US3366230A - Dental instrument tray - Google Patents

Dental instrument tray Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3366230A
US3366230A US523076A US52307666A US3366230A US 3366230 A US3366230 A US 3366230A US 523076 A US523076 A US 523076A US 52307666 A US52307666 A US 52307666A US 3366230 A US3366230 A US 3366230A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
tray
instruments
section
tray section
dental
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US523076A
Inventor
Loran William
Original Assignee
Loran William
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Loran William filed Critical Loran William
Priority to US523076A priority Critical patent/US3366230A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3366230A publication Critical patent/US3366230A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C19/00Dental auxiliary appliances
    • A61C19/02Protective casings, e.g. boxes for instruments; Bags
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C5/00Filling or capping teeth
    • A61C5/40Implements for surgical treatment of the roots or nerves of the teeth; Nerve needles; Methods or instruments for medication of the roots

Description

Jan. 30, 1968 W. L ORAN v DENTAL INSTRUMENT TRAY 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Jan. 26, 1966 ATTORNEY Jan. 30, 1968 W. LORAN 3,366,230

DENTAL: INSTRUMENT TRAY V Filed Jan. 26, 1966 2 sheets-shew f.i

INVENTOR. W/LL/AM ORA/V United States Patent O 3,366,230 DENTAL INSTRUMENT` TRAY William Loran, 112 Janes St., Mill Valley, Calif. 94941 Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 381,062,

July 8, 1964. This application Jan. 26, 1966, Ser.

7 Claims. (Cl. 2116-635) ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A tray comprising separable sections constructed to receive dental instruments for sterilization and storage thereof and linally to present such instruments in an organized order for use by the dentist in an operating procedure performed thereby. One of the separable tray sections includes helical springs mounted upon a wire carrier extending therethrough and being adapted to receive and hold implements between their adjacent coils. At least one of the springs has its adjacent coils disposed in contiguous relation and it is bodily movable along the carrier so as to enable the contiguous coils to expand upon receipt ot the implements therebetween.

Disclosure This application is a continuation in part of my copending patent application, Ser. No. 381,062, tiled July 8, 1964, now Patent No. 3,285,409.

As in the case of such copending application, the present invention relates to a dental instrument tray and, more particularly, to a set-up tray for dental instruments and the like.

As explained in the aforementioned application, setup dentistry is taught as a part of all dental school curricula, but for a variety of reasons the order in which instruments are stored by the dental student is only incidentally related to the order in which he uses the instruments. Consequently, the dentist carries into private practice the habit of storing instruments in an order not completely organized for operating procedures, thereby causing substantial waste in the time required Afor gathering instruments from and replacing them in storage areas. In addition to such time wastage and the general confusion usually accompanying disorganization of this type, it is difficult to avoid instrument contamination since the repeated openings of the storage areas inherent in such lack of orderliness cause the areas to have questionable cleanliness.

In view of the foregoing, an object of the present invention is to provide a system of storage, transport, sterilization and presentation for use in which implements such as dental instruments are arranged in a predetermined order and are maintained therein during such enumerated functions.

Another object of the invention is that of providing an instrument tray adapted to receive and support a plurality of dental instruments and the like in an array convenient for use, such tray being employed during sterilization, storage and use of the instruments.

Still another object is in the provision of a system lfor storage and use of dental instruments in which the instruments are received and supported by such instrument tray, and in which the tray with the instruments thereon 3,356,239 Patented Jan. 30, 1968 ICC is wrapped in a cover and the resultant package sterilized, after which it may be stored in a suitable storage area; and the package subsequently unwrapped to expose the tray and instruments for use, at which time the wrapper may serve as a sterilized support area for the tray and instruments.

A further object is to provide a set-up tray for dental instruments and the like, and in which such tray is comprised of two parts or sections, one thereof being adapted to be removably supported by the other and substantially constrained thereon against lateral displacements, but being movable longitudinally with respect thereto so as to permit such movable part to be centered or otherwise oriented relative to the support section in accordance with the length requirements of instruments supported on the movable section.

