US3384347A - Shirt body pressing machine - Google Patents

Shirt body pressing machine Download PDF

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US3384347A
US3384347A US55148966A US3384347A US 3384347 A US3384347 A US 3384347A US 55148966 A US55148966 A US 55148966A US 3384347 A US3384347 A US 3384347A
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pressing
buck
machine
bucks
station
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Blease J Russell
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Ametek Inc
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Ametek Inc
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06FLAUNDERING, DRYING, IRONING, PRESSING OR FOLDING TEXTILE ARTICLES
    • D06F71/00Apparatus for hot-pressing clothes, linen, or other textile articles, i.e. wherein there is substantially no relative movement between pressing element and article while pressure is being applied to the article; Similar machines for cold-pressing clothes, linen, or other textile articles
    • D06F71/08Apparatus for hot-pressing clothes, linen, or other textile articles, i.e. wherein there is substantially no relative movement between pressing element and article while pressure is being applied to the article; Similar machines for cold-pressing clothes, linen, or other textile articles wherein one or more of the pressing elements is moved laterally between successive pressing operations
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06FLAUNDERING, DRYING, IRONING, PRESSING OR FOLDING TEXTILE ARTICLES
    • D06F71/00Apparatus for hot-pressing clothes, linen, or other textile articles, i.e. wherein there is substantially no relative movement between pressing element and article while pressure is being applied to the article; Similar machines for cold-pressing clothes, linen, or other textile articles
    • D06F71/16Apparatus for hot-pressing clothes, linen, or other textile articles, i.e. wherein there is substantially no relative movement between pressing element and article while pressure is being applied to the article; Similar machines for cold-pressing clothes, linen, or other textile articles having a pressing element or buck adapted to provide interior support for a garment to be pressed

Description

May 21, 1968 F. c. LORNITZO SHIRT BODY PRESSING MACHINE 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 27, 1966 INVENTOR FRANK C. LOKIV/TZ Kara-mew) 5y (1 FUJISELL ELEASE, ADMMMSI'IPATOR y 968 F. c. LORNITZO 3,384,347

SHIRT BODY PRESSING MACHINE ATTORIVAYS May 21, 1968 F. C. LORNITZO SHIRT BODY PRESSING MACHINE,

Filed April 27, 1966 '7' Sheets-Sheet 5 FRANK c. wzM/zwmmm By a. RUSSELL Elf/95E, AOMM/I87R4TOR May 21, 1968 F. c. LORNITZO SHIRT BODY PRESSING MACHINE Filed April 27, 1966 FIG. 5.

7 Sheets-Sheet 4 y 1968 I F. c. LORNITZO I 3,384,347

SHIRT BODY PRESSING MACHINE Filed April 27, 1966 v 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR.

1 Y m FQlM/k c. mew/r20 Kala-4:4)

5) d. RUSSELL BLMSE flDM/IV/JfRflTROR By Amwm May 21, 1968 F. c. LORNITZO SHIRT BODY PRESSING MACHINE 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed April 27, 1966 FIG. 6.

FIG. IO.

INVENTOR. fkAA k C. MAW/7Z0 laicsflssb) BYd-RUSSELL BLEnss United States Patent 3,384,347 SHIRT BODY PRESSING, MACHINE Frank C. Lornitzo, deceased, late of Portland, Maine, by

J. Russell Blease, administrator, c.t.a., Lincoln, R.I., as-

signor to Ametek, Inc., New York, N. a corporation of Delaware Filed Apr. 27, 1966, Ser. No. 551,489 12 Claims. (Cl. 22357) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A double buck shirt-pressing machine. The loading and pressing stations are at opposite ends of a line parallel with the machine. The two bucks are moved to alternate stations along substantially symmetrical oppositelydisposed paths on the two sides of said line.

The present invention relates generally to pressing machines, and in particular to a double buck shirt bodypressing machine.

There are a number of shirt body-pressing machines which are presently on the market and include spaced loading and pressing stations. At the loading station, the machine operator drapes the shirt about the inflatable body of a buck; and upon indexing of the machine, the buck carrying the shirt draped thereon moves into the pressing station wherein opposed heated platens engage the draped shirt to press the body thereof. In the socalled double buck machine, there are two bucks, one being located at the loading station and the other being located at the pressing station, with provision for moving such bucks in alternation relative to each other.

