US3262190A - Method for the production of metallic heat transfer bodies - Google Patents

Method for the production of metallic heat transfer bodies Download PDF

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US3262190A
US3262190A US47677065A US3262190A US 3262190 A US3262190 A US 3262190A US 47677065 A US47677065 A US 47677065A US 3262190 A US3262190 A US 3262190A
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heat transfer
fibers
method
transfer element
tube
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Rostoker William
Robert H Read
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IIT Research Institute
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IIT Research Institute
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N5/00Exhaust or silencing apparatus combined or associated with devices profiting from exhaust energy
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B21MECHANICAL METAL-WORKING WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21DWORKING OR PROCESSING OF SHEET METAL OR METAL TUBES, RODS OR PROFILES WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21D53/00Making other particular articles
    • B21D53/02Making other particular articles heat exchangers or parts thereof, e.g. radiators, condensers fins, headers
    • B21D53/04Making other particular articles heat exchangers or parts thereof, e.g. radiators, condensers fins, headers of sheet metal
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D1/00Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators
    • F28D1/02Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid
    • F28D1/04Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with tubular conduits
    • F28D1/047Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with tubular conduits the conduits being bent, e.g. in a serpentine or zig-zag
    • F28D1/0477Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with tubular conduits the conduits being bent, e.g. in a serpentine or zig-zag the conduits being bent in a serpentine or zig-zag
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F13/00Arrangements for modifying heat-transfer, e.g. increasing, decreasing
    • F28F13/003Arrangements for modifying heat-transfer, e.g. increasing, decreasing by using permeable mass, perforated or porous materials
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B3/00Ohmic-resistance heating
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/10Internal combustion engine [ICE] based vehicles
    • Y02T10/16Energy recuperation from low temperature heat sources of the ICE to produce additional power
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S165/00Heat exchange
    • Y10S165/907Porous
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/4935Heat exchanger or boiler making
    • Y10T29/49359Cooling apparatus making, e.g., air conditioner, refrigerator
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/4935Heat exchanger or boiler making
    • Y10T29/49377Tube with heat transfer means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/4935Heat exchanger or boiler making
    • Y10T29/49393Heat exchanger or boiler making with metallurgical bonding
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49801Shaping fiber or fibered material

Description

July 26, 1966 w. ROSTOKER ET AL 3,262,190

METHOD FOR THE PRODUCTION OF METALLIC HEAT TRANSFER BODIES Original Filed July 10, 1961 /0 4 l INVENTORS F MZM/V 2057016? //4 BY 246KB) ,l zp

United States Patent 3,262,190 METHOD FOR THE PRODUCTION OF METALLIC HEAT TRANSFER BODIES William Rostoker, Chicago, and Robert H. Read, Chicago Heights, Ill., assignors to IIT Research Institute, a corporation of Illinois Original application July 10, 1961, Ser. No. 122,844. Divided and this application Apr. 21, 1965, Ser. No. 476,770

5 Claims. (Cl. 29-1573) This application is a division of our copending application Serial No. 122,844 filed July 10, 1961.

The present invention is directed to improved heat transfer systems of the type employed, for example, in automobile radiators, heaters, refrigerators, and air conditioning systems. The heat transfer systems of the present invention are specifically designed to replace the conventional fin and tube structures now commonly employed as heat exchange elements.

The manufacture of fin and tube type heat exchangers is usually accomplished by an assembly of blanked and stacked fins strung over serpentine heat transfer tubes. While such assemblies are reasonably eificient heat transfer systems, they are rather difficult to assemble and consequently are relatively expensive to manufacture.

The present invention employs techniques of the new field of fiber metallurgy in building up a heat transfer system consisting basically of a heat transfer element having relatively short, heat conductive fibers of metal bonded to the surface of the heat transfer element and bonded to each other along their areas of contact. This structure results in an improved heat transfer system because of the very large surface to volume character of the metal fibers. The improved heat transfer system is also capable of being automated more completely than present methods and therefore provides a cheaper manufacturing cost by virtue of reduced labor cost.

Fiber metallurgy concerns itself with the manufacture and use of metallic fibers, that is, metallic elements whose length is considerably greater than any dimension in cross-section but is not so long as to constitute a continuous filament. As a general rule, the fiber has a ratio of at least to 1 between its length and its mean dimension in cross-section. In the case of a circular fiber, the mean dimension is the diameter, while in the case of a rectangular fiber, the mean dimension is one-half the sum of the short side and the long side of the rectangle.