Yet a further object is that of providing a set-up tray of the character described having means for separating cotton pellets one from another without contamination and with a simpe unidirectional movement of the hand; having also an attachment structure for holding rubber dam clamps to prevent inadvertent displacement thereof but which permits such clamps to be removed for use quickly and easily by rubber damp clamp forceps; having further a helical spring retainer adapted to receive and hold dental instruments between the adjacent coils thereof, and in which provision is made to permit expansion of the spring as the spaces between adjacent coils become lilled; and having additionally a scale for use in accurately adjusting the position of a depth control device along a dental instrument to thereby determine the permissible depth of insertion thereof into a dental or pulpa] canal.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the specification develops.

An embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE l is a perspective view of an instrument tray shown in association with a plurality of dental instruments;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective View of the tray enclosed in a wrapper;

FIGURE 3 is a transverse sectional view taken along the plane 3 3 of FIGURE l;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the instrument tray showing the separable sections thereof in spaced apart relation; and

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged, broken, top plan view of a portion of the lower tray section illustrating one of the coil spring retainers thereon.

The illustrative embodiment of the instrument tray shown in the drawings is a dental set-up tray and is designated in its entirety with the numeral 10. The tray 10 comprises a first lower tray section 11 and a second upper tray section 12. The tray section 11 shown is generally rectangular and is provided with a bottom wall 13 having a plurality of longitudinally spaced and upwardly offset ribs 14 therealong respectively defining recesses 15 along the under surface of such bottom wall.

Extending upwardly from the bottom wall 13 is a perimetric wall or lip 16 that increases significantly in vertical dimension along the longitudinal side walls of the tray, as shown at 17 and 18. Such upwardly enlarged wall portions 17 and 18 are essentially parallel and are adapted to receive and support the second tray section 12 thereon, as shown in FIGURES 1 and 3.

The tray section 11 is intended to receive and support a plurality of work implements such as the dental instruments illustrated in FIGURES l and 4; and the longitudinally spaced ribs 14 comprise a portion of the means utilized in such receipt and support of the instruments. Such ribs are particularly useful in supporting elongated work implements such as scissors, as shown best in FIG URE 4, at spaced apart locations therealong which enables ready grasping of each such instrument when removing it from the tray, Examples of other instruments that might be supported along the spaced apart ribs 14 are a saliva ejector and a rubber dam clamp forceps, The spaced ribs 14 also restrict longitudinal drifting of any small articles which might be positioned therebetween.

The tray section 11 is equipped adjacent the ends thereof with support structures 19 and 2t), each of which includes a pair of helical springs denoted 19a and 19h in the case of the structure 19, and 20a and 20h in the case of the structure 20. The spring structures 19 are coaxially and movably mounted upon a relatively stiff wire carrier 21 which extends through a plurality of eyes 21a, 2lb and 21e formed in the bottom wall 13 of the tray in any conventional manner, as in a stamping operation. In this event, the ribs 14 and perimetric wall or lip 16 may be formed in the same stamping operation. In a similar manner, the springs 20 are coaxially and movably mounted upon a relatively stiff wire carrier 22 which extends through a plurality of eyes 22a, 22b and 22C formed inthe bottom wall of the tray.

The eyes 21a and 21C are located quite close to the adjacent longitudinal edges of the tray to afford the greatest space for the support structures, and these eyes face in the same direction. The eye 2lb faces in the opposite direction, and though located intermediate the eyes 21a and 21C, it is not centrally disposed but is offset to the left or toward the eye 21a, as viewed in FIGURES l and 4. In a similar manner, the eyes 22a and 22C are disposed in close proximity to the respectively adjacent longitudinal edges of the tray and face in the same direction. The eye 22b faces in the opposite direction and is offset from the center of the tray section toward the eye 22a.

The springs 19a and 20a may terminate at the opposite ends thereof in substantial abutment with the associated eyes, although such relationship is not essential, and the coils of such springs are spaced apart to provide a gap therebetween. In contrast, the springs 19b and 2Gb have closed coils so that each turn thereof is disposed in substantially contiguous relation with the turns adjacent thereto, and these springs respectively terminate in spaced relation with the eyes associated therewith to enable the coils to separate and the springs to elongate correspondingly when dental instruments are inserted between adjacent coils.

