US3362186A - Cooling device for fluids - Google Patents

Cooling device for fluids Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3362186A
US3362186A US54243966A US3362186A US 3362186 A US3362186 A US 3362186A US 54243966 A US54243966 A US 54243966A US 3362186 A US3362186 A US 3362186A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
container
layer
means
fluid
portion
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Albert S Patterson
Original Assignee
Albert S. Patterson
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Albert S. Patterson filed Critical Albert S. Patterson
Priority to US54243966 priority Critical patent/US3362186A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3362186A publication Critical patent/US3362186A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D5/00Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, using the cooling effect of natural or forced evaporation
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25DREFRIGERATORS; COLD ROOMS; ICE-BOXES; COOLING OR FREEZING APPARATUS NOT COVERED BY ANY OTHER SUBCLASS
    • F25D7/00Devices using evaporation effects without recovery of the vapour
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25DREFRIGERATORS; COLD ROOMS; ICE-BOXES; COOLING OR FREEZING APPARATUS NOT COVERED BY ANY OTHER SUBCLASS
    • F25D31/00Other cooling or freezing apparatus
    • F25D31/002Liquid coolers, e.g. beverage cooler

Description

Jan 9, 1968 A. s. PATTERSON 3,362,186

COOLING DEVICE FOR FLUIDS Original Filed May 28, 1964 United States Patent G l 3,362,186 COOLING DEVICE FOR FLUIDS Albert S. Patterson, 504 W. 112th St., New York, NJK'.k 10025 Continuation of application Ser. No. 370,822, May 28, 1964. This application Mar. 10, 1966, Ser. No. 542,439 9 Claims. (Cl. 62--316) This is a continuation of application Ser. No. 370,822 tiled May 28, 1964, now abandoned.

My present invention relates to the broad held of refrigeration. The knowledge is common that much heat is absorbed in the evaporation of a liquid (approximately 1050 B.t.u. per pound in the case of water). Many have reduced this principle to practice in devious ways. Each instance has been accompanied by certain disadvantages or limitations, however, such as mechanical failure and chemical corrosion, and the capability of cooling only one type of fluid.

By taking increased advantage of the phenomenon of evaporation into air in an improved and unique manner, then, it is the object of this invention to provide cooling means not only less subject to the above hazards but which offers several distinct advantages. One of these is structural versatility and, through a number of variations and embodiments, its benefits of greater economy and eliiciency are extended to several devices, ranging from only a simple form to others more complex in situations of greater demand, each within the scope of its purpose. Specifically included in these operational beneits is the appreciable reduction in water and/or power requirements incidental to the operation of particular heat-extracting apparatuses. Still another advantage is relative ease of manufacture. These and other advantages will become apparent in the following speciiication, illustrated, in part, by the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a central vertical sectional view of a iirst embodiment.

FIGURE 2 is an elevational view partly in section of a modication of FIG. 1.

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view of a second embodiment.

FIGURE 3A is a fragmentary section at 3A-3A on FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view of a third embodiment.

FIGURE 4A is a fragmentary section at 4A--4A- on FIGURE 4.

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view of a fourth embodiment.

Turning now to FIGURE l, a simplilied illustration of a water-dispensing unit suitable for a drinking fountain in a restaurant, comprising a container 12 having an inlet 16 and an outlet 18, the outlet being controlled by a tap 24. The container 12 is provided with an absorbent layer 20 covering the entire surface of the wall 22. The absorbent material 20 is shaped in a manner to form a small basin 21 just below the outlet of the tap 24. Waste water 26a drawn from outlet 18 falls into basin 21 and spreads through the absorbent material 20 and is there evaporated, thereby absorbing heat from the container 12 and reducing the temperature of the container and later flowing water 26, the subject fluid to be cooled and consumed.

In this embodiment, the container 12 is preferably coneshaped to obtain several operational advantages. The interior decreases in capacity progressively toward the apex, and it is here that waste water 26a first contacts the absorbent layer 20 and will be most thoroughly supplied therewith for evaporation. The ow of contained water 26 is theerfore from a warmer to the colder section. Concomitantly, however, the conical shape assures uniformity of distribution of waste water 26a, with basin 21 at the apex encouraging quick permeation for maximum cooling;

The absorbent layer 20 is preferably comprised of an in- 3,362,186 Patented Jan. 9, 1968 ICC organic substance, such as mineral wool or open-cell plastic sponge, to permit ready evaporation and quick cooling. Functionally, it acts to break up the waste water into minute droplets, thereby further favoring evaporation, yet it holds the liquid in contiguity' with container 12 until evaporation occurs, thus offering maximum etticiency. This feature will assume greater importance in later igures. Moreover, during periods of disuse the absorbent layer 20 may become dry, at which times said layer will serve as a thermal insulator.

