US3234498A - Insulation-penetrating clip-type electrical connectors - Google Patents

Insulation-penetrating clip-type electrical connectors Download PDF

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US3234498A
US3234498A US285339A US28533963A US3234498A US 3234498 A US3234498 A US 3234498A US 285339 A US285339 A US 285339A US 28533963 A US28533963 A US 28533963A US 3234498 A US3234498 A US 3234498A
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jaws
conductor
insulation
material
connectors
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US285339A
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Logan Alexander
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Western Electric Co Inc
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Western Electric Co Inc
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Priority claimed from BE630034D external-priority patent/BE630034A/xx
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Priority claimed from US47851365 external-priority patent/US3394454A/en
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R4/00Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact, i.e. touching one another; Means for effecting or maintaining such contact; Electrically-conductive connections having two or more spaced connecting locations for conductors and using contact members penetrating insulation
    • H01R4/24Connections using contact members penetrating or cutting insulation or cable strands
    • H01R4/2416Connections using contact members penetrating or cutting insulation or cable strands the contact members having insulation-cutting edges, e.g. of tuning fork type
    • H01R4/242Connections using contact members penetrating or cutting insulation or cable strands the contact members having insulation-cutting edges, e.g. of tuning fork type the contact members being plates having a single slot
    • H01R4/2425Flat plates, e.g. multi-layered flat plates
    • H01R4/2429Flat plates, e.g. multi-layered flat plates mounted in an insulating base
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R43/00Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current collectors or for joining electric conductors
    • H01R43/16Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current collectors or for joining electric conductors for manufacturing contact members, e.g. by punching and by bending

Description

e. 8, 1966 LOGAN 3,234,498

INSULATION-PENETRATING CLIP-TYPE ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS Filed June 4., 1965 2. Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. A. LOGAN ATTORNEY Feb. 8, 1966 A. LOGAN 3,234,498

INSULATION-PENETRATING CLIP-TYPE ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS Filed June 4, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 QK R\ hwy uL wwm m cm nw vkmL MLEYL United States Patent Ofiice Patented Feb. 8, 1966 3,234,498 INSULATTON-PENETRATING CUP-TYPE ELECTRICAL C(BNNECTORS Alexander Logan, Stoneleigh, Mi, assignor to Western Electric Company, Incorporated, New York, N.Y., a

corporation of New York Filed June 4, 1963, Ser. No. 285,339 4 Claims. (Ci. 339-97) This invention relates to devices for mechanically retaining and electrically contacting conductors. More particularly, this invention relates to corrosion resistant cliptype electrical connectors for penetrating the insulation of electrical conductors to connect such conductors without first removing the insulation therefrom.

Clip-type electrical connectors of the prior art have been used to mechanically retain and electrically contact insulated conductors without first removing the insulation from the conductor. (See copending application Serial No. 182,560 now Patent No. 3,112,147 filed on March 26, 1962 by W. Pferd, K. H. Pohland and D. W. Tyler.) Such connectors include a pair of elongated, contigous, contacting jaws formed from a resilient, electrically conductive material, such as Phosphor bronze or the like. The insulated conductor to be joined to the connnector is forced between the contiguous jaws to space them apart a slight distance. Due to the resiliency of the jaws, they tend to close or re-obtain their contiguous state, thereby penetrating or tearing apart the insulation and tightly clamping the conductor. Thus, the connector mechanically retains and electrically contacts the conductor.

In using these connectors in moist or corrosive environments, the contacting faces of the resilient jaws have developed nonconducting coatings which interfere with both the electrical connection and mechanical retention of the conductor. However, if the contacting faces of the jaws could be plated with a corrosion resistant conductive metal, such as tin or the like, and if this plating would in no way interfere with the resiliency of the jaws of the connector, the connectors could be used in moist or corrosive environments. Moreover, such plating could increase the wear resistance of the jaws. Accordingly, it is necessary to space apart the contiguous contacting jaws prior to the joining of a conductor thereto a sufficient distance to permit the plating of the faces of such jaws and at the same time without sacrificing the resiliency of the contacting jaws. Moreover, the spacing of the jaws must be equal to a distance of less than the diameter of the conductor to be joined to the connector to thereby enable the jaws to exert a sufficient force on the conductor to securely hold it and provide a good electrical connection.

It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide new and improved devices for mechanically retaining and electrically contacting conductors.

