US3350102A - Golfer's head movement control device - Google Patents

Golfer's head movement control device Download PDF

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Publication number
US3350102A
US3350102A US44205665A US3350102A US 3350102 A US3350102 A US 3350102A US 44205665 A US44205665 A US 44205665A US 3350102 A US3350102 A US 3350102A
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head
member
movement
swivel
ball
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Jr Frank M Tiernan
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Jr Frank M Tiernan
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/36Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for golf
    • A63B69/3608Attachments on the body, e.g. for measuring, aligning, restraining
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2209/00Characteristics of used materials
    • A63B2209/08Characteristics of used materials magnetic
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/80Special sensors, transducers or devices therefor
    • A63B2220/805Optical or opto-electronic sensors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2225/00Other characteristics of sports equipment
    • A63B2225/09Adjustable dimensions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/36Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for golf
    • A63B69/3611Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for golf not used, see A63B69/36 and subgroups
    • A63B69/3614Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for golf not used, see A63B69/36 and subgroups using electro-magnetic, magnetic or ultrasonic radiation emitted, reflected or interrupted by the golf club

Description

Oct. 31, 1967 F. M. TIERNAN, JQ 3,

GOLFER'S HEAD MOVEMENT CONTROL DEVICE Filed March 25, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 PHOTO- CELL /O INVENTOR.

47 FkAA/KM 77EM4A4J BY C420 THEESAND Oman/52s #15 A rroeusrs 1967 F. M. TIERNAN, JR 3,

GOLFER'S HEAD MOVEMENT CONTROL DEVICE Filed March 23, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 i f 43v SOLENOID? J I (J /5 /2 /6 A 7 /5 /7 INVENTOR.

F RANKM FEEA/AM J4.

C420 n/Eesmva (Aea n/ses 5 A TTOENE vs United States Patent O 3,350,102 GOLFERS HEAD MOVEMENT CONTROL DEVICE Frank M. Tiernan, Jr., 103 Oakwood Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15229 Filed Mar. 23, 1965, Ser. No. 442,056 7 Claims. (Cl. 273-190) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A golf training apparatus having a stationary support with an outwardly extended arm having a stationary member secured to its end and a swivel member rotatably secured to the stationary member. A head grip element is attached to the swivel member to receive and hold the head of a golfer. Means are provided in the stationary and swivel members to, first, limit the travel of the swivel member relative to the stationary member in the confines of a planar arc and to, second, provide adjustably selective pressure resistance between the members to produce initial resistance to movement of the swivel member relative to the stationary member along the planar arc.

This invention relates generally to a golf training apparatus, more particularly an adjustable standard carrying a swiveled head gear for the golf trainee that provides limited directional motion of the head only after applying a predetermined pressure produced by the swing after the ball has been struck.

The art shows different standards with a swiveled head gear for the purpose of retaining the head of the golf trainee in a fixed position while he swings at the ball. In some instances thedevice which retains the trainees head will permit limited movement. In most structures of the art the golf trainee is not permitted to move his head during the swing of the golf club.

The purpose of such training apparatus is to permit the golfer to develop habits that will allow him to freely swing without moving the head. If the trainee moves his head before the ball is struck such movement will throw the body off balance as the head is the heaviest appendage to the body.

One object of this invention is the provision of a golf training apparatus which includes a stable standard having an adjustable arm for supporting a swivel carrying a head grip member to receive and hold the head of the golf trainee but also permit limited guiding movement of the head only after overcoming initial resistance to movement which is produced after the ball is struck. The head grip member may be swivelly supported from in front of the golfer or from in back of the golfer. The relative position of the standard or bridge nor its construction-is not important to this invention other than the fact that the standard or bridge should provide a relative firm support for the swivel.

One of the important features of this invention is the provision of a swivel that supports the head grip member so that it is free to move. after substantial resistance of moving has been overcome, but in a guided direction and for a limited distance.

