the ring 4 and is positioned on the outside of the ring, extending between the outer surface of the ring and the inner surface of the jacket 2. This sleeve 5 is also formed of glass fibers or other suitable porous material which has sufficient compressive strength. The sleeve 5 and the ring 4 are slightly spaced at their adjacent faces by a spacer ring 6. The spacer 6 is shorter than the ring 4 and sleeve 5 to provide annular grooves to receive the ends of annular insulation packs 7. The insulation packs 7 extend longitudinally between adjacent supporting rings 4, as shown, and these insulation packs are assembled in the following manner: A flat faced polyester sheet 8 termed Mylar is coated by a reflecting material such as silver. The flat sheets 8 are separated by corrugated or dimpled sheets 9, which sheets are also formed of a polyester coated material termed Mylar. The corrugated or dimpled sheets 9 have a permanent corrugation or dimple formed therein, and since the polyester sheet is so formed that the corrugation or dimpling of the sheet will not flatten or diminish, due to normal weight, vibration, or the like. The corrugated or dimpled separations, while contacting adjacent flat insulator sheet 8, will still not cause a heat flow or transfer through the insulating pack, due to the fact that the points of contact are small and, furthermore, the corrugated or dimpled sheets are also reflective structures, thus materially reducing the heat flow due to contact. The dimples of the separating sheet 9 are spaced along two directions which are disposed substantially at right angles to each other. A characteristic of the polyester sheet termed Mylar is such that no drying or baking cycle is required to dry moisture out of the insulation. The composition of the polyester film precludes the absorption of moisture or the entraprnent of gases. Also the dimpling or corrugation of the polyester sheets 9 provides convenient escape routes or passages for atmospheric air which might be trapped between the flat sheets 8 and the dimpled sheets 9 during the vacuum pump down. These qualities of the polyester sheets and their construction as described materially simplifies the maintenance of the required vacuum within the pipe line, and also materially simplifies this pump operation.

In FIGURE 7 I have illustrated a modified form of end support for the insulating bundles of polyester sheets, consisting of an outer annular supporting ring 10 which is formed with an inner annular groove 11. A pair of inner annular sleeves 12-13 are spaced longitudinally of the conduit 1 to provide an annular space 14. The ends of the adjacent insulation packs 7 extend into the space between the rings 10 and the spaced sleeves 1213 as shown. To hold these packs 7 in position, particularly as to their adjacent abutting ends, I provide a short length of insulation 14 which fits in the groove 11. The insulation 14- is constructed in the same manner as the insulation pack 7 previously described. A second insulation pack 15 is positioned within the space 14, and this insulation pack is also similar in construction to the insulation pack 7 previously described. In this manner I provide additional depth of insulation between the inner conduit 1 and the outer pipe or jacket 2. In this construction also there is a continuous pack of insulation running longitudinally of the conduit and extending throughout the entire length of that conduit.

My method of suspending a dimpled polyester (Mylar) cryogenic insulation in pipe lines or in Dewars results in a stress-free system with a safety factor based on weight of the insulation of more than ten to one. The insulation qualities of metallized polyester sheets (Mylar) would never deteriorate in use, due to temperature, cycling or any other conditions to be found in cryogenic applications. This means that a dimpled sheet of Mylar, as disclosed in this application, will be maintenance free for the life of the equipment. There are also material advantages due to a savings in the cooled down process, due to a reduced mass in my insulation.

In my method and structure as disclosed, no Mylar layers will touch either a cold or warm surface of the evacuated space, thereby permitting only a small temperature difference across the insulation packs 7 or the layers thereof. This means according to the Stefan- Boltzmann law that the undesirable heat leak is brought to a minimum and is under a controlled design environment.