Another object of this invention is the provision of clip-type connectors for interconnecting a plurality of electrical conductors without first removing the insulation therefrom.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a clip-type electrical terminal block having a plurality of pairs of wear and corrosion resistant resilient jaws, which are spaced apart a predetermined distance, for penetrating the insulation of an electrical conductor and tightly elements, holds the free ends thereof apart a distance equal to less than the diameter of the conductor.

Other objects and advantages of the invention may be more clearly understood by reference to the following description in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is an enlarged, fragmentary, front-elevational view of an electrical connector, clearly showing the spaced relationship of the jaws of the connector and the deformation of the inner edges of such jaws for maintaining this spaced relationship;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a terminal block incorporating a vast number of the connectors of FIG. 1 and illustrates the manner in which a plurality of insulated conductors are either joined to, or temporarily held by, the connectors;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary perspective view, showing how an insulated conductor is securely joined to the jaws of the connector and how the terminal block for supporting the connector prevents the conductor from sliding downwardly beyond a predetermined portion of the jaws into an aperture formed between such jaws;

FIG. 4 is a schematic, front-elevational view of an apparatus for making the electrical connectors in accordance with the present invention; and

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a strip of electrically conductive resilient material from which the connectors are formed.

Referring now to the drawings, and more particularly to FIG. 1, there is shown a device or a clip-type connector 11 for mechanically retaining and electrically contacting an insulated conductor 12, FIGS. 2 and 3. The connector 11 is formed from a sheet of resilient, electrically conductive material such as Phosphor bronze or the like.

The connector 11 includes first and second elongated elements or jaws 13 and 14 joined at one end by a base portion 16 and free at the other end. The free end of the first jaw 13 has a rounded portion 17 while the free end of the second jaw 14 has a sidewise rounded protruding portion or hook 18 extending partially over the rounded portion 17. The rounded portion 17 coacts with the hook 18 to form a V-shaped conductor-receiving passageway 19 in which an insulated electrical conductor 12 may be conveniently placed and held, as shown in FIG. 2, before such conductor 12 is forced down between the jaws 13 and 14, as shown in FIG. 3. Moreover, the roundness of the portion 17 and hook 18 prevents the jaws 13 and 14 from piercing, tearing or injuring in any way the insulation of the conductor 12 as it is being positioned in, or as it is being temporarily held by, the passageway 19. In addition, the hook 18 of the jaw 14, which is longer than the jaw 13, in conjunction with the V- shaped conductor-receiving passageway 19, greatly facilitates the positioning of the conductor 12 within such passageway 19. Also, the V-shaped passageway 19 provides an inclined plane against the conductor 12 as it is forced downwardly between the jaws 13 and 14 to slowly open such jaws 13 and 14 and slideably receive the conductor 12.

Formed between the jaws 13 and 14 is a slot 21, the dimensions of which determine the forces exerted by these jaws 13 and 14 against the conductor 12 when it is forced therebetween, as shown in FIG. 3, and as dis closed in the aforementioned application Serial No. 182,- 560 filed March 26, 1962. Moreover, an aperture 22 located above the slot 21 is formed between the jaws 13 and 14. The aperture 2.2, in cooperation with the slot 21, defines the length of portions or protuberances 23 produced by plastically deforming the inner edges of the jaws 13 and 14. The function of the deformed portions 23 is to resiliently hold apart the jaws 13 and 14 to establish a space 24 between such jaws 13 and 14. The

lateral dimension of this space 24 is critical. Such dimension must be less than the diameter of the conductive part of the insulated conductor 12, but must be sufficiently large to permit plating of the inner edges of the inner edges of the jaws 13 and 14 which contact the conductor 12. For a 24 gauge insulated conductor, this lateral dimensions is equal to 0.005 inch.

, As shown in FIG. 2, a plurality of the connectors 11 are joined' together by the base portions 16 thereof, and a group of such joined connectors 11, are mounted in a terminal block 26 to form a unit. Securely holding the connectors 11 Within the block 26 is a base 27 secured to. the block 26 by threaded members 23. As is apparent. from FIG. 3, the terminal block 26, in addition to holding a group of joined connectors 11, prevents the conductor 12 from sliding too far down the jaws 13 and 14 and into the apertures 22 of the connectors 11.

Also, as is illustrated in FIG. 2, a plurality of electrical conductors 12 may be temporarily held by the V- shaped pasageways 19 of the connectors 11.