Broadly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved shirt-pressing machine of the aforesaid general type.

Present double buck shirt-pressing machines exhibit a number of practical shortcomings. Probably the most troublesome problem is the inability to index or position the two bucks of such machines in substantially the same loading position at the loading station. There exists a need for a machine of this type wherein the two bucks thereof will occupy substantially the same relative working positions in both the loading and pressing stations. This is particularly important at the loading station wherein the operator should be able to easily drape a shirt over each of the bucks while working in substantially the same relative position and without the need-for reaching over a portion of the machine. Such single relative position for the bucks at the loading station facilitates the operation of related mechanisms, such as the collar yoke press. Further, the foregoing objectives should be achieved in a machine which does not occupy an undue amount of floor space and is constructed of mechanisms which are rugged, durable and capable of use over prolonged periods of time without the necessity of undue servicing.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a shirt body-pressing machine of the double buck type wherein the bucks which alternately move between the loading and pressing stations occupy substantially the same relative working position in each such stations. Specifically, it is within the contemplation of the present invention to provide a double buck pressing machine which is relatively easy to operate, is constructed and arranged to enable high speed loading and unloading with minimum operator fatigue and is capable of use over prolonged periods of time without undue servicing or replacements of parts.

3,384,347 Patented May 21, 1968 ICC In accordance with an illustrative embodiment demonstrating objects and features of the present invention there is provided a shirt body-pressing machine which comprises a support having spaced loading and pressing stations. First and second buck-supporting means are movable in spaced and substantially parallel first and second movement paths between the loading and pressing stations. Actuating means are operatively connected to the'buck-snpporting means for moving the same respectively in opposite directions. First guide means movably mount a first buck on the first buck-supporting means and second guide means movably mount a second buck on the second buck-supporting means. The first and second guide means cooperate with the first and second buck-supporting means such that the bucks are normally disposed in working positions when at the limits of their movements in the loading and pressing stations respectively, and when moved, alternately occupy substantially the same relative working positions in the loading and pressing stations. The first and second guide means are constructed and arranged to displace the bucks relative to each other such that the bucks clear each other during movement between the loading and pressing stations. Preferably, the first and second guide means each includes a linkage in the form of a drag link mechanism which produce similar curved motion paths for the first and second bucks as they move between the loading and pressing stations.

The above brief description as well as further objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be best appreciated by reference to the following detailed description of a presently preferred, but nonetheless illustrative embodiment in accordance with the present invention, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view, with parts broken away, showing a double buck bosom pressing machine embodying features of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows, illustrating the normal or starting position of the machine wherein one of the bucks is in a work position at the loading or dressing station and the other of the bucks is in a work position at the pressing station;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows, with parts broken away and sectioned, showing the details of the mechanisms at the pressing station and with the heated platens thereof closed about a buck located in such station;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 44 of FIG. 1 and looking upwardly and in the direction of the arrows, showing the details of the bucksupporting and actuating mechanisms, illustrated in the normal or starting position;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 4, but showing the buck-supporting and indexing mechanisms in an intermediate position wherein the bucks are passing each other during their movement in alternation from one station to the other;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIGS. 4 and 5 showing the buck-supporting and indexing mechanism at the end of its indexing travel, having moved the buck which was formerly in the loading station into the pressing station and vice versa;

FIG. 7 is a vertical section taken lengthwise through the machine substantially along the line 77 of FIG. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows showing the details of the buck-supporting and indexing mechanisms;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary plan view, similar to FIG. 2, but showing the heated platens swung to their diverging position to facilitate the removal of one buck from a working position in the pressing station and the insertion of the other buck therein;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view, taken substantially along the line 99 of FIG. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows, showing the actuating and biasing arrangement for the platens in the pressing station;

FIG. 10 is a diagrammatic showing of the respective motion paths for the two bucks with successive positions of the bucks during movement from the loading station to the pressing station being illustrated by the lighter lines and with the heavier lines and directional arrows indicating the path of movement of a center point through each of such bucks; and

FIG. 11 is a pneumatic diagram of an elementary control arrangement for coordinating platen closing movement and the buck traverse.