-It is important to provide guided and limited movement of the swivelling action of the head. But this alone is insufiicient, as some means must be provided to hold the head stationary with eyes on the ball until after the right shoulder swings with the arcuate motion of the club to approach or engage the head alignment, at which time the ball is well on its way. The shoulder movement, then, causesthe head to move in the direction of the travel of the ball due to the body action which aids in completing the follow through of the stroke. If one attempts to hold the head on the follow through stroke, the body becomes unbalanced and there is a tendency for the trainee to check the swing movement of his arms to avoid such an unbalanced position caused by movement of his head which results in the face of the club improperly striking the ball at the time of impact.

Thus, the important factor of applicants device is that a swivel be provided to permit limited movement of the head on the follow through stroke as the shoulder approaches or passes into the alignment between the ball and the head. This movement of the body creates a considerable pressure through the neck and head which is sufiicient to overcome the initial resistance in the swivel and permit the head to travel with the pivoting body so that the trainee looks up in the follow through portion of the stroke.

In addition to the resistance to the movement of the head until the shoulders and the body force this action of the head, the permissible pivoting of the swivel head grip member should be guided through a limited distance in its swivelling action. In other words, the head should not be permitted to travel too far but merely forward in the direction of the travel of the ball. If the head travels too far it may reach the position where the body becomes unbalanced and the rear or right foot, in the case of a right-handed golfer, is actually raised off the ground and the club head swings too far beyond the front or left shoulder.

The prior art has not attempted to approach this prob lem in the manner accomplished herein by permitting the head to travel through a defined are after first overcoming a predetermined resistance to movement which is the important object of this invention.

The resistance against movement in some players must be materially greater than in others. In some players this resistance against movement should be such that it is difficult for the trainee to overcome this resistance merely by turning his head without swinging. This insures that the trainee will not forcibly overcome the resistance to movement of the head until his rear shoulder, or right shoulder in case of a right-handed golfer, actually reaches the vicinity of the head-ball alignment, relative to the direction of travel of the ball when struck.

By preadjusting the axis of the swivel one can cause the arcuate movement .of the head to extend in a predetermined direction. This may be found by trial and error by observing the movement of the head following a natural swing of the trainee. With the axis fixed in the proper position the means limiting the swing of the head is positioned to hold the head firmly with the eyes on the ball and not permitting it to move on the back stroke but allowing all the movement to take place on the follow through and this movement only for a limited distance. This distance or length of arc may be changed by employing different sized stops. Again, the length of the arc in which the swivel stop is inserted may be made shorter or longer to suit the trainee.

Other objects and advantages appear hereinafter in the following description and claims.

The accompanying drawings show for the purpose of exemplification without limiting the invention or claims thereto, certain practical embodiments illustrating the principles of this invention wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view in side elevation showing a golfer with his head held by a swivelled head grip member supported from an arm on a standard.

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view of one form of swivel and initial resistance means secured to a heat grip member.

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view of a singular swivel with a different sized stop member.

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view of another form of swivel pressure resistance means with a different character of initial resistance.

FIG. is a vertical sectional view of another form of swivel pressure resistance means employing a positive locking member.

Referring to the drawings the golf trainee device comprising this invention is shown, in this instance, to be suspended from a support in the form of the foundation block 1 which has secured therein and extending upwardly therefrom the base pipe 2 having a series of holes 3 adjacent its upper end to receive the locking stud 4. The holes 3 are in pairs at the same and different levels of the base pipe 2 and are in alignment with each other to receive locking pin 4. However, if there is more than one set of pairs of holes they are positioned with their aligned axes at different angles and duplicated at different levels.

The upper end of the base pipe 2 is upwardly open to telescopically receive the standard 5 which has one or more sets of holes for aligning with the holes 3 at different elevations to aid in adjusting the height of the arm 6 at the upper end of the extension or standard 5 which is shaped into an are so as to project the outer end of the arm 6 along the axis 7, which axis would normally extend downwardly through the neck of the golf trainee shown in FIG. 1. The outer end of the arm 6 is provided with pins 8 extending through additional adjustable holes for receiving and supporting the tubular arm extension 10 which in turn supports the swivel member 11 having on its end the head grip member 12, which grips and holds the head of the golf trainee. This grip member is preferably arranged so as to engage the front and sides of the head and extend rearwardly to a position behind and above the ears. This head grip member provides a three point engagement with the head of the golf trainee, one on each side, located behind the ears, and one at the forehead in order to readily fit different sizes of heads. Since these points direct a pressure inwardly on the head they will prevent the golf trainee from turning his head when the swivel is locked, but he may always withdraw his head backwardly since the head is at an inclination in the head grip member 12. The withdrawing motion may be backwardly and slightly downwardly from the back of the head grip member. This permits the golf trainee to insert and withdraw his head with ease, which is an important feature in this invention.