On the other hand, with the aid of the inclined edges of the passageway 19, one of the conductors 12 may be slideably forced down beyond such passageway 19, between thejaws 13 and 14, and into the space 24. As the conductor 12 is forced into the space 24, the jaws 13 and 14 are resiliently opened by the conductor 12. Since the jaws 13 and 14 are resiliently biased toward each other, the inner edges of such jaws 13 and 14 pierce or tear apart the insulation of the conductor 12 and bite into the conductor 12 to mechanically retain such conductor 12 with great force and make a good electrical connection between the conductor 12 and connector 11.

Shown in- FIG. 4 is a schematic of an apparatus for making the clip-type electrical connectors 11 joined together by base portions 16 in accordance with the present invention. In making such connectors 11, a strip of electrically conductive resilient material 31, such as Phosphor bronze or the like, is advanced from a supply reel 32 to a take-up reel 33. The take-up reel 33 is driven by a conventional indexing motor 34 through a standard V belt drive 36.

The material 31 is initially advanced to a punching station 37; whereupon the material 31 is stopped by the indexing motor 34. Then, a motor 39 rotates a shaft 41 to rotate a cam 42. Rotation of the cam 42 pushes a punch 43 through the material 31 into a die 44 to form a plurality of aligned apertures 46, perpendicular to the longitudinal edges ofthe'material 31, as shown in FIG. 5. I

After the apertures 46 are formed in the material 31, the indexing motor 34 advances the material 31 to move the apertures 46 to aposition just in front of a second punching station 47. Next, the motor 34 stops the material 31. Then, the motor 39 rotates the shaft 41 to rotate a cam 48. The rotation of the cam 48 then pushes a punch 49 through the material 31 into a die 50 to produce a plurality of slots 51 (FIG. in front of each aperture .46. At the same time that the slots 51 are formed in the material 31, a second series of apertures 46 are also produced at the first punching station 37.

Upon the formation of the slots 51 in the material 31, the indexing motor 34 advances the material 31 to a third punching station 52 where a plurality of openings 53 are formed in the material 31 in the same manner that the slots 51 are formed in the material 31. The openings 53 are clearly shown in FIG. 5.

Again, the indexing motor 34 advances the material 31, but this time to a shearing station 54 where a first portion of the material 31 is sheared, as shown at 55 in FIG. 5, by a movable shear 56 which coacts with a stationary shear 57. This shearing of the material 31 joins the slots 51 with the apertures 46 and, further, defines the second jaw 14, asillustrated in FIG. 5. Such shearingaction is controlled by the motor 39, in the same manner that the punching action at stations 37' and 38 is controlled by the motor 39.

Next, the material 31 is advanced by the indexing motor 34 to another shearing station 58; whereupon, the material 31 is again sheared, as clearly shown at 59 (FIG. 5), to form the first jaw 13. This shearing is accomplished in the same way that the shearing at the station 54 is accomplished.

The material 31 is then advanced to a deforming station 61 where the inner edges of the jaws 13 and 14 are stamped, coined or plastically deformed by a movable stamping die 62 which coacts with a stationary platen 63 to form the portions 23 to thereby space such jaws 13 and 14. This stamping operation is controlled by the motor 39 in the same manner that such motor controls the punching and shearing operations at the other stations 37, 47, 52, 54 and 58.

After the stamping operation, the indexing motor 34 advances the material 31 to a blanking station 64. At this station 64, the jaws 13 and 14 are blanked from the strip 31 in such a manner that such jaws 13 and 14 are joined together by the base portion 16 to form the connector 11, and a group of such connectors 11 are also joined together by a group of such base portions 16. The blanking dies, which are of the conventional type, are controlled by the motor 39 in the same manner that the punching and shearing operations are controlled by such motor 39 at the other stations 37, 4'7, 52, 54, 53 and 61. After the connectors 11 are blanked from the strip 31, they fall into and are collected by abin 66.

Next, the connector-s 11 are plated with a wear and corrosion resistant, electrically conductive material which does not interfere with the resiliency of the jaws 13 and 14. Since the jaws 13 and 14 are spaced by the deformedportions 23, such plating may be efI'ectuated at the inner edges of the jaws 13 and 14, which bite into the conductor 12 when it is forced into the space 24 between such jaws 13 and 14.

As to the thickness of the plated material, it must be sutficiently thin so as not to interfere with or block up the space 24 between the jaws 13 and 14.