tMy improved multiple layer insulation is applicable to cryogenic installations other than a pipe line, for example, this construction can be used on cryogenic Dewar vessels, spaced chambers, as might be employed in outer space, as 'well as vessels, containers, and the like, which either contain or house a cryogenic material, or with which to exclude an outer low temperature from the space within the vessel. My insulation construction can be employed in any vessel or pipe line with vacuum jacketin g.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A multiple layer insulation in combination with a cryogenic pipe line comprising,

an inner pipe conveying a cryogenic material,

an outer jacket surrounding the inner pipe and radially spaced therefrom,

an insulation pack in said space comprising superimposed sheets of reflective plastic material formed as cylinders surrounding the inner pipe,

said insulation pack comprising alternate plain surfaced sheets of reflective plastic material separated by a dimpled sheet of reflective plastic material which dimples make small points of contact with a 4 said plain surfaced sheets and wherein said dimples are spaced apart along two directions disposed substantially at right angles to each other,

and annular insulative and porous supporting rings surrounding the inner pipe and longitudinally spaced thereon,

said annular supporting ring having means thereon to receive one end of an insulation pack to support said insulation pack in spaced relation to both said inner pipe and said outer jacket.

2. A multiple layer insulation in combination with a cryogenic pipe line comprising,

an inner pipe conveying a cryogenic material,

an outer jacket surrounding the inner pipe and radially spaced therefrom,

an insulation pack in said space comprising superimposed sheets of reflective plastic material formed as cylinders surrounding the inner pipe,

said insulation pack comprising alternate plain surfaced sheets of reflective plastic material separated by a dimpled sheet of reflective plastic material which dimples make small points of contact with said plain surfaced sheets and wherein said dimples are spaced apart along two directions disposed substantially at right angles to each other,

and annular insulative and porous supporting rings surrounding the inner pipe and longitudinally spaced thereon,

said annular supporting ring having means thereon to receive one end of an insulation pack to support said insulation pack in spaced relation to both said inner pipe and said outer jacket,

said means comprising an annular groove in the end of the supporting ring into which the end of the insulation pack fits.

3. An assembly comprising:

(a) a container having spaced inner and outer walls;

and

(b) thermal insulation packs extending between said walls and being spaced therefrom;

(c) each of said packs including opposed and spaced essentially planar, radiation-reflecting sheets; and (d) a separator sheet intermediate each pair of said reflecting sheets,

(c) said separator sheet being formed to provide dimples facing each pair of said reflecting sheets which dimples make small points of contact with said reflecting sheets,

(f) said dimples being spaced apart along two directions of said separator sheet disposed substantially at right angles to each other; and

(g) thermal insulative support means interfitting edge portions of said packs for holding said packs in spaced relation to said walls.

4. The assembly defined in claim 3 in which said support means comprises porous material, the space between said walls being at a pressure substantially below atmospheric pressure.

5. The assembly defined in claim 3 in which each of said sheets consists of plastic film having a radiationreflecting metallic coating on the outer film surfaces.

6. A thermal insulation packing comprising:

(a) opposed and spaced essentially planar, radiationreflecting sheets; and

(b) a separator sheet disposed intermediate each pair of said reflecting sheets,

(c) said separator sheet being formed to provide dimplies facing each pair of said reflecting sheets which dimples make small points of contact with said reflecting sheets, and said dimples being spaced apart along two directions of said separator sheet disposed substantially at right angles to each other, and

(d) porous, thermal insulative support means interlitting edge portions of: the packing for holding the packing between and in spaced relation to inner and outer walls of a container.

7. The packing defined in claim 6 in which each of said sheets consists of plastic film with a metallic, radiation-reflecting coating on the outer surfaces of said film.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 683,514 10/1901 Stephens 138-448 1,987,798 1/1935 Ruppricht 161137 X 2,179,057 11/1-939 Schuetz 138148 X 10 LAVERNE D. GEIGER, Primary Examiner.

C. L. HOUCK, Assistant Examiner.

US40592964 1964-10-23 1964-10-23 Multiple layer insulation for a cryogenic structure Expired - Lifetime US3397720A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US40592964 US3397720A (en) 1964-10-23 1964-10-23 Multiple layer insulation for a cryogenic structure

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US40592964 US3397720A (en) 1964-10-23 1964-10-23 Multiple layer insulation for a cryogenic structure

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3397720A true US3397720A (en) 1968-08-20

Family

ID=23605804

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US40592964 Expired - Lifetime US3397720A (en) 1964-10-23 1964-10-23 Multiple layer insulation for a cryogenic structure

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3397720A (en)