The golf trainee should be taught to develop a natural swing that is correct in all golfing aspects, with the proper stance and the proper bend of the knees, and proper distribution of the weight on the feet to accommodate the back swing without the movement of the head. The head is held by the head grip member 12 on this back swing and to permit a full and unhampered swing through the bottom of the pendulum stroke, where the wrists advance the club head to the position of the ball and carry the arms and shoulders through the stroke, at which time the shoulders following through this swing force or sometimes even engage the chin causing the golf trainee to move his head in the follow through stroke in the direction of the driven ball. The swivel member of this invention will permit the golf trainee to move his head only after the shoulder has come into position below but near the head and chin at which time follow through of the stroke commences, which is after the ball has departed from the face of the club.

The swivel supporting the head grip member prevents the head from moving until this additional pressure overcomes an initial resistance to movement and then permits the head to travel only through a selective are.

This is accomplished by one of several means such as shown in FIGS. 2 through 5. In the structure of FIG. 2 the arm extension 10 is keyed to the member 13 by means of the key 14 that is fastened in adjacent slots in the bore of the member 13 and the extension arm 10. Thus, the member 13 is secured relative to the extension arm 10 and is substantially rigid except for any give in or flexing of the standard 5.

The extension arm 10 passes through the member 13 and is reduced at its end to receive by a press fit the inner race of the anti-frictional ball bearing 15 held in place by the split ring 16. The outer race 19 of the anti-frictional bearing is received by a press fit in the bore 9 of the swivel member 11 and is held in place by the split ring 17. Thus the shoulder on the end of the extension arm and the shoulder in the bore of the swivel member together with the split ring 16 and 17 prevent relative axial movement between the swivel member 11 and the rigid member 13. To the structure described, the head grip member 12 is secured lineally to the swivel member 11 by the screws 18. Both the grip member 12 and swivel member 11 have a free rotary movement relative to the member 13.

In order to limit this movement, there is provided in the structure of FIG. 2 a pressure resistance means in the form of one or more of the ball detent members 20 which when aligned with the detent 21 and biased by the spring 22 which is backed by the follower member 23 and locked by the set screw 24. This ball detent requires an initial amount of energy to overcome the spring pressure and dislodge the ball from the detent and let it slide or roll on the surface of the swivel member 11 with very little resistance. If, of course, a single ball detent does not provide initial pressure resistance to movement, two or more of such ball detents may be provided. This is a very important feature of this invention. It is necessary to employ a sufficient amount of pressure resistance through the ball detents that will prevent the golf trainee from turning his head or let us say when his body begins to turn it will retain the head until after striking the ball; the shoulder moves downwardly below the head building up pressure until sufficient forces will cause the head to move as part of the follow through stroke.

As shown in FIG. 4 this pressure resistance means is in the form of adjacent roughened surfaces between the adjacent faces of the swivel member 11 and the arm member 13. Each of these faces are knurled as indicated at 25 and they will offer sufficient resistance to movement owing to the spring washer 26 bearing against the outer face of the member 13 which in this instance is slidable over the threaded section of the extension 10 that is also a fluted section 28. A nut 30 bears against the washer 31 which when forced downwardly against the spring washer 26 which is in the form of a frusto conical spring washer that provides a specific resistance to flattening which characteristic is measurable along a definite curve. This resistance to flattening is in turn transformed to a spring pressure force between the swivel member 11 and the member 13. Thus, by a selected predetermined surface 25 on each face of the engaged members one may determine the initial resistance to movement of the swivel member 11. The engaging surfaces 25 may be roughened at their initial extent to permit initial rapid movement between the arm member 13 and the swivel member 11. The rest of the surfaces 25 may be roughened or knurled even more in order to provide increasing greater resistance to head movement in the head grip member 12 as one proceeds through the initial portion of a golf club swing. This characteristic eliminates the need of a definite stop.