To avoid needless repetition, certain parts common to subsequent figures and performing essentially the same function will be given the same reference characters with prefixes coinciding with the ligure number.

In FIGURE 2 the modification differs from FIGURE l principally in that container 212 is elongated and helically convoluted. Layer 220 is held in place by supporting member 230, which may be a plastic screening or other suitable foraminous corrosion-resistant material. Conceived of as a consumer-operated drinking fountain, a customary louvered housing 238 supports a collector pan 228 usual with such units just under outlet 218. Unconsumed waste Water 226:1 falls through openings 229 therein and onto absorbent layer 220. In the event the supply of waste water becomes excessive, lower collector pan 234 carries away excess 226b through drain 236.

In FIGURE 3 the embodiment differs both in configuration and operation. Although container 312 is elongated, the convolution is serpentine. A hollow, arbitrarilyshaped central passage 341 is formed through which air may be forced by blower 340, actuated by driving means 342, since it is known that increasing air volume promotes evaporation. Pairings 350 enhance blower etiiciency. A penetrating evaporative liquid 326a, preferably water, is provided to absorbent layer 320 by mechanical means 346, which includes piping 358 and spray nozzles 329. As in FIGURE 2, the absorbent layer bridges the convolutions so that there is a continuous outer surface with no intervening gaps so that all the liquid 326a is captured and absorbed.

Conceived of as adaptable to such well known closedcircuit industrial services as cooling jacket water, lubricating oil, or the condensing coils of a sizable air conditioning system, means are further provided for automatically adjusting the fluctuations in demand. This may be accomplished in one instance by regulating the output of blower 340 through control means 344, which may include a heat-sensing element 352 disposed in or near inlet 316, and which acts as a speed control for the motor driving means 342 by varying the power input from energy supply 354 through circuit 356. Circuit 360 connects heat-sensing element 352 with motor-driving means 342. In a second instance, control means 348 may include a moisture-sensing element 362, a solenoid 364, a lever 366, a power source 368 and circuitry 363 and 370, whereby the degree of saturation of layer 320 may be regulated. Here, screening 330 may serve protectively.

FIGURE 4 illustrates an instance in which advantage may be taken of existing conditions favorable to the operation of another embodiment of the invention, such as a ventilation duct 438, within which an increased passage of air is normally assured. As shown, a multiplicity of air passages 441 are created by a plurality of longitudinally arranged and interconnected banks of serpentine coils 412, which may represent the condensing coils of an air conditioning unit, accommodated by fairings 450. The advantages of this arrangement, especially as applied to condensing coils, are not restricted to such an installation, however.

The means for providing the penetrating evaporative liquid (not shown) in this embodiment is seen to differ from the preceding in FIGURE 4A. Feeder tubes 458 branch off from means 446 into the spaces between `coil passes of convoluted container 412 and supply evaporative water to absorbent layers 420, which are conveniently rectangular in shape in this instance, through apertures 429.

In FIGURE the principal difference is that absorbent and porous layer or member 520 is transversely arranged in 4the duct 538, through which air is drawn. This can produce an air-washing effect.

Still other modifications and adaptations will occur to those skilled in the arts to which the invention relates. Hence, it should be understood that I do not wish to be limited to the exact details of construction shown and set forth in this specification.

I claim:

1. A cooling device for fluids comprising: a container for the subject fluid to be cooled having an inlet for admitting the fluid into the container and means for withdrawing the said fluid therefrom; and an absorbent layer in effective and substantially continuous contact with at least a portion of the exterior of said container in such a manner as to be free of intervening gaps with respect to the configuration of the container, other than when the layer is capable of rectilinearity in two dimensions at one surface thereof; and means for providing an evaporative liquid to said layer from a source independent of said inlet, said layer being substantially exposed to freely circulating air, the subject uid to be cooled being isolated from the evaporative liquid while within the container and being capable of flowing freely therethrough.

2. A claim 1 structure having electrically-activated means for automatically controlling the feed of the evaporative liquid.