When metallic fibers of the character described are suitably deposited by any of a variety of methods to be described later, they assume a random three dimensional distribution which provides a uniform porosity, and remarkable strength to porosity ratios. The strength characteristics of the fibers arise from providing metal-tometal bonds between the fibers along their areas of contact. Such metal-to-metal bonds may be provided, for example, by sintering the fibers at an appropriate sintering temperature, or by employing pre-coated fibers having a coating of a brazing material thereon and then heating the fibers to a temperature sufficient to melt the brazing material without melting the fibers, causing the molten brazing material to eventually solidify at the points of contact between the fibers and bond them together.

The unique strength to porosity ratio, the ability to produce extremely porous materials, and the very large surface to volume character of the deposited fiber mass are properties which adapt such fiber metallurgy structures to the field of heat transfer elements.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide a method for the production of an improved heat transfer system utilizing a highly porous heat transfer means.

Another object of the invention is to provide a method for the production of a highly porous felted heat transfer element for use in heat transfer systems.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved method for assembling a heat exchange device.

Another object of the invention is to provide a method for the manufacture of heat transfer elements which is more readily adaptable to automation and is less expensive than methods presently used in the manufacture of fin and tube type heat transfer elements.

A further description of the present invention will be made in conjunction with the attached sheet of drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of the heat transfer assembly in an early stage of formation;

FIGURE 2 is a cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line 11-11 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 but illustrating the heat transfer assembly with the metallic fibers incorporated therein and bonded together;

FIGURE 4 is a plan view of the finished assembly; and

FIGURE 5 is a view in perspective of a. modified form of the invention.

As shown in the drawings:

In FIGURE 1, reference numeral 10 indicates generally an open support frame consisting of sheet metal or the like. The frame 10 carries a conventional serpentine type tube 11 consisting of copper or the like and having its ends 11a and 11b secured to the frame 10. A relatively coarse metal screen 12 is fastened to one side of the frame 10 to rigidify the frame 10 and also to serve as a collector for the metal fibers which are subsequently deposited over and about the tube 11.

Relatively small, heat conductive fibers are then deposited in the form of a felt over the tube 11 so that the tube is completely immersed within a mat 13 of fibers, as best illustrated in FIGURE 3.

While copper fibers are preferred for the mat because of their excellent heat transfer characteristics, it should be appreciated that other types of metallic fibers can also be employed. It should also be apparent that the fibers can be deposited about the tube 11 in any of a variety of manners. The simplest consists in simply dropping the fibers by gravity onto and around the tube 11, using the screen 12 as a collector. In order that the metallic fibers have a substantial amount of mobility during the felting, it is advisable to employ fibers which have lengths not in excess of two inches, and preferably not in excess of one inch. Particularly good results have been achieved by employing fibers in the range from one quarter to three quarters inch in length.

Another procedure for depositing the fiber mat 13 about the tube 11 consists in suspending the metallic fibers in a liquid medium such as oil or glycerine, agitating the fibers in suspension so that a uniform slurry 18 produced, and then pouring the slurry over the tube 11 so that the suspending medium drains out through the screen 12, leaving a randomly oriented felt of fibers about the tube 11. 7

Still another technique which can be employed consists in suspending the short length fibers in. an air stream under a slight positive pressure, and blowing the fibers Onto and about the tube 11 until a mat of sufficient thickness is built up.

By any of these means of deposition, the porous, randomly orineted mat of fibers can be produced about the tube 11. The best results, the porosity of the mat should be at least 50%, while it may be as high as After the fiber mat 16 has been incorporated about the tube 11, a second screen 1 4 may be secured across the face of the frame 10 to further rigidify the structure 3 without significantly increasing its resistance to air flow. As illustrated in FIGURE 3, the upper ends a and 10b of the frame 10 may be bent over to provide areas for fastening the screen 14 to the frame 10.

After the mat has been built up, the complete assembly is treated to provide metal-to-metal bonds between the tube 11 and the fibers, as well as between the fibers themselves. This is most conveniently done by passing the entire assembly into a sintering furnace and holding the assembly within the furnace, in the presence of a reducing or a non-oxidizing atmosphere until the metal-tometal bonds are produced. Generally, the sintering temperature will be on the order of two-thirds of the melting temperature of the metal involved, expressed in degrees Kelvin.