As shown in FIGURES 1 and 4 in particular, a variety of instruments such as dental drills or burs are adapted to be received and supported by the spring structures 19 and 20. It is also seen in these figures that a variety of instruments, or work implements generally, may be supported along the bottom wall 13 of the lowermost tray as, for example, the illustrated cotton rolls and cotton pellets and the amalgam condenser or dental contra angle handpiece. For purposes of identification, the dental burs are denoted with the numeral 23, the cotton rolls with the numeral 24, the cotton pellets are designated 25, and the amalgam condenser is denoted 26.

As shown in FIGURES l and 4, the upwardly enlarged wall portion 17 is provided therealong with a notch or recess 25a of generally V-shaped configuration. This notch defines separation structure useful in separating one cotton pellet 25 from a group of interconnected pellets as each such pellet is needed. This separation can be accomplished by gripping one pellet with a suitable tool and passing it through the notch 25a which is sufficiently large to permit one such pellet to pass therethrough, but prevents movement of the remaining pellets. Accordingly, the constraint applied to the group of pellets will permit the one gripped pellet to be separated therefrom.

The tray section 12 is also of generally rectangular configuration and has an essentially planar bottom wall 27 equipped along each of the transverse edges thereof with a plurality of channels or recesses separated from each other by intervening ribs. For purposes of identification, the recesses along one transverse edge of the wall 27 are designated with the numeral 28a and those along the opposite edge with the numeral 28E); and in a similar manner, the respectively intervening ribs are denoted 29a and 2912, The recesses 28a and 23!) are oriented in aligned pairs for the purpose of receiving and supporting therein the elongated dental instruments 39 which, in the illustrative form shown, comprise two pluggers, one burnisher, and one carver.

The tray section 12. is turned upwardly and is then folded downwardly along each longitudinal edge thereof so as to define a pair of downwardly opening channels 31 and 32 which slidably receive therein the upper edges of the walls 17 and 18 of the support section 11. In that the channel 31 is bordered on each side thereof by generally vertical wall portions 33 and 34 and, in a similar manner, the channel 32 is bordered by wall portions 35 and 36, the tray section 12 is constrained on the tray section 11 against lateral displacements with respect thereto but is substantially free to slide longitudinally therealong. As a result of such arrangement, the tray section 12 can be appropriatey located so that the elongated dental instruments 3f) will not project beyond either end of the lower tray section 11. This channel arrangement also permits the tray section 12 to be readily removed from the tray section 11, as shown in FIGURE 4, to permit all of the dental instruments to be available for convenient pick-up by the dentist; and the wall portions 34 and 36 are made shorter than the walls 17 and 18 associated therewith to permit the fingers to be inserted under such shorter wall portions to lift the tray section 12.

Removably supported upon the lower tray section 11 is an attachment structure 37 adapted to hold a plurality of rubber dam clamps (two groups thereof being shown in FIGURE 4, each group being denoted with the numeral 38). to prevent inadvertent displacements thereof, but which permits such clamps to be removed for use quickly and easily by rubber darn clamp forceps. The attachment structure 37 includes an inverted, generally Ushaped channel member comprised by a pair of integrally formed walls 39 and 40. The walls 39 and 40 are spaced apart to define a downwardly facing channel therebetween dimensioned to snugly receive the wall 18 of the tray section 11 therein. The wall members 39 and 40 may converge slightly along their lower edges so as to effect a frictional grip with the wall 18 inserted therebetween, which frictional grip restricts movement of the attachment structure with respect to the lower tray section.

Extending inwardly from the wall 40 of the attachment structure are a plurality of longitudinally spaced holders 41, each of which comprises a generally planar arm 42 turned upwardly at its inner end and enlarged thereat to form an arcuate stop 43. Each of the rubber dam clamps is itself somewhat U-shaped in configuration, and the free ends thereof are biased toward each other because of the resilient clamping force inherent in the clamp structure. Each clamp is readily placed on a holder 41 at the time that the tray is being equipped with the various implements, and the holders retain the clamps thereon during normal use of the tray. In this respect, displacements of a clamp along the associated arm are limited in one direction by the wall 40 of the attachment structure, and in the opposite direction by the associated stop 43. Removal of each clamp when need therefor arises is also readily accomplished as by means of rubber dam clamp forceps which, without disengagement from the clamp, are then used to position the clamp in the patients mouth.