Referring now to FIGS. 1-3 inclusive of the drawings, the present shirt body or bosom pressing machine, which is generally designated by the reference numeral 20, includes an elongated support or frame 22. For convenience in illustration and exposing the internal details of the machine, the frame 22 has been shown in skeletal form. In general, the support or frame 22 is constructed to provide a loading station or location 24 and a pressing station or location 26 in the form of an enclosed cabinet having an opening 26a (FIG. 3) directed toward the loading station 24.

Normally, a first buck 28 is disposed in the loading station 24 and is adapted to have a shirt S (see FIG. 1) draped thereover and a second and substantially identical buck 30 is disposed in the pressing station 26 and is adapted to present the shirt draped thereon to pressing platens, as will be subsequently described. The bucks 28, 30 are movable in opposite directions in alternation such that a shirt S draped thereon in the loading station 24 (i.e. on buck 28) is indexed into the pressing station 26; and concurrently the buck having the pressed shirt thereon (i.e. buck 30) is returned to the loading station 24 to present the pressed shirt to the machine operator for unloading, as is generally understood for double buck pressing machines of this type. The bucks 28, 30 each include an expandable body and the usual expanders and are the type generally known in this art. Accordingly, they have been illustrated in elemental form, but it is understood that many and different buck types which are I generally available in this industry will find useful application in the present machine.

First and second buck-supporting mechanisms are movably mounted on the machine support or frame 22 and, as detailed hereinafter, support the bucks 28, 30 to move in opposite directions along the corresponding curve motion paths shown diagrammatically in FIG. 10 and respectively identified by the legends P P The motion paths P P for the bucks 28, 30 are substantially identical and are symmetrically disposed relative to a common and longitudinally extending vertical reference plane R. As will be appreciated as the description proceeds, the bucks 28, 30 are disposed in the same relative work positions in both the loading and pressing stations 24, 26 and are symmetrically disposed relative to the reference plane R when in such work positions.

The buck-supporting and actuating mechanisms include first and second rails 32, 34 which extend lengthwise of the support or frame 22 and are appropriately mounted thereon. The rails 32, 34 are disposed at opposite sides of the vertical plane of symmetry R of the machine 20 and define substantially parallel first and second paths between the loading and pressing stations 24, 26.

Disposed outwardly of the first rail 32 is a first trolley 36 (see FIGS. 2 and 3) which is generally channel shaped and includes upper and lower horizontal legs 36a, 36b interconnected by a vertical plate 360 which, as seen in FIG. 7, is enlarged at one end to include a depending extension 36d. Contiguous to its opposite ends, the first rail 32 is provided with rollers 38, 40 which are journalled on the plate 36c, 36d and overlie and engage the upper V-shaped bearing surface 32a of the first rail 32. Thus, the trolley 36 may be moved through a traverse lengthwise of the machine frame 22 from the starting position illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2 and 4, through the intermediate position illustrated in FIG. 5 and into the indexed position illustrated in FIG. 6 wherein the first buck 28 is appropriately oriented relative to the pressing platens. In some instances, it may be desirable to further stabilize the rail 36 during its reciprocating movement. To this end, the lower edge of the first rail 32 may be provided with a lower V-shaped bearing surface 32b which is engaged by a further roller 42 journalled on the lower end of the depending extension 36d of the trolley 36 (see FIGS. 1 and 7). Further, at its end contiguous to roller 36, the first trolley 36 carries a bumper 44 which will abut the adjacent end wall of the support 22 and may be adjusted to accurately establish the corresponding limit of the trolley traverse.

Disposed outwardly of the second rail 34 is a second trolley 46 which is of identical but reverse construction as compared to the trolley 36 (see FIGS. 1 and 7) and includes an upper horizontal leg 46a, a lower horizontal leg 46b and an interconnecting vertical plate 460 having an enlarged depending extension 46d. Contiguous to its opposite ends the second rail 46 carries rollers 48, 50 which are journalled on the upstanding plate 46c and extension 46d and engaged with the corresponding upper bearing surface 34a of the second rail 34 (see FIG. 2). This trolley is likewise provided with a bottom stabilizing roller 52 which engages the lower bearing surface 34b of the adjacent rail 34. The end of the trolley 46 directed toward the loading station 24 carries an adjustable bumper 54 which also engages the left end wall of the support 22 (see FIGS. 2 and 6).