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3463691A (en) * 1965-08-11 1969-08-26 American Standard Inc Method for forming liquid heat exchange piping system
US3511282A (en) * 1966-02-07 1970-05-12 Continental Oil Co Prestressed conduit for heated fluids
US3654691A (en) * 1966-02-07 1972-04-11 Continental Oil Co Process for constructing prestressed conduit for heated fluids
US3694914A (en) * 1970-09-08 1972-10-03 Comp Generale Electricite Cryogenic connection for the transmission of high electric power and method of manufacture thereof
US3696627A (en) * 1971-01-18 1972-10-10 Air Prod & Chem Liquid cryogen transfer system
US3725565A (en) * 1971-04-22 1973-04-03 Siemens Ag Expansion member for superconducting cable
JPS4833449A (en) * 1971-09-04 1973-05-10
US3777501A (en) * 1971-03-12 1973-12-11 Martin Marietta Corp Capillary insulation
US3810491A (en) * 1971-10-27 1974-05-14 Linde Ag Method of insulating conduit
US3911961A (en) * 1970-09-25 1975-10-14 Federal Mogul Corp High temperature duct insulator and method of making same
JPS5183261A (en) * 1975-01-18 1976-07-21 Hitachi Cable Tajudoshindannetsudokan
US4099726A (en) * 1977-09-08 1978-07-11 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Packing for cryogenic seal joint
US4235956A (en) * 1978-04-29 1980-11-25 Brown, Boveri & Cie Aktiengesellschaft Electrochemical storage battery
EP0042356A1 (en) * 1980-06-13 1981-12-23 Ciba-Geigy Ag Use of partially crystalline polymers as insulating material for cryogenic applications
US4525968A (en) * 1980-02-01 1985-07-02 Kraftwerk Union Aktiengesellschaft All-metallic heat insulation, formed of heat insulating building blocks which can be joined together
WO1986000122A1 (en) * 1984-06-07 1986-01-03 The Dow Chemical Company Heat insulating structures for low-temperature or cryogenic pipings
CH665266A5 (en) * 1984-10-12 1988-04-29 Brugg Ag Kabelwerke Fixed point to a pipeline.
US5400602A (en) * 1993-07-08 1995-03-28 Cryomedical Sciences, Inc. Cryogenic transport hose
US6003321A (en) * 1997-04-15 1999-12-21 The University Of Toledo Open flow helium cryostat system and related method of using
US6123218A (en) * 1997-10-02 2000-09-26 Nippon Sanso Corporation Construction for attaching a radiant heat blocking metal foil of an insulated container
US6179155B1 (en) * 1994-02-03 2001-01-30 Nippon Sanso Corporation Insulated vessel and method of production therefor
US6230750B1 (en) 1995-02-14 2001-05-15 Marc Lessard Insulating air conduit
US6491180B2 (en) * 1998-11-18 2002-12-10 Mannesmann Vdo Ag Fuel tank
FR2842278A1 (en) * 2002-07-15 2004-01-16 Strulik Wilhelm P Insulated flexible duct e.g. for air conditioning systems has thermal insulation layer made from plastic forming air-filled cavities
US20050121903A1 (en) * 2003-11-20 2005-06-09 Itp Pipeline for the transportation of liquefied natural gas
EP1645793A2 (en) * 2004-10-08 2006-04-12 Cryospace l'air liquide aerospatiale Cryogenic insulation device
EP2105547A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2009-09-30 Thomas Rotter Vacuum insulating element
US20130205826A1 (en) * 2010-07-12 2013-08-15 Johannes Wild Cooling apparatus
US20140299038A1 (en) * 2013-04-05 2014-10-09 Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. Cargo tank for extremely low temperature substance carrier