Another form of pressure resistance means is shown in FIG. 5 wherein a solenoid 32 is provided within the member 13 and it controls the movement of the slidable bolt member 33 that provides a core in the solenoid. This core member has a light spring 34 forcing it from the solenoid and inwardly into the socket 35 in the swivel member 11 and this pressure may likewise be adjusted by a set screw 36.

In this form of the invention the pressure resistance means must be released by a suitable tripping circuit such as the photo-electric eye 37 which carries with it an amplifier in the container 38. When the photo-electric eye is tripped it operates a relay which in turn completes a circuit through wires 40 that extend upwardly through the hollow extension arm and are connected to the solenoid 32 to Withdraw the pin 33, which is preferably tapered so that the pressure by the head will permit it to be withdrawn from the socket 35, and thus the head grip member would be free to move on the anti-frictional bearing and would be limited in its arcuate movement.

It will be noted in FIG. 1 that the head grip member 12 is unbalanced relative to the rotary axis 7 and the fact that the swivel member 11 is supported by an anti-frictional hearing will allow it to freely swing downwardly to the original position at which time the light spring 34 will force the pin 33 back into the socket 35 and again lock the device in place. After the golf trainee has swung and his head has been released, he would ordinarily step back out of the head grip member to watch the ball and this would permit the head grip member to reset. The source of light 41 for the electric eye 37 is positioned behind the end out of the way of the golf trainee. If the golf trainee takes a practice swing, of course, the same action will transpire insofar as the pressure resistance means in the form of the pin 33. However, he may return his head to the proper position or merely step out to allow it to reset because this circuit functions only as a pulse and requires only a pulse of electricity to release the pin 33. One may adjust the position of the electric eye 37 or the light 41 in order to find the proper position where the club shaft or club head intersects the light beam after having hit the ball to release the resistance to movement of the head in the follow through stroke after the ball has left the club head.

Another feature of this invention lies in the use of a means to limit the extent and the direction of the motion of the head which is illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 wherein the swivel member 11 is provided with a cylindrical plug 42 seated firmly therein. This plug rides in an arcuate slot 43 in the member 13 about the rotary central axis 7 and the plug 42 in FIG. 2 being cylindrical would have a longer travel in the arc 43 of FIG. 3 than does the plug 44 as shown in FIG. 3. A lug 45 is placed on the plug 44 in FIG. 3 to shorten the length of travel in the arc 43. The lug 45 can, of course, be extended on opposite sides of the central portion of the plug 44 that is driven or screwed into the swivel member 11. It is best to screw the member in as indicated so that different plugs may be employed as the form shown in FIG. 2 at 42 and the form shown at 44 in FIG. 3 has a foot 45 thereon.

As shown in FIG. 3 the key way 14 has been omitted but as replaced by dual set screws 46 and 47 which in some instances simplify the structure. Just another mode of connecting the member 13 to the arm extension 10.

FIG. 4 also shows that the swivel need not be an antifrictional bearing although in some instances it is preferable to have an anti-frictional bearing. However, a mere cylindrical journal is employed in the swivel structure as indicated at 48.

Thus, with the several structures illustrated, one can select the preference for producing a pressure resistance means under the pressure of the spring 22 on the ball detents or the roughened surfaces in combination with the spring washer 26 or the positive lock in the form of the bolt 33 electromagnetically actuated. When either of the members shown in FIGS. 2 and 5 are released they will provide a relative low resistance to movement. However, in some instances it is necessary to have some resistance as the head is moving to prevent it from moving too fast or too hard which is, of course, taken care of in the roughened surface 25 shown in FIG. 4. This type of cooperative rough surface between the member 13 and the swivel member 11 provides a very good reason for not utilizing an anti-frictional bearing because the simple cylindrical bearing surface is adequate in comparison with the reaction of the roughened surfaces 25 on each of the swivel members 11 and the member 13.