Since the instrument tray is to be used by the dentist during an operating procedure and can be equipped conveniently with instruments selected for particular operations, it will be advantageous to provide the tray with a measuring scale because such scale is especially useful in endodontic operations in which it may be necessary to control the depth of penetration of an instrument into root canals and the like. Such a scale is illustrated in FIG- URES 1 and 4 in association with the tray section 12.

The scale is denoted with the numeral 44 and is disposed along the generally planar surface 27 of the tr-ay section 12. The scale 44, in the specific embodiment shown, is calibrated in millimeters with each division therealong being equivalent to one millimeter. The division marks bear a predetermined measured relationship with respect to that edge of the tray section 12 providing the recesses 28a and ribs 29a therealong. More particularly, the scale 44 is aligned with one of the recesses 28a and, in a typical embodiment, the first division mark along the scale may be 20 millimeters from the terminal edge of the aligned recess 28a. Accordingly, the location of a depth control indicator along an elongated dental instrument, such as a root canal file, reamer, broach, needle, spreader or plugger, can be measured -by positioning the same against the edge of the tray section 12 and reading the position of the instrument tip along the scale 44.

All of the dental instruments must be sterilized before use, and necessarily then the instrument tray must also be sterilized to prevent contamination of the instruments supported thereon. The subject instrument tray is particularly suited for the three separate operations of sterilizing the instruments, thereafter storing the same, and then presenting the instruments in a predetermined order for use by the dentist. In this connection, the tray and in struments are Washed after each use, the instruments are then placed Within the tray as shown in FIGURE l, and the instrument-equipped tray is then enclosed in a wrapper 45 as illustrated in FIGURE 2. The wrapper 45 may be toweling made of muslin or paper, or it may be formed of any other suitable material. After being wrapped about the tray 10, the wrapper 45 may be maintained in the closed position thereof illustrated `in any convenient manner, such as by pins or the tape strip 46 illustrated.

After the package has been formed, the entire unit can be sterilized in the usual manner as, for example, in a dry heat sterilizer or in an autoclave. Following sterilization, the package is placed bodily in a suitable storage area and may -be labeled either before or after sterilization so that the precise contents of the package are known. FIG- URE 2 is indicative of both the steps of sterilizing and storing as well as of the package per se. When it is desired to use the instruments, the entire package is removed from storage and placed on a work table. The wrapper 45 is then opened, and the tray section 12 removed from the section 11, all as shown in FIGURE 4..Since the wrapper 44 has been sterilized, it provides a sterile surface for supporting the tray sections and instruments and also provides a sterile area on which the instruments may be wiped.

The tray 10 may be formed of any suitable material and the two sections 11 and 12 may or may not comprise the same material. A metal such as stainless steel or aluminum has been found especially suitable in that they are good heat conductors and facilitate the transmission of heat uniformly to the various instruments and work implements in heat-sterilizing the same. The precise configurations of the tray sections can be provided by any suitable and well known fabrication process and, for example, if the tray sections are formed of metal, the illustrated configurations may be provided in a simple stamping operation.

As indicated hereinbefore, various types of instrument set-ups or arrangements may be placed Within the tray sections, and the choice of instruments and the number thereof will depend'upon the particular use intended by the dentist. For example, a typical arrangement is a rubber dam set-up, in which event the attachment structure 37 will be mounted upon the tray section 11, as shown in FIGURES 1, 3 and 4. Accordingly, rubber darn clamps 38 will be positioned upon the attachment structure and the rest of the set-up could include a rubber dam scissor, saliva ejector, rubber dam clamp forceps, punch, beaver tail burnisher, rubber dam frame, etc.