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1074933B (en) *
US683514A (en) * 1901-02-25 1901-10-01 David Q Stephens Non-conducting covering.
US1987798A (en) * 1931-05-19 1935-01-15 Ruppricht Siegfried Thermal insulating material
US2179057A (en) * 1937-05-03 1939-11-07 United States Gypsum Co Heat insulation
US2547607A (en) * 1947-12-30 1951-04-03 Hofman Lab Inc Double-walled thermally insulated vessel
US2785536A (en) * 1953-11-03 1957-03-19 Little Inc A Delivery tube for liquefied gases
US3007596A (en) * 1956-07-16 1961-11-07 Union Carbide Corp Thermal insulation
US3018016A (en) * 1959-09-24 1962-01-23 Nat Res Corp Vacuum device
US3146005A (en) * 1961-12-04 1964-08-25 Arrowhead Products Vacuum insulated conduits and insulated joining means
US3201947A (en) * 1963-09-06 1965-08-24 Little Inc A Cryogenic transport tube incorporating liquefaction apparatus

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1074933B (en) *
US683514A (en) * 1901-02-25 1901-10-01 David Q Stephens Non-conducting covering.
US1987798A (en) * 1931-05-19 1935-01-15 Ruppricht Siegfried Thermal insulating material
US2179057A (en) * 1937-05-03 1939-11-07 United States Gypsum Co Heat insulation
US2547607A (en) * 1947-12-30 1951-04-03 Hofman Lab Inc Double-walled thermally insulated vessel
US2785536A (en) * 1953-11-03 1957-03-19 Little Inc A Delivery tube for liquefied gases
US3007596A (en) * 1956-07-16 1961-11-07 Union Carbide Corp Thermal insulation
US3018016A (en) * 1959-09-24 1962-01-23 Nat Res Corp Vacuum device
US3146005A (en) * 1961-12-04 1964-08-25 Arrowhead Products Vacuum insulated conduits and insulated joining means
US3201947A (en) * 1963-09-06 1965-08-24 Little Inc A Cryogenic transport tube incorporating liquefaction apparatus

Cited By (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3463691A (en) * 1965-08-11 1969-08-26 American Standard Inc Method for forming liquid heat exchange piping system
US3511282A (en) * 1966-02-07 1970-05-12 Continental Oil Co Prestressed conduit for heated fluids
US3654691A (en) * 1966-02-07 1972-04-11 Continental Oil Co Process for constructing prestressed conduit for heated fluids
US3694914A (en) * 1970-09-08 1972-10-03 Comp Generale Electricite Cryogenic connection for the transmission of high electric power and method of manufacture thereof
US3911961A (en) * 1970-09-25 1975-10-14 Federal Mogul Corp High temperature duct insulator and method of making same
US3696627A (en) * 1971-01-18 1972-10-10 Air Prod & Chem Liquid cryogen transfer system
US3777501A (en) * 1971-03-12 1973-12-11 Martin Marietta Corp Capillary insulation
US3725565A (en) * 1971-04-22 1973-04-03 Siemens Ag Expansion member for superconducting cable
JPS5654512B2 (en) * 1971-09-04 1981-12-25
JPS4833449A (en) * 1971-09-04 1973-05-10
US3810491A (en) * 1971-10-27 1974-05-14 Linde Ag Method of insulating conduit
JPS5183261A (en) * 1975-01-18 1976-07-21 Hitachi Cable Tajudoshindannetsudokan
US4099726A (en) * 1977-09-08 1978-07-11 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Packing for cryogenic seal joint
US4235956A (en) * 1978-04-29 1980-11-25 Brown, Boveri & Cie Aktiengesellschaft Electrochemical storage battery
US4525968A (en) * 1980-02-01 1985-07-02 Kraftwerk Union Aktiengesellschaft All-metallic heat insulation, formed of heat insulating building blocks which can be joined together
EP0042356A1 (en) * 1980-06-13 1981-12-23 Ciba-Geigy Ag Use of partially crystalline polymers as insulating material for cryogenic applications
WO1986000122A1 (en) * 1984-06-07 1986-01-03 The Dow Chemical Company Heat insulating structures for low-temperature or cryogenic pipings
CH665266A5 (en) * 1984-10-12 1988-04-29 Brugg Ag Kabelwerke Fixed point to a pipeline.
US5400602A (en) * 1993-07-08 1995-03-28 Cryomedical Sciences, Inc. Cryogenic transport hose
US6179155B1 (en) * 1994-02-03 2001-01-30 Nippon Sanso Corporation Insulated vessel and method of production therefor
US6230750B1 (en) 1995-02-14 2001-05-15 Marc Lessard Insulating air conduit
US6003321A (en) * 1997-04-15 1999-12-21 The University Of Toledo Open flow helium cryostat system and related method of using
US6123218A (en) * 1997-10-02 2000-09-26 Nippon Sanso Corporation Construction for attaching a radiant heat blocking metal foil of an insulated container
US6491180B2 (en) * 1998-11-18 2002-12-10 Mannesmann Vdo Ag Fuel tank
FR2842278A1 (en) * 2002-07-15 2004-01-16 Strulik Wilhelm P Insulated flexible duct e.g. for air conditioning systems has thermal insulation layer made from plastic forming air-filled cavities
AU2004229037B2 (en) * 2003-11-20 2010-05-20 Itp Pipeline for the transportation of liquefied natural gas
US20050121903A1 (en) * 2003-11-20 2005-06-09 Itp Pipeline for the transportation of liquefied natural gas
US7494155B2 (en) * 2003-11-20 2009-02-24 Itp Pipeline for the transportation of liquefied natural gas
EP1645793A2 (en) * 2004-10-08 2006-04-12 Cryospace l'air liquide aerospatiale Cryogenic insulation device
FR2876437A1 (en) * 2004-10-08 2006-04-14 Cryospace L Air Liquide Aerosp Device for cryogenic insulation, implementation of method and use of such an insulating device, and launcher crew of such an isolation device
EP1645793A3 (en) * 2004-10-08 2010-12-08 Cryospace l'air liquide aerospatiale Cryogenic insulation device
WO2009118154A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2009-10-01 Thomas Rotter Vacuum-insulation element
EP2105547A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2009-09-30 Thomas Rotter Vacuum insulating element
US20110183119A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2011-07-28 Thomas Rotter Vacuum-Insulation Element
US8383225B2 (en) 2008-03-26 2013-02-26 Thomas Rotter Vacuum-insulation element
US20130205826A1 (en) * 2010-07-12 2013-08-15 Johannes Wild Cooling apparatus
US9851126B2 (en) * 2010-07-12 2017-12-26 Johannes Wild Cooling apparatus
US20140299038A1 (en) * 2013-04-05 2014-10-09 Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. Cargo tank for extremely low temperature substance carrier
US9335003B2 (en) * 2013-04-05 2016-05-10 Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. Cargo tank for extremely low temperature substance carrier