An example of a satisfactory plating material is tin Which may be very easily electroplated in accordance with conventional techniques and typically is plated to a thickness of about 0.0001 inch.

Inasmuch as the connectors 11, which may be more efiicaciously utilized by being positioned within the terminal block 26, are plated with a corrosion resistant material, they may be utilized in a moist, corrosive environment and such connectors 11 would not develop nonconducting coatings on the inner faces of the jaws 13 and 14 which would interfere with the electrical connection and the mechanical retention of the electrical conductors 12'.

Since the connector 11 is formed first by shearing the jaws 13 and 14 from the material 31 with no space 2 4 between such jaws 13 and 14', and then the jaws 13 and 14 are subsequently plastically deformed to produce the portions 23 to space apart such jaws 13 and 14 to establish the space 24 therebetween, the force tending to close the space 24 between the jaws 13 and 14 is the same as if the connector 11 were formed with no space 24. Thus,

the jaws 13 and 14 of'the connector 11 have the same ability to penetrate and tear apart the insulation to tightly clamp and bite into the conductive part of the insulated conductor 12 as the jaws 1-3 and 14 would have if there were no space 24 between them. In other words, the provision of the space 24 between the jaws 13 and 14 does not sacrifice the resiliency of the jaws 13 and 14 nor the force which the jaws 13 and 14 exert on an insulated conductor forced between such jaws 13- and 14 and into the space 24. Moreover, with the space 24 between the jaws 13 and 14, such jaws 13 and 14 may be easily plated, as mentioned above, with a wear and corrosion resistant material such as tin or the like and the connector 11 may be readily utilized in an unfavorable environment.

It is to be understood that the above-described product forms y one embodiment of the present invention, and

numerous products may be derived from the abovedescribed embodiment without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An insulation-penetrating terminal connector for an 5 insulated electrical conductor, comprising:

a pair of electrically conductive elongated elements having opposing free ends and an integral base section for supporting said free ends,

said base section biasing said free ends toward one another,

a pair of mutually opposed edges on the elements for shearing insulation from a conductor inserted therebetween, and

a least one protuberance projecting from one of said edges into an abutting relationship with a mutually opposed edge for forcing said elements apart against 3. An insulation-penetrating terminal connector for an insulated electrical conductor, comprising:

bifurcated electrically conductive elongated elements having free ends and an integral base section for supporting said free ends,

said base section biasing said free ends toward contact with one another,

a pair of mutually opposed edges on the bifurcated elements for shearing insulation from a conductor inserted therebetween, and

a protuberance formed on at least one of the opposed edges and located between the extremities of said free ends and said base section for forcing said elements apart a distance less than the diameter of the conductor against the bias applied by said base section, so that said elements are in a prestressed insulationshearing state prior to receiving the conductor.

the bias applied by said base section so that said elements are in a prestressed insulation-shearing state 4. The connector as claimed in claim 3, wherein at least said mutually opposed edges of said connector are prior to receiving the conductor. 2. An insulation-penetrating terminal connector for an insulated electrical conductor, comprising:

a pair of electrically conductive elongated elements having bifurcated free ends and an integral base section for supporting said free ends,

said base section biasing said free ends toward contact with one another, pair of mutually opposed edges on the bifurcated elements for shearing insulation from a conductor inserted therebetween, and

a pair of mutually abutting protuberances formed integral with said edges for forcing said elements apart a distance less than the diameter of the conductor against the bias applied by said base section, so that 3 said elements are in a prestressed insulation-shearing state prior to receiving the conductor.

plated with an electrically conductive, corrosion resisting material.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,539,230 1/1951 Craig 339-278 X 2,545,352 3/1951 Gibbs 29155.55 2,610,390 9/1952 Locke 29155.55 2,762,030 9/ 1956 Scoville 339277 2,828,474 3/1958 Fox 33947 X 2,851,670 9/1958 Senior 339 2,933,007 4/1960 Healy 339220 X 2,962,692 11/ 1960 White 339-220 3,027,536 3/1962 Pasternak 339-97 3,112,147 11/1962 Pferd et a1. 33997 JOSEPH D. SEERS, Primary Examiner.