3. A claim 1 structure having means for automatically controlling the air volume contacting at least a portion of said absorbent layer.

4. A cooling device for uds comprising: a convoluted conduit for conducting a subject fluid to be cooled, and an absorbent layer in effective and substantially continuous contact with at least a portion of the exterior of said conduit and bridging at least two of the convolutions and being substantially and operatively exposed to air, and an evaporative liquid provided to said layer.

5. A claim 4 structure having electrically-activated means for automatically controlling the feed of the evaporative liquid.

6. A claim 4 structure having means for automatically controlling the air volume contacting at least a portion of said absorbent layer.

7. In a Ventilating system, the combination: a portion of an elongated conduit for conducting a fluid to be cooled that yconstitutes a closed circuit, an absorbent layer contacting the exterior of said portion of said conduit and means for providing an evaporative liquid to said layer; and a portion of said ventilation duct; said conduit being so disposed that at least a portion of said absorbent layer contacting said conduit is exposed lto the gas within said portion of said ventilation duct.

8, In a Ventilating system, the combination: a convoluted conduit for conducting a fluid to Ebe cooled, and an absorbent layer contacting at least a portion of the exterior of said conduit and bridging at least two of lthe convolutions and means for providing an evaporative liquid to said layer from a source removed from said conduit; and a portion of a ventilation duct; said conduit being so disposed that at least a portion of said absorbent layer contacting said conduit is exposed to the gas within said portion of said ventilation duct.

9. In a cooling device for fluids comprising a container for the subject fluid to be cooled and having a housing surrounding at least a portion of the container, the improvement` consisting of an absorbent layer in effective and substantially continuous contact with at least a portion of the exterior of said container in such a manner as to be free of intervening gaps with respect to the configuration of said container, the said housing being spaced apart from Ithe major portion of the absorbent layer, and an evaporative liquid provided to said layer and being operatively exposed to air.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 964,734 7/1910 Ammons 62-17l 1,428,661 9/ 1922 Richardson 62-310 1,552,953 9/ 1925 Rickards 62-316 1,904,686 4/ 1933 Humphreys 62-316 1,927,521 9/1933 Laucaster 62-171 2,020,604 11/ 1935 Gruver 62-3 16 2,266,321 12/1941 Holder 62-171 2,342,841 2/ 1944 Carraway 62-176 2,653,803 9/1953 Bauer 62-314 3,125,868 3/1964 Guarino 62-316 3,130,557 4/1964 McFarlau 62--171 WILLIAM I. WYE, Primary Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A COOLING DEVICE FOR FLUIDS COMPRISING: A CONTAINER FOR THE SUBJECT FLUID TO BE COOLED HAVING AN INLET FOR ADMITTING THE FLUID INTO THE CONTAINER AND MEANS FOR WITHDRAWING THE SAID FLUID THEREFROM; AND AN ABSORBENT LAYER IN EFFECTIVE AND SUBSTANTIALLY CONTINUOUS CONTACT WITH AT LEAST A PORTION OF THE EXTERIOR OF SAID CONTAINER IN SUCH A MANNER AS TO BE FREE OF INTERVENING GAPS WITH RESPECT TO THE CONFIGURATION OF THE CONTAINER, OTHER THAN WHEN THE LAYER IS CAPABLE OF RECTILINEARITY IN TWO DIMENSIONS AT ONE SURFACE THEREOF; AND MEANS FOR PROVIDING AN EVAPORATIVE LIQUID TO SAID LAYER FROM A SOURCE INDEPENDENT OF SAID INLET, SAID LAYER BEING SUBSTANTIALLY EXPOSED TO FREELY CIRCULATING AIR, THE SUBJECT FLUID TO BE COOLED BEING ISOLATED FROM THE EVAPORATIVE LIQUID WHILE WITHIN THE CONTAINER AND BEING CAPABLE OF FLOWING FREELY THERETHROUGH.
US54243966 1966-03-10 1966-03-10 Cooling device for fluids Expired - Lifetime US3362186A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US54243966 US3362186A (en) 1966-03-10 1966-03-10 Cooling device for fluids

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US54243966 US3362186A (en) 1966-03-10 1966-03-10 Cooling device for fluids

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3362186A true US3362186A (en) 1968-01-09

Family

ID=24163843

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US54243966 Expired - Lifetime US3362186A (en) 1966-03-10 1966-03-10 Cooling device for fluids