Another typical arrangement is the amalgam and silicate set-up and, in the event of this arrangement, the included instruments could be burs supported between certain coils of the spring structures 19 and 20, wedges, condensing points, cotton rolls, cotton pellets, power driven amalgam condensing instrument, vacuum tip, matrix device, etc. Other set-ups which might be used are the gingivectomy, alveolectomy, suture, etc. Quite evidently, it is not necessary that all instruments needed in an operation be included in such set-up. For example, it might be desirable to omit a mirror, cotton pliers, and explorer from each set-up tray and to provide such implements in a separate packet.

The hand instrument tray section 12 illustrated in the drawing is adapted to receive and support thereon a predetermined number of instruments 30 usually suiiicient in quantity to satisfy the set-up requirements for treating one patient. However, should a greater number of instruments be required or desired, a second tray section 12 is simply supported upon the first tray section 12 as indicated in phantom in FIGURE 3. It may be noted that the depending legs or wall portions 34 and 36 of the tray section 12 (see FIGURE 3) diverge outwardly and downwardly so that the openings or channels 31 and 32 are slightly larger along the lower open extremities thereof than along their inner closed extremities. Therefore, one tray section 12 may be readily disposed upon another tray section 12. The extra length of the wall portions 34 and 36 augment the inherent stability of one tray section 12 upon another.

The instrument tray 10 may .be used also as a set-up tray for general medical, ophthalmic and veterinary purposes following the arrangement heretofore described. In such instances, the spring structures 19 and 20 could be used to support and retain relatively small instruments such as needles and scalpels.

In use of the tray, a plurality of instruments which comprise those most frequently used in the examination and/ or treatment of a patient or certain class of patients are positioned in the tray sections 11 and 12 after such instruments have been washed. The instruments are arranged in a predetermined order such as the progression of use thereof because this serves as an added convenience for the user of the tray. The tray 10 comprising the section 11 and one or more sections 12 is then enclosed in a wrapper 45 and the entire package placed within a conventional sterilizer for the time period required to effect complete sterilization thereof. The wrapper may first be secured in closed position, if this is desired, as heretofore described.

After the package is removed from the sterilizer, it may be bodily placed Within a suitable storage space such as a drawer or cabinet and left in such space until used. For use, the package is removed from the storage space and placed upon the usual work table, and the wrapper 45 is then unfolded to expose the tray 10. The wrapper 45 continues to isolate the tray and instruments from any contamination of such support surface and also affords a sterile material on which the instruments may be wiped. After a patient has been treated, the instruments are again washed and located in their appropriate positions on the tray, the instrument-equipped tray is enclosed in a wrapper 45, and the entire package is then sterilized prior to storage.

The spring or support structures 19 and 20 are especially suited for receipt of a variety of implements of different thickness or cross-sectional area and shape. In this respect, the coils of each of the springs 19h and 2Gb are closely spaced and, in fact, may be in contiguous relation. Thus, these springs are especially suited to the receipt of very thin instruments such as needles and the like but are not necessarily restricted to the receipt of instruments of this type. That is to say, each of the springs 19h and 20b is shorter in length than the space defined between the respectively associated eyes 2lb and Zic, and 22b and 22e so that the spring can expand substantially as a plurality of relatively small articles are inse1ted lbetween adjacent coils thereof, or as several larger-diameter instruments are inserted therebetween, or both. Nevertheless, the expected procedure is to locate needles and similar thin articles between the coils of the springs 19h and Ztlb.

The springs 19a and 20a are not so tightly wound and the successive coils of each may be spaced somewhat one from the others. Accordingly, each of these springs may occupy substantially the entire space between the respectively associated eyes Zla and 2lb, and 22a and 22b because expansion of at least a substantial number of the coils is accommodated by the spring itself. Thus, since coils of the springs 19a and 2da are not in contiguous relation, these springs are more susceptible to the receipt of somewhat larger instruments and implements.

The attachment structure 37 can be removed when not needed for a rubber dam set-up simply by displacing the structure from the wall 18 of the tray section 11. However, this is unnecessary and the attachment structure might be retained upon the tray section 11 even though not required for a particular set-up. The separation structure in the form of the notch 25a and the scale 44 are permanent components respectively associated with the tray sections 1]. and 12. Thus, both of these elements are available for the dentists convenience whenever he may need to use the same.