An actuating and coordinating mechanism is operatively connected to the buck-supporting trolleys 36, 46 for moving the same respectively in opposite directions. This mechanism includes an actuating cylinder 56 and piston 58 which is of the double acting type and is connected to an appropriate source of air under pressure and a coordinating control (not shown). The cylinder 56 has a pivotal mount 60 on bracket 62 connected to an intermediate cross brace 22a of the support 22 (see FIG. 7). The piston rod 58 is connected at 64 to a coupling lever 66 which is pivotally mounted at 68 on the base 22b of the support 22. The free end of the lever 66 has a pivotal connection 70 to a coupling link 72 which has a pivotal connection 74 to extension 36d of trolley 36. The confronting vertical plates 36b, 46b of the trolleys 36, 46 carry respective coordinating racks 76, 78 which face each other and are interengaged by a pinion 80 which is journalled for rotation about a vertical axis on the enlarged upper end of the pinion-mounting standard 82 (see FIG. 3). Thus, as trolley 36 is driven from left to right in FIGS. 1 and 2 to move the corresponding buck 28 from the loading station to the pressing station, trolley 46 will be driven from right to left to remove the buck 30 from the pressing station and return the same to the loading station.

Provision is made for movably mounting the first buck 28 on the first buck-supporting trolley 36; and similar provision is made for mounting the second buck 30 on the second buck-supporting trolley 46. As seen best in FIGS. 4 to 7 inclusive, the first buck 28 is supported on a first carrier 28a which serves as a movable link of a drag link mechanism which includes first and second mounting links 84, 86 which in turn are pivotally mounted on the trolley 36 and are operatively connected to the support 22. Specifically, mounting link 84 has a vertical pivotal mount 88 at one end on the trolley 36 which extends between the upper and lower legs 36a, 36b thereof (see FIG. 7) and a pivotal connection 90 at its other end to the carrier 28a of buck 28. The second mounting link 86 has a pivotal mount 92 at one end (see FIG. 7) on the trolley 36 which mount extends between the upper leg 36a and an appropriate lateral mounting ear on the lower end of the extension 36d and a pivotal connection 94 at its opposite end to the carrier 28a of the buck 28. It will be appreciated that the portion of the trolley 36 between the pivotal mounts 88, 92 serves as a relatively stationary, but nonetheless longitudinally translatable base or supporting link for a four-bar linkage composed of the mounting link 84, the portion of the carrier 28a between the pivotal connections 90, 94 and the mounting link 86. The linkage is completed by providing a rigid arm 86a on the second mounting link 86 which is connected via a drag or coupling link 96 to a triangular mounting plate 82a rigid with the standard 82. Specifically, the drag link 96 has a pivotal connection 98 to the arm or extension 86a of the second mounting link and a pivotal connection 100 to the fixed supporting plate 82a. To those skilled in the linkage art, the four-bar linkage including the trolley 36 and the carrier 28a in conjunction with the extension 860 and the link 96 will be recognized as providing a drag link mechanism. By proper proportioning of the several links, this mechanism is capable of achieving the desired path of movement P for the buck 28 incident to the longitudinal translation of the trolley 36 between its limit positions, as progressively shown in FIGS. 4 to 6 and as shown diagrammatically in FIG. 10.

A similar guiding arrangement in the form of a drag link mechanism is provided for mounting the carrier 30a for the buck 30 for movement along a curved path P which is substantially symmetrical to the path P relative to the reference plane R. This drag link mechanism includes first and second mounting links 104, 106 which are proportioned to be identical respectively to the links 84, 86. The first mounting link 104 has a pivotal mount 108 on the trolley 46 and a pivotal connection 110 to the carrier 30a. The second mounting link 106 has a pivotal mount 112 on the trolley 46 and a pivotal connection 114 to the carrier 30a at a location spaced from the pivotal connection 110. The second mounted link 106 is provided with an arm or extension 106a which is coupled via drag or coupling link 116 to the mounting plate 82a on standard 82. Specifically, the drag link 116 has a pivotal connection 118 to the arm 106a and a pivotal connection or mount 120 on plate 82a. The symmetry of the respected linkages for mounting the bucks 28, 30 on the trolleys 36, 46 may be best appreciated by considering FIG. 5 which shows an intermediate position for the bucks 28, 30 when they are face to back and substantially coextensive, but disposed at opposite sides of the reference plane R.