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3362186A (en)

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3509716A (en) * 1967-09-05 1970-05-05 Edward N Avery Solar energy thermodynamic motor
US3735604A (en) * 1971-07-02 1973-05-29 J Astl Evaporative water cooler
US3946142A (en) * 1974-09-30 1976-03-23 Mazin Kellow Cooling of power cables utilizing an open cycle cooling system
US4007601A (en) * 1975-10-16 1977-02-15 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Tubular sublimator/evaporator heat sink
US4440000A (en) * 1979-12-27 1984-04-03 Bacchus Rockney D Evaporative cooler
US4697435A (en) * 1985-10-23 1987-10-06 Kessler + Luch Gmbh Apparatus for humidifying, cleaning and cooling of gases
US4935169A (en) * 1988-02-05 1990-06-19 Ernst Guenter Evaporative cooler
US4970876A (en) * 1988-03-22 1990-11-20 Barak-Concord Evaporative cooler
US5050391A (en) * 1991-01-18 1991-09-24 Ari-Tec Marketing, Inc. Method and apparatus for gas cooling
US5209078A (en) * 1991-08-16 1993-05-11 Conrad Wayne E Vacuum fluid cooling apparatus
US5463873A (en) * 1993-12-06 1995-11-07 Cool Fog Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for evaporative cooling of air leading to a gas turbine engine
US5715698A (en) * 1996-06-21 1998-02-10 Calton; William R. Evaporative air cooler
US5787722A (en) * 1991-10-07 1998-08-04 Jenkins; Robert E. Heat exchange unit
US20040007553A1 (en) * 1997-09-19 2004-01-15 Smolko Daniel D. Pervaporatively cooled containers
US20060201186A1 (en) * 1997-09-19 2006-09-14 Smolko Daniel D Cooling tubes and straws for liquids
US20080041083A1 (en) * 2006-08-15 2008-02-21 Al-Garni Ahmed Z Low-cost air conditioning system for open area
US20130042995A1 (en) * 2011-08-15 2013-02-21 Richard D. Townsend ACEnergySaver (AC Energy Saver)

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US964734A (en) * 1909-12-30 1910-07-19 Ralph Waldo Ammons Water-cooler.
US1428661A (en) * 1920-02-25 1922-09-12 Robert N Richardson Air cooler
US1552953A (en) * 1924-06-13 1925-09-08 W A S Foster Evaporation water cooler
US1904686A (en) * 1928-03-19 1933-04-18 Hoxie H Humphreys Cooling system
US1927521A (en) * 1931-05-02 1933-09-19 Carl B Lancaster Water dispenser
US2020604A (en) * 1935-07-03 1935-11-12 Arthur L Gruver Drinking fountain
US2266321A (en) * 1940-06-04 1941-12-16 Leonard H Holder Roof cooling device
US2342841A (en) * 1941-03-31 1944-02-29 Thomas W Carraway Air conditioning or cooling system
US2653803A (en) * 1951-04-30 1953-09-29 Rawlings R Baner Apparatus for cooling and humidifying air
US3125868A (en) * 1964-03-24 Automatic automobile radiator cooler
US3130557A (en) * 1962-05-23 1964-04-28 Mcfarlan Alden Irving Cooling tower control means

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3125868A (en) * 1964-03-24 Automatic automobile radiator cooler
US964734A (en) * 1909-12-30 1910-07-19 Ralph Waldo Ammons Water-cooler.
US1428661A (en) * 1920-02-25 1922-09-12 Robert N Richardson Air cooler
US1552953A (en) * 1924-06-13 1925-09-08 W A S Foster Evaporation water cooler
US1904686A (en) * 1928-03-19 1933-04-18 Hoxie H Humphreys Cooling system
US1927521A (en) * 1931-05-02 1933-09-19 Carl B Lancaster Water dispenser
US2020604A (en) * 1935-07-03 1935-11-12 Arthur L Gruver Drinking fountain
US2266321A (en) * 1940-06-04 1941-12-16 Leonard H Holder Roof cooling device
US2342841A (en) * 1941-03-31 1944-02-29 Thomas W Carraway Air conditioning or cooling system
US2653803A (en) * 1951-04-30 1953-09-29 Rawlings R Baner Apparatus for cooling and humidifying air
US3130557A (en) * 1962-05-23 1964-04-28 Mcfarlan Alden Irving Cooling tower control means