W. DONALD MILLER, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. AN INSULATION-PENETRATING TERMINAL CONNECTOR FOR AN INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONDUCTOR, COMPRISING: A PAIR OF ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTIVE ELONGATED ELEMENTS HAVING OPPOSING FREE ENDS AND AN INTEGRAL BASE SECTION FOR SUPPORTING SAID FREE ENDS, SAID BASE SECTION BIASING SAID FREE ENDS TOWARD ONE ANOTHER, A PAIR OF MUTUALLY OPPOSED EDGES ON THE ELEMENTS FOR SHEARING INSULATION FROM A CONDUCTOR INSERTED THEREBETWEEN, AND A LEAST ONE PROTUBERANCE PROJECTING FROM ONE OF SAID
US285339A 1963-06-04 1963-06-04 Insulation-penetrating clip-type electrical connectors Expired - Lifetime US3234498A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US285339A US3234498A (en) 1963-06-04 1963-06-04 Insulation-penetrating clip-type electrical connectors

Applications Claiming Priority (9)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
BE630034D BE630034A (en) 1962-03-26
US182560A US3112147A (en) 1962-03-26 1962-03-26 Insulation crushing solid wire clip terminal
DE1963W0033939 DE1232232B (en) 1962-03-26 1963-02-20 For insulated electrical conductors certain connection means
GB1119463A GB1030235A (en) 1962-03-26 1963-03-21 Improvements in or relating to electrical connectors
US285339A US3234498A (en) 1963-06-04 1963-06-04 Insulation-penetrating clip-type electrical connectors
DE1964W0036380 DE1257239B (en) 1962-03-26 1964-03-14 Clamp for mechanically securing and electrically connecting insulated conductors
GB1791364A GB1068741A (en) 1962-03-26 1964-04-30 Improvements in or relating to terminal assemblies
BE648254D BE648254A (en) 1962-03-26 1964-05-21
US47851365 US3394454A (en) 1962-03-26 1965-07-06 Methods of making insulationpenetrating clip-type electrical connectors

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Cited By (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3400362A (en) * 1966-03-31 1968-09-03 Amp Inc Fracture resistant connecting post
US3405385A (en) * 1966-02-02 1968-10-08 Western Electric Co Quick connect solderless wire connector
US3521221A (en) * 1968-02-21 1970-07-21 Northern Electric Co Insulation slicing connector
US3557346A (en) * 1966-11-07 1971-01-19 Int Standard Electric Corp Optical binary counter
US3605072A (en) * 1969-02-28 1971-09-14 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Solderless wire connector
US3611264A (en) * 1968-12-27 1971-10-05 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Wire connecting blocks
US3617983A (en) * 1969-03-07 1971-11-02 Amp Inc Terminal junction interconnection system
US3761771A (en) * 1972-03-06 1973-09-25 J Thompson A terminal board for expediting restoration of phone service over a severed communication cable
US3761868A (en) * 1969-08-22 1973-09-25 Krone Kg Clip connector terminal for one or more insulated conductors
US3790918A (en) * 1972-01-21 1974-02-05 Heneveld L Dauser Trust Electrical connector
US3846590A (en) * 1973-01-16 1974-11-05 Siemon Co Telephonic equipment distribution panel assembly
US3866996A (en) * 1972-10-16 1975-02-18 Bunker Ramo Multi-conductor connector apparatus for telephone and other data transmission systems
US3887259A (en) * 1973-10-17 1975-06-03 Bunker Ramo Connector retaining adapter
US3918790A (en) * 1974-06-14 1975-11-11 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Snap spade electrical connector
US3963318A (en) * 1974-02-19 1976-06-15 American Telecommunications Contact and contact assembly
US4002391A (en) * 1976-03-03 1977-01-11 Northern Electric Company, Limited Insulation slicing terminal
US4012102A (en) * 1976-05-26 1977-03-15 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Solderless electrical contact
FR2343343A1 (en) * 1976-03-01 1977-09-30 Northern Telecom Ltd cutting thimble isolated conductor
US4113340A (en) * 1977-06-27 1978-09-12 Illinois Tool Works Inc. Protective electrical device
US4116524A (en) * 1977-06-29 1978-09-26 Illinois Tool Works Terminal bridging assembly
US4118091A (en) * 1975-10-08 1978-10-03 Trw Inc. Electrical connection assemblies
US4126369A (en) * 1977-12-19 1978-11-21 Illinois Tool Works Electronic component terminal bridging assembly
FR2431780A1 (en) * 1978-07-19 1980-02-15 Yamaichi Electric Mfg Terminal electrical contact
US4221445A (en) * 1978-02-02 1980-09-09 Amp Incorporated Cross connect distribution system and apparatus
US4274198A (en) * 1978-02-20 1981-06-23 Bunker Ramo Corporation Self-stripping electrical terminal
US4306759A (en) * 1980-01-02 1981-12-22 Norden Alexander Insulation-cutting connectors and method of making connections
EP0068697A1 (en) * 1981-06-25 1983-01-05 AMP INCORPORATED (a New Jersey corporation) Method of manufacturing an electrical contact
US4421374A (en) * 1980-09-05 1983-12-20 Western Electric Company, Inc. Trifurcated insulation-penetrating terminal
USRE31714E (en) * 1974-09-20 1984-10-30 The Siemon Company Pre-wired terminal connecting block
US4575588A (en) * 1984-10-15 1986-03-11 Michael Vande Vyver Universal telephone test apparatus
AU589280B2 (en) * 1986-06-25 1989-10-05 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft A terminal strip for electrical cables
US5088933A (en) * 1989-09-08 1992-02-18 Stocko Metallwarenfabriken Henkels Und Sohn Gmbh & Co. Electrical contact element
US6102729A (en) * 1998-04-23 2000-08-15 Lucent Technologies, Inc. Electrically-conductive universal connector and connector assembly