By way of review, and with progressive reference to the bottom plan showings of FIGS. 4 to 6 inclusive, in response to the introduction of pressure to the appropriate inlet port of the cylinder 56, the piston rod 58 is extended to cause the trolley 36 to translate from left to right, moving out of the loading station 24 (see FIGS. 1, 2 and 4). The buck 28 moves along the motion path P (FIG. while the buck simultaneously moves along the motion path P with the bucks 28, 30 being adequately spaced relative to the reference plane R in the intermediate position shown in FIG. 4 to clear each other. Thereupon, buck 28 begins to move inwardly toward the position formerly occupied by buck 30 in the pressing station, while buck 30 likewise begins to move inwardly toward the position formerly occupied by buck 28 in the loading station, the limit positions of such movement being clearly shown in FIG. 6. A typical position for the bucks 28, 30 as the buck 28 is approaching the pressing station 26 and as the buck 30 is being withdrawn therefrom is illustrated in FIG. 8 which also shows the detailed mechanisms at the pressing station 26. It will be appreciated that the illustrated mounting and actuating mechanism including the respective drag linkages permits the indexing of the two bucks such that both are in the same relative position for loading and pressing yet provides a machine which is of relatively short overall length and depth, with the attendant advantages in initial cost and in required floor space for utilization.

Reference will now be made to the mechanisms at the pressing station for pressing the shirts S successively presented therein by the bucks 28, 30. Within the pressing station 26 there is provided a pair of opposed platens 122, 124 which are appropriately contoured such that the pressing faces 122a, 124a will embrace the bucks 28, 30, as may be appreciated by comparing the open position illustrated in FIG. 8 and the closed position illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. The platens 122, 124 are heated in any convenient fashion, either by electrical means, by steam or by combinations thereof, as is generally understood by those skilled in the art. The platens 122, 124 are mounted on straight line linkage mechanisms for movement toward and away from each other, with provision for concurrently swinging the sides of the platens directed toward the loading station into diverging relation (see FIG. 8) to facilitate the entry and withdrawal of the bucks from their working position relative to the platens. The details of the platen mounting and actuating assemblies are seen best in FIGS. 1, 2, 3, 8 and 9 and will now be described in detail. Disposed within the cabinet at the pressing station 26 and at opposite sides of the vertical central plane R are opposed bowed platen-mounting levers 126, 128 which have pivotal mounts 130, 132 intermediate their ends on the support or frame 22. The levers 126, 128 are of substantially identical construction, and as seen best in FIG. 1, each have two arms. Disposed within the respective levers 126, 128 are stabilizing links 134, 136 which are of identical construction (see FIG. 1) and respectively have bifurcated upper and lower ends. At their lower ends the stabilizing links 134, 136 have respective pivotal mounts 138, 140 on the support outwardly, respectively, of the pivotal mounts 130, 132 for the mounting levers 126, 128. Extending between the upper ends of the lever 126 and stabilizing link 134 is a platen-mounting block 142 which has a pivotal 'connection 144to the lever 126 and a pivotal connection 146 to the stabilizing link 134. This arrangement, as seen best in FIG. 3, will be recognized as providing a parallelogram linkage wherein the portion of the support between pivotal mounts 130, 138 constitutes a fixed link, the arm 126a between pivotal mount 130 and pivotal connection 144 serves as a first movable link, the platen-mounting block 142 between the pivotal connections 144, 146 serves as a second movable link and the link 134 serves as the third movable link thereof. In a similar fashion, a platen-mounting block 148 is pivotally interconnected between the corresponding upper ends of lever 128 and stabilizing link 136 to provide a parallelogram mounting linkage for the platen 124.

Fixed to the inner end of the platen-mounting block 142 is a vertical pivot 150 which serves as a journal for upper and lower integral and projecting ears 122b, 1220 on platen 122. In a similar fashion, block 148 carries vertical pivot 152 which serves as a journal for ears 124b, 1246 projecting from platen 124. An adjustable restraining link 154 (see FIGS. 2 and 8) has a pivotal mount 156 on the frame and a pivotal connection 158 to the ear 12212 at a point spaced outwardly of the vertical pivot 150; and in similar fashion there is provided an adjustable constraining link 160 which has a pivotal mount 162 on the support and a pivotal connection 164 to ear 12% of platen 124.