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3509716A (en) * 1967-09-05 1970-05-05 Edward N Avery Solar energy thermodynamic motor
US3735604A (en) * 1971-07-02 1973-05-29 J Astl Evaporative water cooler
US3946142A (en) * 1974-09-30 1976-03-23 Mazin Kellow Cooling of power cables utilizing an open cycle cooling system
US4007601A (en) * 1975-10-16 1977-02-15 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Tubular sublimator/evaporator heat sink
US4440000A (en) * 1979-12-27 1984-04-03 Bacchus Rockney D Evaporative cooler
US4697435A (en) * 1985-10-23 1987-10-06 Kessler + Luch Gmbh Apparatus for humidifying, cleaning and cooling of gases
US4935169A (en) * 1988-02-05 1990-06-19 Ernst Guenter Evaporative cooler
US4970876A (en) * 1988-03-22 1990-11-20 Barak-Concord Evaporative cooler
US5079934A (en) * 1988-03-22 1992-01-14 Lev Vinokurov Evaporative cooler
US5050391A (en) * 1991-01-18 1991-09-24 Ari-Tec Marketing, Inc. Method and apparatus for gas cooling
US5209078A (en) * 1991-08-16 1993-05-11 Conrad Wayne E Vacuum fluid cooling apparatus
US5787722A (en) * 1991-10-07 1998-08-04 Jenkins; Robert E. Heat exchange unit
US5463873A (en) * 1993-12-06 1995-11-07 Cool Fog Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for evaporative cooling of air leading to a gas turbine engine
US5715698A (en) * 1996-06-21 1998-02-10 Calton; William R. Evaporative air cooler
US20040007553A1 (en) * 1997-09-19 2004-01-15 Smolko Daniel D. Pervaporatively cooled containers
US20060201186A1 (en) * 1997-09-19 2006-09-14 Smolko Daniel D Cooling tubes and straws for liquids
US20060201187A1 (en) * 1997-09-19 2006-09-14 Smolko Daniel D Cooling jacket for containers
US7107783B2 (en) * 1997-09-19 2006-09-19 Advanced Porcus Technologies, Llc Self-cooling containers for liquids
US20060248910A1 (en) * 1997-09-19 2006-11-09 Smolko Daniel D Self-cooling container for liquids
US7475560B2 (en) * 1997-09-19 2009-01-13 Advanced Porous Technologies, Llc Cooling tubes and straws for liquids
US7475561B2 (en) * 1997-09-19 2009-01-13 Advanced Porous Technologies, Llc Cooling jacket for containers
US20080041083A1 (en) * 2006-08-15 2008-02-21 Al-Garni Ahmed Z Low-cost air conditioning system for open area
US20130042995A1 (en) * 2011-08-15 2013-02-21 Richard D. Townsend ACEnergySaver (AC Energy Saver)

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Maclaine-Cross et al. A general theory of wet surface heat exchangers and its application to regenerative evaporative cooling
US4023949A (en) Evaporative refrigeration system
GB1129632A (en) Trough system for evaporative heat exchangers
US4002040A (en) Method of cooling air and apparatus intended therefor
US5349829A (en) Method and apparatus for evaporatively cooling gases and/or fluids
US4142575A (en) Run-around type energy recovery system
US20050056042A1 (en) Hydronic rooftop cooling systems
US4612778A (en) Precooler for an evaporative cooler
US3116612A (en) Air conditioning by evaporative pad means
US3266266A (en) Double effect absorption refrigeration machine
US4129179A (en) Apparatus for utilization of waste energy
US3822561A (en) Self contained air cooling unit
US7430878B2 (en) Air conditioning system and methods
AU2001294882B2 (en) Method and plate apparatus for dew point evaporative cooler
US4148355A (en) Water heating system and combined storage tank and heat exchanger unit therefor
NL1021812C1 (en) Dewpoint cooler.
US3395900A (en) Gas and liquid contact apparatus
US2825210A (en) Heat exchange apparatus
US5315843A (en) Evaporative air conditioner unit
US7197887B2 (en) Method and plate apparatus for dew point evaporative cooler
US4976113A (en) Apparatus for indirect evaporative gas cooling
US2255292A (en) Aie condraoning system
US4679617A (en) Ceiling or wall unit
EP0491092A1 (en) Cooling apparatus
US8499576B2 (en) Dewpoint cooling device