I claim:

1. A golf training apparatus comprising a stationary support having an outwardly extending arm member, a swivel member rotatably secured to the end of said arm member to permit rotary planar movement of said member relative to said arm member, and carrying a head grip element to receive and hold the head of a golf trainee, limit means provided in said arm member and said swivel member to limit the movement of said head grip member within the confines of a planar arc and pressure resistance means for providing substantial initial resistance to movement of said head grip member along said arc.

2. The golf training apparatus of claim 1 characterized by means to selectively adjust said initial resistance provided by said pressure resistance means.

3. The golf training device of claim 1 characterized in that said pressure resistance means includes at least one spring loaded ball mounted in one of said members with a detent in the other of said members to provide said initial resistance to movement of said head grip member until the shoulder of the swinging trainee approaches the vicinity of the head-ball alignment with sufiicient force to overcome said initial resistance to move said loaded ball out of said detent to permit limited guided movement of the head of the trainee.

4. The golf training apparatus of claim 3 characterized by means to selectively adjust said initial resistance provided by said pressure resistance means.

5. The golf training device of claim 1 characterized in that said pressure resistance means includes opposed engaging surfaces on said members to provide said initial resistance to movement of said head grip member until the shoulder of the swinging trainee approaches the vicinity of the head-ball alignment with sufficient force to overcome said initial resistance to permit limited guided movement of the head of the trainee.

6. The golf training device of claim 5 characterized by means to selectively adjust said initial resistance provided by said pressure resistance means.

7. The golf training device of claim 6 characterized in that said opposed engaging surfaces are knurled to provide said initial resistance and said means to selectively adjust said initial resistance includes a frusto-conical spring washer on said arm member to adjustably bias the engagement of said opposed engaging surfaces.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,636,753 7/1927 OIcott 273 1,962,256 6/1934 Nelson et al 273-19O X 2,626,151 1/1953 Jenks 273-190 3,136,546 6/1964 Connolly 273-186 3,138,388 6/1964 Herold 273-183 ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner. F. BARRY SHAY, Examiner. G. I. MARLO, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A GOLF TRAINING APPARATUS COMPRISING A STATIONARY SUPPORT HAVING AN OUTWARDLY EXTENDING ARM MEMBER, A SWIVEL MEMBER ROTATABLY SECURED TO THE END OF SAID ARM MEMBER TO PERMIT ROTARY PLANAR MOVEMENT OF SAID MEMBER RELATIVE TO SAID ARM MEMBER, AND CARRYING A HEAD GRIP ELEMENT TO RECEIVE AND HOLD THE HEAD OF A GOLF TRAINEE, LIMIT MEANS PROVIDED IN SAID ARM MEMBER AND SAID SWIVEL MEMBER TO LIMIT THE MOVEMENT OF SAID HEAD GRIP MEMBER WITHIN THE CONFINES OF A PLANAR ARC AND PRESSURE RESISTANCE MEANS FOR PROVIDING SUBSTANTIAL INITIAL RESISTANCE TO MOVEMENT OF SAID HEAD GRIP MEMBER ALONG SAID ARC.
US3350102A 1965-03-23 1965-03-23 Golfer's head movement control device Expired - Lifetime US3350102A (en)