As may be appreciated by progressively inspecting FIGS. 2 and 8, as the platens 122, 124 are displaced outwardly relative to each other in response to operation of their respective parallelogram linkages (as will be described), the constraining links will swing the platens respectively about the vertical pivots 150, 152 to the diverging position wherein the entry sides of the platens 122, 124 define a wide open mouth affording adequate clearance for the desired indexing movement of the bucks.

Referrence will now be made to FIGS. 3 and 9 for a description of the illustrative mechanisms for actuating the depending arms 126b, 1281) of the bowed levers 126, 128. Extending between the lower ends are a cylinder 166 and piston 168, with the cylinder 166 having a pivotal mount 170 on arm 12812 and piston 168 having a pivotal connection 172 to the arm 12612. When pressure is applied to the cylinder 166 from the machine control, a spreading force is applied between the arms 126b, 12% which in turn drives the respective parallelogram mounting linkages for the platens 122, 124 toward each other to move the platens from the open position illustrated in FIG. 8 to the closed position illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. A stabilizing linkage is interconnected between the arms 126b, 1281: to assure uniform motion distribution between the levers 126, 128 which takes the form of an intermediate double-arm lever 174 having a pivotal mount 176 intermediate its ends on the support 22 and having respective stabilizing links 177, 178 pivotally connected to the opposite ends of the lever 174 and to the arms 126b, 1282;. A spring return is provided for driving the platens from the closed position back to the open position and takes the form of a spring-supporting shaft 180 which extends through bearing plates 126a, 128a afiixed to the arms 126b, 1281:. The spring-supporting shaft 180 carries return springs 182, 184 which serve to bias the arms 126b, 1281) toward each other. Specifically, return spring 182 is a coil spring under tension between abutment 186 adjustably secured to shaft 180 and a sliding abutment 188 bearing against bearing plate 1260. In a similar fashion, return spring 184 is under tension between a relatively fixed abutment 190 on the opposite end of the shaft and a sliding abutment 192 against bearing plate 128a. Thus in response to pneumatic operation of the machine, the platens 122, 124 may be moved to the closed position relative to each other; and when the pneumatic system is ported to atmosphere the return springs 182, 184 take over to return the platens to the open position illustrated in FIG. 8.

Referring now specifically to FIG. 11, there follows a brief description of a typical but elementary pneumatic and electrical control suitable for coordinating the buck traverse and platen movement of the illustrative machine. It will, of course, be appreciated that in an actual double buck machine embodying the several features of the present invention, the controls will be much more sophisticated will include provision of the coordinated movement of the yoke in timed relation to the body-pressing platens. Further, the control will include various safety and addition control features which find useful application in the day to day use of the machine. It is seen that the doubleacting, traversing cylinder and piston 56, 58 is selectively actuated by conventional solenoid-controlled valves SVR and SVL, while the single-acting, platen-closing cylinder and piston, 166, 168 is controlled by a similar valve SVP. The main air supply line has branch connections to the solenoid-controlled valves SVR, SVL and to solenoid-com trolled valved SVP. Upon operation of valve SVR, air is introduced to the right end ofthe cylinder 56 to index buck 28 from one position to the other; and upon introduction of air via solenoid-controlled valve SVL to the opposite or left end of the cylinder 56, the buck 28 is returned to the one position. Upon actuation of valve SVP, air is introduced to the cylinder 166 to close the pressing platens 22, 24. The return movement of such pressing platens is achieved by the springs 182, 184, with appropriate provision for porting the cylinder 166 to atmosphere. Although cylinder and piston 166, 168 have been described as being air-operated, it will be appreciated that for certain operations higher pressures may be desired and therefore a hydraulic booster could be incorporated into the control.

Referring specifically to FIG. 11, there is shown an elementary ladder diagram for a typical control which includes input lines L L The solenoid-controlled valve SVR is connected across the lines L L over normally closed contact P8 of foot switch PS. The solenoid-controlled valve SVL is connected across the lines L L over contact FS" of foot switch PS. The foot switch is of the type which, when depressed, will stay in one or the other of its circuit-completing positions. The solenoid-controlled valve SVP for controlling the pressing platens 22, 24 is connected across the lines L L via the normally open contact TS of timer T. Finally, the timer itself is selectively connected across the lines L L over parallel limit switches LS, RS, which are selectively opened and closed by switch actuator 58a on piston rod 58.