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3489311A (en) Tanks for storage of liquefied gas
US3539137A (en) Pipe saddle
US3339778A (en) Insulated tank for liquids at low temperatures
US4344462A (en) Flexible tubular conduit
CA2524830C (en) Double wall pipe with spacer member and aerogel insulation layer
JP2662432B2 (en) Conduit for transporting the medium cryogenic
US3317074A (en) Cryogenic containers
US3990203A (en) Insulated ceramic fiber panels for portable high temperature chambers
CA1060362A (en) Cryogenic storage container and manufacture
US3525452A (en) Method and device for thermally insulating a vessel
US8616246B2 (en) Insulated pipe and method for preparing the same
US4105819A (en) Laminated sheets particularly for cryogenic enclosures, pipes, and the like
EP0263511A2 (en) Vacuum insulation panel
US3865145A (en) Pipeline system
US2776776A (en) Liquefied gas container
US3706208A (en) Flexible cryogenic liquid transfer system and improved support means therefor
US4531511A (en) Means for controlling heat flux
NL192129C (en) By vacuum-insulated pipeline section for a transport conduit for fluids.
US3179549A (en) Thermal insulating panel and method of making the same
US5011729A (en) Vacuum insulated panels with concave surfaces on the surface layers
US6403180B1 (en) Pipe insulation
US5175975A (en) Compact vacuum insulation
Tseng et al. Thermal conductivity of polyurethane foams from room temperature to 20 K
US5107649A (en) Compact vacuum insulation embodiments
US4513041A (en) Tubular vacuum-tight enclosures for thermal and acoustical insulating panels

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: B.F. GOODRICH COMPANY THE, AKRON, OH. A CORP. OF

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:DUCOMMUN INCORPORATED;REEL/FRAME:003939/0026

Effective date: 19811222