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US2539230A (en) * 1944-09-28 1951-01-23 Rowe & Co Proprietary Ltd H Electrical power outlet and power plug
US2610390A (en) * 1947-06-10 1952-09-16 Louis P Locke Method of making electrical terminals
US2545352A (en) * 1947-08-05 1951-03-13 George S Gibbs Method of making raised electrical contact points
US2828474A (en) * 1953-09-29 1958-03-25 Fox Benjamin Multi-contact connector
US2762030A (en) * 1954-09-03 1956-09-04 Ray R Scoville Terminal lug
US2851670A (en) * 1955-06-02 1958-09-09 Empire Prod Inc Cable connector
US2933007A (en) * 1956-03-27 1960-04-19 Boots Aircraft Nut Corp Flat expanding insert having an arched connecting member
US2962692A (en) * 1957-05-02 1960-11-29 North American Aviation Inc Electric contact terminal
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Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3405385A (en) * 1966-02-02 1968-10-08 Western Electric Co Quick connect solderless wire connector
US3400362A (en) * 1966-03-31 1968-09-03 Amp Inc Fracture resistant connecting post
US3557346A (en) * 1966-11-07 1971-01-19 Int Standard Electric Corp Optical binary counter
US3521221A (en) * 1968-02-21 1970-07-21 Northern Electric Co Insulation slicing connector
US3611264A (en) * 1968-12-27 1971-10-05 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Wire connecting blocks
US3605072A (en) * 1969-02-28 1971-09-14 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Solderless wire connector
US3617983A (en) * 1969-03-07 1971-11-02 Amp Inc Terminal junction interconnection system
US3761868A (en) * 1969-08-22 1973-09-25 Krone Kg Clip connector terminal for one or more insulated conductors
US3790918A (en) * 1972-01-21 1974-02-05 Heneveld L Dauser Trust Electrical connector
US3761771A (en) * 1972-03-06 1973-09-25 J Thompson A terminal board for expediting restoration of phone service over a severed communication cable
US3866996A (en) * 1972-10-16 1975-02-18 Bunker Ramo Multi-conductor connector apparatus for telephone and other data transmission systems
US3846590A (en) * 1973-01-16 1974-11-05 Siemon Co Telephonic equipment distribution panel assembly
US3887259A (en) * 1973-10-17 1975-06-03 Bunker Ramo Connector retaining adapter
US3963318A (en) * 1974-02-19 1976-06-15 American Telecommunications Contact and contact assembly
US3918790A (en) * 1974-06-14 1975-11-11 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Snap spade electrical connector
US3945709A (en) * 1974-06-14 1976-03-23 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Snap spade electrical connector and method of manufacture
USRE31714E (en) * 1974-09-20 1984-10-30 The Siemon Company Pre-wired terminal connecting block
US4118091A (en) * 1975-10-08 1978-10-03 Trw Inc. Electrical connection assemblies
FR2343343A1 (en) * 1976-03-01 1977-09-30 Northern Telecom Ltd cutting thimble isolated conductor
US4002391A (en) * 1976-03-03 1977-01-11 Northern Electric Company, Limited Insulation slicing terminal
FR2353145A1 (en) * 1976-05-26 1977-12-23 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Leguminous electric seamless and process for its manufacturing
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