The instrument tray in its entirety serves the convenience of the dentist. For example, and in addition to the general convenience of an orderly presentation of instruments, the tray section 12 has depending side walls 34 and 36 which are significantly shorter than the respectively associated side walls 17 and 18 of the tray section 1i. As a result, the dentist can, with facility, place his fingers beneath the lower edges of the walls 34 and 36 so as to grip the tray section l2 and remove it from juxtaposition with the tray section El. Further, the support elements 14 along the bottom wall of the tray section 11 are spaced apart and therefore support elongated implements, such as the scissors illustrated, at spaced apart locations so that the dentist can grasp such irnplements which are effectively elevated for this purpose by the raised ribs 14. Also, the tray section l2 is relatively short so that the instruments 30 extend beyond the terminal edges thereof which permits such instruments to be lifted readily from the tray section; and it also permits vapor to fiow readily between the upper and lower sections during sterilization.

The tray arrangement described provides a uniform or standardized instrument set-up instantaneously available for each type of operation to be performed. As a result, the dentist or his assistant need no longer search in different rooms or cabinets for required instruments; and it will no longer be necessary to stop work to search for forgotten instruments. Neither will it be necessary to find an unoccupied storage location for each instrument after use and sterilization thereof and then transfer each instrument thereto with awkward tongs which, along with the storage area, may or may not be sterile. In having `all of the instruments sterile and readily available, the operator is able to work at his highest etiiciency and the patient gains in having quick, calm attention under as nearly aseptic conditions as possible.

While in the foregoing specification, an embodiment of the invention has been set forth in considerable detail for purposes of making an adequate disclosure thereof, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that numerous changes may be made in such details without departing from the spirit and principles of the invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A set-up tray for dental instruments and the like, comprising a first tray section having a bottom wall adapted to receive and support dental implements and the like of various configuration and dimension, an elongated carrier secured at spaced-apart locations to said first tray section, a helical spring substantially shorter than and mounted circumjacent said carrier and being axially displaceable therealong and having a yplurality of successive coils disposed in substantially contiguous relation to receive and support relatively small implements therebetween, the substantially contiguous coils of said springs being axially displaceable bodily along said carrier to enable adjacent coils to spread upon insertion of implements therebetween, whereby said spring is able to accommodate a great plurality of such implements by expanding along said carrier, a second tray section having a bottom wall adapted to receive and support dental implements and the like of various configuration and dimension, and support structure for removably supporting said second tray section upon said first tray section with said bottom walls being disposed in spaced-apart relation to provide a predetermined clearance therebetween for accommodating dental implements supported upon the bottom wall of said first tray section.

2. The set-up tray according to claim 1 in which said first tray section is provided with a pair of upwardly extending side walls forming a part of the aforesaid support structure for `removably supporting said second tray section, one of said side walls having therealong a recess of restricted extent at one location to enable cotton pellets and the like to be separated one from another by relative displacement thereof through said recess adjacent such restricted location.

3. The set-up tray according to claim 2 in which said recess is a generally V-shaped notch.

4. The set-up tray according to claim 1 in which said first tray section is provided with a pair of upwardly extending side walls forming a part of the aforesaid structure for removably supporting said second tray section, and further comprising an attachment structure removably supported on one of said upwardly extending side walls and being equipped with a plurality of holders adapted to provide a mounting for rubber dam clamps and the like.

5. The set-up tray according to claim 4 in which each of said holders comprises an arm equipped at the end thereof with a stop, each of said arms being adapted to receive such a rubber dam clamp thereon and the associated stop being adapted to prevent inadvertent displacement of such clamp therefrom in one direction.

6. The set-up tray according to claim 1 and further comprising an additional helical spring having a plurality of successive coils disposed in spaced-apart relation so as to receive and support relatively large implements therebetween, said additional helical spring being coaxially circumjacent said elongated carrier in axially spaced relation with said first-mentioned spring and .being fixed with respect to said carrier so as to prevent relative axial displacements therebetween.