When the machine is in a typical rest position, the two bucks are at the extreme ends of the tracks in the loading and pressing stations, respectively, the pressing platens are open, the timer T has run its time cycle and the switch TS is open. Thus, the cylinder 56 receives air from the right via solenoid-controlled valve SVR. The foot switch FS is then depressed which transfers air from the right side of the cylinder 56 to the left side by transferring the movable contactor from contact F5 to contact FS". Thereupon the piston rod 58 moves to the right and there is an interval during which both limit switches LS, RS are open. The timer is reenergized during this interval and is automatically reset by well known internal mechanisms. When the bucks arrive at their terminal positions, actuator 58a on piston rod 58 closes the limit switch RS which initiates the next timing interval. Timer switch TS is closed to actuate solenoid-controlled valve SVP to thereby apply air to cylinder 166 to close the pressing platens 22, 24. When the timing interval is completed, switch TS opens, the pressing platens are restored to their open position and the machine is at rest for the next sequence of operations. Although only one specific control arrangement has been illustrated, it will be appreciated that modifications and variations of controls of this general type are known to those skilled in the art.

A latitude of modification, change and substitution is intended in the foregoing disclosure and in some instances some features of the invention will be employed without a corresponding use of other features. Accordingly, it is appropriate that the appended claims be construed broadly and in a manner consistent with the spirit and scope of the invention herein.

What I claim is:

1. A shirt body-pressing machine comprising a support, a loading station on said support, a pressing station on said support spaced from said loading station, first and second buck-supporting means movable in spaced and substantially parallel first and second paths between said loading and pressing stations, actuating means operatively connected to said buck-supporting means for moving the same respectively in opposite directions, first and second shirt-receiving bucks, first guide means movably mounting said second buck on said second buck-supporting means, said first and second guide means cooperating with said first and second buck-supporting means such that said bucks are normally disposed in working positions along a line symmetrically positioned between the paths of movement of said bucks when at the limits of their movement in said loading and pressing stations, respectively, and when moved, alternately occupy substantially the same relative working positions in said loading and pressing stations, said first and second guide means being operative to displace said bucks relative to each other such that said bucks clear each other during movement between said loading and pressing stations and to move both of said bucks along substantially symmetrical oppositely-disposed paths on the two sides of said symmetrically positioned line.

2. A shirt body-pressing machine according to claim 1 wherein said first and second guide means each include a linkage.

3. A shirt body-pressing machine according to claim 2 wherein each of said linkages is in the form of a drag link mechanism.

4. A shirt body-pressing machine according to claim 1 wherein each of said guide means includes a pair of guide links pivotally mounted on the buck-supporting means and pivotally connected to the corresponding buck and cooperating therewith to define a four-bar linkage and actuating means connected between said support and said four-bar linkage.

5. A shirt body-pressing machine according to claim 1 wherein said first and second guide means are constructed and arranged to produce respective motion paths for said first and second bucks substantially as shown in FIGURE 10 of the annexed drawings.

6. A shirt body-pressing machine according to claim 1 wherein each of said first and second buck-supporting means includes a rail on said support and a trolley on said rail.

7. A shirt body-pressing machine according to claim 1 wherein said actuating means includes respective racks on said first and second buck-supporting means and a pinion interposed between and engaging said racks.

8. A shirt-pressing machine according to claim 7 wherein said actuating means includes a piston and cylinder operatively connected to one of said buck-supporting means and effective to reciprocate both said buck-supporting means.

9. A shirt-pressing machine according to claim 1 wherein said pressing station includes opposed heated platens, respective means mounting said platens for movement toward each other into pressing relation to said bucks when the latter are moved into their respective working positions at said pressing station and away from each other into clearance relation to said bucks, each of said mounting means further including a pivotal support for its corresponding platen and means for swinging said platens into diverging relation relative to each other as said platens move away from each other.

10. A shirt body-pressing machine comprising an elongated support, loading and pressing stations on said support in spaced relation to each other, first and second buck-supporting means movable in spaced and substantially parallel first and second paths between said loading and pressing stations, said paths being arranged substantially symmetrical to a common longitudinal and vertical plane extending through said stations, actuating means operatively connected to said buck-supporting means for moving the same respectively in opposite directions, substantially identical first and second shirt-receiving bucks, first guide means mounting said first buck on said first buck-supporting means, second guide means mounting said second buck on said second buck-supporting means, said first and second guide means cooperating with said first and second buck-supporting means such that said bucks are normally disposed in working positions at said loading and pressing stations in said common plane, opposed heated platens in said pressing station arranged at opposite sides of said vertical plane and means mounting said platens for movement toward and away from each other and into and out of pressing relation to said first and second bucks in alternation.