,After.sintering themetal fibers are. secured bymetallurgical bonds to the surface of the tube 11 and are similarly secured to adjoining fibers at their areas of contact. Some sintering of fibers also occurs to the material of the opposed screens 12 and 14, resulting in the production of a completely porous but substantially rigid heat transfer assembly.

As previously indicated, another method of securing the metal-to-metal bonds consists in pre-coating the metal fibers with a brazing compound, such as a low melting alloy, and then heating the assembly to a temperature sufficient to melt the brazing compound without melting the fibers or the tube 11. When the molten material has solidified, it forms metal bonds at the areas along which the fibers contact the surface of the tube 11, and also along those areas at which the fibers contact each other.

A modified form of the invention is illustrated in FIGURE 5 of the drawings. In this form, the heat exchanger is composed of a pair of opposed side plates 16 and 17 spaced from each other by means of sheet metal separators 1 8, 19, 20, 21 and 22, thereby providing a series of compartments 23, 24, 2 5 and 26. Metal fibers 27 are disposed in each compartment thus provided, the fibers 27 being bonded to each other (by sintering, brazing, or the like) and also being bonded to the walls of the compartment which they abut. With the illustrated structure, a hot fluid can be introduced through the fibrous masses in compartments 23 and 25 and a cooling fluid through compartments 24 and 26 in countercurrent flow to the hot fluids in the adjoining compartments, and thereby provide eificient heat exchange between the fluid streams.

The fiber mat possesses excellent heat transfer properties from the bonds between the fibers and the tubing, and between the fibers themselves. The very high porosites achieved by the felting process permits the easy passage of air or gases through the felted body. The heat transfer is therefore by conduction through the wall of the tubing from the fluid circulated through the tubing, through the high specific surface fiber network by conduction, and finally to the forced permeating gas by convection and radiation.

It should be evident that various modifications can be made to the described embodiments without departing from the scope of the present invention.

We claim as our invention:

1. The method of making a heat transfer assembly which comprises positioning a heat transfer element in spaced relation to a foraminous surface, dispersing heat conductive metal fibers in three dimensional random orientation to fill up the space between said heat transfer element and said foraminous surface, and thereafter metallurgically bonding said fibers to said heat transfer element, to said foraminous surface, and to themselves.

2. The method of making a heat transfer assembly which comprises positioning a heat transfer element in spaced relation to a foraminous surface, dispersing heat conductive metal fibers in three dimensional random orientation to fill up the space between said heat transfer element and said foraminous surface, said fibers having .lengths. not. in excess of two inches. and having lengths at least 10 times their mean dimension in cross-section, and thereafter metallurgicaly bonding said fibers to said heat transfer element, to said foraminous surface, and to themselves.

3. The method of making a heat transfer assembly which comprises positioning a heat transfer element in spaced relation to a foraminous surface, dispersing heat conductive metal fibers in three dimensional random orientation to fill up the space between said heat transfer element and said foraminous surface, and thereafter sintering said fibers to said heat transfer element, to said foraminous surface, and to themselves.

4. The method of making a heat transfer assembly which comprises positioning a heat transfer element in spaced relation to a foraminous surface, dispersing heat conductive metal fibers in three dimensional random orientation to fill up the space between said heat transfer element and said foraminous surface, each of said fibers having a length not in excess of two inches and having a length at least 10 times its mean dimension in crosssection, and thereafter sintering said fibers to said heat transfer element, to said foraminous surface, and to themselves.

5. The method of making a heat transfer assembly which comprises positioning a heat transfer element in spaced relation to a foraminous surface, dispersing heat conductive metal fibers in three dimensional random orientation to fill up the space between said heat transfer element and said foraminous surface, and thereafter metallurgically bonding said fibers to said heat transfer element, to said foraminous surface, and to themselves to form a mat of felted fibers having a porosity of at least 50%.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,893,330 1/1933 Jones 113118 XR 2,401,797 6/1946 Rasmusson 3,062,509 11/1-9-62 Mulder 29157.3 3,127,668 4/1964 Troy 29419 XR JOHN F. CAMPBELL, Primary Examiner.