7. The set-up tray according to claim 6 in which said first tray section is equipped with a plurality of mounting elements comprising three eyes struck therefrom and certain of which are oriented to face in opposite transverse directions relative to said carrier and engaging the same at spaced-apart locations therealong so as to constrain the same against inadvertent transverse displacements, two of said eyes being respectively disposed adjacent edge portions of said first tray section and facing in the same direction and the other of said eyes being intermediately located and facing in the opposite direction and being off- 9 Set from the center of said rst tray section toward one of such two eyes to establish different distances from it to each of the other eyes, the aforesaid spring having the contiguous coils being located between the eyes having the greater distance therebetween.

References Cited UNTED STATES PATENTS 2,682,950 7/19541` Mercer et a1 206-72 Kaufman et al. 206-72 Graham 24--1-0 Benton.

Aimes 211-60 Lotterer.

JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

THERON E. CONDON, Examiner.

3/ 1939 Roehm 206--72 10 I. M. CASKIE, Assistant Examiner.

US523076A 1966-01-26 1966-01-26 Dental instrument tray Expired - Lifetime US3366230A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US523076A US3366230A (en) 1966-01-26 1966-01-26 Dental instrument tray

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US523076A US3366230A (en) 1966-01-26 1966-01-26 Dental instrument tray

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3366230A true US3366230A (en) 1968-01-30

Family

ID=24083556

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US523076A Expired - Lifetime US3366230A (en) 1966-01-26 1966-01-26 Dental instrument tray

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3366230A (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2539614A1 (en) * 1983-01-24 1984-07-27 Kaltenbach & Voigt Device receiving dental surgery instruments
US20080000910A1 (en) * 2006-06-16 2008-01-03 Innovative Surgical Solutions, L.L.C. Clamp-On Tray for Neurosurgical Patties
US20100040994A1 (en) * 2008-08-18 2010-02-18 Johnson William B Reciprocal Reverse Rotation Endodontic File
US20100174415A1 (en) * 2007-04-20 2010-07-08 Mark Humayun Sterile surgical tray
US20110190690A1 (en) * 2007-04-20 2011-08-04 Doheny Eye Institute Independent surgical center
US8568391B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2013-10-29 Doheny Eye Institute Sterile surgical tray
US20140346072A1 (en) * 2013-05-24 2014-11-27 Daniel R. Jacobson Protective Box for Surgery
US9060913B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2015-06-23 H & M Innovations, Llc Surgical table magnetic instrument holder
US9314315B2 (en) * 2014-01-10 2016-04-19 Wong Technology LLC Device for holding small dental parts
US9771196B1 (en) * 2011-01-25 2017-09-26 Terri Lynn Speed Dental maintenance kit
US9770316B1 (en) * 2011-01-25 2017-09-26 Terri Lynn Speed Dental maintenance kit for animals
US9962226B2 (en) 2013-11-28 2018-05-08 Alcon Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Ophthalmic surgical systems, methods, and devices
US10350020B2 (en) 2015-05-01 2019-07-16 Chris Geiger Medical tray assembly

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US375743A (en) * 1888-01-03 Ear-rack for pens
US1293002A (en) * 1918-11-05 1919-02-04 David W Benton Pen-rack.
US2150784A (en) * 1937-08-06 1939-03-14 Frederick F Roehm Receptacle and brush holder
US2490141A (en) * 1946-07-25 1949-12-06 Victor G Lotterer Sales book pencil holder
US2682950A (en) * 1951-06-04 1954-07-06 Norman J Mercer Kitchen utensil holder
US2703091A (en) * 1954-11-29 1955-03-01 Kaufman Samuel Ash tray
US3162313A (en) * 1962-06-27 1964-12-22 Francis M Aimes Devices including an openwork base frame for providing hanger support of writing implements

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US375743A (en) * 1888-01-03 Ear-rack for pens
US1293002A (en) * 1918-11-05 1919-02-04 David W Benton Pen-rack.
US2150784A (en) * 1937-08-06 1939-03-14 Frederick F Roehm Receptacle and brush holder
US2490141A (en) * 1946-07-25 1949-12-06 Victor G Lotterer Sales book pencil holder
US2682950A (en) * 1951-06-04 1954-07-06 Norman J Mercer Kitchen utensil holder
US2703091A (en) * 1954-11-29 1955-03-01 Kaufman Samuel Ash tray
US3162313A (en) * 1962-06-27 1964-12-22 Francis M Aimes Devices including an openwork base frame for providing hanger support of writing implements