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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3712625A (en) * 1971-06-21 1973-01-23 J Taylor Golfer{40 s head movement reminder device
US3767205A (en) * 1971-09-28 1973-10-23 E Maldonado Golfer{40 s head movement restraining device rendered non-restraining at ball impact position
US3801108A (en) * 1973-02-28 1974-04-02 G Murray Golfer{40 s wrist-release detector
JPS5010378U (en) * 1973-05-23 1975-02-03
WO1979000112A1 (en) * 1977-08-26 1979-03-08 K Atkinson Method and apparatus for golf practice and instruction
JPS5527578U (en) * 1978-08-12 1980-02-22
US4278249A (en) * 1979-10-23 1981-07-14 Forrest Charles P Neck exercising device
US5087047A (en) * 1991-03-12 1992-02-11 Mcconnell John P Golf training method and apparatus
US6402633B1 (en) 2001-05-10 2002-06-11 Bob Hsiung Golf swing training and exercising device
US20090105006A1 (en) * 2007-10-23 2009-04-23 Doyle Robert S Training Apparatus for improving a golf swing
US20100279784A1 (en) * 2009-04-29 2010-11-04 Michael Hamelburg Golf Swing Guidance Device and Methods of Use
US8079917B2 (en) * 2008-10-14 2011-12-20 Doyle Robert S Training apparatus for improving an athletes swing
USRE44895E1 (en) * 2003-12-02 2014-05-13 Bigben Interactive, Sa Interactive step-type gymnastics practice device
US9211466B2 (en) 2013-06-26 2015-12-15 John D. Bell Pivotable boom golf swing improvement device

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1636753A (en) * 1924-07-15 1927-07-26 Olcott Herman Parker Training apparatus
US1962256A (en) * 1933-01-30 1934-06-12 Everett C Nelson Training device
US2626151A (en) * 1949-01-28 1953-01-20 Jenks George M Troutman Golf practicing apparatus
US3136546A (en) * 1961-08-25 1964-06-09 Joseph J Connolly Swingable practice game implement with slidable weight
US3138388A (en) * 1961-10-06 1964-06-23 Charles C Herold Device for coordinating the pivotal movement of a golfer's shoulders and hips

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1636753A (en) * 1924-07-15 1927-07-26 Olcott Herman Parker Training apparatus
US1962256A (en) * 1933-01-30 1934-06-12 Everett C Nelson Training device
US2626151A (en) * 1949-01-28 1953-01-20 Jenks George M Troutman Golf practicing apparatus
US3136546A (en) * 1961-08-25 1964-06-09 Joseph J Connolly Swingable practice game implement with slidable weight
US3138388A (en) * 1961-10-06 1964-06-23 Charles C Herold Device for coordinating the pivotal movement of a golfer's shoulders and hips

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3712625A (en) * 1971-06-21 1973-01-23 J Taylor Golfer{40 s head movement reminder device
US3767205A (en) * 1971-09-28 1973-10-23 E Maldonado Golfer{40 s head movement restraining device rendered non-restraining at ball impact position
US3801108A (en) * 1973-02-28 1974-04-02 G Murray Golfer{40 s wrist-release detector
JPS5010378U (en) * 1973-05-23 1975-02-03
WO1979000112A1 (en) * 1977-08-26 1979-03-08 K Atkinson Method and apparatus for golf practice and instruction
US4181309A (en) * 1977-08-26 1980-01-01 Kenneth W. Atkinson Method and apparatus for golf practice and instruction
JPS5527578U (en) * 1978-08-12 1980-02-22
JPS5747002Y2 (en) * 1978-08-12 1982-10-15
US4278249A (en) * 1979-10-23 1981-07-14 Forrest Charles P Neck exercising device
US5087047A (en) * 1991-03-12 1992-02-11 Mcconnell John P Golf training method and apparatus
US6402633B1 (en) 2001-05-10 2002-06-11 Bob Hsiung Golf swing training and exercising device
USRE44895E1 (en) * 2003-12-02 2014-05-13 Bigben Interactive, Sa Interactive step-type gymnastics practice device
US20090105006A1 (en) * 2007-10-23 2009-04-23 Doyle Robert S Training Apparatus for improving a golf swing
US7815518B2 (en) * 2007-10-23 2010-10-19 Doyle Robert S Training apparatus for improving a golf swing
US8079917B2 (en) * 2008-10-14 2011-12-20 Doyle Robert S Training apparatus for improving an athletes swing
US20100279784A1 (en) * 2009-04-29 2010-11-04 Michael Hamelburg Golf Swing Guidance Device and Methods of Use
US9211466B2 (en) 2013-06-26 2015-12-15 John D. Bell Pivotable boom golf swing improvement device

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