J. D. HOBART, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. THE METHOD OF MAKING A HEAT TRANSFER ASSEMBLY WHICH COMPRISES POSITIONING A HEAT TRANSFER ELEMENT IN SPACED RELATION TO A FORAMINOUS SURFACE, DISPSERING HEAT CONDUCTIVE METAL FIBERS IN THREE DIMENSIONAL RANDOM ORIENTATION TO FILL UP THE SPACE BETWEEN SAID HEAT TRANSFER ELEMENT AND SAID FORAMINOUS SURFACE, AND THEREAFTER METALLURGICALLY BONDING SAID FIBERS TO SAID HEAT TRANSFER ELEMENT, TO SAID FORAMINOUS SURFACE, AND TO THEMSELVES.
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Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3333318A (en) * 1964-10-15 1967-08-01 Olin Mathieson Method of fabricating a tubular heat exchanger
US3334400A (en) * 1964-12-07 1967-08-08 Olin Mathieson Method of producing heat exchangers
US3415316A (en) * 1967-04-11 1968-12-10 Olin Mathieson Modular units and use thereof in heat exchangers
US3493042A (en) * 1967-04-11 1970-02-03 Olin Mathieson Modular units and use thereof in heat exchangers
US3508312A (en) * 1968-01-15 1970-04-28 Frederick A Burne Method of assembling a heat exchanger
US3595310A (en) * 1969-11-12 1971-07-27 Olin Corp Modular units and use thereof in heat exchangers
US3934117A (en) * 1973-03-27 1976-01-20 Schladitz Hermann J Electric fluid heating device
US4066450A (en) * 1974-11-26 1978-01-03 Kabushiki Kaisha Toyota Cho Kenkyusho Metal body having large surface area and process for producing same
US4071935A (en) * 1975-08-07 1978-02-07 Stainless Equipment Company Method of making heat exchanger
US4108241A (en) * 1975-03-19 1978-08-22 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Heat exchanger and method of making
US4141327A (en) * 1976-09-09 1979-02-27 Texas Instruments Incorporated Early fuel evaporation carburetion system
DE2844520A1 (en) * 1977-10-14 1979-04-26 Hitachi Ltd A method for manufacturing a heat exchanger
US4172311A (en) * 1977-06-15 1979-10-30 American Solar Heat Corporation Process for manufacturing solar collector panels
DE2925967A1 (en) * 1978-06-28 1980-01-24 Hitachi Ltd A process for the manufacture of heat exchangers
US4455353A (en) * 1980-02-01 1984-06-19 Uddeholms Aktiebolag Method of producing an article and article produced in a mould which defines the contour of the article
US4771825A (en) * 1987-01-08 1988-09-20 Chen Hung Tai Heat exchanger having replaceable extended heat exchange surfaces
US4810587A (en) * 1985-11-28 1989-03-07 N.V. Bekaert S.A. Laminated object comprising metal fibre webs
WO2001069160A1 (en) * 2000-03-14 2001-09-20 Delphi Technologies, Inc. High performance heat exchange assembly
US20010032720A1 (en) * 2000-03-14 2001-10-25 Gary Lynn Eesley High performance heat exchange assembly
US6761211B2 (en) * 2000-03-14 2004-07-13 Delphi Technologies, Inc. High-performance heat sink for electronics cooling
US20050126172A1 (en) * 2003-12-16 2005-06-16 Hudson Robert S. Thermal storage unit and methods for using the same to heat a fluid
US20050279292A1 (en) * 2003-12-16 2005-12-22 Hudson Robert S Methods and systems for heating thermal storage units
US20060107664A1 (en) * 2004-11-19 2006-05-25 Hudson Robert S Thermal storage unit and methods for using the same to heat a fluid
US7063131B2 (en) 2001-07-12 2006-06-20 Nuvera Fuel Cells, Inc. Perforated fin heat exchangers and catalytic support
US20090025710A1 (en) * 2007-05-30 2009-01-29 Gordon Hogan Solar panel
US20090288814A1 (en) * 2008-05-20 2009-11-26 The Boeing Company. Mixed Carbon Foam/Metallic Heat Exchanger
US20100018231A1 (en) * 2004-11-30 2010-01-28 Valeo Climatisation Heat Exchanger With Heat Storage
US9279626B2 (en) * 2012-01-23 2016-03-08 Honeywell International Inc. Plate-fin heat exchanger with a porous blocker bar