11. A shirt-pressing machine according to claim 10 wherein the mounting means for each of said platens is operative to swing said platens into diverging relation relative to each other as said platens move away from each other to thereby define a corresponding entry opening facilitating the movement of said bucks in alternation into the working positions at said pressing station.

12. A shirt-prcssing machine according to claim 11 wherein said mounting means includes a parallelogram linkage mounting each of said platens for movement toward and away from each other and a pivot on said parallelogram linkage for swingably mounting the corresponding platen.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,757,832 8/1956 Johnson et al. 223-57 2,757,833 8/1956 Petre 22357 3,070,268 12/ 1962 Carpenter 22.357 3,198,407 8/1965 Hughes 22357 JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primaly Examiner.

G. V. LARKIN, Assistant Examiner.

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3463367A (en) * 1967-01-23 1969-08-26 Harry D Forse Pressing machine
US3471067A (en) * 1967-01-31 1969-10-07 Mc Graw Edison Co Shirt pressing machine
US3473708A (en) * 1968-03-15 1969-10-21 Unipress Co Inc The Double buck garment drying apparatus
US3613969A (en) * 1970-05-05 1971-10-19 Harry D Forse Shirt press
US5012962A (en) * 1990-01-16 1991-05-07 American Laundry Machinery, Inc. Indexing mechanism for a mannequin carriage having a slidable, pivotable support and index bar moveable by a fluid cylinder for movement between a dressing position and a garment press
US5148955A (en) * 1991-06-17 1992-09-22 Sheldon Company Shielded inflatable side bags for shirt presser bag assembly
US5474216A (en) * 1994-04-15 1995-12-12 Harrod; Michael K. Method and apparatus for concurrently pressing the front and back of a shirt and finishing the sleeves through the use of a single source of air pressure

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2757832A (en) * 1954-02-04 1956-08-07 American Laundry Mach Co Pressing machine
US2757833A (en) * 1954-02-04 1956-08-07 American Laundry Mach Co Pressing machine
US3070268A (en) * 1959-05-25 1962-12-25 Unipress Company Multiple buck one-lay bosom press
US3198407A (en) * 1962-07-25 1965-08-03 Weston Laundry Machine Company Shirt presses

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2757832A (en) * 1954-02-04 1956-08-07 American Laundry Mach Co Pressing machine
US2757833A (en) * 1954-02-04 1956-08-07 American Laundry Mach Co Pressing machine
US3070268A (en) * 1959-05-25 1962-12-25 Unipress Company Multiple buck one-lay bosom press
US3198407A (en) * 1962-07-25 1965-08-03 Weston Laundry Machine Company Shirt presses

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3463367A (en) * 1967-01-23 1969-08-26 Harry D Forse Pressing machine
US3471067A (en) * 1967-01-31 1969-10-07 Mc Graw Edison Co Shirt pressing machine
US3473708A (en) * 1968-03-15 1969-10-21 Unipress Co Inc The Double buck garment drying apparatus
US3613969A (en) * 1970-05-05 1971-10-19 Harry D Forse Shirt press
US5012962A (en) * 1990-01-16 1991-05-07 American Laundry Machinery, Inc. Indexing mechanism for a mannequin carriage having a slidable, pivotable support and index bar moveable by a fluid cylinder for movement between a dressing position and a garment press
EP0438272A2 (en) * 1990-01-16 1991-07-24 American Laundry Machinery, Inc. Indexing mechanism for garment press
EP0438272A3 (en) * 1990-01-16 1992-02-19 American Laundry Machinery, Inc. Indexing mechanism for garment press
US5148955A (en) * 1991-06-17 1992-09-22 Sheldon Company Shielded inflatable side bags for shirt presser bag assembly
US5474216A (en) * 1994-04-15 1995-12-12 Harrod; Michael K. Method and apparatus for concurrently pressing the front and back of a shirt and finishing the sleeves through the use of a single source of air pressure

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