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2539614A1 (en) * 1983-01-24 1984-07-27 Kaltenbach & Voigt Device receiving dental surgery instruments
US20080000910A1 (en) * 2006-06-16 2008-01-03 Innovative Surgical Solutions, L.L.C. Clamp-On Tray for Neurosurgical Patties
US7665606B2 (en) * 2006-06-16 2010-02-23 Gaillard Johnnie M Clamp-on tray for neurosurgical patties
US10070934B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2018-09-11 Doheny Eye Institute Sterile surgical tray
US20100174415A1 (en) * 2007-04-20 2010-07-08 Mark Humayun Sterile surgical tray
US20110190690A1 (en) * 2007-04-20 2011-08-04 Doheny Eye Institute Independent surgical center
US9730833B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2017-08-15 Doheny Eye Institute Independent surgical center
US8568391B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2013-10-29 Doheny Eye Institute Sterile surgical tray
US8623000B2 (en) * 2007-04-20 2014-01-07 Doheny Eye Institute Independent surgical center
US9526580B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2016-12-27 Doheny Eye Institute Sterile surgical tray
US9463070B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2016-10-11 Doheny Eye Institute Sterile surgical tray
US10363165B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2019-07-30 Doheny Eye Institute Independent surgical center
US20100040994A1 (en) * 2008-08-18 2010-02-18 Johnson William B Reciprocal Reverse Rotation Endodontic File
US8047842B2 (en) * 2008-08-18 2011-11-01 Johnson William B Reciprocal reverse rotation endodontic file
US9771196B1 (en) * 2011-01-25 2017-09-26 Terri Lynn Speed Dental maintenance kit
US9770316B1 (en) * 2011-01-25 2017-09-26 Terri Lynn Speed Dental maintenance kit for animals
US9060913B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2015-06-23 H & M Innovations, Llc Surgical table magnetic instrument holder
US9414893B2 (en) * 2013-05-24 2016-08-16 Daniel R. Jacobson Protective box for surgery
US20140346072A1 (en) * 2013-05-24 2014-11-27 Daniel R. Jacobson Protective Box for Surgery
US9962226B2 (en) 2013-11-28 2018-05-08 Alcon Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Ophthalmic surgical systems, methods, and devices
US9314315B2 (en) * 2014-01-10 2016-04-19 Wong Technology LLC Device for holding small dental parts
US10350020B2 (en) 2015-05-01 2019-07-16 Chris Geiger Medical tray assembly

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3451133A (en) Dispensing holder for dental burs
US3034507A (en) Intracutaneous injection device
KR940005297B1 (en) Dental root canal shaping file
US4269310A (en) Aseptic container and manipulator for a urethral catheter having an integral antiseptic solution and lubricant
US5082111A (en) Surgical instrument holder
US1120549A (en) Catheter-case.
US5384103A (en) Instrument tray
US2890519A (en) Surgical spring clip forceps
US5528811A (en) Article and method for safely mounting a blade on a surgical scalpel
ES2271655T3 (en) Measuring structure for surgical instruments.
US5222600A (en) Autoclave pouch
US20060272979A1 (en) Surgical Tray
US4798292A (en) Sterilization, storage, and presentation container for surgical instruments
US5228851A (en) Single-use disposable prophylactic elastic sleeve
US4408692A (en) Sterile cover for instrument
KR100846475B1 (en) Sterile container for medical applications
NL1014480C2 (en) An apparatus for performing an endodontic treatment.
US5531754A (en) Retractable surgical blade device and associated method
US2834459A (en) Absorbent dressing package
US4930660A (en) Combination working tray and sterilization case for medical instruments
JP2547415B2 (en) Catheter - ether curved holding device
DE2933677C2 (en)
EP0072171B1 (en) Cartridge for hemostatic clips
US2790547A (en) Laboratory tray for medical technicians
US3819039A (en) Suture holder