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1893330A (en) * 1928-08-07 1933-01-03 Charles L Jones Permeable metal and method of making the same
US2401797A (en) * 1943-12-27 1946-06-11 Gen Motors Corp Heat exchanger
US3062509A (en) * 1953-02-12 1962-11-06 Philips Corp Heat regenerator
US3127668A (en) * 1955-03-03 1964-04-07 Iit Res Inst High strength-variable porosity sintered metal fiber articles and method of making the same

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1893330A (en) * 1928-08-07 1933-01-03 Charles L Jones Permeable metal and method of making the same
US2401797A (en) * 1943-12-27 1946-06-11 Gen Motors Corp Heat exchanger
US3062509A (en) * 1953-02-12 1962-11-06 Philips Corp Heat regenerator
US3127668A (en) * 1955-03-03 1964-04-07 Iit Res Inst High strength-variable porosity sintered metal fiber articles and method of making the same

Cited By (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3333318A (en) * 1964-10-15 1967-08-01 Olin Mathieson Method of fabricating a tubular heat exchanger
US3334400A (en) * 1964-12-07 1967-08-08 Olin Mathieson Method of producing heat exchangers
US3493042A (en) * 1967-04-11 1970-02-03 Olin Mathieson Modular units and use thereof in heat exchangers
US3415316A (en) * 1967-04-11 1968-12-10 Olin Mathieson Modular units and use thereof in heat exchangers
US3508312A (en) * 1968-01-15 1970-04-28 Frederick A Burne Method of assembling a heat exchanger
US3595310A (en) * 1969-11-12 1971-07-27 Olin Corp Modular units and use thereof in heat exchangers
US3934117A (en) * 1973-03-27 1976-01-20 Schladitz Hermann J Electric fluid heating device
US4066450A (en) * 1974-11-26 1978-01-03 Kabushiki Kaisha Toyota Cho Kenkyusho Metal body having large surface area and process for producing same
US4108241A (en) * 1975-03-19 1978-08-22 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Heat exchanger and method of making
US4540045A (en) * 1975-08-07 1985-09-10 Molitor Victor D Heat exchanger
US4071935A (en) * 1975-08-07 1978-02-07 Stainless Equipment Company Method of making heat exchanger
US4141327A (en) * 1976-09-09 1979-02-27 Texas Instruments Incorporated Early fuel evaporation carburetion system
US4172311A (en) * 1977-06-15 1979-10-30 American Solar Heat Corporation Process for manufacturing solar collector panels
DE2844520A1 (en) * 1977-10-14 1979-04-26 Hitachi Ltd A method for manufacturing a heat exchanger
DE2925967A1 (en) * 1978-06-28 1980-01-24 Hitachi Ltd A process for the manufacture of heat exchangers
US4455353A (en) * 1980-02-01 1984-06-19 Uddeholms Aktiebolag Method of producing an article and article produced in a mould which defines the contour of the article
US4810587A (en) * 1985-11-28 1989-03-07 N.V. Bekaert S.A. Laminated object comprising metal fibre webs
US4771825A (en) * 1987-01-08 1988-09-20 Chen Hung Tai Heat exchanger having replaceable extended heat exchange surfaces
US20010032720A1 (en) * 2000-03-14 2001-10-25 Gary Lynn Eesley High performance heat exchange assembly
US6424529B2 (en) 2000-03-14 2002-07-23 Delphi Technologies, Inc. High performance heat exchange assembly
US6761211B2 (en) * 2000-03-14 2004-07-13 Delphi Technologies, Inc. High-performance heat sink for electronics cooling
US6840307B2 (en) * 2000-03-14 2005-01-11 Delphi Technologies, Inc. High performance heat exchange assembly
WO2001069160A1 (en) * 2000-03-14 2001-09-20 Delphi Technologies, Inc. High performance heat exchange assembly
US7063131B2 (en) 2001-07-12 2006-06-20 Nuvera Fuel Cells, Inc. Perforated fin heat exchangers and catalytic support
US20050279292A1 (en) * 2003-12-16 2005-12-22 Hudson Robert S Methods and systems for heating thermal storage units
US20050126172A1 (en) * 2003-12-16 2005-06-16 Hudson Robert S. Thermal storage unit and methods for using the same to heat a fluid
US7693402B2 (en) 2004-11-19 2010-04-06 Active Power, Inc. Thermal storage unit and methods for using the same to heat a fluid
US20060107664A1 (en) * 2004-11-19 2006-05-25 Hudson Robert S Thermal storage unit and methods for using the same to heat a fluid
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